Hot Best Seller

This Thing Between Us

Availability: Ready to download

It was Vera's idea to buy the Itza. The "world's most advanced smart speaker!" didn't interest Thiago, but Vera thought it would be a bit of fun for them amidst all the strange occurrences happening in the condo. It made things worse. The cold spots and scratching in the walls were weird enough, but peculiar packages started showing up at the house—who ordered industrial l It was Vera's idea to buy the Itza. The "world's most advanced smart speaker!" didn't interest Thiago, but Vera thought it would be a bit of fun for them amidst all the strange occurrences happening in the condo. It made things worse. The cold spots and scratching in the walls were weird enough, but peculiar packages started showing up at the house—who ordered industrial lye? Then there was the eerie music at odd hours, Thiago waking up to Itza projecting light shows in an empty room. It was funny and strange right up until Vera was killed, and Thiago's world became unbearable. Pundits and politicians all looking to turn his wife's death into a symbol for their own agendas. A barrage of texts from her well-meaning friends about letting go and moving on. Waking to the sound of Itza talking softly to someone in the living room... The only thing left to do was get far away from Chicago. Away from everything and everyone. A secluded cabin in Colorado seemed like the perfect place to hole up with his crushing grief. But soon Thiago realizes there is no escape—not from his guilt, not from his simmering rage, and not from the evil hunting him, feeding on his grief, determined to make its way into this world. A bold, original horror novel about grief, loneliness and the oppressive intimacy of technology, This Thing Between Us marks the arrival of a spectacular new talent.


Compare

It was Vera's idea to buy the Itza. The "world's most advanced smart speaker!" didn't interest Thiago, but Vera thought it would be a bit of fun for them amidst all the strange occurrences happening in the condo. It made things worse. The cold spots and scratching in the walls were weird enough, but peculiar packages started showing up at the house—who ordered industrial l It was Vera's idea to buy the Itza. The "world's most advanced smart speaker!" didn't interest Thiago, but Vera thought it would be a bit of fun for them amidst all the strange occurrences happening in the condo. It made things worse. The cold spots and scratching in the walls were weird enough, but peculiar packages started showing up at the house—who ordered industrial lye? Then there was the eerie music at odd hours, Thiago waking up to Itza projecting light shows in an empty room. It was funny and strange right up until Vera was killed, and Thiago's world became unbearable. Pundits and politicians all looking to turn his wife's death into a symbol for their own agendas. A barrage of texts from her well-meaning friends about letting go and moving on. Waking to the sound of Itza talking softly to someone in the living room... The only thing left to do was get far away from Chicago. Away from everything and everyone. A secluded cabin in Colorado seemed like the perfect place to hole up with his crushing grief. But soon Thiago realizes there is no escape—not from his guilt, not from his simmering rage, and not from the evil hunting him, feeding on his grief, determined to make its way into this world. A bold, original horror novel about grief, loneliness and the oppressive intimacy of technology, This Thing Between Us marks the arrival of a spectacular new talent.

30 review for This Thing Between Us

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melissa (LifeFullyBooked)

    If you like books by Stephen King or the show Lovecraft Country (and Lovecraftian horror tales), then you should definitely pick up this cosmic horror novel. The novel starts out with Thiago, attending his wife Vera's funeral. The book is mostly told by Thiago to Vera in kind of a second person musing, with first person accounts weaving throughout. Vera died after a fluke event occurs, and Thiago is mired in grief and self-blame. The reader gets background of Thiago and Vera's life together, the If you like books by Stephen King or the show Lovecraft Country (and Lovecraftian horror tales), then you should definitely pick up this cosmic horror novel. The novel starts out with Thiago, attending his wife Vera's funeral. The book is mostly told by Thiago to Vera in kind of a second person musing, with first person accounts weaving throughout. Vera died after a fluke event occurs, and Thiago is mired in grief and self-blame. The reader gets background of Thiago and Vera's life together, the fact that he wasn't initially accepted by Vera's family, they didn't like the condo the couple chose, among other things. Thiago is Mexican-American, but doesn't speak Spanish and isn't Mexican enough for Vera's family. Then some things begin to happen. Their "Itza" (think Alexa) starts doing strange things, ordering bizarre items, randomly playing music. There are cold spots in the condo, scratching in the walls. When they start to do research into the former owner, they discover odd things. The build-up lasts through the first half of the book. Then we move into the present and Thiago decides to move away from Chicago to Colorado. That's when so many odd and horrible things begin to happen. What is real? What is imagined? Is this a manifestation of Thiago's grief, or is it something in the universe out to get him? This quote just broke me in its stark honesty: "What they say: call me. What they mean: it's your responsibility to let me know when I have to care." I loved how the final quarter of this book peels back the veil so that the reader gets a larger picture of what is going on, yet the author skillfully doesn't reveal the entire truth. There's much left to interpretation, and I think that could be different depending on each reader. It's kind of confusing at times, but I chose to just set those parts aside and focus on the parts that I could understand and relate to and leave the rest. As a trigger warning--this is a horror novel and something bad happens to a dog. It is sad at first and then let's just say it is not so bad later. If you can't handle Pet Semetary/Cujo type vibes, then maybe skip this one. I will be looking for future books by this author, if you're in the mood for horror this is an excellent choice. I listened to this partially as an audiobook, and the narrator Robb Moreira does a wonderful job, especially with the Spanish, which, since I don't speak Spanish, I kind of glazed past while I was reading. I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book, all opinions are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    "You were you and I was me and there was this thing between us." This Thing Between Us is a surreal and oddly seductive novel. The story revolves around Mexican American couple Thiago and Vera. Vera purchases an Itza, the world's most advanced smart speaker, and from here the couple experience supernatural (or are they?) phenomenon. Cold spots in rooms, music playing at odd hours, Itza communicating to no one in particular. "I'm here whether you need me, here whether you see me, so don't b "You were you and I was me and there was this thing between us." This Thing Between Us is a surreal and oddly seductive novel. The story revolves around Mexican American couple Thiago and Vera. Vera purchases an Itza, the world's most advanced smart speaker, and from here the couple experience supernatural (or are they?) phenomenon. Cold spots in rooms, music playing at odd hours, Itza communicating to no one in particular. "I'm here whether you need me, here whether you see me, so don't be sad...." As many people do Thiago sets Itza as their main alarm clock but when it fails to go off Vera finds herself running late, late, late and rushing to the train to make it to her work on time. Sadly an unfortunate event as well as terrible circumstances finds Vera in a coma only to lose her life soon after. (This is not a spoiler as it is in the book synopsis itself.) Thiago spirals down in his grief and rage. He even destroys the Itza whom he blames for Vera's death. Why didn't the alarm go off? He sells their condo and moves to a cabin in a secluded area of Colorado. He wants to be as far away from people as he can possibly be. Even in his seclusion it appears he is not alone. Something has followed him. This was a page turner that had me gripping my kindle while looking over my shoulder. I wouldn't call this scary per se but I did find it chilling, eerie, unrelenting, and a few creepy scenes even gave me hair raising goosebumps. Very well done indeed. This book morphs from what I believed to be a tale of a haunting into cosmic horror territory and this is where it began to lose me ever so slightly. It gets incredibly trippy toward the end and I'm not sure my brain was absorbing everything that was being thrown at it yet I am still so glad to have read this. I found this to be a very unique reading experience and now Gus Moreno is on my author to watch list. 4 stars! Thank you to NetGalley and MCD x FSG Originals for my copy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    3.5⭐ How foolish of me to presume This Thing Between Us is another haunted tale. Told entirely from Thiago Alvarez's point of view, This Thing Between Us starts at a funeral. Initially, written in second person, we listen to Thiago speaks to his late wife. We follow Thiago as he deals with grief and recalls unusual occurrences at their "new" condo until her premature and tragic death. I absolutely love this and felt so strongly for Thiago's loss. As a way to cope with his wife's death, he left C 3.5⭐ How foolish of me to presume This Thing Between Us is another haunted tale. Told entirely from Thiago Alvarez's point of view, This Thing Between Us starts at a funeral. Initially, written in second person, we listen to Thiago speaks to his late wife. We follow Thiago as he deals with grief and recalls unusual occurrences at their "new" condo until her premature and tragic death. I absolutely love this and felt so strongly for Thiago's loss. As a way to cope with his wife's death, he left Chicago for a remote cabin in Colorado where stranger and creepier things follow. I think Stephen King fans will enjoy this debut by Gus Moreno. I'm not sure if I understand the ending though. I wonder if I'm supposed to feel lost inside Thiago's head and with him slip into the dark.😬 Thank you Macmillan Audio and Netgalley for an audio copy for review.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

    Really interesting and well written horror novel about a man losing his wife and dealing with grief afterward. This wasn’t necessarily scary, but it’s super eerie and creepy. And some scenes were genuinely so creepy I was so impressed. The ending went a little over my head I think, and I don’t understand exactly what happens? 😅 But either way I think that was a super solid debut, and I can’t wait to check out other books this author writes in the future!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Fran

    "We never lined up [on stuff] but we still worked together somehow, like two different animals that learned to hunt as a team." Thiago Alvarez was from a Mexican family with "herniated roots...There were bullet holes in the furniture at my grandmother's house. Drive-bys. Secret lovers." "I was the quiet kid, taking after my mom and the passive, isolated way she went through life." Vera's mother thought that Thiago was a burnout, someone going nowhere. He wasn't "Mexican enough" or successful enou "We never lined up [on stuff] but we still worked together somehow, like two different animals that learned to hunt as a team." Thiago Alvarez was from a Mexican family with "herniated roots...There were bullet holes in the furniture at my grandmother's house. Drive-bys. Secret lovers." "I was the quiet kid, taking after my mom and the passive, isolated way she went through life." Vera's mother thought that Thiago was a burnout, someone going nowhere. He wasn't "Mexican enough" or successful enough for her daughter. Nonetheless, Thiago and Vera married and purchased a remodeled condo in Chicago. At night, Thiago and Vera would wake up to loud hammering noises, floorboards creaking, cold spots feeling like a polar vortex or scratching deep inside the walls. Vera's purchase of an Itza, a smart speaker that functioned as a personal assistant, added to a chain of unlikely, terrifying events. Packages arrived...a samurai sword...industrial lye, packages charged to their account, seemingly ordered by Itza. Then, an alarm set by Itza epically failed. Vera would be late for work. Tragedy struck! The assailant was an immigrant. It was an election year and pundits fanned the flames. In Thiago's words, "You were in the news, on television, your photo in countless think pieces...The world would sooner or later have its foot on the gas pedal...no more interview requests...". There would be no more people-family or so called friends- people who didn't matter. "I didn't have to feel things anymore...the part that could care for another person, invest in them, it froze and sheared off like a glacier into the dead ocean...". Thiago chose solitude. He purchased a secluded cabin in Colorado. Grief, loneliness, guilt and rage ate away at him. A harrowing, evil presence played havoc with his emotions. Frightening dreams contributed to his questionable grip on reality. "This Thing Between Us" by Gus Moreno is a gut-wrenching, cosmic horror read. Written in first person narrative voiced by Thiago, he addresses Vera, expressing his sorrow, guilt and wish to turn back time. Thiago is being sucked into a vortex of madness in this chilling, creepy read. Fans of horror will enjoy the ride! Thank you Farrar, Strauss And Giroux/ MCD and Net Galley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dutchie( turkey slowed my reading down)

    This review will be short….I loved most of this book-like A TON…then I hit the end and I got confuzzled. I don’t know if this is more folklore or demonizing inventions. 🤔 regardless siri, Alexa and myself are broken up 💔

  7. 5 out of 5

    luce

    | | blog | tumblr | ko-fi | | 2 ½ stars The blurb for This Thing Between Us is somewhat misleading. After reading it, I went into this novel expecting to be a tale about this couple who buy a possibly evil home smart speaker only to discover that said home speaker is a mere speck in the story and that the events described in the blurb don’t really happen on the page but have already come to pass by the start of the novel. This Thing Between Us opens with Vera’s funeral. Her death leaves her hus | | blog | tumblr | ko-fi | | 2 ½ stars The blurb for This Thing Between Us is somewhat misleading. After reading it, I went into this novel expecting to be a tale about this couple who buy a possibly evil home smart speaker only to discover that said home speaker is a mere speck in the story and that the events described in the blurb don’t really happen on the page but have already come to pass by the start of the novel. This Thing Between Us opens with Vera’s funeral. Her death leaves her husband, and narrator, Thiago bereft. He refers to Vera as ‘you’, a stylistic choice that might as well appeal to other readers, but one that does zilch for me. I find this device gimmicky at the best of times and in this case it contributed nothing to the story or it did not help in making ‘you’ (aka Vera) into a fully dimensional character. Maybe this was intentional, after all, she’s dead by the start of the novel so we never truly ‘meet’ her, however, I would have still preferred it if her character had been fleshed out (flashbacks, for instance, would have helped). Anyhow, Thiago is definitely not doing so well after her death, a death which turns out was very much a public affair. The media and various political parties try to spin her death in their own favour, or try to use it to further their agendas. Thiago couldn't care less, he just wants to be left alone. Other people’s grief and sympathies alienate him further and he finds himself increasingly aware of a sense of wrongness in his house. He eventually leaves Chicago for a remote cabin where, surprise surprise, things take a turn for the worst. Here the story definitely brought to might The Only Good Indians by Stephen Graham Jones. This is yet another horror novel that did not really affect me all that much. I wasn’t creeped out or horrified or even preoccupied. Part of it is because Thiago as a character bored me. I found him very generic and despite the majority of the narrative constituting his internal monologue, well, I did not feel as if I knew all that well. The guy is grieving for sure, but I would have liked to see more of his personality (other than he’s sort of an introvert). His voice didn’t captivate me nor was I invested in his character. While the author does dedicate a lot of time to Thiago’s grief and grieving process, he seems to lose focus of Vera. She’s very much a blank, and I wish that her death had not happened off-page prior to the beginning of the story. The horror/paranormal angle of the story was also ultimately a letdown. As I said above, I thought this would be more about Itza, the speaker, but, turns out this was more of a supernatural/cosmic horror kind of tale. At times I was reminded of Pet Sematary (but lite). The lack of secondary characters also made the story harder to get through. So much of the narrative revolves around Thiago, a guy I was not particularly keen on. In the latter half of the novel things pick up somewhat but I found a lot of the events predictable. I was hoping it would subvert certain horror tropes but it ends up dishing out the same tired horror stuff (your protagonist has a dog? guess what happens…). The gore was eeh...not quite as gratuitous as other horror novels but nevertheless unnecessary if you ask me. Having those scenes didn’t upset me, however, they made me roll my eyes once or twice. If you want to read this novel I recommend you check out more positive reviews. If you, like me, added this to your tbr thinking it would be about a knock-off Alexa gone bad, I suggest you look elsewhere because this book has very little to do with technology (but rather it gives us the same ol’ cosmic horror).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    Every so often a book comes along and just blows your mind. You look for these books, these awesome ventures into the darkest corners of one’s mind, these quietly terrifying tales of descent into madness and sometimes you find them. I found this book. And it blew my mind. This is a story of grief made tangible, a devastation manifested physically, this book takes inside emotions and twists them into a force to fight against. Inspired by the author’s personal grief, it absolutely devastates in it Every so often a book comes along and just blows your mind. You look for these books, these awesome ventures into the darkest corners of one’s mind, these quietly terrifying tales of descent into madness and sometimes you find them. I found this book. And it blew my mind. This is a story of grief made tangible, a devastation manifested physically, this book takes inside emotions and twists them into a force to fight against. Inspired by the author’s personal grief, it absolutely devastates in its emotional potency. Crafted by the author’s considerable talent, it grabs you by the lapels, throws you into a riding car and takes you on a journey unlike no other. A ride you’ll not soon forget. This is a story of Thiago and Vera, a nice Mexican American married couple living in Chicago. Thiago is something of a bum with a laissez faire approach to life, Vera is a more type A breadwinner sort of person, but together they work despite or perhaps because of their differences. There’s certainly no shortage of love between them. And then Vera dies, suddenly and tragically, and Thiago is left alone in a world that increasingly seems less rational and more dangerous. The entire novel is written in that You style, by Thiago, addressed to Vera, as it follows his Dantean descent into the darker and darker levels of the underworld. It begins with sinister (Amazon like though amusingly renamed) technology that acquires an unpleasant degree of sentience even prior to Vera’s death and proceeds to follow Thiago all the way to Colorado and back, taking stranger and scarier forms each time. Is he possessed by grief alone or if there something more evil at work here, something supernatural, something that wants to be released. I don’t want to say too much, because this novel really needs to be read with every stunning surprise in it maintained a surprise. These aren’t fun surprises, either. Thiago is this story’s punching bag protagonist, it punches emotionally and otherwise, above and below the proverbial belt. And it throws punches with such pugilistic potency that it gets right through to the readers. It’s a devastating novel to read, but it’s certainly emotionally engaging, alarmingly so. It spirals into the sort of darkness towards the end that might be difficult for some readers, it gets positively trippy towards the every end. And yet, it absolutely commands your attention in the best possible way. It does all the things the best literary novels of dark psychological fiction and nightmares do and with a striking aplomb, especially for a debut, featuring a notable creative confidence and a compelling narrative voice. In fact, this might be the novel Reid’s I’m thinking of endings things tried and failed to be, but that’s neither here nor there. It’s thoroughly original, though with heavy echoes of (without overthinking it) The Outsider and Pet Cematary and some possession novels. Doesn’t matter though, this is fresh , scary and thrillingn the best possible way. At any rate. This was an absolutely awesome read. Genre fans, this is the one you’ve been searching for. Recommended. Thanks Netgalley. This and more at https://advancetheplot.weebly.com/

  9. 4 out of 5

    Terry

    I wanted to read this because of the creep factor. Many thanks to MCD x FSG Originals and Net Galley for sharing a copy with me. Have you heard the phrases 'staggering grief' or 'waves of grief'? This Thing Between Us by Gus Moreno makes me think a lot about them. We literally begin at a funeral, that of Thiago's wife, Vera. She was killed in a freak accident, and now he's trying to make sense of things. Narrated by Thiago addressing Vera, we follow him as he goes about this in this cleverly pack I wanted to read this because of the creep factor. Many thanks to MCD x FSG Originals and Net Galley for sharing a copy with me. Have you heard the phrases 'staggering grief' or 'waves of grief'? This Thing Between Us by Gus Moreno makes me think a lot about them. We literally begin at a funeral, that of Thiago's wife, Vera. She was killed in a freak accident, and now he's trying to make sense of things. Narrated by Thiago addressing Vera, we follow him as he goes about this in this cleverly packaged novel, which one could label as cosmic horror a.k.a Lovecraftian horror, which is a subgenre of horror fiction and weird fiction (spot on for both) that emphasizes the horror of the unknowable and incomprehensible more than gore or shock. The unknowable and incomprehensible of this book are the premature traumatic, shocking death of a loved one and the afterlife. Only, Gus Moreno has made this more modern day with the addition of Itza (basically a fictional Amazon Alexa) and the intrusiveness of social media into our everyday lives. You see, strange things were happening in the months preceding Vera's death. Random music playing at random hours. Itza answering questions when no one had addressed it. Odd packages showing up on the doorstep without having bene ordered by one of them. Eventually, Thiago grows sick of the inexplicability, the well-wishers, and the people using Vera's death for their own agendas and picks up and moves to a secluded cabin in Colorado. But these strange things keep happening, only they begin to get stranger, scarier, and downright dangerous. (You see the waves I mentioned earlier?) The story starts out slow, but Moreno's writing is mesmeric, which will keep many readers held until the snowball gets a'rollin downhill. It certainly did me. We follow along as the horrors only become more and more (ha!) horrible. It's as if one is right with Thiago as he descends into the madness of his grief. Thiago and Vera are a Mexican-American couple, so pieces of Mexican folklore make their way into the tale. There's a dark sense of humor at play in the writing and instances where the hair on the back of one's neck stands up while reading it. I really enjoyed this one; I'm realizing that even more so as I write about it. It bears a splash of genius. I personally feel like there is a lot one can dissect and analyze from it, but for all I know, Gus Moreno just felt like writing a creepy horror story, so the joke may be on me ultimately. Because it is a bit quirky and weird, a bit niche, and because there are some extremely gory moments and brutality towards a pet, it won't be for everyone. I'd recommend to fans of Stephen King and/or Samanta Schweblin. It reads like a bit of both meshed together, with a good dollop of Gus Moreno himself.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    I prefer my Cosmic Horror filled with chaos and menace and this book really delivers. I think it would pair nicely with the very-different The Cipher, if you can handle that much nihilism in one go. At first I wasn't sure about this one as for the first section it is so much about grief and sometimes grief narratives can feel so paralyzed, so stagnant. (Which I know is an accurate depiction of grief, but still don't always work for me as a reader.) But if you give it a little time, it does start I prefer my Cosmic Horror filled with chaos and menace and this book really delivers. I think it would pair nicely with the very-different The Cipher, if you can handle that much nihilism in one go. At first I wasn't sure about this one as for the first section it is so much about grief and sometimes grief narratives can feel so paralyzed, so stagnant. (Which I know is an accurate depiction of grief, but still don't always work for me as a reader.) But if you give it a little time, it does start to get ridiculously weird and creepy. Plus the grief becomes more of a thing in motion as Thiago gains a deeper understanding (or at least as much of one as he can mange) of what he's up against. The inciting event is a seemingly-possessed virtual assistant, like an Alexa. I enjoyed this deeply because it was incredibly creepy but in that way that OF COURSE IT IS because the concept of the thing is already deeply creepy on its face. (I do not have one, I read Horror. I know what I'm doing.) I could have gone with this for a long time, but Moreno continues to twist the narrative and raise the stakes so that this is not at all a one-note or one-setting story. If you aren't familiar with the idea of Cosmic Horror, it's a broad category but to me it's about the scope, the feeling that the entire universe is set against you, that you are up against incomprehensible forces, outside of the accepted natural world. Moreno is great at getting you to feel these feelings while also keeping you rooted in the real world and wanting our protagonist to make it back to something like a normal existence. But of course here the massiveness of what is wrong in the universe is a fitting metaphor for grief. When you lose a person who's close to you, it can feel impossible that the universe continues to exist. Was great to see a Mexican-American protagonist just being a relatively normal guy. Thiago doesn't have a deep knowledge of Mexican folklore or magical/spiritual traditions (although he does resort to it with help at one point) he is much more of an everyman-style protagonist. We need all the kinds. This can be gory in a few places. Only major contnet warning otherwise is that bad things happen to a dog for those of you who are sensitive to that.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Justin Chen

    5 stars Ripe with empathy but also fantastically deranged, This Thing Between Us is a worthwhile literary horror roller coaster, even if the final destination might leaves you a little baffled to what exactly has happened. I detect influence of Pet Sematary, 2001 A Space Odyssey, and even Drag Me to Hell (a 2009 movie from Sam Raimi). Written as continuous monologue from the protagonist to his dead wife (with no chapter stop), I highly recommend experience this novel through its audiobook, as the 5 stars Ripe with empathy but also fantastically deranged, This Thing Between Us is a worthwhile literary horror roller coaster, even if the final destination might leaves you a little baffled to what exactly has happened. I detect influence of Pet Sematary, 2001 A Space Odyssey, and even Drag Me to Hell (a 2009 movie from Sam Raimi). Written as continuous monologue from the protagonist to his dead wife (with no chapter stop), I highly recommend experience this novel through its audiobook, as the performance heightens the intimacy and the corrosion of his mental state. Even though the synopsis really doubles down on the B-movie level 'haunted smart speaker' plot point, it ultimately plays a minor role to a larger story centering on grief. I particularly appreciate the writing in This Thing Between Us, which is filled with a surprising amount of levity, considering the book deals with such a bleak subject matter. The humor also acts as a false sense of safety, and intensifies the harrowing terror when it strikes; at one point I had to pause my audiobook and take a break when a certain individual got 'half-sucked' into 'something'—not only was the visual gruesome, the fact this character just had such great banter with the protagonist right before made it even more devastating. This Thing Between Us starts out as an eerie character-focused slow burn, then turns into a nightmare gone berserk in its second half. I'll admit the ending lost me, but it has been awhile since I was so emotionally attached to a horror novel protagonist, that getting a resolution regarding his state of being overtook my need for a comprehensible plot wrap-up. Highly recommend for readers who enjoy horror being used as a device to discuss human condition. **This ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Much appreciated!**

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    3.0 Stars From the premise, this horror novel had a lot of potential for me. Unfortunately, the actual story was severely lacking. It followed all the horror tropes without bringing anything new to the genre. I am a tough horror reviewer, but it's because I know how amazing the genre can be. This was just incredibly average.  Disclaimer I received a copy of this book from the publisher. 3.0 Stars From the premise, this horror novel had a lot of potential for me. Unfortunately, the actual story was severely lacking. It followed all the horror tropes without bringing anything new to the genre. I am a tough horror reviewer, but it's because I know how amazing the genre can be. This was just incredibly average.  Disclaimer I received a copy of this book from the publisher.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    "I glanced at the rearview mirror again and then really looked into it to make sure I saw what I saw, but it was gone. My foot hit the gas anyway. I was getting used to parts of me operating on their own. The back end of the truck fishtailed. Exhaust smoke filled the space where the thing had been. The truck jerked forward and then punched it, speeding towards the highway. By the time the daylight returned, I'd forgotten all about it. But it was him. I know that now." "I glanced at the rearview mirror again and then really looked into it to make sure I saw what I saw, but it was gone. My foot hit the gas anyway. I was getting used to parts of me operating on their own. The back end of the truck fishtailed. Exhaust smoke filled the space where the thing had been. The truck jerked forward and then punched it, speeding towards the highway. By the time the daylight returned, I'd forgotten all about it. But it was him. I know that now."

  14. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie (That's What She Read)

    3.5 Grieving widower Thiago is addressing his late wife, Itza throughout this supernatural story. They had purchased a refurbished condo together and had an Itza, essentially an Alexa, but things got weird as the Itza would turn on randomly, strange packages would appear on their doorstep. So he can't help but blame Vera's death on it. Right? This was an interesting story. The characters were Mexican-American and had stuff to say about growing up in America, expecatations about what it means to be 3.5 Grieving widower Thiago is addressing his late wife, Itza throughout this supernatural story. They had purchased a refurbished condo together and had an Itza, essentially an Alexa, but things got weird as the Itza would turn on randomly, strange packages would appear on their doorstep. So he can't help but blame Vera's death on it. Right? This was an interesting story. The characters were Mexican-American and had stuff to say about growing up in America, expecatations about what it means to be "Mexican," but beyond that this was about marriage and death. I think the novel was at it's peak when Thiago was processing his grief. This was interesting haunted house tale that takes a turn for the cosmic. Which might have lost me a bit, because I always find cosmic horror a bit confusing, but I feel like that's a personal problem.

  15. 5 out of 5

    inciminci

    A perfectly decent cosmic horror story which sports elements of two of my all-time favorite books; The Fisherman and The Ceremonies! I liked the way cosmic evil is depicted/characterized here but I was irritated by the book being in the second person singular and I just can't get past that. Did I ever mention that I hate that? Probably in every review for every book that uses this narrative device... I just can't concentrate on reading when books do that and can't warm up to it. So, needless to s A perfectly decent cosmic horror story which sports elements of two of my all-time favorite books; The Fisherman and The Ceremonies! I liked the way cosmic evil is depicted/characterized here but I was irritated by the book being in the second person singular and I just can't get past that. Did I ever mention that I hate that? Probably in every review for every book that uses this narrative device... I just can't concentrate on reading when books do that and can't warm up to it. So, needless to say, it destroyed a big part of the pleasure I would have had reading this book. What I enjoyed: there were some truly scary moments and unsettling scenes here. Even though it is a short book, it felt very full, not one scene was wasted and everything had a meaning, is worth pondering. So, it was more a book that blew great potential away, but is nevertheless very much worth reading if books addressed to the "you" don't bother.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David

    This Thing Between Us is literary horror. Moreno isn't just telling a straightforward ghost story, he's writing from the first-person perspective of a widower who is trying to cope with his wife's death, and then with the supernatural fuckery that follows. It's an intimate story of overwhelming grief and sorrow, soon joined by dread and horror. The author reveals in the afterward that it was partly a cathartic exercise to deal with his own loss: hopefully he was not also harassed by a demonic Al This Thing Between Us is literary horror. Moreno isn't just telling a straightforward ghost story, he's writing from the first-person perspective of a widower who is trying to cope with his wife's death, and then with the supernatural fuckery that follows. It's an intimate story of overwhelming grief and sorrow, soon joined by dread and horror. The author reveals in the afterward that it was partly a cathartic exercise to deal with his own loss: hopefully he was not also harassed by a demonic Alexa. Thiago Alverez is an uneducated, working class schlub from a family full of violence and bad endings. Against the odds, the beautiful, ambitious, career-oriented Vera falls in love with him, and much of this book is their love story, told in flashbacks made tragic because we know how it ends. Moreno brings Thiago's and Vera's families - both Mexican-American - into the story, both as background and sometimes as secondary characters. Thiago and Vera live in a Los Angeles condo that seems strange from the beginning. Mysterious scratching behind the walls, cold spots, your basic weird but harmless haunted activity. Then Vera buys an "Itza," a voice-activated smart device, and the Itza starts acting weird and creepy, and by the time Thiago finally backs his truck over it, I would have put it in a trash compactor long ago. Vera is killed in a tragic "accident" - a young hooligan running from the police shoves Vera in a subway platform, and she falls backwards, cracks her head, and dies. Besides dealing with the political and media fallout (the hooligan turns out to have been an illegal, and it's an election year), Thiago is now unwillingly rich because Vera had paid for a massive life insurance policy to make sure he'd be set up if something happened to her. Now Vera's family is offering condolences while holding their hands out, and Thiago just wants to get away. So he buys a remote cabin in Colorado. This is where the horror really rockets into gear. The thing that possessed Thiago and Vera's condo, and their Itza, is not so easily left behind. It's also cleverly handled, as real-world, physical things happen, things that leave blood and bodies for the police to try to figure out, and with Thiago realizing that he's dealing with the supernatural, and that the cops aren't going to believe in demons even when presented with things that make no sense. Thiago is both smart and not — he's smart enough not to stay in denial about what he's dealing with, but still so grief-stricken that sometimes he makes bad moves because he's obviously not thinking like the survivor in a horror movie. The nature of the threat is bizarre and creepy and doesn't neatly manifest itself as an easily definable entity. As Thiago puts it, it's pure evil. "Demon" is as good a word as any. The thing manifests physically but is also not a purely physical thing. It fucks with Thiago's head as well as trying to kill him — or is it really trying to kill him? Because it's pretty obvious that if that's all it wanted to do, it has plenty of chances to do so. This was an excellent supernatural and psychological thriller, though I found the ending strange and confusing, waffling off into vaguely cosmic horror. But it was a compelling read that manages to make a supernatural threat feel like something that could actually exist in a world that doesn't believe in the supernatural.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Zuky the BookBum

    What a beautiful and mind-bending horror book! I wasn't really sure what to expect of this one going in. The cover drew me in and I needed something short and fast-paced to pick me up out of an incoming reading slump. This Thing Between Us sure did deliver! This story looks deeply into the grief of a loved one. In the acknowledgements, Moreno talks about loss in his own life that helped influence the writing of this book. It's sad to know this book came out of real experiences but it's plain to s What a beautiful and mind-bending horror book! I wasn't really sure what to expect of this one going in. The cover drew me in and I needed something short and fast-paced to pick me up out of an incoming reading slump. This Thing Between Us sure did deliver! This story looks deeply into the grief of a loved one. In the acknowledgements, Moreno talks about loss in his own life that helped influence the writing of this book. It's sad to know this book came out of real experiences but it's plain to see in the pages. The grief flows across the pages in a very real, human form. I felt deeply for Thiago, by no means a perfect character but extremely believable in the ways he coped with his loss. Highly recommend reading this one at night, in a dark room. I was genuinely scared reading this in the pitch black with just the light of my kindle for company. The book does fall into many horror tropes but they didn't feel cheap or overdone. I thought at every moment where the horror ramped up, it never overdid it, leaving you just spooked enough before it became a bit silly or totally unbelievable. I love a horror or a thriller that isn't afraid to shock you, and this one did just that! Heart-breaking, violent and original. This book did so many great things. If you enjoyed The Fisherman by John Langan (though I didn't lol), or are into cosmic horror, you will likely enjoy this. It's safe to say I will be watching out for more releases from Moreno in the future. Ad-gifted by MCD x FSG Originals & Netgalley

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tory

    This confused the crap outta me. There was some lovely prose, but I got so turned around reading this that I can't even fully remember what happened. There were just so many elements. Is it a tech horror, as advertised? Or is it, like, Mexican folklore horror? Or some kind of overarching pervading malicious vibe? I dunno. This confused the crap outta me. There was some lovely prose, but I got so turned around reading this that I can't even fully remember what happened. There were just so many elements. Is it a tech horror, as advertised? Or is it, like, Mexican folklore horror? Or some kind of overarching pervading malicious vibe? I dunno.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    A few years ago, some of my friends and I participated in biweekly writing prompts on Facebook. It was short lived, as the novelty wore off quickly, but one of our prompts pertained to the idea that Siri was in love with their user/person/owner (whatever you might call yourself!) but the feelings were not reciprocated and, in fact, Siri’s user was in love with someone else. The idea wasn’t exactly new, as we’ve seen stories that use technology this way before, but it was a fun concept and certai A few years ago, some of my friends and I participated in biweekly writing prompts on Facebook. It was short lived, as the novelty wore off quickly, but one of our prompts pertained to the idea that Siri was in love with their user/person/owner (whatever you might call yourself!) but the feelings were not reciprocated and, in fact, Siri’s user was in love with someone else. The idea wasn’t exactly new, as we’ve seen stories that use technology this way before, but it was a fun concept and certainly opened the door to some dark possibilities. Because we’d participated in this prompt, my husband knew then that This Thing Between Us by Gus Moreno might appeal to me, so he sent me a link to the synopsis when it came up as a suggestion in his feed. It involves a device similar to Alexa and its potential for malfunction or, more accurately, evil. The story reads like a letter to the deceased, which is funny, because this is the third second person narrative I’ve read in the last two months. I’d previously claimed to not like this storytelling method, but it seems I hadn’t tried the right books yet. The fact that Thiago is addressing his now dead wife, Vera, which we know from the start since the book opens at her funeral, makes the entire tale all the more personal, powerful, and eerie. Moreno’s writing captures the grim beauty of Thiago’s observations and grief. He leads the reader slowly into the catastrophic horror of it all, lacing the narrative with foreshadowing that proved utterly compelling. There is so much going on in this story - layers I want to revisit, as this is the type of book a reader might want to start again when it ends. I realized only as it concluded that thoughts that had crossed my mind because of certain passages were far more meaningful than I’d realized that first time around. As is generally the case with horror, this book contains disturbing details, some of which will punch the reader hard in the heart. None of it is without purpose. Moreno blended tragedy and terror in a remarkable way, so I’ve no regrets about the devastation I chose to endure. It takes more than talent, but a true understanding of human beings, to create a novel like this, and I felt it was profoundly moving and utterly shocking. I was quite satisfied with this lyrical journey. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️💫

  20. 4 out of 5

    Becky Spratford

    Review in the SF/F/H Spotlight issue of Booklist in August 2021: http://raforall.blogspot.com/2021/08/... Three Words That Describe This Book: original, Cosmic Horror, escalating terror Review in the SF/F/H Spotlight issue of Booklist in August 2021: http://raforall.blogspot.com/2021/08/... Three Words That Describe This Book: original, Cosmic Horror, escalating terror

  21. 4 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Spoiler alert: In which I try not to give too much away but inadvertently reveal a lot more, probably, than I should have, for which I am very sorry. But you’ve been warned… Gus Moreno’s debut novel “This Thing Between Us” has my vote for Best Horror Novel of 2021, in a year that has, apparently, produced a lot of excellent horror novels. Moreno is part of this New Weird Horror trend that seems to have taken off in the last few years, spearheaded by authors like Stephen Graham Jones, Catriona Ward Spoiler alert: In which I try not to give too much away but inadvertently reveal a lot more, probably, than I should have, for which I am very sorry. But you’ve been warned… Gus Moreno’s debut novel “This Thing Between Us” has my vote for Best Horror Novel of 2021, in a year that has, apparently, produced a lot of excellent horror novels. Moreno is part of this New Weird Horror trend that seems to have taken off in the last few years, spearheaded by authors like Stephen Graham Jones, Catriona Ward, Paul Tremblay, Cassandra Khaw, Grady Hendrix, Tiffany D. Jackson, just to name a few that have received positive buzz. I can’t say that I have read even a few of the horror novels in the past year. Hell, I recently discovered Stephen Graham Jones and Grady Hendrix, so I’ve got a lot of catching up to do… That said, It’s been hard not to notice a renaissance of extremely exciting new horror voices out there, all of them bringing their own unique twists and brand of horror. Moreno’s novel does many things well, not the least of which is overturning the reader’s expectations at every page. Here I was, going into the book thinking it was going to be a darkly humorous examination about our exhausting fascination with technology. The protagonist, who is dealing with the recent death of his wife, blames the death on the purchase of a smart speaker called an Itza (a thinly-veiled Alexa) that essentially takes on a life of its own, playing loud music at odd hours of the night, ordering ridiculous packages like a dozen pink dildos, and re-setting alarms so that you’re late for work. It’s “Christine” for the millennial set. Then, not even half-way through, the book becomes something else, something darker. It starts going all “Hereditary”, replete with pentagrams and animal sacrifice and ancient Mexican demons called the Cucuy, which is commonly called the “Mexican boogeyman”. Then there’s this (not-so-funny) nod to Stephen King’s “Cujo” which erupts into so much amazing blood and guts: again, not what I was expecting. Then it becomes this Lovecraftian cosmic horror straight out of a Laird Barron story. Then it becomes a tearjerker about the protagonist’s inability to deal with grief and depression about losing his wife, and how it affects his other relationships, and how emotionally fragile we are as humans. It’s also a love story. It manages, somehow, to be each one of these things all in one, but it never feels disjointed or awkward. On the contrary, it flows beautifully, like a boat cruise through the nine levels of Hell. This is true horror, in every sense of the word, which is why it gets my vote for Best Horror Novel of the year.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Audra (ouija.reads)

    Haunted houses are my jam. So a house that's haunted by someone (or something?) coming through an Alexa-style device? Yep, that's gonna be a must-read. I know whenever I open up an MCD x FSG Originals title it is going to give me something completely different from anything else I could pull off the shelf. They are interested in strange, experimental narratives driven by unique writers who aren't afraid to venture off the beaten path. I loved the premise of this so much and was instantly drawn i Haunted houses are my jam. So a house that's haunted by someone (or something?) coming through an Alexa-style device? Yep, that's gonna be a must-read. I know whenever I open up an MCD x FSG Originals title it is going to give me something completely different from anything else I could pull off the shelf. They are interested in strange, experimental narratives driven by unique writers who aren't afraid to venture off the beaten path. I loved the premise of this so much and was instantly drawn in by main character Thiago. At the beginning of the book, his wife is unexpectedly dead and he's dealing with his own grief and feelings of blame as well as the expectations of her family and friends. It felt so truthful to the experience of losing someone. It isn't just graceful funeral services and one tear sliding artistically down a cheek. It's messy and confusing and awkward and terrible and hysterical and numb and all of the above. The second half of the book takes a full hairpin turn into the cosmic, throwing in a dash of Pet Sematary and Cujo, an otherworldly wall that keeps moving around, strange visions, and a haunted cabin. I wasn't exactly sure what was going on (view spoiler)[ or how much I could trust Thiago, who potentially turns into an unreliable narrator, (hide spoiler)] but I was stuck in this book like it was one of those spinning amusement park rides that pins you to the wall and disorients the crap out of you. For me, the book didn't stick the landing, mostly because I wanted more from it. But perhaps that was Moreno's intention—to leave you disturbed and gasping for air and wondering what in the actual f**k is going on here?! All I know is that Moreno is an author to watch—and this is his debut novel! I will be looking forward to what he does next.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    And this is why I don't talk to Alexa or Siri! :) But seriously, it starts as a cautionary tale and ends as I'm not quite sure what. I began reading it at night and 30 pages in, was a little shy about turning the lights out. I'm glad I finished it in daylight. That said, it's quite confusing in many ways and doesn't come to much of a resolution. Very disturbing, though And this is why I don't talk to Alexa or Siri! :) But seriously, it starts as a cautionary tale and ends as I'm not quite sure what. I began reading it at night and 30 pages in, was a little shy about turning the lights out. I'm glad I finished it in daylight. That said, it's quite confusing in many ways and doesn't come to much of a resolution. Very disturbing, though

  24. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    Right up there with Langan's THE FISHERMAN as an exploration of grief twinned with cosmic horror. Moreno's prose is gentle until it isn't, just like the story. It's interesting to see non-cosmic-horror-versed folks grapple with this one, which is ultimately the tale of a man whose life is turned completely upside down by forces outside his control, forces he doesn't understand, forces he and those around him CANNOT understand because they are true supernatural bogeymen type things. But it's also Right up there with Langan's THE FISHERMAN as an exploration of grief twinned with cosmic horror. Moreno's prose is gentle until it isn't, just like the story. It's interesting to see non-cosmic-horror-versed folks grapple with this one, which is ultimately the tale of a man whose life is turned completely upside down by forces outside his control, forces he doesn't understand, forces he and those around him CANNOT understand because they are true supernatural bogeymen type things. But it's also the story of a man suffering the loss of his partner, the guilt he feels over thinking its his fault, the way that the laws of nature feel upended because of that loss. It's a hell of a read. Pull me out of the wall.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jiny S

    Alluringly creepy and fill of action. I was looking for something that will put me in the mood for Halloween, and this is prefect.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Renee

    Thiago is consumed with grief. One alarm that failed to go off meant that his wife Vera left late for work. That one small change in her routine put her in the wrong place at the wrong time. After her death, her friends and family try to be there for Thiago, but none of them understand the depth of his loss. He decides to sell their condo, now the home of too many painful memories. After all, they both were bothered by random unexplained noises and cold spots, and why didn't their high technology Thiago is consumed with grief. One alarm that failed to go off meant that his wife Vera left late for work. That one small change in her routine put her in the wrong place at the wrong time. After her death, her friends and family try to be there for Thiago, but none of them understand the depth of his loss. He decides to sell their condo, now the home of too many painful memories. After all, they both were bothered by random unexplained noises and cold spots, and why didn't their high technology speaker, Itza, actually wake them with their preset alarm? Was it an accident or is there something sinister lurking behind their condo walls? He leaves Chicago for Colorado, driving over Itza before he goes. But he has barely settled in when it appears that something has followed him west, something dark and disturbing. He may no longer be able to decide how he will spend the rest of his life. The question is how many other people will suffer as he falls down the rabbit hole with only despair and evil for company. As a reader, I think what I took from this story might be very different than someone else. Is the horror real or just in Thiago's mind? I don't think there will be any disagreement about how unsettling this entire story made me feel. I couldn't put it down and thought about it for days. To me, that is a very good book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Estefanía

    "I already told you, Thiago. I'm from Mexico. We're all a little haunted. After his wife's tragic murder, Thiago Alvarez is left alone to suffer not only her loss, but the mounting evidence of a sinister haunting that may have caused her death. As Thiago mourns Vera, he reflects on the subtle moments they both ignored: the cold spots throughout the apartment, the unexplained noises, and the unsettling "malfunctions" of their Alexa-esque smart speaker. This Thing Between Us is a haunting depiction "I already told you, Thiago. I'm from Mexico. We're all a little haunted. After his wife's tragic murder, Thiago Alvarez is left alone to suffer not only her loss, but the mounting evidence of a sinister haunting that may have caused her death. As Thiago mourns Vera, he reflects on the subtle moments they both ignored: the cold spots throughout the apartment, the unexplained noises, and the unsettling "malfunctions" of their Alexa-esque smart speaker. This Thing Between Us is a haunting depiction of the ugliest aspects of mourning and grief. Thiago knows Vera's family and friends never sincerely liked or accepted him- by virtue of his antisocial behaviors and troubled past, Thiago "doesn't deserve" a woman like Vera. As we follow him throughout the novel, Moreno reveals the deep and unquestionable love between them as he simultaneously drags the reader down to the very depths of Thiago's despair. This novel was beautifully written, but often uncomfortable- Thiago is a miserable person who's been dealt a cruel hand and grief has not miraculously made him kinder. As he tries to unravel the true nature of the haunting surrounding Vera's death, we follow Thiago as he tries to climb out of his grief only to be thrown back into it again and again. This book surprised me. While a story about a sinister Alexa may seem gimmicky at first, Moreno constructs an authentic emotional narrative that kept me quickly and consistently invested in Thiago. I was pleasantly surprised to see the author do something dimensional and compelling with a secondary character named Diane, the ever-disapproving mother-in-law whose disdain for Thiago is readily apparent. Instead of relying on tired and often sexist tropes, Moreno spends time really giving Diane shape in this text. Where this plot takes her specifically left me absolutely stunned- somehow I thought the book just wouldn't go that far, but I know now that I was in for a wild ride when I began this text. This Thing Between Us effectively creates a haunting and compelling supernatural mystery. Just when I thought I knew where the novel was going, I was stunned again and again. To me, this is truly a story about the horror of the incomprehensible: whether its the incomprehensible injustice of a loved one gone too soon or the unknowable nature of death, intergenerational curses, and a seemingly unstoppable predator, this book was incredibly eerie and deeply, deeply sad. This novel roots its horror both in the human experience and the cosmic. There are some detailed depictions of gore, animal violence, and body horror, but these scenes are written in an effective and skillful way. As a Latina myself, it's a real pleasure to see Latine characters take center-stage in a horror novel. This Thing Between Us isn't exclusively about the racial and ethnic experiences of its characters, but the beauty and horror of Latine (and specifically Mexican) culture is woven masterfully into the text and I can't applaud that enough.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Talia

    CW: distressing animal death, violence, gore This Thing Between Us (TTBU) has a highly fascinating premise: our main character Thiago is grieving and haunted by his smart speaker device, Itza (like Amazon’s Alexa or Google home). Packages arrived at his home he shared with his late wife containing weird, unexplainable objects they didn’t order: industrial lye, a samurai sword, a sex toy.. all ordered by Itza. So after his wife passes tragically, Thiago chooses to live in seclusion and purchases a CW: distressing animal death, violence, gore This Thing Between Us (TTBU) has a highly fascinating premise: our main character Thiago is grieving and haunted by his smart speaker device, Itza (like Amazon’s Alexa or Google home). Packages arrived at his home he shared with his late wife containing weird, unexplainable objects they didn’t order: industrial lye, a samurai sword, a sex toy.. all ordered by Itza. So after his wife passes tragically, Thiago chooses to live in seclusion and purchases a cabin in the woods in Colorado. There he meets (and later adopts) a stray Saint-Bernard outside of a hardware store he calls Wilford Brimley. This book is a modern horror story, with a dark and ominous atmosphere, perfect for spooky season! It gave me serious Pet Semetary and Black Mirror vibes all the way. I really loved the way that Gus Moreno’s writing feels personal, which makes it all the more eerie. It was also really nice to see Mexican-American main characters (the horror genre can oftentimes be very white) and have some Mexican folklore added to the story which made it a lot more interesting! Regarding the dog.. I will say that I am someone who actively avoids anything that depicts harm or violence against animals; however, I read a review that summed it up pretty well for me, saying: “it’s sad at first but then let’s just say it’s not so bad later..” This book has many twists and turns to keep the reader in suspense and I found myself never knowing exactly where this was going to go. There is one twist that gave me a VERY frightening visual and was something straight out of a horror movie. TTBU is a limitless, cosmic horror story about grief, loneliness, and our attachment and intimate connection to technology. Fans of haunted house/haunted object horror will definitely like this one. Thank you very much to Farrar, Strauss And Giroux and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

    In the words of Simba: slimy, yet satisfying. I wasn't sure how this would pull together but at the end, I was happy -- which really means creeped out -- with this horror. I would definitely read more from this writer. I loved all the references to 2001. In the words of Simba: slimy, yet satisfying. I wasn't sure how this would pull together but at the end, I was happy -- which really means creeped out -- with this horror. I would definitely read more from this writer. I loved all the references to 2001.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Zak

    An extremely moving and sensational masterpiece. This Thing Between Us originally caught my attention because of the premise; I've often joked about how devices like Alexa possessed by demonic forces would make for an eerie horror story so it felt like fate suggested I read Gus Moreno's haunting and intense novel. However, Moreno offers a much more nuanced, superior crafted tale than the one I would have imagined. Perhaps the greatest strength (among many) of This Thing Between Us is the narrati An extremely moving and sensational masterpiece. This Thing Between Us originally caught my attention because of the premise; I've often joked about how devices like Alexa possessed by demonic forces would make for an eerie horror story so it felt like fate suggested I read Gus Moreno's haunting and intense novel. However, Moreno offers a much more nuanced, superior crafted tale than the one I would have imagined. Perhaps the greatest strength (among many) of This Thing Between Us is the narrative voice. Thiago recounts the events leading up to his wife Vera's death and the aftermath as though he were addressing her directly (like in a conversation or letter). This masterful stylistic choice allows the reader on a stream of consciousness-like journey in which all the stages of grief manifest themself-from guilt to rage to sorrow- that feels very raw and authentic. It also tremendously showcases Thiago's alienation, isolation, and depth of complicated devotion to Vera. Gus Moreno conveys the horror of loss in a fresh, compelling, and frighteningly resonant prose that left this reader begging for his next novel.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...