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The Impossible Resurrection of Grief

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IN A DYING WORLD, GRIEF HAS A LIFE OF ITS OWN... With the collapse of ecosystems and the extinction of species comes the Grief: an unstoppable melancholia that ends in suicide. When Ruby’s friend, mourning the loss of the Great Barrier Reef, succumbs to the Grief, the letters she leaves behind reveal the hidden world of the resurrected dead. The Tasmanian tiger, brought bac IN A DYING WORLD, GRIEF HAS A LIFE OF ITS OWN... With the collapse of ecosystems and the extinction of species comes the Grief: an unstoppable melancholia that ends in suicide. When Ruby’s friend, mourning the loss of the Great Barrier Reef, succumbs to the Grief, the letters she leaves behind reveal the hidden world of the resurrected dead. The Tasmanian tiger, brought back from extinction in an isolated facility, is only the first... but rebirth is not always biological, and it comes with a price. As a scientist, Ruby resists the Grief by focusing her research on resilient jellyfish, but she can’t avoid choosing which side she’s on. How can she fight against the dead and the forces behind them when doing so risks her home, her life, and the entire biosphere?


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IN A DYING WORLD, GRIEF HAS A LIFE OF ITS OWN... With the collapse of ecosystems and the extinction of species comes the Grief: an unstoppable melancholia that ends in suicide. When Ruby’s friend, mourning the loss of the Great Barrier Reef, succumbs to the Grief, the letters she leaves behind reveal the hidden world of the resurrected dead. The Tasmanian tiger, brought bac IN A DYING WORLD, GRIEF HAS A LIFE OF ITS OWN... With the collapse of ecosystems and the extinction of species comes the Grief: an unstoppable melancholia that ends in suicide. When Ruby’s friend, mourning the loss of the Great Barrier Reef, succumbs to the Grief, the letters she leaves behind reveal the hidden world of the resurrected dead. The Tasmanian tiger, brought back from extinction in an isolated facility, is only the first... but rebirth is not always biological, and it comes with a price. As a scientist, Ruby resists the Grief by focusing her research on resilient jellyfish, but she can’t avoid choosing which side she’s on. How can she fight against the dead and the forces behind them when doing so risks her home, her life, and the entire biosphere?

30 review for The Impossible Resurrection of Grief

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jaidee

    2.5 "embryonic, unfinished, tantalizing" stars !! Thank you to Netgalley, the author and Steliform Press for an e-copy of this novella. This work will be released May 2021. I am providing my honest review. Thank you to Marchpane whose review prompted my interest in reading this book. This book is unfinished. The novella form is not well suited to this work. In this work lie so many interesting ideas about animal and plant extinction, environmentalism, art, love, friendship and ecology. The ideas 2.5 "embryonic, unfinished, tantalizing" stars !! Thank you to Netgalley, the author and Steliform Press for an e-copy of this novella. This work will be released May 2021. I am providing my honest review. Thank you to Marchpane whose review prompted my interest in reading this book. This book is unfinished. The novella form is not well suited to this work. In this work lie so many interesting ideas about animal and plant extinction, environmentalism, art, love, friendship and ecology. The ideas and premises are fascinating, thought provoking and if worked on could be a major player in the speculative fiction genre. The author has pasted together this work and does a whole lot of tellin', a whole lot of 'splainin, a whole lot of glossing over what could be a five hundred page novel that could rival Atwood's dystopian trilogy. I see such huge potential for this book both in a literary fashion but also to assist humanity in realizing what our continued ignorance, disdain and greed is doing to our beautiful earth and all the lovely creatures. I sincerely hope Ms. Cade goes back and expands, edits and embellishes a work that is highly imaginative, provocative and important. (Also a shout out to the cover designer for creating something spectacularly beautiful !)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Today, 5/20 @ 8pm EDT, Stelliform Press celebrates this #BookBirthday! And you can get tickets: https://tinyurl.com/5p689rhk I RECEIVED A DRC FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA NETGALLEY. THANK YOU. My Review: Here's how we start this tale: The Sea Witch lived in an abandoned salt water pool. I knew her when she was called Marjorie and had the office next to mine at the University, but when the Grief came on her she stopped coming into work and set herself up at the derelict public pool with a stack of useless Today, 5/20 @ 8pm EDT, Stelliform Press celebrates this #BookBirthday! And you can get tickets: https://tinyurl.com/5p689rhk I RECEIVED A DRC FROM THE PUBLISHER VIA NETGALLEY. THANK YOU. My Review: Here's how we start this tale: The Sea Witch lived in an abandoned salt water pool. I knew her when she was called Marjorie and had the office next to mine at the University, but when the Grief came on her she stopped coming into work and set herself up at the derelict public pool with a stack of useless journal articles and a lifetime supply of plastic. That's a high-octane start to what turns into a careening rush between ugly and awful, ending its trip at unthinkable. And you will not be blamed for wondering why I now say: Get this book right now. Sit down, open it, and then let Author Cade do her wicked, caustic thing for/to you. The jellyfish migrated through the lake during the day, and snorkelers could swim with them, with thousands of jellies, with millions of them, and see in their lovely, delicate forms the histories of another life. They pulsed around me like little golden hearts, shimmering in the surface layer of waters, and it was as close as I've ever come to religious communion. On a Palau dive a woman, Marjorie, becomes the narrator's very best friend. Marjorie's obsession is the Great Barrier Reef. The ladies, scientists both, bond over their love of and understanding for the ocean's many and wildly variable ecosystems, all under threat from Anthropogenic Climate Change (maybe you've heard about it?)—but few ecosystems are under greater threat than the Great Barrier Reef. Marjorie succumbs to a new thing, the Grief, a declining mental health state that invariably ends in suicide, that is becoming more and more prevalent among humans who, for idiosyncratic reasons, suddenly can no longer bear to exist in the changing world. Our narrator, called Ruby as we discover about midway through the story, is apparently immune to the Grief. So is her Māori husband, George...not a scientist, an artist of science subjects, so it's really not science that saves or damns. But Marjorie retreats to behaviors so weird, so utterly foreign to her former self, and yet still sea-themed...she renames herself "the Sea Witch" from "The Little Mermaid" by H.C. Andersen, which is also what she named the expensive boat she bought herself before the Grief and burned to the water-line after it...that it's clear what the decline's end will be while remaining unclear what the hell she's going to do next. The next thing the Sea Witch does...well.... That is a thing of spoilers. The things Marjorie, I mean the Sea Witch, does or causes or abets, are...disturbing. I will leave it to you to read the under-100 page novella, instead of doing what I would love to do and relating the scary, freaky, incredible things that Ruby rips from pillar to post to attempt to make sense of, to attempt to explain to herself (and very possibly the authorities, though which ones and what she could convince them to do in a Grief-stricken world is unclear even to her) what Grief is doing to some apparent survivors. Why I want you to get this book is really very simple: I need people to talk about it with! There are so many fascinating characters...Tasmanian Granny the Thylacine Jesus for one, addled by Grief but quite the scientist withal, and maybe the Sea Witch's relative...? Ruby goes to visit her at...well, because she gets a Message to, although George her husband isn't keen on it: "Hurt's easy enough to live with," he said. "If there's an end to it. Break your arm and it hurts, but it heals soon enough and the hurt goes away. Even a small pain, if it never leaves...It wears you down," he said. "In the end it isn't the hurt that gets you, it's the exhaustion." He's right; physical or psychic, it's the unending aches that cost one the most to survive. As for how that explains the Grief, and those who succumb, we don't know if it's causal or correlative, but Indigenous peoples all over are succumbing to the Grief in greater numbers than the population as a whole. Great grief is always a form of insanity, a melding of psychosis and depression, but Granny is extra no matter what yardstick we're using. The Sea Witch, if she's related, came by it honestly. Gawd...this climate-changed world of Author Cade's is one scary place! Resurrection is never a harbinger of sunshine lollipops and rainbows, anywhere, anytime. "Some people said...{t}he coming of people like me, and what we'd done to Tasmania, the rest of Australia, and what we'd don in New Zealand...the same devouring, the same indifference to the pre-existence of other life. The same conversation, over and over, with different settings and different subjects." (Ruby speaking) –and– "I guess we all got better and better at killing. What a shock it must be, to find how efficiency in slaughter always takes the upward trajectory." (George speaking) At the end of the read, Author Cade delivers a devastating truth to us, one that went straight into my commonplace book. Ruby is having the one conversation she most hoped she wouldn't have to have, and least expected to be remotely possible. In her newly cleared eyesight, she sees this: Self-knowledge was the clearest thing in the world. It was also the unkindest. Unholy, misbegotten things always survive, don't they? Isn't that Evolution's sick little secret?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Marchpane

    The Impossible Resurrection of Grief is a slim speculative fiction novella that takes the real phenomenon of eco-grief and amplifies it into a dementing contagion known as ‘The Grief’. Sufferers are afflicted with unbearable feelings of loss, guilt, and complicity, brought on by species extinction. The Grief manifests in different ways: for most, it leads to bizarre behaviour and ultimately, suicide. A few are driven to try to recover the losses, either through de-extinction efforts (aka the The Impossible Resurrection of Grief is a slim speculative fiction novella that takes the real phenomenon of eco-grief and amplifies it into a dementing contagion known as ‘The Grief’. Sufferers are afflicted with unbearable feelings of loss, guilt, and complicity, brought on by species extinction. The Grief manifests in different ways: for most, it leads to bizarre behaviour and ultimately, suicide. A few are driven to try to recover the losses, either through de-extinction efforts (aka the Jurassic Park method), or by creating replacements—lifelike little robot birds, or holograms of lost habitats. I will admit I was drawn to pick this up because of the thylacines on the cover and I’m so glad I did. Octavia Cade writes just the kind of speculative fiction that I like—smart, topical, a tiny bit surreal—and this hit the spot. The trans-Tasman setting, the sweet, affectionate dynamic between the protagonist and her recently estranged husband, the oddball events, all give this novella a brightness that is undercut by the grim real world issues it presents. It’s a balance that works. 80 pages is a tricky length for a book, one that seems especially difficult to get right. It feels awkward here, like either a truncated novel or an over-padded short story, just not quite the right size for the story being told. This short read is still knocking around in my head and I’m very glad to have discovered Cade’s work.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Janelle

    I was initially drawn to this book by the striking cover. Like many people I have a fascination for thylacines, the last known member of the species died in captivity in 1935. The black and white footage of this animal pacing around its enclosure is compelling and often when there’s talk of cloning extinct species, the thylacine is mentioned. This brilliant novella is set in the nearish future. I was drawn into the story immediately and couldn’t it put it down, in fact It could’ve been longer for I was initially drawn to this book by the striking cover. Like many people I have a fascination for thylacines, the last known member of the species died in captivity in 1935. The black and white footage of this animal pacing around its enclosure is compelling and often when there’s talk of cloning extinct species, the thylacine is mentioned. This brilliant novella is set in the nearish future. I was drawn into the story immediately and couldn’t it put it down, in fact It could’ve been longer for me. The Great Barrier Reef is dead and has been taken over by the crown of thorns starfish and jellyfish. Ruby, the narrator is a scientist who loves jellyfish and the jellyfish have adapted to the temperatures brought about by climate change. Her friend , Marj is suffering from the Grief over the loss of the reef. The Grief affects many people, it’s a depression and feeling of great loss due to ecosystem devastation and usually ends in suicide. I think this story will stick in my mind for some time. It talks about the waves of extinctions that humans have brought about through colonisation, hunting and environmental destruction. There’s a lot of sadness yet also wonder that people can still go on and ignore what’s happening. “Can you watch something die and let it die?”

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    “The shift in climate that we’d ignored for so long, that we’d only given lip service to preventing…when it came it took so many of us with it, took us with floods and droughts. That was a small thing, really, and we were practiced at looking away, so long as it only happened to other people, in other places. But when it started taking what lived with us-the birds and the beasts and creatures that we loved, the green world that grew up around us, well. That was a loss we hadn’t prepared for, for “The shift in climate that we’d ignored for so long, that we’d only given lip service to preventing…when it came it took so many of us with it, took us with floods and droughts. That was a small thing, really, and we were practiced at looking away, so long as it only happened to other people, in other places. But when it started taking what lived with us-the birds and the beasts and creatures that we loved, the green world that grew up around us, well. That was a loss we hadn’t prepared for, for all we had allowed it…encouraged it, even, though our choices.” The Impossible Resurrection of Grief is a story of loss over everything else. Loss of self, loss of familiarity, and a loss of environment. It explores the response of humanity as it struggles with the mass exodus of ecosystems. This results in ‘The Grief’, an all-encompassing depression that typically ends in suicide. I truly did love the premise of this incredibly short speculative fiction story. That being said, I really would’ve enjoyed seeing this fleshed out a bit more. The storytelling is dark, different, and thoughtful. This book would be great for readers that enjoy Jeff Vandermeer or other sci-fi/speculative fiction works. My only real qualm with Resurrection is the length. There’s just so much more needed, at least for me. It’s a 3 star read for me. Thanks so much to NetGalley and Stelliform Press for this eARC in exchange for an honest review!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    The Impossible Resurrection of Grief is a troubling novella, in which New Zealand scientist-author Octavia Cade explores the moral considerations surrounding and human emotional implications of species extinction. In a not-too-distant climate ravaged future, research scientist Ruby specialises in the study of jellyfish species. She's fortunate, in that the species for which she feels both a personal and professional fascination are able to adapt to warming waters and other environmental effects c The Impossible Resurrection of Grief is a troubling novella, in which New Zealand scientist-author Octavia Cade explores the moral considerations surrounding and human emotional implications of species extinction. In a not-too-distant climate ravaged future, research scientist Ruby specialises in the study of jellyfish species. She's fortunate, in that the species for which she feels both a personal and professional fascination are able to adapt to warming waters and other environmental effects caused by human-induced climate change. Many of her colleagues have not been so lucky, in particular her friend and colleague Marjorie, who once studied reef ecosystems and has witnessed the death of the Great Barrier Reef due to climate change. Marjorie, who now identifies as The Sea Witch, has become afflicted by a progressive experiential depressive illness labelled as Grief, an devastating diagnosis that is spreading throughout the world as individuals face the reality of a world forever changed for the worse. "That was always the hardest part of Grief, the realization that the absence, and the loss, was total." (Location 1090) While some descend into Grief, others emerge as "new resurrectionists", attempting to reinstate, or at least replicate what has been lost, by means of biological technology, animatronics or hologram. Through Ruby, accompanied by her estranged husband George, Cade explores the scientific, human and moral implications of this. How do we choose which species are worth saving (or worth resurrecting)? Do we have any right to choose, given that it is we who have initiated their destruction? What are our motives in attempting renewal - is it for the benefit of the species involved, or our own? "The Reef had been iconic, and nothing had been done to stop the pale skeletal death. That iconic was a statement of worth itself, because who were we to judge which absence was the most distressing, or the least deserved? Hard to make that judgment without mirrors, but we did." (Location 625) Octavia Cade's writing is intelligent and immersive, successfully evoking the simultaneous wonder and incipient horror of what Ruby witnesses. She employs familiar motifs from fairytale and fable, emphasising the inevitability of human hubris when faced with the limitations of the natural world. The Impossible Resurrection of Grief was a disquieting read, but really thought-provoking in its consideration of both past and present attitudes to the natural environment. I'd recommend this short novel to readers who enjoy high quality cli-fi, as well as those who are concerned by both colonial and modern capitalist attitudes to humans' dominion over the physical world, in some cases including other humans. My thanks to the author, Octavia Cade, publisher Stelliform Press and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review this title.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gautam Bhatia

    A beautiful, haunting novella about climate change, the terrain of physical - and other kinds - of loss, and the nameless melancholy (or the "twilight" of the soul that Amjad Nasser wrote about) that comes with losing something without quite knowing what it is that you've lost. As an added bonus, you'll learn a lot about jellyfish. A beautiful, haunting novella about climate change, the terrain of physical - and other kinds - of loss, and the nameless melancholy (or the "twilight" of the soul that Amjad Nasser wrote about) that comes with losing something without quite knowing what it is that you've lost. As an added bonus, you'll learn a lot about jellyfish.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bertie (LuminosityLibrary)

    The Impossible Ressurection of Grief is set in a world where widespread extinction and the impacts of climate change are strongly felt. A disease called grief has arisen from these events, always leading in the person's death. It was beautifully written, uncanny, and even fairytale-inspired in parts. I'd definitely recommend this to people who love strange, thoughtful short stories. My one complaint is it felt slightly odd in its length, too short to truly be a novella, but too long for a typica The Impossible Ressurection of Grief is set in a world where widespread extinction and the impacts of climate change are strongly felt. A disease called grief has arisen from these events, always leading in the person's death. It was beautifully written, uncanny, and even fairytale-inspired in parts. I'd definitely recommend this to people who love strange, thoughtful short stories. My one complaint is it felt slightly odd in its length, too short to truly be a novella, but too long for a typical short story. I would have loved to have seen a longer book to explore the themes even deeper. CW: Suicide, self-harm, violence, death, minor gore, colonialism Thanks to Stelliform Press for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review If you enjoy diverse sci-fi, fantasy, and horror you should check out my Blog! You could also follow me on Twitter or Instagram.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kristen Shaw

    This is a book unlike any other I have read. It is a concise shapeshifter of a story that pulled me in quickly and kept me engaged throughout. Set in a near future world plagued by species extinction and climate change, the story follows Ruby, a scientist who works with jellyfish. The book deals with fraying relationships: the relationships between Ruby and the humans around her, but also the relationships between humans and ecosystems, humans and nonhuman animals. Humans are being affected by a This is a book unlike any other I have read. It is a concise shapeshifter of a story that pulled me in quickly and kept me engaged throughout. Set in a near future world plagued by species extinction and climate change, the story follows Ruby, a scientist who works with jellyfish. The book deals with fraying relationships: the relationships between Ruby and the humans around her, but also the relationships between humans and ecosystems, humans and nonhuman animals. Humans are being affected by an illness caused The Grief which, in my interpretation, is basically a drive to self-annihilation brought on by a deep sense of mourning and regret at what has been lost due to climate change. When Ruby loses a friend, she is sent on a journey to uncover the mysterious resurrection of several extinct species. The story prompts questioning about human accountability, the role of technology in "progress" and "conservation," and the relationship between human and nonhuman life. Cade's approach to climate fiction is stark and unflinching. My favourite aspect of the story is that it often feels a little bit dreamlike and surreal. It works well for me, though I honestly would have liked it if this was longer so I could learn more about this world and its characters. At times this felt like a fable, then it shifted to science fiction, then to an eco-thriller, then to a kind of eerie fairy tale. I really appreciated the experimentation with genre and the potency of the author's imagery. There is a kind of foreboding tone throughout that reminded me of Vandermeer's Southern Reach trilogy. Thank you to Stelliform Press for an ARC!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Miss Bookiverse

    The idea of "Grief" as a psychological state that mixes grief and guilt about the loss of a species and ends in suicide is absolutely brilliant, especially in 2021. Generally, there were a lot of themes in this short novella that tied in so well with the overall topic of extinction, such as fairy tales and divorce. I was also impressed by the inclusion of the discussion of (Western) people being sadder about losing animal species than indigenous nations as a result of the climate crisis. The Aus The idea of "Grief" as a psychological state that mixes grief and guilt about the loss of a species and ends in suicide is absolutely brilliant, especially in 2021. Generally, there were a lot of themes in this short novella that tied in so well with the overall topic of extinction, such as fairy tales and divorce. I was also impressed by the inclusion of the discussion of (Western) people being sadder about losing animal species than indigenous nations as a result of the climate crisis. The Australian/New Zeland setting was another plus. The only thing I wish had been a little clearer was the Sea Witch's plan and the overall ending. I felt a little lost after the last paragraph, but maybe that's the point in a story like this.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Darshayita Thakur

    TW: Suicide, Mental health, Colonialism. Octavia Cade likes using speculative fiction to talk about science in new and interesting ways, and this shows in her work. The Grief is at large, more people are becoming afflicted with it. But what exactly is this Grief? It is "the undermining up-welling of loss in response to ecosystem devastation, the failure of conservation" No one knows how or why it strikes. "It wasn't the same for everyone. Some people didn't get it at all. Some people got it more tha TW: Suicide, Mental health, Colonialism. Octavia Cade likes using speculative fiction to talk about science in new and interesting ways, and this shows in her work. The Grief is at large, more people are becoming afflicted with it. But what exactly is this Grief? It is "the undermining up-welling of loss in response to ecosystem devastation, the failure of conservation" No one knows how or why it strikes. "It wasn't the same for everyone. Some people didn't get it at all. Some people got it more than others- there was a higher rate of grief in Indigenous populations, another negative metric people didn't want to acknowledge lest it highlight their own culpability and continued privilege." This short novella touches on relevant themes and the author does have a unique way of presenting them. It explores the impact of climate change and its consequences on the human psyche. It equates the loss of the ecosystem with that of a loved one and paints a grim picture of what our future could look like - but it is speculative fiction, right? The plot takes a backseat with this one, rather it is the questions raised through the story that make this work shine. Then why have I rated it only 3 stars? The foremost reason would be, the story felt somewhat like an over-mixed cake batter. The taste is there but the texture is a bit off. Apart from the awareness issue, the story could have been so much more. The plethora of twists and turns, new characters and their limited contribution seemed forced and rushed. The character development lacked depth. Regardless of the fact that it is only some 80 pages long, the characters had room for growth, and for being more interesting. No doubt, it left me with some important thoughts as to what my contribution, as a species, should be towards the protection of other species facing extinction, but it also left me questioning as to what happens at the end, and I don't like that. Maybe this question is not meant to be answered through this book, but to be realized through our actions. Thank you NetGalley and Stelliform Press for providing this e-ARC.

  12. 4 out of 5

    ianthereader

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️✨ “Can you watch something die and let it die? The answer, too often, was yes.” The Impossible Resurrection of Grief is a strange novella, that would be offensive if it weren’t gleaming with sharp truth. While ultimately pessimistic, this story is so important, as it holds the reader accountable, causing them to be more introspective, opening up their eyes to things they have chosen to ignore. This novella gazes unflinchingly at how humanity faces and more often chooses not to face, the bitte ⭐️⭐️⭐️✨ “Can you watch something die and let it die? The answer, too often, was yes.” The Impossible Resurrection of Grief is a strange novella, that would be offensive if it weren’t gleaming with sharp truth. While ultimately pessimistic, this story is so important, as it holds the reader accountable, causing them to be more introspective, opening up their eyes to things they have chosen to ignore. This novella gazes unflinchingly at how humanity faces and more often chooses not to face, the bitter realities of the environmental decline of the world around us. This novella implies that deep down people only care about things that are personal to them, and are ultimately unfazed by things that do not directly impact their way of life or their preferences. “Monstrous self interest masquerading as emotional stability”, as it is put in the story. Mirrors are a huge symbol in the story, and questions whether or not we are really honest with ourselves when we self-reflect, or if our own perceptions of ourselves are self-created with the intent of idealizing. This novella tells the truth without regard for sensitivity, which I found refreshing. The story is a chameleon of sorts, shifting between science fiction and fable, but all the while maintains a dark and gritty tone that shows hopelessness and beauty entwined. I didn’t feel attached to any of the characters in a meaningful way, but I think that is partly because they were pretty detached and selfish people. It was purposeful, which I can also appreciate. I think this novella fully accomplished it’s purpose, and while I would not say I loved the experience of reading it, I did benefit from it and I do recommend it. Thank you Netgalley, Octavia Cade, and Stelliform Press for an early copy of this novella.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shannon (That's So Poe)

    I'm coming to realize that I adore Cade's writing. It is so beautiful and immersive and filled with science as well as emotion. I loved how this story explored the grief of humanity over the destruction of nature in a science fiction setting. It got a little bit literary, especially at the end, and totally went over my head, but I still really enjoyed the experience. Content Warnings: self-harm, suicide, intense grief, mental instability, animal death I'm coming to realize that I adore Cade's writing. It is so beautiful and immersive and filled with science as well as emotion. I loved how this story explored the grief of humanity over the destruction of nature in a science fiction setting. It got a little bit literary, especially at the end, and totally went over my head, but I still really enjoyed the experience. Content Warnings: self-harm, suicide, intense grief, mental instability, animal death

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jae

    Tw// suicide, self harm, depression This was a very unique read. I’d never read something like this before and I appreciate the themes explored in this a lot, but at the same time the book simply wasn’t for me. I’ll start with the good. The author has clearly done the required research and it shows in the writing. One of the most notable aspect was the handling of the Grief, the literary input regarding that, suicide, loneliness, depression, was put together really well and the focus on the enviro Tw// suicide, self harm, depression This was a very unique read. I’d never read something like this before and I appreciate the themes explored in this a lot, but at the same time the book simply wasn’t for me. I’ll start with the good. The author has clearly done the required research and it shows in the writing. One of the most notable aspect was the handling of the Grief, the literary input regarding that, suicide, loneliness, depression, was put together really well and the focus on the environment and ecology truly was phenomenal in this book. Its just a very quotable book! That said, the story felt like a meandering mess. There was no plot to it. I was waiting for something more to happen when it ended and nothing happened. While it lacked in plot, it also lacked in characters, there was no depth to the mc and i did not feel connected to her story or invested in any of the characters. The writing itself was accessible but not phenomenal or captivating. Despite these, i think those were never a focus of the story. It dealt with a futuristic scenario and the theme was about loss and grief we feel from the extinction of other species and that was brought about and discussed, in a literary sense, phenomenally within the book. The author tackled and accomplished what the author had wanted really well!! So I definitely would recommend this book for people who enjoy speculative science books!! Thank you to Stelliform Press for granting me with an arc in exchange for an honest review via NetGalley!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christina.escapes.reality

    “We weren’t thunderstorms, nor did we blunder about, blind as bacteria. We had the capacity for choice, and what we had chosen- what we continued to choose- was death.” Today I finished #theimpossibleresurrectionofgrief by #octaviacade. This speculative dystopian eco-thriller is an eye opening read that everyone should be aware of. Due to species and ecosystem extinction from climate change, humans are faced with “the Grief,” a physiological illness of overwhelming guilt and remorse for the compla “We weren’t thunderstorms, nor did we blunder about, blind as bacteria. We had the capacity for choice, and what we had chosen- what we continued to choose- was death.” Today I finished #theimpossibleresurrectionofgrief by #octaviacade. This speculative dystopian eco-thriller is an eye opening read that everyone should be aware of. Due to species and ecosystem extinction from climate change, humans are faced with “the Grief,” a physiological illness of overwhelming guilt and remorse for the complacency and ignorance exhibited at preventing such devastation, resulting in mass suicide. It’s so common in this current world that healthcare professionals disregard diagnoses of it, due to the inevitability of humans success at ending their lives regardless. Ruby is a marine biologist who’s going through a divorce, and is doing all she can to avoid succumbing to the Grief herself and finding purpose to go on in such a dismal world. So much so that Ruby has dedicated the remainder of her hope to supporting jellyfish, who have managed to adapt to the rising ocean temperatures to survive, even as the Great Barrier Reef has turned to bleach and decay. Ruby’s friend Marjorie soon succumbs to the Grief, and the remainder of the novel portrays Ruby’s attempt at processing her friends decision to end her life, as she was unable to notice the signs of her impending demise. We are then led on a speculative journey with Ruby as she attempts to understand her purpose in the world and essentially what humans are fighting so hard to live for if everything around them is already dead. This is a vitally important read regarding the inevitability and severity of climate change and how it will impact our ecosystems and homes if we do not attempt to alter its course. Ruby’s thoughts hit close to home when she realizes her hope isn’t the same as other’s hope, and holding onto one aspect of life to find purpose to continue is futile if everything else is gone. It’s sad really- there’s no point in saying “well at least my life is good even though it’s not elsewhere” when you can’t even walk outside your home to birds or sunshine or greenery or own a pet anymore. As Majorie hauntingly states, “..it’s all dead but for the jellyfish.. it’s so lonely there,” leading to the grim realization that life is meaningless without LIFE! A desperate, imminent, uncomfortable read that makes you take responsibility for your actions; your individual actions can help change the world. This was my first granted #netgalley eARC (suuuper late to the netgalley game😅)! Thank you so much to them and @stelliformpress for granting me access to such an imperative read! This novella will be published 5/20/21🌍 . Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This short novella follows Ruby, a scientist, living in a time of Grief – when some are overwhelmed with a sense of loss and guilt for climate change and extinctions that ends in suicide. Ruby is always navigating her own susceptibility to it, and when her former colleague Marjorie is lost to Grief and leaves behind a mysterious stack of letters she begins to follow clues that lead her to several apparently ‘resurrected’ extinct species. However, these resurrections are anything but straightforw This short novella follows Ruby, a scientist, living in a time of Grief – when some are overwhelmed with a sense of loss and guilt for climate change and extinctions that ends in suicide. Ruby is always navigating her own susceptibility to it, and when her former colleague Marjorie is lost to Grief and leaves behind a mysterious stack of letters she begins to follow clues that lead her to several apparently ‘resurrected’ extinct species. However, these resurrections are anything but straightforward, and each one prompts questions about the possibility (or not) of undoing devastation. Cade’s writing is beautiful – the characters felt multi-faceted and real. I did find the ending to be very abrupt, though I can understand this as a deliberate choice given the content of the text. My criticism here would be that the plot at times feels more like a vehicle for asking environmental + ethical questions than it does a story that really stands on its own – it doesn’t read as particularly subtle to me. However, do I appreciate the ways that Cade has found to ask a lot of important questions – about responsibility, accountability, the (in)ability to feel deep connection to (an)other specie(s) and to grieve them when they’re gone. I also appreciate that Cade has made clear connections between climate change, species extinction, and colonialism + genocide (I will note here that as a reader, I am not located in Australia or NZ and am not as knowledgeable about these histories as I could be – readers with more understanding of colonialism in this region specifically may have more to say here). I would, based on this novella, absolutely read more of Octavia Cade’s work. Thank you to Stelliform + NetGalley for the ARC of this book. Content warning: suicide, genocide, colonialism

  17. 4 out of 5

    Yahaira

    An unsettling and beautifully written speculative fiction on climate change, grief, colonialism, greed and tech. This book grabbed me from the beginning with images of the ‘Sea Witch’ in an abandoned saltwater pool surrounded by plastic suffering from the ‘Grief’. The ‘Grief’ is a psychological illness that flourishes and evolves as everything else collapses; it is contagious and, sometimes, hard to spot. It usually ends in death. Not everyone reacts the same to every ecological death. Through t An unsettling and beautifully written speculative fiction on climate change, grief, colonialism, greed and tech. This book grabbed me from the beginning with images of the ‘Sea Witch’ in an abandoned saltwater pool surrounded by plastic suffering from the ‘Grief’. The ‘Grief’ is a psychological illness that flourishes and evolves as everything else collapses; it is contagious and, sometimes, hard to spot. It usually ends in death. Not everyone reacts the same to every ecological death. Through this short novella we see Ruby travel through Tazmania and New Zealand dealing with the loss of her friend and marriage, but not really reacting to the larger losses (and resurrections) around her. We see tech used in different ways to bring back what was lost- through genetics, robotics, and art? I found all of this intriguing, but ultimately too short. Each new encounter and character could have been developed deeper. There is such a rich story to be expanded upon here. The ending was abrupt and a little bit confusing. I read it twice and I’m still not sure what we should be thinking from that encounter. If Cade ever revisits this story I’ll be sure to pick it up. I love that this story is a mirror we’re made to hold while answering the question “Can you watch something die and let it die?”. Thank you Stelliform Press for the ARC.

  18. 5 out of 5

    bookcaked

    A novella that explores a future where humans have basically destroyed the planet, leading to flooding and loss of wildlife, even down to extinction of species. I wasn’t sure what to expect from this, but once I started reading, I found myself sucked into this piece of speculative fiction, avoiding sleep until the last page. We follow Ruby, an environmentalist and jellyfish expert, whose friend Marjorie (the Sea Witch) recently committed suicide. In this future people become ill with Grief, a pr A novella that explores a future where humans have basically destroyed the planet, leading to flooding and loss of wildlife, even down to extinction of species. I wasn’t sure what to expect from this, but once I started reading, I found myself sucked into this piece of speculative fiction, avoiding sleep until the last page. We follow Ruby, an environmentalist and jellyfish expert, whose friend Marjorie (the Sea Witch) recently committed suicide. In this future people become ill with Grief, a profound sense of loss and impending doom due to the loss of environment that ends with suicide. Grief is a staple of this story, an illness that can also cause madness, and it will have you questioning who is reliable, who is sane, and who isn’t. Ruby follows a stack of letters left by the Sea Witch, which takes her on a journey of morality and ethics. In order to combat this environmental loss, scientists are trying to directly resurrect lost species, but failing. Can we resurrect something that has already been lost? Will it ever be the same? Will it simply cause more problems? These are some of the questions we come upon with Ruby, who believes what is dead should stay dead, but the Sea Witch’s opinions and perspective always lingers over her head. While this story is very obviously about environmentalism, there is also a focus on the effects of Grief on Indigenous populations in New Zealand, the effects of colonialism, greed, questionable science, and how we let things, and others, die. This story will stick with me. The writing was fantastic, and the author explored these topics really well while using a unique story to do so. I will be checking out this author’s other works, and I hope you do too. Thank you to NetGalley and Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America for the ARC!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Monique

    “The thing about Grief: once it comes it never leaves. The Grief is spiralling down and down into loss that can never be recovered, that will never lack culpability. It’s the guilt that makes it so devastating...and so profoundly destructive.” Octavia Cade’s novella The Impossible Resurrection of Grief takes place in the near future and runs under the assumption that we have done nothing to combat climate change. It’s not necessarily post-apocalyptic, but more pre- or mid-apocalyptic. The world “The thing about Grief: once it comes it never leaves. The Grief is spiralling down and down into loss that can never be recovered, that will never lack culpability. It’s the guilt that makes it so devastating...and so profoundly destructive.” Octavia Cade’s novella The Impossible Resurrection of Grief takes place in the near future and runs under the assumption that we have done nothing to combat climate change. It’s not necessarily post-apocalyptic, but more pre- or mid-apocalyptic. The world hasn’t descended into complete chaos, but it’s certainly on its way. Grief is no longer just an emotion - it’s a disease, capital G. The Grief manifests itself in different ways, but it involves mourning what humans have done to Earth, a descent into madness and dissociation from reality, and always ends in suicide. The novel follows Ruby and her husband, George, as they navigate this new “normal” and the loss of close friends and acquaintances to Grief. I was so intrigued by the premise of Cade’s novella. I had never read anything like it, and was excited to get my hands on it. It’s a very quick read; coming in under 100 pages, it took me a little over an hour to finish. Honestly, I wish it had been longer. Some elements were thrown in and could have used more explanation and/or background, and I wish there had been more character development. Some descriptions got a little too wordy at times for me, and I felt that the limited space could have been better used for the development of the story and the characters. I did enjoy the mix of genres - I would classify this as both a sci-fi and a new-age fable. Overall, it was an interesting read, and I appreciated Cade’s uninhibited portrayal and warning of a world where our efforts to combat climate change were too little, too late. Thank you to NetGalley, Stelliform Press, and Octavia Cade for the e-ARC!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    The Impossible Resurrection of Grief is the story of a not-too-distant future where we did little to respond to climate change. The consequence is a loss of many species and the human psychological response to that loss is in the form of Grief with a capital G. Those afflicted mourn the loss of a specific species, falling deeper until they commit suicide. I found the premise and story compelling. The writing in this novella was excellent. At times, it read like a fairytale, but one with depth an The Impossible Resurrection of Grief is the story of a not-too-distant future where we did little to respond to climate change. The consequence is a loss of many species and the human psychological response to that loss is in the form of Grief with a capital G. Those afflicted mourn the loss of a specific species, falling deeper until they commit suicide. I found the premise and story compelling. The writing in this novella was excellent. At times, it read like a fairytale, but one with depth and reflection. Other times, it was more casual. Scientific words and concepts were artfully woven in. There was a sort of folklore-ish quality to the story itself, with events seeming a little unreal or larger than life. But I think that worked well in the framework of a shorter novella length story. We are not given a specific year the story takes place and some other specifics are glossed over, which seemed appropriate and fitting for the feel of the story. Overall, I enjoyed the novella. However, it did feel like there were a few too many themes and ideas to be tied together within the scope of the story. There was the issue of extinction and climate change, a divorce, the fairytale element as well as the direct mentions of or comparisons to fairytales throughout, then there was Grief and its instantiations. Colonization was also brought up a few times and though it was clearly related to themes of the story, I don't think it was given its due, especially for such a weighty topic. It did seem the novella tried to bring these ideas together on the common thread of human nature and human selfishness, but it didn't seem fully wrought. I'd still recommend this speculative tale for its unique story and take on the effects of humanity on the rest of nature. I received this as an e-ARC from Netgalley.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Abriana

    I’m going to keep this review brief, a short review for a short book. This novella was a disappointment for me. I haven’t read a ton of what I’m now seeing called climate fiction. I really don’t even read a lot of science fiction, so I was prepared to feel a little out of my element here. I went in with an open mind, truly I tried to. Unfortunately, I found this book extremely confusing the whole way through. There are some great concepts here. I love the idea of Grief being this specific iterat I’m going to keep this review brief, a short review for a short book. This novella was a disappointment for me. I haven’t read a ton of what I’m now seeing called climate fiction. I really don’t even read a lot of science fiction, so I was prepared to feel a little out of my element here. I went in with an open mind, truly I tried to. Unfortunately, I found this book extremely confusing the whole way through. There are some great concepts here. I love the idea of Grief being this specific iteration of depression in an age of colossal climate failure. That was really interesting to see talked about. I enjoyed the storyline of people trying to resurrect plants and animals and biospheres that were lost, with middling success. This should have been really compelling, but again, the actual storytelling was a huge letdown. I felt like I was reading snippets from a much longer book. I think this really lacked a lot of exposition and transition pieces. I was frequently having to flip back trying to orient where we were or who certain characters were, sometimes without finding any explanation. I couldn’t focus on the writing at all because there was such a lack of comprehension as to what was happening. There were some scenes and descriptions that felt promising which is why I say I feel like I was missing parts of the book. Had the entire book been fleshed out in that way, I think it could have been really strong. Were it not for the unique premise and these small bits of promise, I'd probably be giving this one star instead of two. I don’t want to harp on this too badly. I can see from other reviews that it really did work for some people, but I’m sad to say it didn’t work for me. Thank you Stelliform Press and NetGalley for an e-arc. CW: suicide, depression, self harm, minor body horror

  22. 4 out of 5

    Littlebookterror

    An absolutely fascinating musing on climate change, the loss of species, eco-anxiety and how to cope with it all. This novella packs a punch. In a way, this felt all too real. Learning about a new species that just died, art projects trying to mimic nature, controversial genetic enterprises. Having the contrast of Ruby, whose jellyfish are doing more than just fine with the changing weather, in contrast to her friend Marjorie who is mourning the loss of the Great Barrier Reef, makes it clear there An absolutely fascinating musing on climate change, the loss of species, eco-anxiety and how to cope with it all. This novella packs a punch. In a way, this felt all too real. Learning about a new species that just died, art projects trying to mimic nature, controversial genetic enterprises. Having the contrast of Ruby, whose jellyfish are doing more than just fine with the changing weather, in contrast to her friend Marjorie who is mourning the loss of the Great Barrier Reef, makes it clear there is no hidden agenda or secret conspiracy concerning climate change. It's neutral in its destruction without being malicious. What is more important is how the characters react to it. Ruby kind of got lucky. But she is affected by what is happening and her helplessness is mirrored by so many people around her; it's infectious. Literally. Grief is a new illness that is slowly taking over the world. And it doesn't stop there. Ruby lost a friend, she's currently getting a divorce – life is still happening, falling apart and changing in this new world and she can do little else but go along. We meet many different people who show very different coping strategies. Sorrow, apathy, anger; it's the same emotions and reactions we encounter when we talk about climate change in real life. It explores a heavy topic and Cade does not hold back. But there is something about this story that feels hopeful and encouranges you to think of a better future. I received an advanced reading copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lorna Vivi

    This novella is the best text I have read so far this year, it is so unique and fantastical yet at the same time the themes it hits on are so relevant, and the Grief could easily become a reality, it has a depth and realness to it. The narrative explores the emotional and mental impact of full blown climate crisis/disaster on people, the depression, loss as well as the sense of guilt that our deep seated biophillia causes when we have to face what we've done to the planet and ourselves. However This novella is the best text I have read so far this year, it is so unique and fantastical yet at the same time the themes it hits on are so relevant, and the Grief could easily become a reality, it has a depth and realness to it. The narrative explores the emotional and mental impact of full blown climate crisis/disaster on people, the depression, loss as well as the sense of guilt that our deep seated biophillia causes when we have to face what we've done to the planet and ourselves. However from this starting point and the musings of the protagonist we are unexpectedly taken on an extraordinary journey with many twists and turns. I honestly just disappeared into the writing, the honest rawness of the confessional tone in the narrator, mixed with vibrant descriptions of an often surreal world and hauntingly weird characters. The ending does let the book down a little but as I was reading it, it felt more like the author was exploring this scenario and that the ending was not the main purpose, instead it was the experiences and questions that were raised in a narrative that refused to be easily defined. The author covered many dark topics such as suicide, mental health, colonialism, ecological devastation and even questioned environmental movements such as conservation. A deeply haunting experience I recommend to anyone who loves good literature that asks important questions.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lexi Denee

    I just finished this novella with absolute chills. *A huge thank you to Netgalley, Octavia Cade, and Stelliform Press for an eARC of this novella in exchange for honest feedback* Octavia Cade has crafted an amazing story here in just 82 pages. Grief as an insidious, physical manifestation would be terrifying enough. To add in a completely ravaged world, wrought with extinction really took it to the next level. This was not an easy story to read, but one that I feel people SHOULD read. It hits on th I just finished this novella with absolute chills. *A huge thank you to Netgalley, Octavia Cade, and Stelliform Press for an eARC of this novella in exchange for honest feedback* Octavia Cade has crafted an amazing story here in just 82 pages. Grief as an insidious, physical manifestation would be terrifying enough. To add in a completely ravaged world, wrought with extinction really took it to the next level. This was not an easy story to read, but one that I feel people SHOULD read. It hits on the selfishness of humans, and how self-interest protects us from what we don't want to see. In The Impossible Resurrection of Grief, people become infected with "Grief" when they can't accept the loss of a species, an ecosystem, a creature. The main character, Ruby, is "lucky" to be enamored with jellyfish - which are thriving under the climate crisis conditions. Meanwhile, the people around her who have loved and lost creatures and ecosystems are falling victim to grief, sometimes with elaborate consequences. "We learn to protect ourselves in the ugliest of ways. Perhaps I should have asked, but sorrow is so terrifying." "Grief wouldn't allow any different. It was mourning down to the marrow, the inability to let go of what had been cut away." I found this story to be downright scary at certain points and the race to the end when I couldn't put it down left me with a growing sinking feeling. Huge props to Octavia Cade for what she has done with this one!

  25. 4 out of 5

    andi

    🠖 2.5 stars 🠖 cw: (view spoiler)[ mental illness, suicide, self-harm, grief, depression (hide spoiler)] while this short novella talks about an important topic, it didn't do as much as it could've done. it lacks in plot, as the book is essentially a bunch of scenes that are very loosely tied. the ending especially was very confusing and abrupt. i did, however, found the book disturbing, since this could be our world in the near future. i loved the descriptions of grief and how the topics of depres 🠖 2.5 stars 🠖 cw: (view spoiler)[ mental illness, suicide, self-harm, grief, depression (hide spoiler)] while this short novella talks about an important topic, it didn't do as much as it could've done. it lacks in plot, as the book is essentially a bunch of scenes that are very loosely tied. the ending especially was very confusing and abrupt. i did, however, found the book disturbing, since this could be our world in the near future. i loved the descriptions of grief and how the topics of depression and suicide were handled. i also really enjoyed the commentary of how usually people only care for things that are personal to them, that affect them directly and not so much about the bigger picture. the characters weren't developed well and i didn't connect with them at all. the story of the sea witch wasn't explored well enough and i simply didn't understand her role in the story. as i said before, the book is finished abruptly. the MC's inner conflict wasn't resolved, so the book simply cut off with no proper ending. it also has no actual climax point, essentially very little happens and what does happen, isn't explored further. overall, i think this would have worked better as a longer novel, rather than a short story. i still recommend it, it just wasn't my cup of tea. thank you to netgalley for providing an ARC in exchange for an honest review!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tessa Palfrey

    TW: Suicide This was an odd little book that I just don’t think I was smart enough for. I love science-y books, and books with a touch of the surreal, so the description immediately caught my attention. Also- jellyfish. The first thing that I DO feel qualified to comment on- the cover is absolutely gorgeous- so kudos to the designer for that! Now for the book: Definitely an interesting idea- taking grief caused by ecological losses resulting from climate change and human apathy and turning it into…. TW: Suicide This was an odd little book that I just don’t think I was smart enough for. I love science-y books, and books with a touch of the surreal, so the description immediately caught my attention. Also- jellyfish. The first thing that I DO feel qualified to comment on- the cover is absolutely gorgeous- so kudos to the designer for that! Now for the book: Definitely an interesting idea- taking grief caused by ecological losses resulting from climate change and human apathy and turning it into….. almost a pandemic?? And one that typically leads to suicide? There’s some dark and twisty science/art/conspiracy here. It’s a good story, but I got a bit lost with the dialogue. When conversation trends toward the esoteric, I tend to tune out a bit. But that’s on me and my preferences, not the stylistic choices of the author. Otherwise, the writing is solid and moves the story along at a pretty good pace. My one tiny complaint is that I’m not sure a book under 100 pages has enough room for the word “prevaricate” to be used as many times as it was here. To sum up? A very creative story, a super-smart author, a less smart reader- but will definitely look out for anything Cade writes in the future. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the review copy!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chantal Lyons

    This story started out wonderfully. The author has clearly done her research, and the science felt far more mature and considered than a lot of what I've been finding in literary fiction of late. I could clearly see the scenes; the lake of golden jellyfish, the abandoned pool, the wilds of Tasmania. Unfortunately, despite a growing sense of mystery and unease, the story did not deliver. I know it's unfashionable to deliver a clear-cut ending, but there's a difference between giving your reader so This story started out wonderfully. The author has clearly done her research, and the science felt far more mature and considered than a lot of what I've been finding in literary fiction of late. I could clearly see the scenes; the lake of golden jellyfish, the abandoned pool, the wilds of Tasmania. Unfortunately, despite a growing sense of mystery and unease, the story did not deliver. I know it's unfashionable to deliver a clear-cut ending, but there's a difference between giving your reader something, and giving them nothing. In the case of this novella, I was taken aback that the next page took me to the Acknowledgements. There wasn't any sense of an ending or a conclusion; the narrator's introspection was still unformed, too vague. Neither did her actions feel at all believable (would you just do nothing about the fact that you'd met a thylacine?). It was as if the novella couldn't decide if it wanted to paint future possibilities (the Grief) or be an exercise in pure surrealism. (With thanks to Stelliform Press and NetGalley for this ebook in exchange for an honest review)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eule Luftschloss

    trigger warning (view spoiler)[ mental illness, grief, trauma, suicide (hide spoiler)] Climate crisis has reached the point at which only a few animals and plants are still in existence, and the humans responded with Grief, capital G. If you have it, you'll carry it with you the rest of your life. Nobody knows why some people get it and others don't. The setting is creepy in this one-day-it-might-be-us way. In this short novella, the author explores the impact of thus big a change on the human min trigger warning (view spoiler)[ mental illness, grief, trauma, suicide (hide spoiler)] Climate crisis has reached the point at which only a few animals and plants are still in existence, and the humans responded with Grief, capital G. If you have it, you'll carry it with you the rest of your life. Nobody knows why some people get it and others don't. The setting is creepy in this one-day-it-might-be-us way. In this short novella, the author explores the impact of thus big a change on the human mind, the knowledge of you could have changed it but you didn't do enough, we didn't do enough, that drives some people literally mad. I don't want to say too much on the actual plot, because you see, even for a novella this is a short one and there is not much to say. I am afraid I'd spoil things. This was eerily haunting, so much so that I decided to quit and go to sleep even though I only had 25 pages left. It was too much to experience directly before sleeping. I am sure my mind will come back to this often. The arc was provided by the publisher.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Set in a futuristic (but not unbelievable) world where climate change has decimated the Great Barrier Reef among other things and where humans are plagued by The Grief, this story is poignant and so very sad. The Grief is an interesting plague as humans are finally aware of their part in destroying the earth and it’s creatures. The grief of all they have lost and miss eventually leads to suicide or worse as we find out later. I’ve never read anything quite like this. The social commentary was rel Set in a futuristic (but not unbelievable) world where climate change has decimated the Great Barrier Reef among other things and where humans are plagued by The Grief, this story is poignant and so very sad. The Grief is an interesting plague as humans are finally aware of their part in destroying the earth and it’s creatures. The grief of all they have lost and miss eventually leads to suicide or worse as we find out later. I’ve never read anything quite like this. The social commentary was relevant and the real terror was that this world didn’t seem like some far-fetched sci-fi creation; instead it felt like a world that is slightly familiar. One that doesn’t seem all that far in the future. The storytelling, world building and characters all had me completely immersed. Would I be able to withstand the Grief? Or would the demolition of all those beautiful creatures cause me to fall into a pit of despair? I hope I never have to find out!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    Thank you to NetGalley and Stelliform Press for the ARC “Can you watch something die and let it die?” I was, of course, drawn to this book by the cover like so many others. This was a fascinating read, albeit too short. The author turns Grief (capital G) into something more, something deeper than depression but often treated the same way (mostly by ignoring it). The book itself takes place in the not too distant future where climate change has become unignorable, and examines the consequences of o Thank you to NetGalley and Stelliform Press for the ARC “Can you watch something die and let it die?” I was, of course, drawn to this book by the cover like so many others. This was a fascinating read, albeit too short. The author turns Grief (capital G) into something more, something deeper than depression but often treated the same way (mostly by ignoring it). The book itself takes place in the not too distant future where climate change has become unignorable, and examines the consequences of our ignorance now on our future. The fact that it was written in lockdown when the world was missing so much of nature makes it even more profound. I would have loved to know more about the minor characters in this book. Grams and Darren, specifically. Also, I’ve always hated jellyfish, but this author turns them into something almost beautiful and magical. So for that alone, alone, I’d recommend it.

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