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The Hollow Land (AUDIO BOOK File Download & Annotation)

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Many of the best science fiction stories, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.


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Many of the best science fiction stories, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

30 review for The Hollow Land (AUDIO BOOK File Download & Annotation)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    This was definitely interesting. I did prefer the first part just because you can clearly understand what's going on. The second and third parts are quite whimsical and it was no easy task to follow along and get the gist of what was happening. The lyrical language used in this piece was beautiful. This was definitely interesting. I did prefer the first part just because you can clearly understand what's going on. The second and third parts are quite whimsical and it was no easy task to follow along and get the gist of what was happening. The lyrical language used in this piece was beautiful.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Morris writes like the great wallpaper designer that he was. His prose is interested neither in words nor events, but only in its own atmosphere, which it exists solely to continuously renew — like a fog machine. If his tastes are exactly yours, his stories will provide you with hours of grist for your medievalist fetishes. Otherwise this reads like someone else's homebrew porn. For my part, I'm only very slightly susceptible to the pre-Raphaelite brand of fantasy, which means that I was only ve Morris writes like the great wallpaper designer that he was. His prose is interested neither in words nor events, but only in its own atmosphere, which it exists solely to continuously renew — like a fog machine. If his tastes are exactly yours, his stories will provide you with hours of grist for your medievalist fetishes. Otherwise this reads like someone else's homebrew porn. For my part, I'm only very slightly susceptible to the pre-Raphaelite brand of fantasy, which means that I was only very slightly exposed to the sense of vertiginously immoderate Romance that Morris clearly intended. The rest was just tedium. Neither half of the experience felt particularly wholesome.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John

    This three-chapter-long short story starts off like gangbusters. In the opening chapter alone, we see a castle stormed, bloody revenge enacted, and battle waged. The whole thing is very well-written and brings to mind a cross between Sir Walter Scott and GAME OF THRONES. Unfortunately, after the first chapter, the story shifts focus, and readers are left with a less-than-satisfying reflection on death and the possibility of an afterlife. That's how I looked at it, anyway. The last 2/3 of the stor This three-chapter-long short story starts off like gangbusters. In the opening chapter alone, we see a castle stormed, bloody revenge enacted, and battle waged. The whole thing is very well-written and brings to mind a cross between Sir Walter Scott and GAME OF THRONES. Unfortunately, after the first chapter, the story shifts focus, and readers are left with a less-than-satisfying reflection on death and the possibility of an afterlife. That's how I looked at it, anyway. The last 2/3 of the story are so surreal, it's hard to talk about it with any certainty.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Johanna Haas

    Almost intangible, this piece of early fantasy sets places and moods that many later authors will use to create a genre. The story both starts and ends in the middle of things, and swirls around for a while reaching a partial resolution, but the ideas live on.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I was enjoying the tale, then it took a turn I never expected. Doing so it easily ascended into the territory of greatness. This one is sticking with me.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shaydy

    ????? Begins with an infodump and only goes down from there, though I laughed at it quite a bit. Not because it was funny or anything. Confusing and dull writing that doesn’t give itself space for its own action, no sense of pacing, and a plot utterly lacking in continuity, so jumbled that I doubted sometimes if it even existed. I think a bunch of knights just had some unresolved religious crises as well. This is far more akin to a weird dream sequence than a believable story. If you want a taste, ????? Begins with an infodump and only goes down from there, though I laughed at it quite a bit. Not because it was funny or anything. Confusing and dull writing that doesn’t give itself space for its own action, no sense of pacing, and a plot utterly lacking in continuity, so jumbled that I doubted sometimes if it even existed. I think a bunch of knights just had some unresolved religious crises as well. This is far more akin to a weird dream sequence than a believable story. If you want a taste, context does nothing for these quotes: "The vehemence with which I spoke, or something else, burst some blood-vessel within my throat, and we both stood there with the blood running from us onto the grass and summer flowers." "And I went painfully because of my weakness, and because also of the great stones; and sometimes I went along a spot of earth where the river had been used to flow in flood-time, and which was now bare of everything but stones; and the sun, now risen high, poured down on everything a great flood of fierce light and scorching heat, and burnt me sorely, so that I almost fainted." "On my head was a light morion, which pressed on my brow and pained me; so I put my hand up to take it off; but when I touched it I stood still in my walk shuddering; I nearly fell to the earth with shame and sick horror; for I laid my hand on a lump of slimy earth with worms coiled up in it I could scarce forbear from shrieking, but breathing such a prayer as I could think of, I raised my hand again and seized it firmly. Worse horror still - the rust had eaten it into holes, and I gripped my own hair as well as the rotting steel, the sharp edge of which cut into my fingers; but setting my teeth, gave a great wrench, for I knew that if I let go of it then, no power on the earth or under it could make me touch it again. God be praised! I tore it off and cast it far from me; I saw the earth, and the worms and green weeds and sun-begotten slime, whirling out from it radiatingly, as it spun round about."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shivani Arora

    My first introduction to the world of chivalry , knights and enchanting narrative of William Morris! Found initial and middle portions quite interesting even got shocked at some unexpected turns but ... Felt ending to be quite absurd and wasn't satisfied as a reader ( found plot to be very weak). Nonetheless it is able to speak on certain issues of morality when it comes to the idea of bravery in the act of vengeance and certain other views but only in a very subtle way) . Good to try if want to My first introduction to the world of chivalry , knights and enchanting narrative of William Morris! Found initial and middle portions quite interesting even got shocked at some unexpected turns but ... Felt ending to be quite absurd and wasn't satisfied as a reader ( found plot to be very weak). Nonetheless it is able to speak on certain issues of morality when it comes to the idea of bravery in the act of vengeance and certain other views but only in a very subtle way) . Good to try if want to read something about knights and the medieval world of Chivalric romances.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laraemilie

    Savez-vous ce qu’est le pays creux ? Non ? Eh bien moi non plus, je ne savais pas de quoi il s’agissait avant de commencer ce livre. J’ai donc commencé par spéculer avant de me plonger dans ce petit roman, et je dois dire que j’ai été bien surprise. Tout d’abord, par le genre de l’histoire. En effet, dès les premières pages, j’ai eu l’impression de lire un conte. Un de ces contes merveilleux dont raffolent les enfants, plein de valeureux chevaliers, de seigneurs et de désirs de vengeance. Toutefo Savez-vous ce qu’est le pays creux ? Non ? Eh bien moi non plus, je ne savais pas de quoi il s’agissait avant de commencer ce livre. J’ai donc commencé par spéculer avant de me plonger dans ce petit roman, et je dois dire que j’ai été bien surprise. Tout d’abord, par le genre de l’histoire. En effet, dès les premières pages, j’ai eu l’impression de lire un conte. Un de ces contes merveilleux dont raffolent les enfants, plein de valeureux chevaliers, de seigneurs et de désirs de vengeance. Toutefois, cette histoire n’est clairement pas destinée à un public jeune : nous suivons les souvenirs de Florian de Liliis, désormais vieil homme, et sa recherche du pays creux. Nous commençons par son enfance, où il décide de venger son frère pour une question d’honneur. Mais il comprend bien vite que d’agir à la place de Dieu n’est pas une solution et, le cœur et l’âme tachés par cette mauvaise action, il se met donc en quête du pays creux, où il avait laissé son amour, et cherche à obtenir le pardon du seigneur. La narration est quelque peu surprenante, car si on s’attarde beaucoup sur les pensées de Florian, on en sait finalement très peu sur son caractère. Les autres personnages m’ont eux aussi paru très simples et peu développés, et je pense que quelques pages supplémentaires s’attardant sur leur psychologie auraient apporté beaucoup à ce court roman. De même, l’inconsistance dans la description des lieux m’a parfois dérangée. En effet, on parle beaucoup du pays creux, mais on n’en a jamais réellement l’image car il n’est pas détaillé – sous prétexte qu’il est trop beau pour être décrit. Par contre, lors des scènes de batailles, l’auteur s’attarde sur certains éléments qui m’ont paru bien insignifiant : les vêtements des combattants sont décrits avec précision, tout comme leurs mouvements, et cela devient quelque peu répétitif. Il y a donc un grand déséquilibre entre les descriptions des lieux, qui sont presque inexistantes, et celles de l’action, qui sont bien trop fournies à mon goût. Un autre point qui m’a surprise est le style de l’auteur, très soigné et complexe. Le vocabulaire est recherché et la présence de quelques termes techniques de l’époque des chevaliers et des seigneurs rend le tout très réel. Il est vrai que ce n’est pas facile à lire, mais après quelques pages, quand on s’habitue à la plume, c’est très agréable et poétique, et on peut le lire avec fluidité. Ce que je déplore, toutefois, c’est que plus on avance dans la lecture, plus de petites erreurs de typographie se glissent dans le texte. Ce qui est dommage au vu du talent manifeste de l’auteur Ce qui m’a un peu plus freinée dans ma lecture, c’est le fil des pensées de Florian, qui m’ont paru, à plusieurs reprises, bien confuses. Je pense que, d’un côté, cela fait partie du charme de cette histoire car, après tout, Florian nous explique au début qu’il est un vieil homme et que sa mémoire lui joue quelques tours. Avec cette organisation, on a vraiment l’impression de se trouver dans sa tête, emporté par le flot des ses souvenirs. C’est toutefois un peu déroutant, et j’ai dû laisser reposer le livre après l’avoir terminé, puis reprendre quelques passages avant de bien comprendre le tout. Le pays creux m’a donc plu dans l’ensemble, même si j’aurais souhaité qu’il soit plus développé, car on arrive à la fin sans même s’en rendre compte. Les personnages manquent un peu de personnalité et les lieux de couleurs, mais l’action est prenante et Florian très attachant. La plume de William Morris est très belle, mais pas toujours facile à comprendre, et une bonne connaissance de la langue française et éventuellement du vocabulaire de la période des seigneurs et chevaliers est nécessaire pour apprécier la lecture à sa juste valeur. Bien qu’elle s’apparente quelque peu à un conte, c’est une histoire qui est, selon moi, plutôt destiné à un public adulte et mûr en raison des thèmes importants décrits : la rédemption, la vengeance, la mort… Je remercie finalement le forum Accrocs et Mordus pour l’organisation de ce partenariat, et les éditions Aux forges de Vulcain pour la découverte de cet univers magique que je n’aurais jamais découvert autrement.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Αταλάντη Ευριπίδου

    The story was beautifully written and the prose and imagery were vivid and wonderful but, in terms of plot, there's not much going on. In any case, it's a fine read, though not one you're inclined to remember afterwards. The story was beautifully written and the prose and imagery were vivid and wonderful but, in terms of plot, there's not much going on. In any case, it's a fine read, though not one you're inclined to remember afterwards.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Fantastical faux-Medieval dream-tale

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Choe

  12. 5 out of 5

    Simon Workman

  13. 5 out of 5

    Faye Bierbower

  14. 5 out of 5

    Judith Shadford

  15. 5 out of 5

    TYLER QXBEAR

  16. 5 out of 5

    Steve Morrison

  17. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Law

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paula

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alec

  20. 4 out of 5

    eris23

  21. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  22. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ange

  24. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

  25. 5 out of 5

    José González ruiz

  26. 4 out of 5

    Skye

  27. 5 out of 5

    Basil Butt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  30. 5 out of 5

    Diane

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