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A Bigger Picture: My Fight to Bring a New African Voice to the Climate Crisis

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A manifesto and memoir about climate justice and how we can—and must—build a livable future for all, inclusive to all, by a rising star of the global climate movement Leading climate justice activist Vanessa Nakate brings her fierce, fearless spirit, new perspective, and superstar bona fides to the biggest issue of our time. In A Bigger Picture, her first book, she shares A manifesto and memoir about climate justice and how we can—and must—build a livable future for all, inclusive to all, by a rising star of the global climate movement Leading climate justice activist Vanessa Nakate brings her fierce, fearless spirit, new perspective, and superstar bona fides to the biggest issue of our time. In A Bigger Picture, her first book, she shares her story as a young Ugandan woman who sees that her community bears disproportionate consequences to the climate crisis. At the same time, she sees that activists from African nations and the global south are not being heard in the same way as activists from white nations are heard. Inspired by Sweden’s Greta Thunberg, in 2019 Nakate became Uganda’s first Fridays for Future protestor, awakening to her personal power and summoning within herself a commanding political voice.   Nakate’s mere presence has revealed rampant inequalities within the climate justice movement. In January 2020, while attending the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, as one of five international delegates, including Thunberg, Nakate’s image was cropped out of a photo by the Associated Press. The photo featured the four other activists, who were all white. It highlighted the call Nakate has been making all along: for both environmental and social justice on behalf of those who have been omitted from the climate discussion and who are now demanding to be heard.   From a shy little girl in Kampala to a leader on the world stage, A Bigger Picture is part rousing manifesto and part poignant memoir, and it presents a new vision for the climate movement based on resilience, sustainability, and genuine equity. 


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A manifesto and memoir about climate justice and how we can—and must—build a livable future for all, inclusive to all, by a rising star of the global climate movement Leading climate justice activist Vanessa Nakate brings her fierce, fearless spirit, new perspective, and superstar bona fides to the biggest issue of our time. In A Bigger Picture, her first book, she shares A manifesto and memoir about climate justice and how we can—and must—build a livable future for all, inclusive to all, by a rising star of the global climate movement Leading climate justice activist Vanessa Nakate brings her fierce, fearless spirit, new perspective, and superstar bona fides to the biggest issue of our time. In A Bigger Picture, her first book, she shares her story as a young Ugandan woman who sees that her community bears disproportionate consequences to the climate crisis. At the same time, she sees that activists from African nations and the global south are not being heard in the same way as activists from white nations are heard. Inspired by Sweden’s Greta Thunberg, in 2019 Nakate became Uganda’s first Fridays for Future protestor, awakening to her personal power and summoning within herself a commanding political voice.   Nakate’s mere presence has revealed rampant inequalities within the climate justice movement. In January 2020, while attending the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, as one of five international delegates, including Thunberg, Nakate’s image was cropped out of a photo by the Associated Press. The photo featured the four other activists, who were all white. It highlighted the call Nakate has been making all along: for both environmental and social justice on behalf of those who have been omitted from the climate discussion and who are now demanding to be heard.   From a shy little girl in Kampala to a leader on the world stage, A Bigger Picture is part rousing manifesto and part poignant memoir, and it presents a new vision for the climate movement based on resilience, sustainability, and genuine equity. 

30 review for A Bigger Picture: My Fight to Bring a New African Voice to the Climate Crisis

  1. 4 out of 5

    Pam

    Fantastic environmental activism report from Uganda. I appreciated Nakate's personal and national struggles to create/represent/grow an Ugandan climate activism channel in a place where you can be jailed for protesting. She figured out a way to navigate a system to allow her to make a real impact and build solidarity with the people who need climate change plans now. Fantastic environmental activism report from Uganda. I appreciated Nakate's personal and national struggles to create/represent/grow an Ugandan climate activism channel in a place where you can be jailed for protesting. She figured out a way to navigate a system to allow her to make a real impact and build solidarity with the people who need climate change plans now.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Jane

    See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits In common with thousands of people around the world, I first heard of Vanessa Nakate and her climate activism when Associated Press cropped her out of a photograph of five young climate activists gathered at Davos, Switzerland. That that cynical obliteration actually resulted in a global amplification of her voice is perhaps ironic, but as Nakate so eloquently argues throughout A Bigger Picture, the climate emergency movement needs us all to See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits In common with thousands of people around the world, I first heard of Vanessa Nakate and her climate activism when Associated Press cropped her out of a photograph of five young climate activists gathered at Davos, Switzerland. That that cynical obliteration actually resulted in a global amplification of her voice is perhaps ironic, but as Nakate so eloquently argues throughout A Bigger Picture, the climate emergency movement needs us all to listen to underrepresented Global South voices in order to truly understand the magnitude of the crisis being faced now. Western affluence still cushions us from climate change effects already devastating lives across Africa, Asia and Latin America, so the Global North wilfully overlooks their tragedies, still kidding ourselves that we have time to procrastinate, while activists such as Nakate can see clear evidence to the contrary within their countries and communities. I was impressed with how Nakate presents realistic intersectional actions needed to avert a rapidly worsening climate crisis. Its magnitude often has me overwhelmed, but I appreciated the clarity of Nakate's explanations and the way in which she uses both personal and more remote examples to illustrate her arguments for change. This multifaceted approach of demonstrating, of speaking out and of coordinating physical projects allows her to speak convincingly from her own experience and I felt my enthusiasm for activism rising with each chapter I read. A Bigger Picture is both a very personal memoir and an excellent guide for other fledgling activists or all ages, abilities and confidence levels - that last being an attribute with which I could strongly empathise.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Laura Hoffman Brauman

    Vanessa Nakate is a young climate activist from Uganda. As she was graduating from college, she became aware of the impact of climate change on her local community, her country, and her region. She recognized that she could start taking steps to bring attention to the issue in her home community and was inspired by the work of other activists from around the world. Like many others in the Global North, I first heard about Nakate’s work to bring attention to the climate emergency when she was cro Vanessa Nakate is a young climate activist from Uganda. As she was graduating from college, she became aware of the impact of climate change on her local community, her country, and her region. She recognized that she could start taking steps to bring attention to the issue in her home community and was inspired by the work of other activists from around the world. Like many others in the Global North, I first heard about Nakate’s work to bring attention to the climate emergency when she was cropped out of a picture with 4 white activists at a conference in Switzerland. The fact that the AP felt that it was ok to remove her from the photo highlights both the intersection of climate activism with other social justice issues from around the world as well as represents how often the Global South is left out of media attention to climate change. Despite having a lesser impact on the warming of the planet than many parts of the world, the Global South feels a disproportionate amount of the consequences. I appreciated Nakate’s fact-based approach to discussing climate change and it’s impact on the Global South. This is well-researched and she supports her assertions. There was a great deal in here I wasn’t aware of - information that isn’t being discussed in much of the media in the US. I also appreciated the way she incorporated the intersectionality of climate activism and other issues of social justice — again, an area where I learned a lot. This is an excellent read for anyone interested in learning more about the worldwide impact of climate change along with concrete ideas on how you can make a change. Excellent read from an important voice and perspective.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    I was introduced to Vanessa Nakate last year, as she entered the world stage as the activist who was cropped from the photo at the World Economic Forum at Davos, whilst her white peers were celebrated. She was the only Black woman, and also the only activist from Africa. A Bigger Picture: My Fight to Bring a New African Voice to the Climate Crisis by Vanessa Nakate is a memoir, as well as an insight into how climate activism takes place in Africa. I read the book as the UK prepares for the arrival I was introduced to Vanessa Nakate last year, as she entered the world stage as the activist who was cropped from the photo at the World Economic Forum at Davos, whilst her white peers were celebrated. She was the only Black woman, and also the only activist from Africa. A Bigger Picture: My Fight to Bring a New African Voice to the Climate Crisis by Vanessa Nakate is a memoir, as well as an insight into how climate activism takes place in Africa. I read the book as the UK prepares for the arrival of world leaders to COP 26, and hope that the calls from Nakate and other activists in what we call the Global South are met with the urgency these activists require. ***Thank you Netgalley and Pan MacMillan for this ARC in exchange for an honest review.*** Read my other reviews on my blog: https://www.elaineadupoku.com

  5. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

    finished a while ago, finally getting to review! Here we are, it's January and I've already read one of the most important books of this year. Vanessa Nakate is a Ugandan climate activist who I became aware of (like a lot of people) after the incident where the Associated Press cut her out of a picture with other climate activists in Davos. She was the only Black activist in the picture and the only one from Africa. In this book she uses this act of erasure and turns it into a an amplification of finished a while ago, finally getting to review! Here we are, it's January and I've already read one of the most important books of this year. Vanessa Nakate is a Ugandan climate activist who I became aware of (like a lot of people) after the incident where the Associated Press cut her out of a picture with other climate activists in Davos. She was the only Black activist in the picture and the only one from Africa. In this book she uses this act of erasure and turns it into a an amplification of her voice, exploring how she became an activist, the issues that her local community as well as Africa as a whole are facing with regards to climate change, and how it is all connected to other social justice issues and global structures of inequality. Following Nakate on social media, I realized that apart from generally knowing that the Global South was contributing the least to climate change but facing its impact the harshest, I didn't really have an idea of what the realities of people living in these most affected countries and areas was actually like. Vague abstract knowledge bits only get you so far. I wanted to actually be informed. How do people live in Uganda, what are they facing? And this book was so good at helping me recontextualize a lot of my knowledge about climate change in general, but also made me see a lot of relations of issues much more clearly and in more detail. And it also, as sappy as it may sound, made me think about the interconnectivity of all of us and the resilience of the human spirit and the ways in which I actually still have faith despite it all, and what I can do to help. First off I just want to say that the structure of the book was really well thought out, as it starts small with Nakate's journey to becoming an activist, which helps you get an authentic picture of the circumstances of her life. It then branches out to how this daily life of people is already affected by climate change in various ways, and then it widens out to a global perspective and to all of the other issues the climate crisis intersects with and the many ways and areas in which change needs to happen. It was very impactful to read, and Nakate's clear and concise way of exploring these questions is extremely well written. I also just gained a lot of admiration for her as a person. At the beginning she was literally out on her own striking in a country where demonstrations can be very dangerous, started doing climate education in elementary schools, then went to various foreign countries also all on her own and gave interviews and talks, and on top of that had to deal with all the bigotry and structural exclusion. And altough she has no problem admitting the toll activism sometimes takes on her, she still transports so much hope and such a bright vision of justice and a good future for all that it is practically impossible to read this and not be motivated - even with all the horribly bleak information in it! Of course, that information is also crucial. I'll just list a couple of things that this book explored that impacted how I think about climate change now: Most people in Uganda and other African countries rely on agriculture for their livelihood and their literal survival, so the state of the environment impacts them in the most direct way possible. Floods and droughts can destroy someone's basis for survival in the shortest amount of time. What is still a sort of distant threat to us is literal life and death for these people. Education isn't free in Uganda, so the first thing families do when they lose income because of e.g. environmental catastrophe, is stop sending their kids to school. So the right for education, which is so important for so many reasons, is also directly threatened by climate change. This issue is also directly related to women's rights, because another way to get money to get your family to, once again, literally survive, is the dowry for marriage. So underage girls getting married, most likely never getting an education and never being able to live independently, is what will happen more with future crises. The facts about the Congo rainforest and how quickly it's shrinking, mostly due to deforestation and mining of minerals, was shocking. There were many more instances when seeing dates like "by 2025" connected to some alarming fact made me realize time and again that this kind of large-scale devastation is just around the corner. Equally shocking though is the fact that I don't think I even heard of this forest before, and that non-information is a systemic problem. The dominance of the West regarding media focus and attention was starkly highlighted in the book. It actually shocked me when she mentioned that in 2020, even in Uganda's own media there was more of a focus on the wildfires in Australia and California than the (numerous!) disasters that were happening in their own country. I think that that is just such a strong illustration of how this cultural hegemony expresses the different values that are assigned to different lives, and the insidious ways white supremacy works through institutions like the media. Speaking of which, Nakate mentions how we need to re-think what "development" even means, and that made so many things click for me. Right now the model for development that a lot of leaders in African countries are following is "be like the West", which basically means rely on the exploitation of natural resources to create wealth. When Westerners are now calling for African countries that that is wrong and they need to "go green", it basically sends the message "we get to fuck up the world for our gain but not you!" Of course that doesn't mean that sustainability is not a goal that needs to happen everywhere, and Nakate calls on her own government to accept responsibility and act quickly multiple times. But it also means that Western countries have the responsbility to transfer resources, money, and technology to the Global South, because our systems created this crisis and also created the inequalities in who has the means to fix it. This was even written in some UN resolution but it's still not really acted upon. There was also this one example of an oil pipeline that is planned to cut through protected forest land, that some governments in Africa struck as a deal with a French oil company and a Chinese firm. That really illustrates well how the intersection of personal interest of local government elites and the interests of foreign investors create climate destruction (and also the direct destruction of the livelihoods of thousands of people.) It's this entanglement of global capitalism, structural inequality, and short-sighted self-interest. Amidst all these hard facts, though, there were also quotes from interviews that Nakate held with other climate activists from all around the world, most from the Global South, and these voices of hope and resilience mixed with the devastation of the reality of the situation really did something with how this book worked on me. Like I said earlier, it's motivating, but not in a cute inspirational way, more like.....a cry for action. Fists raised. Let's go, we only have this one chance. 5/5, this is one of those books I would recommend to absolutely anyone without any qualifications. I can guarantee that you'll want to read this, to see the most pressing issue of our time from the perspective of someone who intimately knows what's at stake, and what needs to be done to secure a future.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tutankhamun18

    A fantastic book by the Climate Activist Vanessa Nakate from Uganda called A Bigger Picture. If you are interested, I have attached two chapter highlights here. I found these chapters in particular very well written, providing a succinct overview and the human context (social) around topics such as climate change mitigation and adaptation and impact investing. It is not at all financial in content, but I thought you may be personally interested. Chapter 6: Uganda, climate change impacts, solar p A fantastic book by the Climate Activist Vanessa Nakate from Uganda called A Bigger Picture. If you are interested, I have attached two chapter highlights here. I found these chapters in particular very well written, providing a succinct overview and the human context (social) around topics such as climate change mitigation and adaptation and impact investing. It is not at all financial in content, but I thought you may be personally interested. Chapter 6: Uganda, climate change impacts, solar power, community effort, energy poverty, food poverty, education – Gives a great overview of the privileges we have in the western world when it comes to abstractly talking about implementing solar power and educating people about climate change. Chapter 7: Women, abuse, education, gender norms, education – Gives an overview of how privileged we are as women in the western world and many challenges women have to face in countries with cultural and societal barriers to women.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Usai

    I finished this non-fiction book in three days. The candid, conversational style of writing, and engaging tone of the author, made it feel like I was sitting with her while she was sharing her experiences, and eventual call to action. Written by Vanessa Nakate, a Ugandan climate activist, “A Bigger Picture” seeks to decolonize the climate change debate, through the inclusion of African voices. Did you know, that although the The majority of carbon emissions derive from the Global North, it is the I finished this non-fiction book in three days. The candid, conversational style of writing, and engaging tone of the author, made it feel like I was sitting with her while she was sharing her experiences, and eventual call to action. Written by Vanessa Nakate, a Ugandan climate activist, “A Bigger Picture” seeks to decolonize the climate change debate, through the inclusion of African voices. Did you know, that although the The majority of carbon emissions derive from the Global North, it is the Global South that is disproportionately affected and suffers as a result? Yes, we had disastrous floods that swept through parts of west Germany this year, and yes we had terrifying bushfires ravaging parts of Turkey and Greece and summer. But why is it that the world only sits up to to take notice when these things happen in the western hemisphere, when these climate change phenomenons have already been happening before and parts of Africa and South America? In her book, Nakate recalls when her image was cropped from a photo featuring five prominent, young, female climate change activists at a press conference in Davos. In her words, the Associated Press (AP) “didn’t just erase a photo. [They] erased a continent”. Thought provoking, and insightful, “A Bigger Picture” Not only discusses climate change, but it does so through the glaring lens of racism, and the insidious white washing of ecological activism. A must read. Thank you to Vanessa Nakate, PanMacmillan and Book Break UK for a copy of this ARC in return for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Minnie

    Nakate ist genau das, was ich mir von Foer gewünscht hätte. Genau das Buch, was ich über Aktivismus und Klimawandel hören wollte. Nakates Name war mir seit dem Crop-Out-Skandal bereits ein bekannter Name, aber was genau bei ihr hintersteckte, habe ich erst durch dieses Buch erfahren Bei so vielen Themen bin ich viel mehr im Klaren als vorher: ihren eigenen Weg zum Aktivismus, die politischen, gesellschaftlichen und klimabedingten Strukturen in Uganda sowie weiteren afrikanischen Ländern, der Kli Nakate ist genau das, was ich mir von Foer gewünscht hätte. Genau das Buch, was ich über Aktivismus und Klimawandel hören wollte. Nakates Name war mir seit dem Crop-Out-Skandal bereits ein bekannter Name, aber was genau bei ihr hintersteckte, habe ich erst durch dieses Buch erfahren Bei so vielen Themen bin ich viel mehr im Klaren als vorher: ihren eigenen Weg zum Aktivismus, die politischen, gesellschaftlichen und klimabedingten Strukturen in Uganda sowie weiteren afrikanischen Ländern, der Klimasituation weltweit, das Leiden der Natur und dem Kongo-Dschungel, der dringend gerettet werden muss. Nakate ist eine große Inspiration und dank ihr möchte ich mich definitiv weiter mit diesen wichtigen Themen befassen. Alles war hervorragend recherchiert und unglaublich viele weiter Aktivisten (teilweise unter 10 Jahre alt!) hat sie genannt. Auch, dass Südafrika am stärksten zu leiden hat, was die Folgen des Klimawandels angeht (in Form von Überflutungen, etc), obwohl es am wenigsten dafür verantwortlich ist und sich niemand auf der Welt dafür zu kümmern scheint. Ich bin froh, mit ihr meine erste richtige Klima-Reise begonnen zu haben. Folge ihr jetzt auf Instragram und hoffe mehr Inspiration zu finden.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Snorki

    Venessa is a young climate activist in Uganda, who was inspired by Greta Thunberg to start a strike movement in her own country. This grew in scale and attention and led her to being invited to some international forums to speak about the climate crisis (or climate emergency, which is her preferred term), including at Davos, where she - the only black person - was cropped out of a photo of young activists, leading to a social media storm, an apology from the Associated Press who did the cropped, Venessa is a young climate activist in Uganda, who was inspired by Greta Thunberg to start a strike movement in her own country. This grew in scale and attention and led her to being invited to some international forums to speak about the climate crisis (or climate emergency, which is her preferred term), including at Davos, where she - the only black person - was cropped out of a photo of young activists, leading to a social media storm, an apology from the Associated Press who did the cropped, and a fair amount of publicity. This book is not really about that incident though, although it clearly and understandably had an effect on her and others. Instead, it's about the impact that the climate emergency is having on Africa, something that is not widely reported in the international or Western press, and the work that she and others are trying to do, both to change policies and behaviours in Africa, and to ensure that Africa and its representatives get a voice in discussions about the climate emergency. It's thoughtful and well written and brings up a perspective that really doesn't have that much of a voice in many of the climate discussions and conferences and this is something that we need to address.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bianca Herzog

    Vanessa Nakate's A Bigger Picture is an outstanding and much-needed call to action on the climate emergency. Nakate's raw and poignant voice mixes personal experiences that drove her to climate activism as a young woman from Uganda and detailed information on the reality and extent of the effects of climate change worldwide. Nakate highlights the intersectional nature of the climate emergency, unpacking how gender, race, geography, and other factors impact people and the planet everywhere while Vanessa Nakate's A Bigger Picture is an outstanding and much-needed call to action on the climate emergency. Nakate's raw and poignant voice mixes personal experiences that drove her to climate activism as a young woman from Uganda and detailed information on the reality and extent of the effects of climate change worldwide. Nakate highlights the intersectional nature of the climate emergency, unpacking how gender, race, geography, and other factors impact people and the planet everywhere while disproportionately affecting those most vulnerable and marginalized. Leading by example, Nakate uses her platform to amplify the voices and work of other young climate activists, having interviewed several of her peers for A Bigger Picture. This manifesto-memoir is proof that ordinary people can do extraordinary things. We need such messages of hope to tackle the climate emergency and secure a (better) future for all

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tamsin

    What I hoped to gain from reading this book was a better idea of a blind spot (in certain countries) in the climate crisis conversation: Africa. The book does provide that to an extent, but also has a lot of detail about issues that anyone vaguely engaged with environmentalism will be most familiar with already (especially the start) and so may feel like preaching to the converted for some. That being said, there was a point made about UK carbon emissions targets that I haven't heard or considere What I hoped to gain from reading this book was a better idea of a blind spot (in certain countries) in the climate crisis conversation: Africa. The book does provide that to an extent, but also has a lot of detail about issues that anyone vaguely engaged with environmentalism will be most familiar with already (especially the start) and so may feel like preaching to the converted for some. That being said, there was a point made about UK carbon emissions targets that I haven't heard or considered before: in meeting its own targets, the UK may be simply shifting its carbon emissions elsewhere, such as by sending its old diesel vehicles overseas to poorer countries. Naturally that wouldn't resolve anything, but look good for the government. I would recommend this book primarily for a young audience from teenager to early adulthood.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dan Castrigano

    Great - it was great reading a nonwhite, non-Global North author talking about the personal impacts of the climate crisis in Nakate's home country of Uganda. She talked about different ecosystems close to Uganda that need to be protected, including Bugoma Forst and the Congo Rainforest. Voices like Nakate's must be read and amplified. I hope more of her fellow climate activists in Uganda can find a publisher to share their own stories. I appreciated how Nakate also denounced capitalism - as a fa Great - it was great reading a nonwhite, non-Global North author talking about the personal impacts of the climate crisis in Nakate's home country of Uganda. She talked about different ecosystems close to Uganda that need to be protected, including Bugoma Forst and the Congo Rainforest. Voices like Nakate's must be read and amplified. I hope more of her fellow climate activists in Uganda can find a publisher to share their own stories. I appreciated how Nakate also denounced capitalism - as a fantasy of infinite growth. She can see it firsthand in Uganda and the rest of Africa - how capitalism exploits people and planet for profit. And endless growth doesn't make sense. Highly recommend this book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maria Robinson

    “Directly or indirectly, you can be a positive influence on others whether they’re close to you or far away.” I’ve been following Vanessa since 2020 when she was infamously cropped out of the AP’s photo coverage of Arctic Basecamp, and have been looking forward to reading her book. This book transformed knowledge I already had about the climate crisis into something completely different. Reading her perspective was eye opening, and I especially loved getting introduced to an array of different a “Directly or indirectly, you can be a positive influence on others whether they’re close to you or far away.” I’ve been following Vanessa since 2020 when she was infamously cropped out of the AP’s photo coverage of Arctic Basecamp, and have been looking forward to reading her book. This book transformed knowledge I already had about the climate crisis into something completely different. Reading her perspective was eye opening, and I especially loved getting introduced to an array of different activists. Vanessas coverage of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals was especially important as she analyzed each point based on her own experience. A must read for anyone interested in the current work being done around climate activism!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cole

    I love the author's premise: that climate activists from Africa and Global South in general need more seats at the table, and to be seen and heard. The execution of the book could have been tighter - it drifted into a lot of topics but didn't weave them into any find of plan or framework of interrelatedness vis a vis the climate crisis. Her passion is formidable and I would love to see that manifest in more strategic planning and organizing for greater impact, esp. where she talks about deforest I love the author's premise: that climate activists from Africa and Global South in general need more seats at the table, and to be seen and heard. The execution of the book could have been tighter - it drifted into a lot of topics but didn't weave them into any find of plan or framework of interrelatedness vis a vis the climate crisis. Her passion is formidable and I would love to see that manifest in more strategic planning and organizing for greater impact, esp. where she talks about deforestation.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Terrence

    Eye opening. I never considered Africa in reference to climate change. I, like many others, consider Climate Change as a problem that can only be solved by white minds and/or First World thinkers. Truth be told, white minds and/or First World thinkers are disproportionately responsible for the situation we find ourselves. Thanks to the podcast "Higher Learning", Van Latham and Rachel Lynn Lindsey, for reporting on Vanessa Nakate and her activism. Eye opening. I never considered Africa in reference to climate change. I, like many others, consider Climate Change as a problem that can only be solved by white minds and/or First World thinkers. Truth be told, white minds and/or First World thinkers are disproportionately responsible for the situation we find ourselves. Thanks to the podcast "Higher Learning", Van Latham and Rachel Lynn Lindsey, for reporting on Vanessa Nakate and her activism.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anne-Marie

    This book kept me engaged with every word. It should be read by everyone. If we all were to put our attention and effort into addressing climate change the way Ms Nakate has we would be facing a much more hopeful future for our children and future generations. If you read this book you will see what I mean.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joyce Yang

    Very eye-opening and important perspectives. Vanessa makes a very strong argument for the inclusion and elevation of more African voices on the climate emergency we are facing. I was really moved by her story and the stories of others that she shared. Most of all, I really appreciated, agreed with, and learned from her connections of this crisis to broader social issues and values.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Eleanor

    Really insightful account of becoming a climate activist in the face of racism and social media. Her comments on burn out and mental health will resonate with any young activist, and her optimism can hopefully inspire more to take action. Also her message that you don't need to be perfect or know everything is so important in today's activism. Really insightful account of becoming a climate activist in the face of racism and social media. Her comments on burn out and mental health will resonate with any young activist, and her optimism can hopefully inspire more to take action. Also her message that you don't need to be perfect or know everything is so important in today's activism.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Ramirez

    A page turner on youth climate activism. The title itself is literal and figurative from the "crop out" incident she went through with the Associated Press to closing that gap in climate awareness and coverage in terms of vulnerable communities and climate consequences in the Global South. A page turner on youth climate activism. The title itself is literal and figurative from the "crop out" incident she went through with the Associated Press to closing that gap in climate awareness and coverage in terms of vulnerable communities and climate consequences in the Global South.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Remah Jane

    Miss Nakate shares her experience and the deadly reality of entire nations being excluded from having voices to demand addressing the global climate crisis. Her book encourages action and provides direction for beginning to practice encouraging others to take up the torch.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Absolutely amazing book! Everyone should and must read Vanessa’s words about including the voices of those most affected by environmental injustice and climate devastation in all environment-related conversations.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jayme

    It is so informative to hear about climate change from someone who lives in the “global south.” I’d never thought about how their experience of climate change would be different from ours in the United States. Parts did make me feel very guilty for not doing more, but I tried to take to heart the reminder about honoring our mental health and doing what we can.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    A must read on the climate emergency. Vanessa Nakate is a climate emergency champion, and a true hero.

  24. 5 out of 5

    ESparkes

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Key passages: - injustice, Africa responsible for 2-3% global CO2 emissions, but has more of effects.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Manika

    3.5

  26. 4 out of 5

    AC

    A must read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Kroutil

    Eye opening book about the intersection of social justice and climate change.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    I haven’t read many books by folks living in the Global South. And the environmental movement doesn’t pay nearly enough attention to their existence and activism. Vanessa Nakate, a Ugandan climate activist, is just one of so many voices I need to listen to, and that others should as well. Vanessa shared this list of fellow climate activists from across the world: Evelyn Acham Deniz Çevikus Cristian Esteban Martelo Ramírez Elijah Mckenzie-Jackson Veronica Mulenga Hilda Flavia Nakabuye Leah Namugerwa Adeni I haven’t read many books by folks living in the Global South. And the environmental movement doesn’t pay nearly enough attention to their existence and activism. Vanessa Nakate, a Ugandan climate activist, is just one of so many voices I need to listen to, and that others should as well. Vanessa shared this list of fellow climate activists from across the world: Evelyn Acham Deniz Çevikus Cristian Esteban Martelo Ramírez Elijah Mckenzie-Jackson Veronica Mulenga Hilda Flavia Nakabuye Leah Namugerwa Adenike Titilope Oladosu Kaossara Sani Aarav Seth Kaime Silvestre Silva Oliveira Roman Stratkötter Leah Thomas Elizabeth Wathuti

  29. 5 out of 5

    Freya

    5/5 Going to be recommending this book to everyone to read! This book is so important because it features and highlights some of the voices from the Global South that are most often left out of the conversation on climate change, despite them being on the frontline of climate catastrophe. From Vanessa herself describing the devastating impacts the climate crisis is already having on her native Uganda to the book highlighting the plight of other frontline environmental activists across Africa and 5/5 Going to be recommending this book to everyone to read! This book is so important because it features and highlights some of the voices from the Global South that are most often left out of the conversation on climate change, despite them being on the frontline of climate catastrophe. From Vanessa herself describing the devastating impacts the climate crisis is already having on her native Uganda to the book highlighting the plight of other frontline environmental activists across Africa and the Global South, this book provides an invaluable insight into how the climate crisis is destroying lives and livelihoods right now and the immense acts of courage individuals and communities are taking to fight this. Vanessa herself is an incredibly incredibly inspiring woman and has done an amazing job in making this book very accessible, urgent and pertinent in its message.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

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