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Being a Human: Adventures in Forty Thousand Years of Consciousness

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A radically immersive exploration of three pivotal moments in the evolution of human consciousness, asking what kinds of creatures humans were, are, and might yet be How did humans come to be who we are? In his marvelous, eccentric, and widely lauded book Being a Beast, legal scholar, veterinary surgeon, and naturalist extraordinaire Charles Foster set out to understand the A radically immersive exploration of three pivotal moments in the evolution of human consciousness, asking what kinds of creatures humans were, are, and might yet be How did humans come to be who we are? In his marvelous, eccentric, and widely lauded book Being a Beast, legal scholar, veterinary surgeon, and naturalist extraordinaire Charles Foster set out to understand the consciousness of animal species by living as a badger, otter, fox, deer, and swift. Now, he inhabits three crucial periods of human development to understand the consciousness of perhaps the strangest animal of all--the human being. To experience the Upper Paleolithic era--a turning point when humans became behaviorally modern, painting caves and telling stories, Foster learns what it feels like to be a Cro-Magnon hunter-gatherer by living in makeshift shelters without amenities in the rural woods of England. He tests his five impoverished senses to forage for berries and roadkill and he undertakes shamanic journeys to explore the connection of wakeful dreaming to religion. For the Neolithic period, when humans stayed in one place and domesticated plants and animals, forever altering our connection to the natural world, he moves to a reconstructed Neolithic settlement. Finally, to explore the Enlightenment--the age of reason and the end of the soul--Foster inspects Oxford colleges, dissecting rooms, cafes, and art galleries. He finds his world and himself bizarre and disembodied, and he rues the atrophy of our senses, the cause for much of what ails us. Drawing on psychology, neuroscience, natural history, agriculture, medical law and ethics, Being a Human is one man's audacious attempt to feel a connection with 45,000 years of human history. This glorious, fiercely imaginative journey from our origins to a possible future ultimately shows how we might best live on earth--and thrive.


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A radically immersive exploration of three pivotal moments in the evolution of human consciousness, asking what kinds of creatures humans were, are, and might yet be How did humans come to be who we are? In his marvelous, eccentric, and widely lauded book Being a Beast, legal scholar, veterinary surgeon, and naturalist extraordinaire Charles Foster set out to understand the A radically immersive exploration of three pivotal moments in the evolution of human consciousness, asking what kinds of creatures humans were, are, and might yet be How did humans come to be who we are? In his marvelous, eccentric, and widely lauded book Being a Beast, legal scholar, veterinary surgeon, and naturalist extraordinaire Charles Foster set out to understand the consciousness of animal species by living as a badger, otter, fox, deer, and swift. Now, he inhabits three crucial periods of human development to understand the consciousness of perhaps the strangest animal of all--the human being. To experience the Upper Paleolithic era--a turning point when humans became behaviorally modern, painting caves and telling stories, Foster learns what it feels like to be a Cro-Magnon hunter-gatherer by living in makeshift shelters without amenities in the rural woods of England. He tests his five impoverished senses to forage for berries and roadkill and he undertakes shamanic journeys to explore the connection of wakeful dreaming to religion. For the Neolithic period, when humans stayed in one place and domesticated plants and animals, forever altering our connection to the natural world, he moves to a reconstructed Neolithic settlement. Finally, to explore the Enlightenment--the age of reason and the end of the soul--Foster inspects Oxford colleges, dissecting rooms, cafes, and art galleries. He finds his world and himself bizarre and disembodied, and he rues the atrophy of our senses, the cause for much of what ails us. Drawing on psychology, neuroscience, natural history, agriculture, medical law and ethics, Being a Human is one man's audacious attempt to feel a connection with 45,000 years of human history. This glorious, fiercely imaginative journey from our origins to a possible future ultimately shows how we might best live on earth--and thrive.

54 review for Being a Human: Adventures in Forty Thousand Years of Consciousness

  1. 4 out of 5

    Will Byrnes

    We think of wilderness as an absence of sound, movement and event. We rent our rural cottages ‘for a bit of peace and quiet.’ That shows how switched off we are. A country walk should be a deafening, threatening, frantic, exhausting cacophony. If today’s shorn, burned, poisoned apology for wilderness should do that to us, just think what the real wild, if it still existed, would do. It’d be like taking an industrial cocktail of speed, heroin and LSD and dancing through a club that’s playing t We think of wilderness as an absence of sound, movement and event. We rent our rural cottages ‘for a bit of peace and quiet.’ That shows how switched off we are. A country walk should be a deafening, threatening, frantic, exhausting cacophony. If today’s shorn, burned, poisoned apology for wilderness should do that to us, just think what the real wild, if it still existed, would do. It’d be like taking an industrial cocktail of speed, heroin and LSD and dancing through a club that’s playing the Mozart Requiem to the beat of the Grateful Dead, expecting every moment to have your belly unzipped by a cave bear. -------------------------------------- All humans are Sheherazades: we die each morning if we don’t have a good story to tell, and the good ones are all old. Up for a bit of time travel? No, no, no, not in the sci-fi sense of physically transporting to another era. But in the mostly imaginary sense of picturing oneself in a prior age. Well, maybe more than just picturing, maybe picturing with the addition of some visceral experience. Charles Foster has written about what life is like for otters, badgers, foxes, deer and swifts, by living like them for a time. He wrote about those experiences in his book, Being a Beast. He wonders, here, how experiencing life as a Paleolithic and a Neolithic person can inform our current understanding of ourselves. I thought that, if I knew where I came from, that might shed some light on what I am…It’s a prolonged thought experiment and non-thought experiment, set in woods, waves, moorlands, schools, abattoirs, wattle-and-daub huts, hospitals, rivers, cemeteries, caves, farms, kitchens, the bodies of crows, museums, breaches, laboratories, medieval dining halls, Basque eating houses, fox-hunts, temples, deserted Middle Eastern cities and shaman’s caravans. Charles Foster - image from Oxford University His journey begins with (and he spends the largest portion of the book on) the Upper Paleolithic (U-P) era, aka the Late Stone Age, from 50,000 to 12,000 years ago, when we became, behaviorally, modern humans. Foster is quite a fan of the period, seeing it as some sort of romantic heyday for humanity, one in which we were more fully attuned with the environments in which we lived, able to use our senses to their capacity, instead of getting by with the vastly circumscribed functionality we have today. Interested in the birth of human consciousness, he puts himself, and his 12 yo son, Tom, not only into the mindset of late Paleolithic humans, but into their lives. He and Tom live wild in Derbyshire, doing their best to ignore the sounds of passing traffic, while living on roadkill (well, I guess they do not entirely ignore traffic) and the bounty of the woods. They deal with hunger, the need for shelter, and work on becoming attuned to their new old world. We’re not making the wood into our image: projecting ourselves onto it. It’s making us. If we let it. In one stretch Foster fasts for eight days, which helps bring on a hallucinatory state (intentionally). Shamanism is a major cultural element in the U-P portrait he paints. It is clearly not his first trip. He recalls an out-of-body experience he had while in hospital, the sort where one is looking down from the ceiling at one’s physical body, seeing this as of a cloth with a broader capacity for human experience. He relates this also to the cave paintings of the era, seeing them, possibly, as the end-product of shamanic tripping. This section of the book transported me back to the 1960s and the probably apocryphal books of Carlos Castaneda. Social grooming was important to ancestors of our species. But, with our enlarged brains able to handle, maybe, a community of 150 people, grooming became too cost-intensive. To maintain a group that size strictly by grooming, we’d have to groom for about 43% percent of our time, which would be deadly. Something else had to make up for the shortfall, and other things have. We have developed a number of other endorphin-releasing, bond-forming strategies that don’t involve touching [social distancing?]. They are…laughter, wordless singing/dancing, language and ritual/religion/story. It sure gives the expression rubbed me the wrong way some added heft. He has theories about religion, communication, and social organization that permeate this exploration. He posits, for example, that late Paleo man was able to communicate with a language unlike our own, a more full-body form of expression, maybe some long-lost form of charades. There is an ancient language, thought to have been used by Neanderthals, called HMMM, or holistic, manipulative, multi-modal, musical, and memetic communication. It is likely that some of this carried forward. And makes one wonder just how far back the roots go to contemporary languages that incorporate more rather than less musicality, more rather than less tonality, and more rather than less bodily support for spoken words. He writes about a time when everything, not just people, were seen as having a soul, some inner self that exists separately, although living within a body, a tree, a hare, a blade of grass. This sort of worldview makes it a lot tougher to hunt for reasons that did not involve survival. And makes understandable rituals in many cultures in which forgiveness is begged when an animal is killed. This becomes much more of a thing when one feels in tune with one’s surroundings, an experience Foster reports as being quite real in his Derbyshire adventure. This tells him that Paleo man was better able to sense, to be aware of his surroundings than almost any modern human can. Foster has a go at the Neolithic as well, trying to see what the shift from hunting-gathering to agriculture was like, and offers consideration of the longer-term impacts on humanity that emanated from that change. This is much less involved and involving, but does include some very interesting observations on how agriculture revolutionized the relationship people had with their environment. …the first evidence of sedentary communities comes from around 11,000 years ago. We see the first evidence of domesticated plants and animals at about the same time. Yet, it is not for another 7,000 years that there are settled villages, relying on domesticated plants or fixed fields. For 7,000 years, that is, our own model of human life, which we like to assume would have been irresistibly attractive to the poor benighted caveman, was resisted or ignored, just as it is by more modern hunter-gatherers. Hunter-gatherers only become like us at the end of a whip. Our life is a last resort for the creatures that we really are. He notes that even when farming took root, many of those newly minted farmers continued living as hunter-gatherers for part of the year. He finishes up with a glance at the contemporary. More of a screed really. He notes that phonetic writing severed the connection our languages have with the reality they seek to portray. Pre-phonetic languages tend to be more onomatopoeic, the sounds more closely reflecting the underlying reality. He sees our modern brains as functioning mostly as valves, channeling all available sensation through a narrow pipeline, while leaving behind an entire world of possible human experience that we are no longer equipped to handle. To that extent we all have super-powers, of potential awareness, anyway, that lie waiting for someone to open the right valve, presuming they have not been corroded into inutility by disuse. He tells of meeting a French woman in Thailand whose near-death experience left her passively able to disrupt electronic mechanisms. She could not, for example, use ATMs. They would always malfunction around her. He takes a run at what is usually seen to indicate “modern” humanity. I’ve come to wonder whether symbolism is all it’s cracked up to be, and in particular whether its use really is the great watershed separating us from everything else that had gone before. He argues that trackers, for example, can abstract from natural clues the stories behind them, and those existed long before so-called “modern man.” He calls in outside authorities from time to time to fill in gaps. These extra bits always add fascinating pieces of information. For example, Later I wrote in panic to biologist David Haskell, an expert on birdsong, begging him to reassure me that music is ‘chronologically and neurologically prior to language.’ It surely is, he replied. ‘It seems that preceding both is bodily motion: the sound-controlling centers of the brain are derived from the same parts of the embryo as the limb motor system, so all vocal expression grows from the roots that might be called dance or, less loftily, shuffling about. Foster is that most common of writers, a veterinarian and a lawyer. Wait, what? Sadly, there is no telling in here (it is present in his Wiki page, though) of how he managed to train for these seemingly unrelated careers. (I can certainly envision a scenario, though, in which we hear lawyer Foster proclaiming to the court, “My client could not possibly be guilty of this crime, your honor. The forensic evidence at the scene clearly shows that the act was committed by an American badger, while my client, as anyone can see, is a Eurasian badger.”) It certainly seems clear, though, from his diatribes against modernity, where his heart is. In the visceral, physical work of dealing with animals, which lends itself to the intellectual stimulation of a truer, and deeper connection with nature. The first time (and one of the only times) I felt useful was shoveling cow shit in a Peak District farm when I was ten. It had a dignity that piano lessons, cub scouts, arithmetic and even amateur taxidermy did not. What I was detecting was that humans acquire their significance from relationship, that relationships with non-humans were vital and that clearing up someone’s dung is a good way of establishing relationships. In that case, I am far more useful in the world than I ever dreamed. GRIPES Foster can be off-putting, particularly to those us with no love of hunting, opening as he does with I first ate a live mammal on a Scottish hill. (Well, as least it wasn’t haggis.) I can well imagine many readers slamming the book shut at that point and moving on to something else. Will this be a paean to a manly killing impulse? Thankfully, not really, although there are some uncomfortable moments re the hunting of living creatures. Sometimes he puts things out that are at the very least questionable, and at the worst, silly. Our intuition is older, wiser and more reliable than our underused, atrophied senses. Really? Based on what data? So, making decisions by feelz alone is the way to go? Maybe I should swap my accountant for an inveterate gambler? He sometimes betrays an unconscious unkindness in the cloak of humor: The last thing I ate was a hedgehog. That was nine days ago. From the taste of them, hedgehogs must start decomposing even when they’re alive and in their prime. This one’s still down there somewhere, and my burps smell like a maggot farm. I regret it’s death under the wheels of a cattle truck far more than its parents or children possibly do. I doubt it. One stylistic element that permeates is seeing an imaginary Paleo man, X, and his son. Supposedly these might be Foster and Tom in an earlier era. It has some artistic appeal, but I did not think it added much overall. All that said, the overall take here is that this is high-octane fuel for the brain, however valved-up ours may be. Foster raises many incredibly fascinating subjects from the origins of religion, language, our native capabilities to how global revolutions have molded us into the homo sap of the 21st century. This is a stunning wakeup call for any minds that might have drifted off into the intellectual somnolence of contemporary life. There are simply so many ideas bouncing off the walls in this book that one might fear that they could reach a critical mass and do some damage. It is worth the risk. If you care at all about understanding humanity, our place in the world, and how we got here, skipping Being a Human would be…well…inhuman. It is an absolute must-read. We try to learn the liturgy: the way to do things properly; the way to avoid offending the fastidious, prescriptive and vengeful guardians of the place. Everything matters. We watch the rain fall on one leaf, trace the course of the water under a stone, and then we go back to the leaf and watch the next drop. We try to know the stamens with the visual resolution of a bumblebee and the snail slime with the nose of a bankvole and the leaf pennants on the tree masts with the cold eyes of kites. Review posted – 9/17/21 Publication date – 8/31/21 This review has been cross-posted on my site, Coot’s Reviews. Stop by and say Hi! I received an ARE of Being a Human from Metropolitan Books in return for a modern era review. Thanks, Maia. =============================EXTRA STUFF Links to the author’s personal, and Twitter pages By my count this is Foster’s 39th book Foster’s bio on WikiCharles Foster (born 1962) is an English writer, traveller, veterinarian, taxidermist, barrister and philosopher. He is known for his books and articles on Natural History, travel (particularly in Africa and the Middle East), theology, law and medical ethics. He is a Fellow of Green Templeton College, Oxford. He says of his own books: 'Ultimately they are all presumptuous and unsuccessful attempts to answer the questions 'who or what are we?', and 'what on earth are we doing here?'Interviews -----The Guardian - Going underground: meet the man who lived as an animal - re Being a Beast by Simon Hattenston -----New Books Network - Defined by Relationship by Howard Burton – audio - 1h 30m Items of Interest from the author -----Emergence Magazine - Against Nature Writing - on language as a barrier to understanding -----Shortform - Charles Foster's Top Book Recommendations Items of Interest -----Wiki on Bear Grylls - a British adventurer – mentioned in Part 1 as an example of someone more interested in the technology of survival than the point of it (p 62 in my ARE) -----Wiki on Yggdrasil - mentioned in Part 1 – humorously (p 85) -----Wiki on the Upper Paleolithic -----Dartmouth Department of Music – a review of a book positing that Neanderthals used musicality in their communications Review Feature - The Singing Neanderthals:
the Origins of Music, Language, Mind and Body by Steven Mithen - Foster addresses this in this discussion of the origins of human language -----Wiki on Carlos Castaneda -----Discover Magazine - Paleomythic: How People Really Lived During the Stone Age By Marlene Zuk Like it says – an interesting read

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    Being a Human by Charles Foster is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early August. Foster takes a deep, near-poetic intellectual tone (with a twinge of wit) when describing early humankind through the ages and the concepts of hunting, cave art, migration. shamanic rituals and prophecy, intercommunication, and higher thought through written language. It has the potential to be really great if it didn't ponder or hypothesize as much. Maybe this means I'd like Being a Beast more? Being a Human by Charles Foster is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early August. Foster takes a deep, near-poetic intellectual tone (with a twinge of wit) when describing early humankind through the ages and the concepts of hunting, cave art, migration. shamanic rituals and prophecy, intercommunication, and higher thought through written language. It has the potential to be really great if it didn't ponder or hypothesize as much. Maybe this means I'd like Being a Beast more?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    Originally posted on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Being a Human is a meandering nearly stream-of-consciousness look at human development over the last forty thousand (or so) years and examining three ages of human-ness along the way. Released 31st Aug 2021 by Macmillan on their Metropolitan imprint, it's 400 pages and is available in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats. It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links throughout. I've Originally posted on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Being a Human is a meandering nearly stream-of-consciousness look at human development over the last forty thousand (or so) years and examining three ages of human-ness along the way. Released 31st Aug 2021 by Macmillan on their Metropolitan imprint, it's 400 pages and is available in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats. It's worth noting that the ebook format has a handy interactive table of contents as well as interactive links throughout. I've really become enamored of ebooks with interactive formats lately; it makes it so easy to find information with the search function. This is an eccentric book; beautifully written and oddly moving in a lot of places. The prose is a lot more prose-like than most nonfiction books I've encountered and I enjoyed the cadence of the author's voice very much. I can imagine that he would be outside the usual standard-operating-fare as a lecturer, and I envy his students. He manages to traverse the metaphorical Strait of Messina without straying into "aw, shucks" self deprecation or pedagogical pomposity, no mean feat. The book covers a massive amount of time (obviously) and is arranged more or less chronologically: Upper Paleolithic (in four parts), Neolithic (ditto), and the current age looking toward the future. I found myself continually distracted during the reading by the enlightening and copious annotations and notes. After the first bit, I decided to ignore the notes and links and just read the information, making notes of the bits I really wanted to delve into more deeply later. That seemed to really help with continuity and flow and reading enjoyment. As stated, the book is copiously annotated and the chapter notes provide a wealth of further reading for readers wishing to deep dive in the material. The bibliography is massive (though, as the author says, impossibly abbreviated since a real bibliography would include everything ever written by or about human beings). I enjoyed this read immensely. I would heartily recommend it for lovers of science philosophy, anthropology, but maybe not so much for readers looking for "just the facts, Ma'am". This has been one of my better nonfiction reads for 2021. Five stars. Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Schmidt

    I received an advance reader's copy through Goodreads First Reads, and I am grateful for this opportunity. This is an evocative and compelling dive into mankind's relationship with nature and ourselves, but one should go into reading it with the understanding that it favors a more informal treatment of the subject rather than full historical and scientific accuracy. Admittedly, this is not really an area of topic where you can rely on exact sources to justify your reasoning, and the fluid nature I received an advance reader's copy through Goodreads First Reads, and I am grateful for this opportunity. This is an evocative and compelling dive into mankind's relationship with nature and ourselves, but one should go into reading it with the understanding that it favors a more informal treatment of the subject rather than full historical and scientific accuracy. Admittedly, this is not really an area of topic where you can rely on exact sources to justify your reasoning, and the fluid nature of the narrative can be engaging. However, much of the narrative cannot be fully substantiated by precise facts. There is no bibliography, merely references and suggested readings - to quote Foster, "An adequate bibliography would be a list of everything ever written by or about humans." I do think Foster does have a well-rounded understanding of the subjects he is addressing, but a good share of the material, such as his assertion that autumn is a negative season of decay and doesn't deserve praise, are simply his own opinion. Still, the book is compelling in its arguments and forces us to address uncomfortable aspects of civilization and what we have lost in the stages of our advancement from the paleolithic age. I don't necessarily agree with everything in the book, but it does give me a lot of food for thought, and I certainly will be thinking hard about some of the touchy subjects he brought up in the course of the book, and what it means for me as a human. While this is a very enjoyable book, it does have a few issues I want to bring up. First is the stream of consciousness sense of the book. Sometimes, there are straightforward arguments set out, and at other times it seems like we're just jumping from one thing to the next. This can sometimes be a little confusing. A related issue stemming in part from the rambling nature of the book is that there isn't really a satisfactory conclusion to the narrative. The final section of the book - covering the Enlightenment - is much shorter than the other portions, being only 35 pages (the Paleolithic was over 200 pages, and the Neolithic was almost 100 pages). The short length of the final section makes me feel that the last section was rushed, and we never really get an answer to the question "What should we do now, then?" Similarly, while the first two sections concluded with an ongoing parable about a man and woman, when asked for a story at the end of the final chapter, Foster just says "It is time to tell it yourself." While I can understand the message he's trying to get across in that omission, it does contribute to a sense of empty uncertainty at the end of the book, leaving us unsure what we should do with our new understanding. However, there is somewhat of a conclusion to be found in the book - however, it's at the very front. The author's note at the beginning is the closest thing the book has to a solid conclusion - one that consolidates and highlights Foster's overall arguments from the narrative. I'd sort of advise saving the author's note for last to end your reading on a more satisfying note. Overall, while the stream of consciousness set-up of the book can be disconcerting and hinders some of its arguments, it nevertheless makes profound statements about how we as humans have changed - physically, mentally, and in our connection to nature. I do not regret reading this book, and it continues to make me question my previous understanding of my existence on the planet.

  5. 5 out of 5

    B.

    I won an ARC of this one in a Goodreads Giveaway. There are a lot of stream of consciousness ramblings on the part of the author, which isn't something that I typically associate with non-fiction. I was hoping for a more academic take on the exploration of consciousness when I entered the giveaway for this one, and I have to admit that the lack of a scholarly tone to the book was a real bummer. There's still some fascinating information in here, but it's not the book for me. It comes off as thou I won an ARC of this one in a Goodreads Giveaway. There are a lot of stream of consciousness ramblings on the part of the author, which isn't something that I typically associate with non-fiction. I was hoping for a more academic take on the exploration of consciousness when I entered the giveaway for this one, and I have to admit that the lack of a scholarly tone to the book was a real bummer. There's still some fascinating information in here, but it's not the book for me. It comes off as though it's being written in a blog-like format, and that's not something I have an interest in keeping on my shelves.

  6. 4 out of 5

    James Orton

    This is an incredibly special book. Beautifully descriptive nature writing exploring the origins of consciousness via three periods in our evolution. Part memoir, philosophy and anthropology, this is ideal for anybody that enjoyed ‘Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance’ and ‘The Songlines’. A wonderful piece of writing that will leave you exhilarated and excited for the where the next 40,000 years will take us.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

    A radically immersive exploration of three pivotal moments in the evolution of human consciousness, asking what kinds of creatures humans were, are, and might yet be.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maudaevee

    This was so interesting, the writing was very engaging and vivid. I was wrapped up in the story right from the opening sentences.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    It was an interesting concept to explore, but I found the book rambled and jumped around a lot, which I personally don’t like.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    Goodreads Giveaway

  11. 4 out of 5

    bijoy prasad

    i would say must have! Aboe i would say must have! Aboe

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Absolutely stunning. Read this book. Quit your job. Go outside.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cyndi

  14. 4 out of 5

    Triumphal Reads

  15. 4 out of 5

    Keith

  16. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Gibson

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jack Young

  18. 4 out of 5

    Clarissa

  19. 5 out of 5

    Val

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mae

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jim Kuhlman

  22. 5 out of 5

    kaylen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Philip

  24. 4 out of 5

    Irawati Ismail

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katie O'

  26. 5 out of 5

    Grace

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gwen

  28. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  30. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  31. 5 out of 5

    Henry Holt

  32. 5 out of 5

    Gary Budden

  33. 4 out of 5

    Paul

  34. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

  35. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Lewis

  36. 4 out of 5

    Alex Helm

  37. 4 out of 5

    Steven Schend

  38. 4 out of 5

    Holly

  39. 4 out of 5

    Towandajane

  40. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  41. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  42. 4 out of 5

    Jennie

  43. 5 out of 5

    Deni

  44. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Salant

  45. 5 out of 5

    Liz

  46. 4 out of 5

    Lori Bennett

  47. 4 out of 5

    Bailey S.

  48. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  49. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  50. 5 out of 5

    Dan Du

  51. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Dishman

  52. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  53. 4 out of 5

    Amy Wigand

  54. 4 out of 5

    Little Freeze Library

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