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The Complete Guide to Absolutely Everything (Abridged): Adventures in Math and Science

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Unlike the rest of life on the planet (as far as we know), humans have evolved with an insatiable desire to make sense of the world around us. Our senses are not equipped to see the universe as it is, and routinely let us down in that quest—the world appears flat, the stars seem fixed in the heavens. That is why we invented math and science—the ultimate toolkit to explain Unlike the rest of life on the planet (as far as we know), humans have evolved with an insatiable desire to make sense of the world around us. Our senses are not equipped to see the universe as it is, and routinely let us down in that quest—the world appears flat, the stars seem fixed in the heavens. That is why we invented math and science—the ultimate toolkit to explain how the world really works. In this book, mathematician Hannah Fry and geneticist Adam Rutherford investigate everyday mysteries (does your dog love you?) alongside the burning questions of time, space, and the origin of the universe. What will the end of the world look like, and when will it happen? What is time, and where does it come from? Approaching these questions and more with science and math rigorous and playful, Rutherford and Fry celebrate the weirdness of the cosmos, and reveal its secrets along the way.


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Unlike the rest of life on the planet (as far as we know), humans have evolved with an insatiable desire to make sense of the world around us. Our senses are not equipped to see the universe as it is, and routinely let us down in that quest—the world appears flat, the stars seem fixed in the heavens. That is why we invented math and science—the ultimate toolkit to explain Unlike the rest of life on the planet (as far as we know), humans have evolved with an insatiable desire to make sense of the world around us. Our senses are not equipped to see the universe as it is, and routinely let us down in that quest—the world appears flat, the stars seem fixed in the heavens. That is why we invented math and science—the ultimate toolkit to explain how the world really works. In this book, mathematician Hannah Fry and geneticist Adam Rutherford investigate everyday mysteries (does your dog love you?) alongside the burning questions of time, space, and the origin of the universe. What will the end of the world look like, and when will it happen? What is time, and where does it come from? Approaching these questions and more with science and math rigorous and playful, Rutherford and Fry celebrate the weirdness of the cosmos, and reveal its secrets along the way.

30 review for The Complete Guide to Absolutely Everything (Abridged): Adventures in Math and Science

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Brilliant. Not only did it expand my mind, it generated enhanced levels of chuckles, sniggers and explosive laughter. Adam and Hannah combined have such extensive expertise, but are equally kind inclusive and hilariously human. Buy one for yourself and a mathematically affordable increased number for loved ones.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    This book was fantastic!!! Full of fascinating facts as well as laugh out loud moments. I love Adam and Hannah’s radio show and felt like I could practically hear their voices narrating this book as I read. 10/10 would recommend!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lalo Hinojosa Palma

    I had a blast reading this book! Even for people who is very scietific literate, the way Fry and Rutherford explain the scientific quest is unique! It is so fun, but also so informative and insighful. I truly believe that if science (at least in my country, Mexico) was taught the way Fry and Rutherford teach it in their book, schools, unis and colleges would be enjoyable places and not the tedoius buildings most people believe they are. Thanks for the laughs and the knowledge Fry and Rutherford!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rory Parle

    Amusingly written and the authors' personalities come through, but this is a very light book and, as is unfortunately the case with a lot of pop science, it seems to assume you've never read any science before. Amusingly written and the authors' personalities come through, but this is a very light book and, as is unfortunately the case with a lot of pop science, it seems to assume you've never read any science before.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Dan Sharp

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is a very good book. Hannah & Adam seem to have had a lot of fun writing it. There are lots of witty puns. It also attempts to answer the most important question humans have ever asked. Does my dog love me?

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    'Forget all you know or think you know; all you require is your intuition' turns out that's bad advice (Thanks High Aldwin) as human intuition is genuinely a terrible tool. But don't take my word for it as scientists Adam Rutherford and Hannah Fry have released Rutherford and Fry's Complete Guide to Absolutely Everything to show us why; 'reality is not what it seems; but if you're ready and willing to set off in search of it, then this is your guide.' The truth bombing duo's approach to prese 'Forget all you know or think you know; all you require is your intuition' turns out that's bad advice (Thanks High Aldwin) as human intuition is genuinely a terrible tool. But don't take my word for it as scientists Adam Rutherford and Hannah Fry have released Rutherford and Fry's Complete Guide to Absolutely Everything to show us why; 'reality is not what it seems; but if you're ready and willing to set off in search of it, then this is your guide.' The truth bombing duo's approach to presenting science is enjoyably informal, enthused with the joys of science and chocked full of nerdy humour, pop culture references and a slight edge of sardonic criticism that strays perilously close to scientists trying hard to be cool n hip. The good Doctors' talents for making science relatable and fun is immense and the informalness of the guide hides (mostly) the hard science so we the reader don't have to strain ourselves understanding the complexities we gave up on in high school. Simply relax and marvel at the astute knowledge offered that may help us understand our little world a little bit better. The cogitating pair enlighten the reader on a range of important sciencey questions, facts and preconceptions, such as how spheres aren't all that spherey, what aliens look like; neither small grey and probey nor actors in alien suits. Aliens may well look like whales, have many legs, be winged and be colourful but odds aren't in bipedal hominids favour. Now we've all heard of Leap Years but did you know about Leap Seconds? And if you ever felt that some days just seem longer, that's because they fucking physically are, well by a few minutes or seconds at least. Which is better than millions of years ago when a year was 420 days long! In the far future a year will be quite a few days less! And what's Coral actually got to do with this? Besides it's all relativity anyway. Time is as confusing as my ranting, but this handy guide is well worth a read for a proper explanation! The science enthused double act range far and wide, discussing maths, science, history, unravelling the mysteries as they go. Not only do they give some surprising answers but they also illustrate the hows and whys, offering examples as to why these answers are important, effects! Consequences! And all that deep meaningful stuff. A chapter may start with asking about something fundamental like humanity's capacity for free will. But the answers are found through the Many World's Theory, having arrived there via Hypnotic Mind Control Zombification Hexes and the parasitic castrator (a rejected Harry Potter title), with a diversion through late-nineteenth century French philosophy and the Gwyneth Paltrow film Sliding Doors, including a biting remark around her vagina scented candles...ohh edgy...in a middle-class middle aged well renowned scientists kind of way... The insanely knowledgeable twosome really do make science a hoot though, and reading Rutherford and Fry's Complete Guide to Absolutely Everything* *Abridged I find I am literally dumbfounded by truths or err science. A shame it’s abridged I’m going need a bigger book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barnaby Richardson

    Loved it, felt exhilarating from start to finish. Found myself transported to some bonkers world filled with amazement continuously. Could be that I'm just really thick and have a severe lack of general scientific knowledge, but either way it was fast paced and full of points for talking and contemplating. Loved it, felt exhilarating from start to finish. Found myself transported to some bonkers world filled with amazement continuously. Could be that I'm just really thick and have a severe lack of general scientific knowledge, but either way it was fast paced and full of points for talking and contemplating.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Andy Parkes

    I'm a fan of Hannah and Adam's podcast so was keen to check this out. It's written very much in the style of the podcast so if you're a fan of that you'll likely enjoy this. Covers a broad array of big topics in an easily digestible manner (there is a ton of references for further reading at the back of the book) Very enjoyable I'm a fan of Hannah and Adam's podcast so was keen to check this out. It's written very much in the style of the podcast so if you're a fan of that you'll likely enjoy this. Covers a broad array of big topics in an easily digestible manner (there is a ton of references for further reading at the back of the book) Very enjoyable

  9. 4 out of 5

    Simon Piman

    Quite brilliant. Amusing and witty (nothing more than I expected being an avid listener of the podcast), two brilliant minds making the complex understandable to the layman. I cannot do anything but recommend this book to any curious minds.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mairead

    Fun, fascinating!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    Enjoyable, but I feel like it was somehow a bit fluffy; not much jumped out and made me go oo!. It's a very conversational book, and I think I'd have liked a clearer delineation between the authors. Enjoyable, but I feel like it was somehow a bit fluffy; not much jumped out and made me go oo!. It's a very conversational book, and I think I'd have liked a clearer delineation between the authors.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Akash Das

    A very good funny and informative book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marian Leica

    It hasn't been 'everything', obviously, but it's been a good read. It hasn't been 'everything', obviously, but it's been a good read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Caro

    4.5

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Todd

    Loved it! It's really informative, and loads of chuckles would recommend. Loved it! It's really informative, and loads of chuckles would recommend.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Joe White

    If you listen to the Rutherford and Fry podcast, then the audiobook edition of this will be the perfect accompaniment, albeit slightly more technical.

  17. 4 out of 5

    John

    Funny and fascinating in equal measures. Recommended.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ivan

    Very nerdy and jolly

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nick Wilks

  20. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  21. 4 out of 5

    Les Walker

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ben Bryans

  23. 4 out of 5

    Victor

  24. 5 out of 5

    Primoz

  25. 5 out of 5

    Wesley Best

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pip

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sencer Berrak

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul Smith

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Ralph Whittaker

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