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Requeening: Poems

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A collection of poetry from the 2020 winner of the National Poetry Series, selected by Ocean Vuong Engaging the matriarchal structure of the beehive, Amanda Moore explores the various roles a woman plays in the family, the home, and the world at large. Beyond the productivity and excess, the sweetness and sting, Requeening brings together poems of motherhood and daughterhoo A collection of poetry from the 2020 winner of the National Poetry Series, selected by Ocean Vuong Engaging the matriarchal structure of the beehive, Amanda Moore explores the various roles a woman plays in the family, the home, and the world at large. Beyond the productivity and excess, the sweetness and sting, Requeening brings together poems of motherhood and daughterhood, an evolving relationship of care and tending, responsibility and joy, dependence and deep love. The poems that anchor this collection don’t shy away from the inevitability of a hive’s collapse and consider the succession of “requeening” a hive as “a new heart ready to be fed and broken and fed again.” The collapse is both physical—there are poems of illness and recovery—and emotional, as the mother-daughter relationship shifts, the daughter becoming separate, whole, and poised to displace. The liminal spaces these poems traverse in human relationships is echoed in a range of poetic and hybrid form, offering freedom and stricture as they contemplate the way we hold one another in love and grief. Requeening is a vivid and surprising collection of poems from a winner of the National Poetry Series Open Competition. 


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A collection of poetry from the 2020 winner of the National Poetry Series, selected by Ocean Vuong Engaging the matriarchal structure of the beehive, Amanda Moore explores the various roles a woman plays in the family, the home, and the world at large. Beyond the productivity and excess, the sweetness and sting, Requeening brings together poems of motherhood and daughterhoo A collection of poetry from the 2020 winner of the National Poetry Series, selected by Ocean Vuong Engaging the matriarchal structure of the beehive, Amanda Moore explores the various roles a woman plays in the family, the home, and the world at large. Beyond the productivity and excess, the sweetness and sting, Requeening brings together poems of motherhood and daughterhood, an evolving relationship of care and tending, responsibility and joy, dependence and deep love. The poems that anchor this collection don’t shy away from the inevitability of a hive’s collapse and consider the succession of “requeening” a hive as “a new heart ready to be fed and broken and fed again.” The collapse is both physical—there are poems of illness and recovery—and emotional, as the mother-daughter relationship shifts, the daughter becoming separate, whole, and poised to displace. The liminal spaces these poems traverse in human relationships is echoed in a range of poetic and hybrid form, offering freedom and stricture as they contemplate the way we hold one another in love and grief. Requeening is a vivid and surprising collection of poems from a winner of the National Poetry Series Open Competition. 

49 review for Requeening: Poems

  1. 4 out of 5

    W.J. Herbert

    The speaker of Amanda Moore’s collection is fully realized and unflinchingly honest: a woman who, in meditating on the natural world, motherhood, and mortality, embodies our raptures, griefs, and frailties. The collection’s first poem, “Opening the Hive” is a particularly fine introduction to themes its speaker will explore, as it concludes “Like late afternoon sunlight, a kiss/on my dented forehead, mother collapsed and emptied// of poison, barbed stinger, and the baby, the jelly, the bee.” In The speaker of Amanda Moore’s collection is fully realized and unflinchingly honest: a woman who, in meditating on the natural world, motherhood, and mortality, embodies our raptures, griefs, and frailties. The collection’s first poem, “Opening the Hive” is a particularly fine introduction to themes its speaker will explore, as it concludes “Like late afternoon sunlight, a kiss/on my dented forehead, mother collapsed and emptied// of poison, barbed stinger, and the baby, the jelly, the bee.” In varied forms including sonnet and haibun, poems in Requeening celebrate life’s richness and depth, the poet’s skill everywhere in evidence. Don’t miss reading this wonderful collection!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Brooke Stouffer

    Thank you to Ecco Books, Amanda Moore, and NetGalley for this eARC copy of REQUEENING (Pub date: 10/26/21) The poems in REQUEENING center themselves around motherhood, women’s roles, illness, death, grief and more. These themes often weave themselves around bee metaphors in the poetry. As it is with most poetry books, there were some poems that I was more drawn to than others in this collection. My favorite was the poem BAD AT BEES, where the author relates an artist who puts broken figurines int Thank you to Ecco Books, Amanda Moore, and NetGalley for this eARC copy of REQUEENING (Pub date: 10/26/21) The poems in REQUEENING center themselves around motherhood, women’s roles, illness, death, grief and more. These themes often weave themselves around bee metaphors in the poetry. As it is with most poetry books, there were some poems that I was more drawn to than others in this collection. My favorite was the poem BAD AT BEES, where the author relates an artist who puts broken figurines into bee hives to her own life. I did find some of the other poems to be confusing, and it was difficult for me to tell if the order of the poems was supposed to reflect a linear timeline or a singular story. I never understood what was happening in a narrative sense (which I’m not sure if that was intended by the author or not). However, the writing is so thoughtful and beautiful on each of these poems, and I think that they could be relatable to many. There are many trigger warnings though, notably: death, chronic illness, grief, struggles in motherhood.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katharine

    3.5 stars I have read much better poetry, but one specific poem sticks with me, about a real artist who places broken objects in a beehive, and takes them back out with comb in the empty spaces. It touched me, and if all of the poems made sense like that I would have rated it 4.5.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura Vogt

    "the sands her entry the messy record my grandmother keeps: a family in objects. All the things and none of their stories: the deeds we did to get them, what we kept and what we stole, this past we’ve made from pilfered dust." A collection that goes all the way to the horizon and down into the earth. Poems ruminating on family, ancestry, life. Moore traces the relationships of women, though birth, sickness, and death, relationships with mothers, daughters, grandmothers, and long-distant, unmet aunts. "the sands her entry the messy record my grandmother keeps: a family in objects. All the things and none of their stories: the deeds we did to get them, what we kept and what we stole, this past we’ve made from pilfered dust." A collection that goes all the way to the horizon and down into the earth. Poems ruminating on family, ancestry, life. Moore traces the relationships of women, though birth, sickness, and death, relationships with mothers, daughters, grandmothers, and long-distant, unmet aunts. Through long, winding poems she showcases the blood and the joys and the agonies of motherhood. I enjoyed how the poems lept around from birth to toddler to teenager, then back again to nursing. Moore expertly, with vivid, brutal details, exposes the rawness of being a mother, of practically losing your own body. She captures seemingly small moments of one's life and teases out the thoughts lurking underneath. There are hints of her love and her marriage, but this collection is mostly surrounding female relationships: it could be expressed as an ancestry of motherhood. I enjoyed the framing of bees and honey.  It reminded me of THE HONEY MONTH but with an earthier, more in-this-world feel. "I hate how I sound when I say things like “Yeah, I keep bees in my backyard,”or “Yeah, I surf most mornings,”“Yeah, I’m a poet,”as if I’m any good at any of it. I don’t really know what I’m doing most days. I just like to touch fear."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erelah

    Requeening by Amanda Moore is an amazingly vivid collection that explores the various roles a woman might play through their life. With a unique poetic writing style and colorful imagery, Requeening was a delight to read. While not all poems were about bees specifically, you could see how the author perfectly intertwined womanhood with the structure of a beehive. Moore has a very classical poetic style, essay like and lyrical, leading to a mixture of long (sometimes hard-to-catch) poems and shor Requeening by Amanda Moore is an amazingly vivid collection that explores the various roles a woman might play through their life. With a unique poetic writing style and colorful imagery, Requeening was a delight to read. While not all poems were about bees specifically, you could see how the author perfectly intertwined womanhood with the structure of a beehive. Moore has a very classical poetic style, essay like and lyrical, leading to a mixture of long (sometimes hard-to-catch) poems and shorter, hard-hitting ones. A few times, I had trouble catching the meanings of poems, but poetry is very subjective so I don’t doubt that others would have had a much easier time. I still enjoyed this read very much. A section of the poems ended in what I believe to be (but could be wrong about) haikus, which was very interesting and definitely not in the norm. I had never read a Haibun until this collection came along. It was interesting to see a bunch of poetic styles I, a poetry reader, had never once heard of, and it made the collection all the more entertaining. That last poem specifically hit me hard. I think this was a nice, classical-vibes collection that will definitely suit the poetry market.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

    I picked up this book because of the bee cover & title. Unsurprisingly, the bee poems were my favorite. They were complex and interesting. The rest of the book was a bit disappointing. While Moore's craft is evident, I just didn't find many of the poems interesting and kept putting the book down. As a cancer survivor, I expected to love the poems about chemo/survival, but I just didn't find them having an interesting perspective. The themes of this collection are incredibly interesting: the cycl I picked up this book because of the bee cover & title. Unsurprisingly, the bee poems were my favorite. They were complex and interesting. The rest of the book was a bit disappointing. While Moore's craft is evident, I just didn't find many of the poems interesting and kept putting the book down. As a cancer survivor, I expected to love the poems about chemo/survival, but I just didn't find them having an interesting perspective. The themes of this collection are incredibly interesting: the cycle of life, growing, dying. I truly wish the bees were a stronger motif. Also, I realize I'm probably not the ideal audience for this collection; the motherhood poems fell flat for me. thanks to netgalley for the arc

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    A stunningly beautiful collection of poems on the body, parenthood, and bees. I loved these poems--they are carefully created, not a word out of place, and full of emotion and grace. The order of the poems, their forms, and the images and ideas they capture within those boundaries results in a collection I'd recommend to any reader. A stunningly beautiful collection of poems on the body, parenthood, and bees. I loved these poems--they are carefully created, not a word out of place, and full of emotion and grace. The order of the poems, their forms, and the images and ideas they capture within those boundaries results in a collection I'd recommend to any reader.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Magical. Vivid, precise language and description convey emotional truths that are nuanced, unpredictable, and weighty. There's gravitas as well as playfulness in the daring and varied choices the poet makes. Loved it. Magical. Vivid, precise language and description convey emotional truths that are nuanced, unpredictable, and weighty. There's gravitas as well as playfulness in the daring and varied choices the poet makes. Loved it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Amanda Moore uses a running (though not omnipresent) metaphor of honeybees, their queen, and the hive throughout her collection of poems entitled Requeening. How one responds to the collection will depend greatly on what one looks for in their poetry. If you like to poetry more on the “poetic” (we know it when we see it) spectrum between poetry and prose, this may not be the collection for you, as the poems are pretty prose-y. Pretty much all of them, but some more formally, as they take the str Amanda Moore uses a running (though not omnipresent) metaphor of honeybees, their queen, and the hive throughout her collection of poems entitled Requeening. How one responds to the collection will depend greatly on what one looks for in their poetry. If you like to poetry more on the “poetic” (we know it when we see it) spectrum between poetry and prose, this may not be the collection for you, as the poems are pretty prose-y. Pretty much all of them, but some more formally, as they take the structure of a haibun, a Japanese poem that combines a prose poem and a haiku. Here is a taste of the prose-heavy style: As teenagers, you would drive Illinois/ back roads to drink beer, make out,/ and talk about the places you would travel./ All that corn might have looked like future/ to the two of you, stretching and vast and topped/ with the bit of silk you imagine life grew into. Or Yet I don’t despise the bike that broke his leg/and dragged us into knowing. At night/when I replay in dreams the afternoon/that flipped us both to the curb, sick wail of ambulance/ and everything that followed, I don’t always say Stop./ Don’t be a jackass ... This isn’t to say Moore doesn’t make use of poetic tools (outside the haiku moments). She does, but they call less attention to themselves here. You still, for example, get the occasional alliterative like “husk of hive” or the consonance/alliteration of “too fat to fly” or the consonance/assonance of “mere metering are; a deception sheathed in steel.” But don’t look for a lot of rhyme or off-rhyme, or a lot of elliptical or compacted language. On the other hand, if you prefer your poetry more prose-like and more direct in its statements (not quite Billy Collins but close to that style), this would be a good choice. Metaphor, too, obviously is employed, as Moore keeps cycling back to those bees and in particular the queen, which is appropriate given the book’s arc itself deals with a female cycle of motherhood and woman-becoming, with a central focus on the relationship between the speaker and her daughter from birth to the teen years (though other women make appear as well). Grief as well rears its inevitable head, nicely foreshadowed by earlier moments where the speaker muses on mortality. The grief is followed, eventually, by recovery, which is partly at least how we arrive at the title. Moore has an honesty and complexity in her speaker’s views toward the relationships in her life, including motherhood, which is neither idealized nor presented as a horror show. Moments of tender love are followed (sometimes even immediately) by more fraught moments, as when the speaker wakes her tween daughter for school: “When her eyes flutter open, it is to scowl at me, but when she rides again toward the crest of sleep, she burrows toward me: her first comfort.” Always the push and the pull. I confess I do prefer my poetry more on the other end of the spectrum, but still I managed to highlight a number of lines that struck me either for their originality of language or their particular phasing of a sentiment/idea, lines like “the nave of me replete” or “the caul of her sleep.” Meanwhile, the narrative arc and thematic threadline enhanced the reading experience, making this an easy recommendation even if it’s not exactly my preference.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carter • carterscompendium

    actual rating: 2.5 stars rounded up, perfectly average reading experience I'd like to thank NetGalley, Amanda Moore, and Ecco (the publisher) for allowing me to have an advanced reader's copy in digital format for this book in exchange for an honest review. Wow. This was a rollercoaster, to say the least. Amanda Moore covers topics such as loss, hospitalization, stress & anxiety, and many, many bug facts throughout this collection of poems. This journey through life as expressed through her work i actual rating: 2.5 stars rounded up, perfectly average reading experience I'd like to thank NetGalley, Amanda Moore, and Ecco (the publisher) for allowing me to have an advanced reader's copy in digital format for this book in exchange for an honest review. Wow. This was a rollercoaster, to say the least. Amanda Moore covers topics such as loss, hospitalization, stress & anxiety, and many, many bug facts throughout this collection of poems. This journey through life as expressed through her work is unique and established over and over again through the selections you read. I'd like to say before beginning to break down my rating that upon finishing this, I'm not sure if I was the target audience for this work as someone who is about to enter their third year of undergrad. Reviews are biased pieces of work. Please take my review with a grain of salt, or even two, as some of the things discussed in this book very much did not align with my life experiences so far. +1: bug facts; if nothing else, the first ~half of this book does have some really cool bug facts, very likely as allegories for Moore's life or lives Moore has observed. -1: breakdown/structure; I did read this in a digital format, so I'm sure the structure of the actual poems will make much more sense once this is printed, but I really wasn't a fan of the overall sectioning and breakdown of the poems to begin with. I don't know what necessarily was wrong with it, it just wasn't to my taste. +1: short and sweet (mostly); most of the poems provided in this work were no longer than about a page, which is always nice when reading poetry. -1.5: stakler-y vibes?; I don't know how to explain this, but the poems when mentioning a child gave me very much stalker/helicopter parent/don't grow up yet vibes and I was really not about that. I don't have much explanation beyond that other than those poems gave me bad vibes. Like, I would have to stop reading for the day after reaching one of those poems bad vibes. +1: arc; I'm glad I received this as an arc, because I likely wouldn't have picked it up otherwise. Broadening horizons is always a good thing :) +1: use of literary devices; my creative writing professors would love this book, if not for it's slightly out-there content (in relevance to my life and experiences as a 19 year old) then for Moore's use of almost every poetic literary device in the book. I can almost guarantee that some of these will be used by professors in advanced poetry courses at different universities.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sydney Wilson

    I was reminded again while reading this that poetry is so subjective! Every reader will take something different from this collection, which is probably my favorite thing about poetry--it’s both universal and personal! I personally found this to be a collection of poems that says what it means. Though these selections are lyrical and evocative, I didn’t detect much metaphor or hidden meaning throughout. I didn’t spend a minute or two after reading the majority of these to think about what might h I was reminded again while reading this that poetry is so subjective! Every reader will take something different from this collection, which is probably my favorite thing about poetry--it’s both universal and personal! I personally found this to be a collection of poems that says what it means. Though these selections are lyrical and evocative, I didn’t detect much metaphor or hidden meaning throughout. I didn’t spend a minute or two after reading the majority of these to think about what might have *actually* been said because I felt it was already explained. These read almost like small snippets of stories or essays, all set on conveying events as they happened through a lens of beauty & emotion. I enjoyed reading Moore’s creative thoughts on various stages of womanhood, her snapshots of marriage and motherhood, her take on sickness and loss, and the importance of leaning into the changes we inevitably face as life continues moving forward. Thank you, NetGalley & Ecco Books, for the ARC!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Fair knowledge: I received an uncorrected proof of Requeening: Poems by Amanda Moore in a Goodreads giveaway. Amanda Moore takes the theme of beekeeping and weaves it into poems about a woman's life. I particularly like her poems about the relationship of a mother and daughter. There are also a number of poems about cancer and dying which affected me profoundly because my own mother died from cancer and because I had my own battle with breast cancer a number of years ago. Thanking God for healin Fair knowledge: I received an uncorrected proof of Requeening: Poems by Amanda Moore in a Goodreads giveaway. Amanda Moore takes the theme of beekeeping and weaves it into poems about a woman's life. I particularly like her poems about the relationship of a mother and daughter. There are also a number of poems about cancer and dying which affected me profoundly because my own mother died from cancer and because I had my own battle with breast cancer a number of years ago. Thanking God for healing me! Unconnected to either of those themes, the poem, "Sonnet While Killing a Chicken," made be both smile and grimace. I have read many types of books including poetry, but one word was new to me: Haibun. I had to look it up. "The haibun is the combination of two poems: a prose poem and haiku. The form was popularized by the 17th century Japanese poet Matsuo Basho." (Source: https://www.writersdigest.com/write-b...)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    This is an interesting collection of poetry, in various styles/formats, that portrays the cycle/path of a woman's life, struggles, illnesses, death, birthing, children, care giving, friendship.....sort of in relation to, or highlighted by a beehive's life. Poetry can be hard for me to appreciate sometimes, & I found the first few poems a bit challenging to see where this was going, but I found my way fairly quickly....& it all laid out in a direction that I could follow & understand, & came to a This is an interesting collection of poetry, in various styles/formats, that portrays the cycle/path of a woman's life, struggles, illnesses, death, birthing, children, care giving, friendship.....sort of in relation to, or highlighted by a beehive's life. Poetry can be hard for me to appreciate sometimes, & I found the first few poems a bit challenging to see where this was going, but I found my way fairly quickly....& it all laid out in a direction that I could follow & understand, & came to appreciate.....& in that, I think the author does really well! Yes.....I appreciated her view, the light she cast, on this look at life. I bet most women would find something to relate to or appreciate in these poems. I received an e-ARC from publisher Ecco/Harper Collins, via NetGalley, after offering to read it & post my own fair & honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Larissa Lee

    This collection is geared more toward people who I imagine like Emily Dickinson or Robert Frost - those classic kinds of poetry that are meant to be on paper. Compare that to the styles of slam or spoken word poetry, which reads on paper like it's meant to be said aloud. I don't enjoy poetry that leans to much toward prose, as if it's telling me a story that happens to be labeled as a poem - there's something about it feeling like an essay or journal entry that doesn't vibe with me. That said, p This collection is geared more toward people who I imagine like Emily Dickinson or Robert Frost - those classic kinds of poetry that are meant to be on paper. Compare that to the styles of slam or spoken word poetry, which reads on paper like it's meant to be said aloud. I don't enjoy poetry that leans to much toward prose, as if it's telling me a story that happens to be labeled as a poem - there's something about it feeling like an essay or journal entry that doesn't vibe with me. That said, poetry is subjective and these poems were eloquent and fit the theme described. Not my cup of tea, but you might like them if your tastes differ.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Troncquo

    The main reason why I picked up this book, is because I love bees, and the tittle and cover peaked my interest. Poetry is very subjective. You either will like and/or understand the poems, or you will not. I did not fully understand the meaning of all the poems, but I did enjoy most of them. They had something very lyrical, which I enjoyed a lot. This collection won’t be for everyone but I’d still recommend to give it a try. I got a free eArc of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    RyReads

    Really happy to have been given an introduction to Amanda Moore’s writing through “Requeening”. She talks about some difficult topics (loss of a loved one, her child growing up, cancer) with a lot of honesty. I connected most to her long pieces about her daughter; I find her longer works, those included, shined more than the rest of the book. 3 Stars

  17. 5 out of 5

    Allie

    Quite a few of these poems were incredible; I can see why they have "Selected by Ocean Vuong" on the cover. There were only a few I didn't care for. Quite a few of these poems were incredible; I can see why they have "Selected by Ocean Vuong" on the cover. There were only a few I didn't care for.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Haley Gaughan

  19. 5 out of 5

    Asher Ballon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  22. 5 out of 5

    Delia

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leanna

  24. 5 out of 5

    jade

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tatiana

  26. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rob

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  29. 4 out of 5

    Georgina Marie

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nora

  31. 4 out of 5

    Leo

  32. 5 out of 5

    mark mendoza

  33. 4 out of 5

    Alan

  34. 5 out of 5

    emma

  35. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  36. 5 out of 5

    Ren

  37. 5 out of 5

    Stapia Tapia

  38. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Marinelli

  39. 5 out of 5

    afewsocks

  40. 5 out of 5

    Jayme

  41. 5 out of 5

    Alex Helm

  42. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  43. 5 out of 5

    Court • Court.betweenthecovers

  44. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

  45. 5 out of 5

    Allie Marini

  46. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline

  47. 5 out of 5

    Dani Hopkins

  48. 5 out of 5

    Teresa Miller

  49. 4 out of 5

    Kim Pollack

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