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Haha

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ICE CREAM MAN writer W. MAXWELL PRINCE brings his signature style of one-shot storytelling to the world of clowns--and he's invited SOME OF COMIC'S BEST ARTISTS to join him for the ride. HAHA is a genre-jumping, throat-lumping look at the sad, scary, hilarious life of those who get paid to play the fool--but these ain't your typical jokers. With chapters drawn by VANESA DEL ICE CREAM MAN writer W. MAXWELL PRINCE brings his signature style of one-shot storytelling to the world of clowns--and he's invited SOME OF COMIC'S BEST ARTISTS to join him for the ride. HAHA is a genre-jumping, throat-lumping look at the sad, scary, hilarious life of those who get paid to play the fool--but these ain't your typical jokers. With chapters drawn by VANESA DEL REY (REDLANDS), GABRIEL WALTA (VISION), ROGER LANGRIDGE (THOR), and more, Haha peeks under the big top, over the rainbow, and even inside a balloon to tell a wide-ranging slew of stories about "funny" men and women, proving that some things are so sad you just have to laugh. Collects HAHA #1-6


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ICE CREAM MAN writer W. MAXWELL PRINCE brings his signature style of one-shot storytelling to the world of clowns--and he's invited SOME OF COMIC'S BEST ARTISTS to join him for the ride. HAHA is a genre-jumping, throat-lumping look at the sad, scary, hilarious life of those who get paid to play the fool--but these ain't your typical jokers. With chapters drawn by VANESA DEL ICE CREAM MAN writer W. MAXWELL PRINCE brings his signature style of one-shot storytelling to the world of clowns--and he's invited SOME OF COMIC'S BEST ARTISTS to join him for the ride. HAHA is a genre-jumping, throat-lumping look at the sad, scary, hilarious life of those who get paid to play the fool--but these ain't your typical jokers. With chapters drawn by VANESA DEL REY (REDLANDS), GABRIEL WALTA (VISION), ROGER LANGRIDGE (THOR), and more, Haha peeks under the big top, over the rainbow, and even inside a balloon to tell a wide-ranging slew of stories about "funny" men and women, proving that some things are so sad you just have to laugh. Collects HAHA #1-6

30 review for Haha

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    HAHA consists of six stories featuring clowns. The stories are lazily linked to eachother by the characters popping up in the backgrounds of eachother's stories. I say lazily, them being connected doesn't add anything to the stories. Most of the stories are almost predictably cynical - the world's a bad place, so is HAHA. It's the trap of thinking extremes convey truth about life. I'm not a huge fan of this style of writing. There are two stories I really liked - one about a clown stuck inside a b HAHA consists of six stories featuring clowns. The stories are lazily linked to eachother by the characters popping up in the backgrounds of eachother's stories. I say lazily, them being connected doesn't add anything to the stories. Most of the stories are almost predictably cynical - the world's a bad place, so is HAHA. It's the trap of thinking extremes convey truth about life. I'm not a huge fan of this style of writing. There are two stories I really liked - one about a clown stuck inside a balloon, and one about an elderly lady clown. There's a lot of narration in all the stories, and I wonder how much of it is actually needed. Most of it seems to be there because that's what you'd expect in comics. Each issue/chapter (never has 'chapter' felt more wrong in a book) is drawn by a different artist, all of them good. I'll end this with a couple of parp noises. Parp parp. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A clown has a terrible day - but manages to stay upbeat. A clown stripper remembers a doomed road trip with her crazy clown mother. A mime makes a friend - in a robot! Another clown floats, a kid attempts to steal from an old lady clown, and a clown stumbles into the world of the Ice Cream Man... … which is appropriate given that Haha is basically Ice Cream Man - the clown-themed version! Also like Ice Cream Man, Haha is a pretty bad pseudo-horror anthology of forgettable and uninteresting short A clown has a terrible day - but manages to stay upbeat. A clown stripper remembers a doomed road trip with her crazy clown mother. A mime makes a friend - in a robot! Another clown floats, a kid attempts to steal from an old lady clown, and a clown stumbles into the world of the Ice Cream Man... … which is appropriate given that Haha is basically Ice Cream Man - the clown-themed version! Also like Ice Cream Man, Haha is a pretty bad pseudo-horror anthology of forgettable and uninteresting short stories. Each issue is drawn by a different artist. The best one is definitely Remi Says, drawn by Roger Langridge, about a mime who makes his act successful after finding a discarded robot and incorporating him into his performance - except the corporation that built the robot wants him back! It’s a decent story, and I liked that it was silent, in keeping with the mime character, and Langridge’s art is very appealing. The others though are really boring and arbitrarily downbeat. Bad things happen to Bartelby the clown, Rudolph’s mother, and Happy Hank for no other reason than these are “sad clown stories”. Because clowns are meant to be happy so… irony? W. Maxwell Prince can’t make these gloomy things interesting either. A lonely old lady eating casserole, a drunken clown in some kind of fantasy floaty land - they just are what they are and it’s unimpressive. I liked Martin Morazzo’s art in the final story, and it ties into his and Prince’s Ice Cream Man series for no reason, but I didn’t really like the art of Vanesa Del Rey, Zoe Thorogood, Patrick Horvath, or Gabriel Hernandez Walta. Haha is only for readers who like Prince’s terrible Ice Cream Man series and want to read more of the same. Like Ice Cream Man, I found reading Haha to be a dreary and underwhelming experience.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Six depressing stories about sad clowns, each by a different artist. I've seen this billed as horror but it's mostly just melancholy. I liked Gabriel Walta's story about a old woman clown who lives along the best, but that's not saying a whole lot. Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss Six depressing stories about sad clowns, each by a different artist. I've seen this billed as horror but it's mostly just melancholy. I liked Gabriel Walta's story about a old woman clown who lives along the best, but that's not saying a whole lot. Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss

  4. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    More miss than hit; issue #5 was the best and could just be read as a standalone. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 2.5 More miss than hit; issue #5 was the best and could just be read as a standalone. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 2.5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Send in The CLOWNS... and give them a hug! When I saw this advertised as a horror comic, it felt like false advertising. Because while I felt that things were getting weird, they didn't feel that scary. But maybe that's because of all the surreal stuff and events that I see every day. The way people talk to each other, the way they blame others for their problems, and the dreams and needs that slip away. I guess I just happened to have related to clowns a lot more than I thought. It was really ref Send in The CLOWNS... and give them a hug! When I saw this advertised as a horror comic, it felt like false advertising. Because while I felt that things were getting weird, they didn't feel that scary. But maybe that's because of all the surreal stuff and events that I see every day. The way people talk to each other, the way they blame others for their problems, and the dreams and needs that slip away. I guess I just happened to have related to clowns a lot more than I thought. It was really refreshing to see how this series wasn't just another clown going bad, insane scenario, or evil stalkers. Because as some issues point out, the Pennywise and Joker scenarios are played out and really don't speak for clowns as a whole. They're just as human as anybody else and they need some levity. The loneliness all of these clowns experience really hit my heartstrings. Everybody's got gripes and challenges, I'm just grateful that there were no huge jerks, just a bunch of people trying to get through life. Which is why the clowns were happy with their simple lives and just wanted to spend it with people capable of empathy. It won't always be the best thing in the world, but it's better than nothing.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    You have to agree that clowns feature in horror books and children's nightmares a bit more than ice cream vendors. So perhaps there was always a chance that taking these characters and putting them in a new series of dark one-shots was going to be a step too close to the norm for our creator. You'll be pleased to hear at least that it's a long time before anyone here is getting sucked down a kerbside drain – and we get four whole stories before meeting up with Pound Foolish. That said, the first You have to agree that clowns feature in horror books and children's nightmares a bit more than ice cream vendors. So perhaps there was always a chance that taking these characters and putting them in a new series of dark one-shots was going to be a step too close to the norm for our creator. You'll be pleased to hear at least that it's a long time before anyone here is getting sucked down a kerbside drain – and we get four whole stories before meeting up with Pound Foolish. That said, the first clown is in the gutter, but he's looking up at the stars, trying to find a positive in a world where he's unemployed, the victim of crime – and then the more serious victim of a more serious crime. The second one-shot suggests there will be copious links throughout this, as a female with some kind of clown connection aims to work at the joint the first just got fired from. Look past the motley and there's death here, too. A mime comes next, and dutifully stays silent throughout, although it's to little benefit in the finish. And it's that pattern that seems to follow – really quite humdrum examples of melancholia, that don't really entertain or elucidate. Let's face it – the unhappy clown, the clown face upside down, the misery behind the artificial smile, have all been there since Chaplin if not long before him, and however tricksy the author wants to get with call-backs to earlier stories in this issue (and indeed other works in his output), using these characters as foils to show the bland, the depressing and the hard-knock-giving nature of life is little new. I wasn't the world's biggest fan of Ice Cream Man, but this failed to even reach the appeal of that other title. Three stars seem generous.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    A clown-centred anthology comic, which may sound ridiculously niche, but W Maxwell Prince has previously written an anthology based around a library, and an ongoing series which anchors horror stories to an ice cream man, so this is pretty much what he does. Opening story Bartelby flips the near-namesake's rejection of life into a rejection of despair, even for one clown at a failing amusement park who has lost almost everything; Vanesa del Rey's art manages to stitch everything from tragicomic A clown-centred anthology comic, which may sound ridiculously niche, but W Maxwell Prince has previously written an anthology based around a library, and an ongoing series which anchors horror stories to an ice cream man, so this is pretty much what he does. Opening story Bartelby flips the near-namesake's rejection of life into a rejection of despair, even for one clown at a failing amusement park who has lost almost everything; Vanesa del Rey's art manages to stitch everything from tragicomic grot to anatomical awfulness to outright delusion into a coherent whole, or at least a crazy quilt, and sells the story's emotional core, which could easily have come across as schmaltz. It's a battered but unbowed vibe which recurs, even in the inevitable It riff, which hybridises with another two-letter title for surprisingly heartwarming results. The artists are definitely a big part of it - especially Roger Langridge, who manages to sell a mime/robot team-up which is otherwise one of the shakiest issues. But either way, I enjoyed this the most of all the extremely specific anthology comics I've read from Prince, at least until the final issue crossed over with Ice Cream Man and slipped into the grinding obviousness of Happy Hank... who's really miserable DO YOU SEE!?!? (Edelweiss ARC)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jon Huff

    I found the concept of this intriguing, and the art was excellent. Some wonderful visual storytelling. These are essentially six loosely connected stories. One of which takes an odd jaunt into crossing over with a popular movie from a couple years ago. I really liked the issue centered on the mime and Pound Foolish. That being said, I might have liked a little more variety of... "outlook" I guess you could say. This is INCREDIBLY subjective, but reading this as a trade just felt like being pelte I found the concept of this intriguing, and the art was excellent. Some wonderful visual storytelling. These are essentially six loosely connected stories. One of which takes an odd jaunt into crossing over with a popular movie from a couple years ago. I really liked the issue centered on the mime and Pound Foolish. That being said, I might have liked a little more variety of... "outlook" I guess you could say. This is INCREDIBLY subjective, but reading this as a trade just felt like being pelted with one unrelentingly sad clown story after the other and when I got done, I realized that I was thoroughly sick of depressing clown stories. A rare instance where I think a modern comic might have been better read as single issues.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Stav

    La primera historia me pareció muy buena, al igual que la del mimo y la payasa anciana El resto está bastante regular, la del payaso que flota me pareció particularmente mala Hace algunas referencias a clows famosos o importantes en la cultura pop, como Joker o Pennywise, y fueron divertidas de identificar

  10. 5 out of 5

    Colette

    What an interesting and grim book. Very DC Arkham vibe. I noticed other people who enjoyed this book also read/prefer Ice Cream Man by the same writer. After reading this book, am keen to check out Prince's other works. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. Book releases on 28 Sept 2021! What an interesting and grim book. Very DC Arkham vibe. I noticed other people who enjoyed this book also read/prefer Ice Cream Man by the same writer. After reading this book, am keen to check out Prince's other works. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. Book releases on 28 Sept 2021!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    Funny and sad stories. more of a 3.5 for me. The stories are just so sparse, you can read this graphic novel in 30 min easy. I liked it all just didn't hit me too hard. Funny and sad stories. more of a 3.5 for me. The stories are just so sparse, you can read this graphic novel in 30 min easy. I liked it all just didn't hit me too hard.

  12. 5 out of 5

    J.W. Donley

    RTC

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

    very weird, so many clowns.

  14. 4 out of 5

    John

    Well that was dark! Loved it. Honk.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Norman

    Lol what a depressing compilation of bitter clowns. I was thinking throughout, "I wonder if the Joker movie influenced this dude?" And we get a little Joaquin at the end there haha. I think there is probably some poignant messaging in here, but in general it is all pretty bleak. Ice Cream Man is better imo, but I can't give this one less than five stars. Lol what a depressing compilation of bitter clowns. I was thinking throughout, "I wonder if the Joker movie influenced this dude?" And we get a little Joaquin at the end there haha. I think there is probably some poignant messaging in here, but in general it is all pretty bleak. Ice Cream Man is better imo, but I can't give this one less than five stars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Imogene

    Well that was one of the strangest and most heart breaking things that I’ve read in a long time NOT for anyone feeling fragile. Props for a couple of Ice Cream Man Easter eggs, and I’m 99% sure that there was an Arthur Fleck Joker reference.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Stewart

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

  19. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kaiulani

  21. 4 out of 5

    Monroe

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jay Hancock

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nico

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pop Bop

  26. 4 out of 5

    Roman

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tahmeed

  29. 4 out of 5

    Milantropio

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tivadar

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