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Freedom's Song

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Her voice made her a riverboat's darling--and its prisoner. Now she's singing her way to freedom in this powerful novel from the bestselling author of The Librarian of Boone's Hollow. "[An] enjoyable faith-filled adventure . . . Sawyer's episodic narrative and rich assortment of characters fighting for freedom provide the story with many twists and unexpected side-plots."-- Her voice made her a riverboat's darling--and its prisoner. Now she's singing her way to freedom in this powerful novel from the bestselling author of The Librarian of Boone's Hollow. "[An] enjoyable faith-filled adventure . . . Sawyer's episodic narrative and rich assortment of characters fighting for freedom provide the story with many twists and unexpected side-plots."--Publishers Weekly Indentured servant Fanny Beck has been forced to sing for riverboat passengers since she was a girl. All she wants is to live a quiet, humble life with her family as soon as her seven-year contract is over. However, when she discovers that the captain has no intention of releasing her, she seizes a sudden opportunity to escape--an impulse that leads Fanny to a group of enslaved people who are on their own dangerous quest for liberty. . . . Widower Walter Kuhn is overwhelmed by his responsibilities to his farm and young daughter, and now his mail-order bride hasn't arrived. Could a beautiful stranger seeking work be the answer to his prayers? . . . After the star performer of the River Peacock is presumed drowned, Sloan Kirkpatrick, the riverboat's captain, sets off to find her replacement. However, his journey will bring him face to face with his own past--and a deeper understanding of what it truly means to be free. . . . Uplifting, inspiring, and grounded in biblical truth, Freedom's Song is a story for every reader who has longed for physical, emotional, or spiritual delivery.


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Her voice made her a riverboat's darling--and its prisoner. Now she's singing her way to freedom in this powerful novel from the bestselling author of The Librarian of Boone's Hollow. "[An] enjoyable faith-filled adventure . . . Sawyer's episodic narrative and rich assortment of characters fighting for freedom provide the story with many twists and unexpected side-plots."-- Her voice made her a riverboat's darling--and its prisoner. Now she's singing her way to freedom in this powerful novel from the bestselling author of The Librarian of Boone's Hollow. "[An] enjoyable faith-filled adventure . . . Sawyer's episodic narrative and rich assortment of characters fighting for freedom provide the story with many twists and unexpected side-plots."--Publishers Weekly Indentured servant Fanny Beck has been forced to sing for riverboat passengers since she was a girl. All she wants is to live a quiet, humble life with her family as soon as her seven-year contract is over. However, when she discovers that the captain has no intention of releasing her, she seizes a sudden opportunity to escape--an impulse that leads Fanny to a group of enslaved people who are on their own dangerous quest for liberty. . . . Widower Walter Kuhn is overwhelmed by his responsibilities to his farm and young daughter, and now his mail-order bride hasn't arrived. Could a beautiful stranger seeking work be the answer to his prayers? . . . After the star performer of the River Peacock is presumed drowned, Sloan Kirkpatrick, the riverboat's captain, sets off to find her replacement. However, his journey will bring him face to face with his own past--and a deeper understanding of what it truly means to be free. . . . Uplifting, inspiring, and grounded in biblical truth, Freedom's Song is a story for every reader who has longed for physical, emotional, or spiritual delivery.

30 review for Freedom's Song

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey (Books for Christian Girls)

    About this book: “Indentured servant Fanny Beck has been forced to sing for riverboat passengers since she was a girl. All she wants is to live a quiet, humble life with her family as soon as her seven-year contract is over. However, when she discovers that the captain has no intention of releasing her, she seizes a sudden opportunity to escape--an impulse that leads Fanny to a group of enslaved people who are on their own dangerous quest for liberty. . . . Widower Walter Kuhn is overwhelmed by About this book: “Indentured servant Fanny Beck has been forced to sing for riverboat passengers since she was a girl. All she wants is to live a quiet, humble life with her family as soon as her seven-year contract is over. However, when she discovers that the captain has no intention of releasing her, she seizes a sudden opportunity to escape--an impulse that leads Fanny to a group of enslaved people who are on their own dangerous quest for liberty. . . . Widower Walter Kuhn is overwhelmed by his responsibilities to his farm and young daughter, and now his mail-order bride hasn't arrived. Could a beautiful stranger seeking work be the answer to his prayers? . . . After the star performer of the River Peacock is presumed drowned, Sloan Kirkpatrick, the riverboat's captain, sets off to find her replacement. However, his journey will bring him face to face with his own past--and a deeper understanding of what it truly means to be free. . . .” Series: As of now, no, a stand-alone book. Spiritual Content- John 8:36 at the beginning; Scriptures are mentioned, quoted, & remembered; Many Prayers; Church Going; Hymns; Talks about God, trusting Him, blessings, & freedom in Christ; ‘H’s are capitalized when referring to God; Walter wonders if God listens to him and when prayers are answered, he wonders if God is listening to him more than he thought; Sloan’s father is a preacher and many things he’s said to him are bought to Sloan’s mind (including that he could never comprehend why his father had abandoned monetary wealth to store up treasures in Heaven); Sloan says he gave up praying a long time ago, but starts to become less closed-off during the book; Many mentions of God & freedom in Christ; Many mentions of prayers, praying, & blessings over food; Many mentions of hymns & praise; Mentions of those & events in the Bible (including Sloan calling Gideon a big sissy and that you can only depend on yourself); Mentions of Sundays, churches, church going, services, sermons, & pastors/reverends; Mentions of sins & Jesus dying for you; Mentions of Heaven; Mentions of Fanny being a Godsend; Mentions of being blessed & blessings; A few mentions of Bibles; A few mentions of angels (most references to Fanny’s singing, but also a mention of her saying that God must have sent angels to save her); A few mentions of denominations; A couple mentions of miracles; A mention of a Mormon family; A mention of being named after a saint; *Note: Sloan says he never liked the cross at the top of his father’s church as it always seemed to mock him; Fanny says Sloan isn’t evil nor a saint; A couple mentions of a mythical elf. Negative Content- Minor cussing including: a ‘sissy’ and two ‘stupid’s; Some sarcasm; Being tossed overboard, nearly drowning, & pain (up to semi-detailed); Trauma from a thunderstorm (up to semi-detailed); Assuming that someone has drowned & looking for the body (barely-above-not-detailed, nothing detailed or graphic, but it’s assumed that the body is at the bottom of the river); Sloan aims a gun towards people as a threat; Sloan says he never drinks (even though he sells it on the boat), but gets “rip-roarin’ drunk” and has a hangover (once); Walter feels very guilty over how his wife died & blames himself; Fanny has to lie (tell falsehoods) to protect her new friends from harm (she does not want to and prays to not have to, but does to keep them safe from salve hunters though she prays that God won’t strike her dead because of telling lies); Mentions of fires, smoke, & a death of a women and horse (barely-above-not-detailed, including a woman trying to save a horse from a burning barn and neither of them making it out); Mentions of deaths & fevers; Mentions of slavery, slaves, bounty hunters/slave hunters, & families being separated; Mentions of guns, shooting, aiming at/threating people, robbing someone at gunpoint, fighting & fights; Mentions of bullies & young Walter being picked on and his pocket money stolen; Mentions of lying & lies; Mentions of gambling & betting; Mentions of alcohol, drinking, drunks, & saloons; Mentions of cigars & smoking; Mentions of plucking chickens & trapping rabbits (no details); A few mentions of a corpse; A few mentions of prejudices; A couple mentions of throwing up; A couple mentions of hunters; A couple mentions of rumors; A mention of a near drowning; A mention of being sent to prison in a game; A mention of manure; *Note: A mention of a child possibly getting a smack on their behind for a temper tantrum. Sexual Content- A semi-detailed kiss; A few Touches & Embraces (Walter mentions (in his point of view) that he imagined what it would be like to hold Fanny); Blushes (mostly from embarrassment because of society norms at this time period); Noticing (barely-above-not-detailed, Fanny noticed Walter’s muscles once); A man offers Fanny five dollars to be with him (it’s implied sexually because of his lecherous gaze, she quickly tells him no and that she is a lady); Walter is waiting on news about a mail-order bride to help him; A few mentions of a husband and wife that want children but have not been blessed with any (the wife cries over this to Fanny); A few mentions of tunes of a bawdy nature (Sloan had Fanny sing songs about enticing a man with rose-tinted lips and other suggestive nature, saying that “her innocent appearance combined with the sultry songs were irresistible”); A mention of that the crew has been told to keep their hands off of Fanny; A mention of Sloan visiting a brothel to try to find a new singer; A mention of flirting; A mention of a married couple kissing; Love, falling in love, & the emotions; *Note: Fanny does not like her performance dresses as they have plunging necklines and make her feel exposed, indecent, and like a strumpet; A mention of two babies born-too-soon passing away; A mention of a mother dying in childbirth. -Fainche “Fanny” Beck, age 21 (?) -Walter Kuhn P.O.V. switches between them & Sloan Set in 1860 352 pages ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~* Pre Teens- One Star New Teens- Two Stars Early High School Teens- Three Stars Older High School Teens- Four Stars My personal Rating- Four Stars Ahh, that epilogue has me sniffing back tears. I wish it would have been just a bit longer in that regard, but the ending was well done. I’m not typically one for mail-order bride stories, but because this one looked different with the woman not being sent for but happened upon, I decided to try it out. I’d like to say how clean it was: so clean. Sure, there were a handful of moments that were a bit awkward/embarrassing for Fanny and Walter because of the time period and its society norms (such as him not wanting to bathe in the same water/tub she just bathed in, blushing when discussing under garments or baring limbs to show an injury, etc.), but honestly, nothing above that. It was so nice and refreshing. Speaking of refreshing…ah, wait, no, let me go back to the beginning of the book first. The first 20% of this book was much more intense than I was expecting with Fanny’s events in the river boat to meeting a group of runaway slaves and helping them. (My heart was pounding like it was a suspense book because of those parts—I was so afraid something bad might happen.) The back-cover plot of Fanny taking care of Walter’s daughter doesn’t start until 30% in, which I was a little shocked about when reading, but I was honestly enjoying the other part, so it didn’t matter much to me. But, the original plot begins and the book becomes a lot slower (though this maybe because it’s more intense at the beginning then goes to farm life) which took me a bit to get used to, but it was still interesting. We do see the Point of View of Sloan, who by all means could be considered the villain of this story, but as Fanny put it so perfectly, he’s not really evil nor a saint. I never felt great animosity for him, but I won’t admit fondness for him either. His parts added to the story at least, though, and didn’t distract from the main plot. Now, back to the refreshing point: Fanny and Walter. Fanny was a sweetheart and Walter was very different from the average hero we see in the Christian Fiction Historical Romance genre. At first, I wasn’t a big fan of him because of the whole mail-order bride ordering shortly after his wife died, but others convinced him it would be good. However, the more we saw his point of view, the more I noticed that he was different—in his thoughts, treating Fanny respectably and also not lusting over her in a physical way (thank you!), but mainly how he was very worried and insecure. He’s not the typical big, manly male lead we see so often in these books. He was bullied as a child for being different and because of recent events, he’s worried about a lot of things. I just liked the difference in that male lead character, even though I wasn’t really his fan at first. I think he was realistic and that added to my enjoyment of the latter half of the book. Fanny was very sweet and was such a blessing to many people when see in this book. I loved seeing her faith and how much importance she placed on praying and listening to what God would have her do next and trusting Him. It was inspiring and she was just a lovely character. One more thing I really liked and honestly found adorable was when Fanny (who grew up in Scotland) and Walter (who is very German) had a couple parts of not understanding what the other was saying or the item they were wanting. I think this may have been my first time really seeing this in Christian Fiction…sure there’s lots of half of the couple is very proud of their home county or native languages, but it was so refreshing to see both of them this way and sharing with the other culture or language differences. It was pretty cute, but also realistic for the beginnings of many families here in the states during this time. Overall, this book was an easy four-star read and once again, I really appreciate how clean it was on faith and how much faith content there was. Another good one by this author! :) Link to review: https://booksforchristiangirls.blogsp... *BFCG may (Read the review to see) recommend this book by this author. It does not mean I recommend all the books by this author. *I received this (uncorrected advance reader copy version) book for free from the Publisher (Revell) for this honest review. (Due to it being an ARC, there may be some differences in the final copy compared to the version I reviewed. If you happen to notice any important content differences, please let me know in the comments below with the page number(s) referenced. Thank you!)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    Whenever I see one if this author's books I always grab it because I know I'm going to love it. She is a talented writer with a theme always in mind and I love her research. I am never disappointed with her books. I laughed so hard at one of the scenes because for some reason it tickled me pink. My husband asked me what was so funny. So I had to tell him. He laughed too. I love how God puts people in your path that he knows who will help and who will not. No matter what walk of life you come fro Whenever I see one if this author's books I always grab it because I know I'm going to love it. She is a talented writer with a theme always in mind and I love her research. I am never disappointed with her books. I laughed so hard at one of the scenes because for some reason it tickled me pink. My husband asked me what was so funny. So I had to tell him. He laughed too. I love how God puts people in your path that he knows who will help and who will not. No matter what walk of life you come from. Everyone needs someone. Messages of faith are throughout this sweet novel. Good always wins over evil even in real life. People aren't born bad it's where life sometimes takes them and who they hang out with. But I overall, I was pleasantly pleased with how the ending turned out. My thanks to Waterbrook and Multnomah for a copy of this book. I was NOT required to write a positive review. All opinions are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Staci

    1860 Missouri, Iowa, Illinois & Indiana Fanny Beck lives out nearly seven years as an indentured servant aboard a riverboat, River Peacock, to pay for her family's passage from Europe. Seven years! She's locked in a room when not performing and has no friends. Fanny is incredibly unhappy but her faith in the Lord grows during these years and she clings to the hope that her freedom is not far off. Riverboat captain Sloane shows how some immigrants were taken advantage of. Fanny's father actually si 1860 Missouri, Iowa, Illinois & Indiana Fanny Beck lives out nearly seven years as an indentured servant aboard a riverboat, River Peacock, to pay for her family's passage from Europe. Seven years! She's locked in a room when not performing and has no friends. Fanny is incredibly unhappy but her faith in the Lord grows during these years and she clings to the hope that her freedom is not far off. Riverboat captain Sloane shows how some immigrants were taken advantage of. Fanny's father actually signed an "X" to a contract for seven years for each family member or a total of 35 years. When Fanny has the opportunity to escape, she takes it. Her journey by foot, wagon and train across states was a heart warming and sometimes tense journey as she looked to put as much distance as possible from the riverboat. What I enjoyed most about this novel was the time spent with a family during part of her journey, the details about life on the prairie and God's provision throughout. I didn't find some of Sloane's actions to be plausible, but it wasn't enough to detract from my enjoyment of the novel. Another faith filled, heart warming novel by Kim Vogel Sawyer. My gratitude to publisher Waterbrook for a complimentary NetGalley copy of the novel. I was not required to post a review and all opinions expressed are my own.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Tero

    If you enjoy “Love Comes Softly,” then you’ll probably enjoy “Freedom’s Song.” This book is almost divided in two parts: the first part of Fanny’s escape and journey up north with new friends, the second part Fanny and Walter (and strong “Love Comes Softly” vibes). This was a sweet story and enjoyable read. It was slightly anti-climatical and I don’t feel that Slade’s story fully wrapped up and was satisfactory, but I realize that’s my opinion. It didn’t spoil the book for me. As with Kim Vogel Sa If you enjoy “Love Comes Softly,” then you’ll probably enjoy “Freedom’s Song.” This book is almost divided in two parts: the first part of Fanny’s escape and journey up north with new friends, the second part Fanny and Walter (and strong “Love Comes Softly” vibes). This was a sweet story and enjoyable read. It was slightly anti-climatical and I don’t feel that Slade’s story fully wrapped up and was satisfactory, but I realize that’s my opinion. It didn’t spoil the book for me. As with Kim Vogel Sawyer’s other books, this one is solid with the spiritual message and balanced with romance. I don’t recall anything that would prevent me from recommending this to older teens.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Karen R

    Readers who enjoy well-written, inspiring historical fiction, with a hint of romance, will want to add this book to their stack. It is a gentler story, with solid characters that will tug on your heart. Suitable for teens and up. "No part of her unexpected journey had been easy, and it didn’t seem as if it would be easier ahead, but she’d seen evidence of grace every step of the way." Fanny Beck has quite a journey to freedom, and some eye opening experiences along the way. Her faith is genuine a Readers who enjoy well-written, inspiring historical fiction, with a hint of romance, will want to add this book to their stack. It is a gentler story, with solid characters that will tug on your heart. Suitable for teens and up. "No part of her unexpected journey had been easy, and it didn’t seem as if it would be easier ahead, but she’d seen evidence of grace every step of the way." Fanny Beck has quite a journey to freedom, and some eye opening experiences along the way. Her faith is genuine and grows with insights from others she meets, and the friendships that develop. I couldn't help but root for her and wonder where her path would lead. There was growing tension from the angle of Sloan's pursuit, and his own personal struggles. It had me reading faster, hoping for a happy ending. The author highlights some difficulties faced by immigrants and slaves in the mid-1800's. An enjoyable story from beginning to end. Recommend! (An ebook was provided by the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are my own.)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This was a captivating story about Fanny Beck who was an indentured servant aboard a riverboat who is able to escape during a storm. In her attempt to get home to her family, she comes upon a man and his daughter and stays with them to help him care for his daughter. In the midst of this, Sloan, who owned the riverboat, is on the search for Fanny and longs to see her returned to his riverboat. Fanny is such a strong character who is such a wonderful role model for women. She took a terrible circ This was a captivating story about Fanny Beck who was an indentured servant aboard a riverboat who is able to escape during a storm. In her attempt to get home to her family, she comes upon a man and his daughter and stays with them to help him care for his daughter. In the midst of this, Sloan, who owned the riverboat, is on the search for Fanny and longs to see her returned to his riverboat. Fanny is such a strong character who is such a wonderful role model for women. She took a terrible circumstance that she was in and continued to rely on God. Thanks so much to netgalley and the publisher for the arc. The opinions are my own.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Loraine

    Fanny Beck as a young Irish girl was indentured as a singer on Sloan Kirkpatrick's riverboat. She thought it was 7 years, but when she reached 21, she discovered it was 7 years for every person in her family. When a riverboat disaster pushed her overboard, was this her chance to make her escape? I absolutely loved how God played such a strong role in this novel. Each time Fanny was at another crossroads with Sloan chasing her, God provided a way for her to escape further from his clutches. It see Fanny Beck as a young Irish girl was indentured as a singer on Sloan Kirkpatrick's riverboat. She thought it was 7 years, but when she reached 21, she discovered it was 7 years for every person in her family. When a riverboat disaster pushed her overboard, was this her chance to make her escape? I absolutely loved how God played such a strong role in this novel. Each time Fanny was at another crossroads with Sloan chasing her, God provided a way for her to escape further from his clutches. It seemed when Fanny blessed someone else, in turn, God blessed her. I also liked how she used her talents as a singer to help both the African American family she was helping as well as herself. Another well written historical fiction novel from Kim Vogel Sawyer. **I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. Opinions are mine alone. I was not compensated for this review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Virginia

    Freedom's Song was the first title I have read by Kim Vogel Sawyer. I thoroughly enjoyed her unique storytelling in this upcoming release. The character growth was well matched with the storyline's progress. There were some unexpected turns, building to the climax, that pleasantly surprised me. I liked not being able to predict what would come next. I am not a huge fan of detailed descriptions in books, but the author crafted the scenes in a way that appealed to all five senses without boring. A Freedom's Song was the first title I have read by Kim Vogel Sawyer. I thoroughly enjoyed her unique storytelling in this upcoming release. The character growth was well matched with the storyline's progress. There were some unexpected turns, building to the climax, that pleasantly surprised me. I liked not being able to predict what would come next. I am not a huge fan of detailed descriptions in books, but the author crafted the scenes in a way that appealed to all five senses without boring. A very short way into the book, I sat aside my reviewer hat and just enjoyed the journey and the message of true freedom throughout. I look forward to adding more of this author's work to my TBR. I received a free eARC from the publisher through Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Freedom's Song by Kim Vogel Sawyer WaterBrook & Multnomah Rated: 3 Back of the Book: “Indentured servant Fanny Beck has been forced to sing for riverboat passengers since she was a girl. All she wants is to live a quiet, humble life with her family as soon as her seven-year contract is over. So, when she discovers that the captain has no intention of releasing her, she seizes a sudden opportunity to escape—an impulse that leads Fanny to a group of enslaved people who are on their own dangerous q Freedom's Song by Kim Vogel Sawyer WaterBrook & Multnomah Rated: 3 Back of the Book: “Indentured servant Fanny Beck has been forced to sing for riverboat passengers since she was a girl. All she wants is to live a quiet, humble life with her family as soon as her seven-year contract is over. So, when she discovers that the captain has no intention of releasing her, she seizes a sudden opportunity to escape—an impulse that leads Fanny to a group of enslaved people who are on their own dangerous quest for liberty. . . . Widower Walter Kuhn is overwhelmed by his responsibilities to his farm and young daughter, and now his mail-order bride hasn’t arrived. Could a beautiful stranger seeking work be the answer to his prayers? . . . After the star performer of the River Peacock is presumed drowned, Sloan Kirkpatrick, the riverboat’s captain, sets off to find her replacement. However, his journey will bring him face to face with his own past—and a deeper understanding of what it truly means to be free. . . . Uplifting, inspiring, and grounded in biblical truth, Freedom’s Song is a story for every reader who has longed for physical, emotional, or spiritual delivery.” My Thoughts: This story was heartwarming with light suspense because of Fanny’s past. The story was engaging and I enjoyed reading it however once completed I felt that Fanny’s experience with Enoch and his family was disconnected from the rest of the story. Meeting Enoch’s family could have become a whole different storyline and been just as interesting. I think that it gave Fanny transition to where she ended up but their friendships became so involved it felt strange letting them go on their way without knowledge of what became of them. Overall it was a good read for historical Christian romance readers. Inspiring Thoughts: “‘Don’t feel shame for not knowin’ somethin’ you ain’t been taught. The shame belongs to them who kept you from learnin’ it.’” “Pa always preached that everything befalling a person upon whom God looked with favor was either ordained by Him or could be used by Him.” I received an ARC of this book via NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for my honest review shared here.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dana Michael

    Freedom's Song is a sweet historical romance with likeable characters. The heroine is indentured on a riverboat as a singer and falls off the boat. She is presumed dead. She comes across the hero of the book and his baby girl on her trip to be with her family in New York. All the while, the riverboat captain is searching for her. If you like Little House on the Prairie type books you will like this story. 3.5 stars *I was given a copy of this book by the publisher and this is my honest opinion Freedom's Song is a sweet historical romance with likeable characters. The heroine is indentured on a riverboat as a singer and falls off the boat. She is presumed dead. She comes across the hero of the book and his baby girl on her trip to be with her family in New York. All the while, the riverboat captain is searching for her. If you like Little House on the Prairie type books you will like this story. 3.5 stars *I was given a copy of this book by the publisher and this is my honest opinion

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarita

    This story had all I’ve come to love about this author’s writing. A strong heroine, a great male lead (Walter), beautiful writing and a strong Christian message woven between the pages. The first 50% of this story had me engaged. I enjoyed Fanny’s journey back to her family, meeting up with Enoch’s family and being detoured at Walter and Annaliese. Fanny was a strong character who found strength in her faith in God. Walter with his own emotional bondages was easy to care for and love. And Annalie This story had all I’ve come to love about this author’s writing. A strong heroine, a great male lead (Walter), beautiful writing and a strong Christian message woven between the pages. The first 50% of this story had me engaged. I enjoyed Fanny’s journey back to her family, meeting up with Enoch’s family and being detoured at Walter and Annaliese. Fanny was a strong character who found strength in her faith in God. Walter with his own emotional bondages was easy to care for and love. And Annaliese was just adorable! But somewhere after 50%, though I totally loved all the scenes with Fanny, Walter and Annaliese, the story felt a bit long with the side plot with Sloan. Maybe if I got to see more of Sloan’s inner struggle between returning to God vs the path he was on, I would have connected with him and his sudden actions af the end. I expected a stronger story with his search from the summary - starting this book I expected he would have been a characters which I would have hated at first but grown to like but sadly he did not won me over. At the end of the story, I did not completely felt finished with all the characters I’ve met, especially the Moores and their longings and dreams! *I received a complimentary copy via Netgalley. All opinions expressed are my own.*

  12. 5 out of 5

    Becky Lewis

    “Just ’cause somethin’ is legal don’t make it right.” Truer words were never spoken. In her new book, Freedom’s Song, Kim Vogel Sawyer has many such pearls of wisdom. This multiplies a book’s value to me. Travel back to 1860 and land on a riverboat on the Mississippi River. Fanny Beck is a popular concert attraction on the River Peacock. Held against her will, she longs for freedom from Sloane, her unscrupulous manager. I loved the plot and characters of this book. The novel flows smoothly, albei “Just ’cause somethin’ is legal don’t make it right.” Truer words were never spoken. In her new book, Freedom’s Song, Kim Vogel Sawyer has many such pearls of wisdom. This multiplies a book’s value to me. Travel back to 1860 and land on a riverboat on the Mississippi River. Fanny Beck is a popular concert attraction on the River Peacock. Held against her will, she longs for freedom from Sloane, her unscrupulous manager. I loved the plot and characters of this book. The novel flows smoothly, albeit with suspense and I found myself often holding my breath. The characters are very relatable, except for maybe Sloane. However, Sawyer paints even her antagonist as multi-dimensional, and I enjoyed seeing the fight between good and evil within a person. It’s amazing to see how well some people can care for their own needs while callously ignoring those of others. This was true of people back then, and is, unfortunately, still true of people today. I was disappointed to have to leave some of our new friends before we got a chance to know them well. Sawyer created them so well, I wanted them to remain throughout the novel. However, their leaving enables the next scenario, with more people that I began to love because of their great personalities. I fell in love with toddler Annaliese. And Walter is so much more valuable than he gives himself credit for. If you like themes of redemption, finding true freedom, and friendship; set against a mid-1800’s America, you will love this novel of faith and suspense. A Reader’s Guide is included at the conclusion. A copy of this book was provided by Waterbrook-Multnomah. No positive review was required. All opinions are my own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Marilyn

    Freedom's Song was a fantastic historical fiction with a beautiful message of faith, protection and new beginnings. Travel with Fanny from a performance on a riverboat, escaping during a storm, traveling with others seeking their freedom and finding a place she felt freedom. Stopping at a rural farm because of the noise she hear, she found herself caring for a child and the widower’s home. Out in the open country she saw the beauty of God’s creation through nature while developing a wonderful fr Freedom's Song was a fantastic historical fiction with a beautiful message of faith, protection and new beginnings. Travel with Fanny from a performance on a riverboat, escaping during a storm, traveling with others seeking their freedom and finding a place she felt freedom. Stopping at a rural farm because of the noise she hear, she found herself caring for a child and the widower’s home. Out in the open country she saw the beauty of God’s creation through nature while developing a wonderful friendship with another lady and discovering exactly what God desired of her life. Fanny’s resilience, fortitude, faith and strength made her a strong heroine despite all the hardships she had endured in her young life. I appreciate the way the author brought her to life with vivid details and dialogue weaving in a beautiful faith message, forgiveness, freedom, peace and love for the true to life characters. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an early e-book of this amazing story by Kim Vogel Sawyer. I was not required to write a positive review but have shared my own opinion.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joan Arning

    Freedom's Song gave me a different look at life in the United States in the mid 1800s! I experienced a taste of what life was like for African-Americans as well as German and Scottish immigrants! I admired Fanny for keeping a strong faith in God even when imprisoned as a singer on a riverboat. I did not like Sloan who owned the riverboat and tricked Fanny's illiterate father into indenturing her for 35 years! Walter Kuhn was a hardworking man trying to care for an infant daughter and his farm at Freedom's Song gave me a different look at life in the United States in the mid 1800s! I experienced a taste of what life was like for African-Americans as well as German and Scottish immigrants! I admired Fanny for keeping a strong faith in God even when imprisoned as a singer on a riverboat. I did not like Sloan who owned the riverboat and tricked Fanny's illiterate father into indenturing her for 35 years! Walter Kuhn was a hardworking man trying to care for an infant daughter and his farm at the same time even while blaming himself for his wife's death in a barn fire! Walter may feel like a coward but he is an honorable man. Fanny and Walter both learn that in Christ we can find freedom and "All is Well!" I recommend Freedom's Song to others who enjoy historical fiction. I received complimentary advance e-book through Net Galley. This is my honest opinion.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Freedom's Song is a beautifully written story of a girl, Fanny, that is an indentured servant on a river paddle boat, as a singer. She doesn't understand that her contract, signed by her father, is for seven years for each family member, not just seven years. During a storm, she is knocked overboard, and tossed into the river below. She awakens to voices nearby, but is unaware of where she is, she only knows that, for now, she is free. She travels a while with a family of runaway slaves, until s Freedom's Song is a beautifully written story of a girl, Fanny, that is an indentured servant on a river paddle boat, as a singer. She doesn't understand that her contract, signed by her father, is for seven years for each family member, not just seven years. During a storm, she is knocked overboard, and tossed into the river below. She awakens to voices nearby, but is unaware of where she is, she only knows that, for now, she is free. She travels a while with a family of runaway slaves, until she reaches Chicago. She wants to get to New York City, but she doesn't have the money for a train ticket. As she travels from one town to the next, she hears a baby crying in the distance from the train station. She investigates, and find a very little girl in a crib, all alone. Soon, the child's father limps home with a leg injury. Since he is a widower, she agrees to work for him, caring for his baby daughter while he works in the field. Everything works out well, until the captain of the riverboat catches up to her. She doesn't want to go back to the boat, but what can she do? An excellent, clean, and very exciting story!

  16. 5 out of 5

    LA

    Freedom’s Song is a beautiful illustration of what it means to be free spiritually, emotionally, and physically. It inspires hope and the realization that physical bonds have no bearing on true freedom in Christ. Fanny is a riverboat singer, indentured for safe passage for her family to America. When it looks like the terms of the contract her father signed will not be honored, Fanny prays for a way to find freedom from enslavement. A fire provides the escape she needs, and sends her off across t Freedom’s Song is a beautiful illustration of what it means to be free spiritually, emotionally, and physically. It inspires hope and the realization that physical bonds have no bearing on true freedom in Christ. Fanny is a riverboat singer, indentured for safe passage for her family to America. When it looks like the terms of the contract her father signed will not be honored, Fanny prays for a way to find freedom from enslavement. A fire provides the escape she needs, and sends her off across the country on foot. The first half of the story kept me glued to the pages. Fanny is rescued by a group of runaway slaves who are traveling the underground railroad. Beautiful friendships are forged and Fanny is challenged in ways she hadn’t been before. I loved the depth of emotions the author created in this small troupe, and appreciated the parallels drawn by Fanny, but not so much that Fanny felt she was equal to them. By far, these characters were my favourites. The riverboat captain is overcome with grief at the loss of his money-making singer. Not only was she beautiful, but she was kind and never gave him trouble. Fanny’s faith was evident aboard and reminds him of his family he left behind. He searches for Fanny’s body in the river and won’t rest until he finds her – dead or alive. We see his internal struggle to find peace and contentment while battling his life goal of building his fortune. Fanny was his ticket to fortune. Readers are pulled into several states at a time when slavery was still acceptable, and when immigrants struggled to work the land and make something in the land of opportunity. The second half of the book finds Fanny without money and looking for a way to make money in order to get to her family in New York. She makes the mistake of singing for her supper and for a few coins…. The story ties up all the loose ends in a neat package. However, I wasn’t completely convinced that the riverboat captain had changed as much as he did in the end. For the majority of the book he was driven to find Fanny. Then the ending that was given to him didn’t quite seem the right ending. I would have liked to see more of the runaway slaves as they were fascinating characters. I wasn’t as taken with the characters in the second half, the ones that helped Fanny find her satisfactory ending. All in all, a satisfying read. I received a copy of the book from the publisher through NetGalley. All opinions expressed are my own.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Pam Burke

    As a huge fan of Kim Vogel Sawyer's writing, I was excited to read her newest book, Freedom's Song. The themes and messages in the story cover the gamut of human experience, from its worst to its best. As is usual for Kim Vogel Sawyer's style, the story is driven by her masterfully crafted characters. From the very beginning, I was drawn in to Fanny Beck's story of natural talent, love for her family, and the experience of unfair circumstances life has dealt her. As she moves from one circumstanc As a huge fan of Kim Vogel Sawyer's writing, I was excited to read her newest book, Freedom's Song. The themes and messages in the story cover the gamut of human experience, from its worst to its best. As is usual for Kim Vogel Sawyer's style, the story is driven by her masterfully crafted characters. From the very beginning, I was drawn in to Fanny Beck's story of natural talent, love for her family, and the experience of unfair circumstances life has dealt her. As she moves from one circumstance to another, she meets and interacts with other characters who add many levels of richness to her passage. In some ways, this book seems to consist of two very different stories. But in reality, it is a well-connected story of freedom and how that concept carries a wide range of meanings to different people in different circumstances. I have to believe Fanny would not have been prepared for the life she ultimately settles into had she not learned such beautiful and important lessons in her earlier encounters -- and found the joy of her freedom's song. I reached the end of the story with a very satisfying reminder of faith and hope and how they make any life journey possible and meaningful. I highly recommend Freedom's Song to fans of great inspirational and hope-filled historical fiction. Thanks to the author's launch team for providing a digital copy of the book. I am happy to share my own thoughts in this review.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Em

    Kim Vogel Sawyer delivers sweet romance with just the right amount of tension in her upcoming release, Freedom’s Song. Years of indentured servitude as the Darling of the River Peacock have dimmed Fanche Beck’s hope for her family’s new life in America, until she is knocked overboard amid the chaos of a terrible storm and fire aboard the entertainment steamboat and into the mighty Mississippi River. Presumed dead, Fanny seizes the opportunity to try to reach her family in New York. A runaway sla Kim Vogel Sawyer delivers sweet romance with just the right amount of tension in her upcoming release, Freedom’s Song. Years of indentured servitude as the Darling of the River Peacock have dimmed Fanche Beck’s hope for her family’s new life in America, until she is knocked overboard amid the chaos of a terrible storm and fire aboard the entertainment steamboat and into the mighty Mississippi River. Presumed dead, Fanny seizes the opportunity to try to reach her family in New York. A runaway slave family and a broken-hearted widower with a darling little girl challenge Fanny to follow God’s guidance despite the fact that they slow her journey to her family. It is these challenges that teach Fanny how to find out who she is when she is freed from her gilded cage and has the chance to choose her way forward. What happens when her former employer discovers she survived the near-drowning and the decisions that must be made when a new bride is found for the widower who has hired her are enough to keep the pages turning until the satisfying end. Thank you to the author and publisher for allowing me a copy to read and review. All opinions expressed here are my own and are completely genuine.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    Freedom's Song, by Kim Vogel Sawyer is a Christian historical fiction story of a young girls who was indentured to sing on a river boat in exchange of her family being brought to the US. This is an easy to read, well written story that has wonderful, loving, caring characters. I enjoyed the care Fanny gave to so many people, putting their needs above hers. I also enjoyed Walter's character. He is a young single father trying to do the best for his daughter while tending his farm. I liked the str Freedom's Song, by Kim Vogel Sawyer is a Christian historical fiction story of a young girls who was indentured to sing on a river boat in exchange of her family being brought to the US. This is an easy to read, well written story that has wonderful, loving, caring characters. I enjoyed the care Fanny gave to so many people, putting their needs above hers. I also enjoyed Walter's character. He is a young single father trying to do the best for his daughter while tending his farm. I liked the strong faith they both had. This story caught my attention right away and held it to the end. It contained suspense that kept me reading to see what would happen. I wish this were part of a series. I received a complimentary copy of this book, this is my honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Bryant

    Expert storyteller Kim Vogel Sawyer delivers another five-star novel with Freedom’s Song! Her expressive prose and meaningful, well-written dialogue kept me hanging on to every word. I fell in love with strong yet vulnerable heroine and hero Fanny and Walter. They quickly made my list of favorite fictional couples. The secondary characters—the escaped slaves, Josephine, and Sloan—are also richly drawn and memorable. The story, set in 1860, moves quickly and flows smoothly and held me captive fro Expert storyteller Kim Vogel Sawyer delivers another five-star novel with Freedom’s Song! Her expressive prose and meaningful, well-written dialogue kept me hanging on to every word. I fell in love with strong yet vulnerable heroine and hero Fanny and Walter. They quickly made my list of favorite fictional couples. The secondary characters—the escaped slaves, Josephine, and Sloan—are also richly drawn and memorable. The story, set in 1860, moves quickly and flows smoothly and held me captive from beginning to end. I greatly appreciate the faith element that flows freely through the story filled with spiritual truths regarding trusting God for His provision and how He puts people in our lives to help us see His plan for us. The theme of freedom—physical, emotional, and spiritual—permeating the story is beautifully expounded and thought provoking. The romance is slow-building and sweet. The “embarrassing moments” between Fanny and Walter are precious. Freedom’s Song is a wonderfully inspiring and absorbing read whose stirring message will resonate with you long after you finish the final page. This book easily made my Best Reads of the Year list—a book to read and reread, and I highly recommend it. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Brewer

    Thank you to Waterbrook & Multnomah and Net Galley for the chance to read and review this book. The opinions expressed are my own. I can always count on author Kim Vogel Sawyer to tell a good story based on Christian values. I was so happy when I was given the chance to read this book. This is the story of young Fanny Beck, who is a singer on a riverboat. She has been purchased by the captain as an indentured servant in exchange for her family's passage to New York. When bad weather destroys the Thank you to Waterbrook & Multnomah and Net Galley for the chance to read and review this book. The opinions expressed are my own. I can always count on author Kim Vogel Sawyer to tell a good story based on Christian values. I was so happy when I was given the chance to read this book. This is the story of young Fanny Beck, who is a singer on a riverboat. She has been purchased by the captain as an indentured servant in exchange for her family's passage to New York. When bad weather destroys the riverboat, Fanny sees her chance to escape and be reunited with her family. This is the story of how Fanny gains her freedom. She meets a lot of interesting people as well as learning a lot about herself. This story is another winner from one of my favorite authors!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Doreen Blair

    FREEDOM'S SONG - Kim Vogel Sawyer I received this free to my Kindle for purpose of review. Mrs. Sawyer is an excellent writer and I have enjoyed only two of her many published titles. Fanny had a voice light a nightingale, she was beautiful and brought a smile to many lives. The only problem here was she had been indentured to Sloan as a singer on the River Peacock by her father as they came to America from Scotland. Fanny was treated poorly and seven years had been more than enough. She was known FREEDOM'S SONG - Kim Vogel Sawyer I received this free to my Kindle for purpose of review. Mrs. Sawyer is an excellent writer and I have enjoyed only two of her many published titles. Fanny had a voice light a nightingale, she was beautiful and brought a smile to many lives. The only problem here was she had been indentured to Sloan as a singer on the River Peacock by her father as they came to America from Scotland. Fanny was treated poorly and seven years had been more than enough. She was known as the Riverboats Darling. But when she recognized Sloan Kirkpatrick had no intention of allowing her to leave. She began to form a plan. A fire aboard the boat gave Fanny Beck the chance she had waited for. She is thrown overboard and now she has her chance to run. And run she did. She traveled with a family running from slaveowners to a free state, she learned much from them and she found people who loved her. Her goal to return to Ma and Da who were now in NYC and be reunited to her family. Her trip went a rather serendipitous route. As she helped her friends be able to get free. She also becomes free and learns true meaning of freedom. She has endurance and she is a woman who loves others. She finds herself caring for a young child whose Mother has died. She stays to help Walter with Annaliese. No more details, get the book....it is hard to put down once you start. Great story historical fiction but many well taught life lessons in this story. #Net Galley #Goodreads #Freedom's Song #Kim Vogel Sawyer The book is not avaiable until 10/17/2021 but can be preordered.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    It is not often that you read a book of this magnitude! Freedom's Song is an inspiring, emotional, spiritual journey. Kim Vogel Sawyer allows the reader to travel with the character, Fainche "Fanny" Beck, on her journey from riverboat singer to housewife. Along the way Fanny encounters escaped slaves, underground railroad workers, friendly and unfriendly people on her journey. Always she is mindful of God's purpose for her life. The story begins with Fanny singing on a riverboat, the River Peaco It is not often that you read a book of this magnitude! Freedom's Song is an inspiring, emotional, spiritual journey. Kim Vogel Sawyer allows the reader to travel with the character, Fainche "Fanny" Beck, on her journey from riverboat singer to housewife. Along the way Fanny encounters escaped slaves, underground railroad workers, friendly and unfriendly people on her journey. Always she is mindful of God's purpose for her life. The story begins with Fanny singing on a riverboat, the River Peacock. At the age of fourteen she is indentured to Sloan Kirkpatrick in exchange for bringing her family from Scotland to America. Now seven years later, Sloan has no intention of releasing Fanny. When the ship catches fire, Fanny has the opportunity to leave her cabin and is accidentally knocked overboard. Her journey home begins and what a journey it is. I loved reading Fanny's story. This is a beautiful story of love, hope, charity and faith. I definitely recommend this book as a must-read! Thank you Netgalley for allowing me to read and review this book!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tish

    Fanny Beck was forced to sing on a Riverboat as a indentured servant as a young girl.. For her service her parents could come to America. Sloan the riverboat captain kept her locked in a room. When she had a chance to escape do to a fire on the boat she tries to escape but is pushed off the boat into the river. A bunch of slaves find her and she travels to help them to safety. When she gets them most of the way she wants to go to New York to find her parents. She has little money and sings at st Fanny Beck was forced to sing on a Riverboat as a indentured servant as a young girl.. For her service her parents could come to America. Sloan the riverboat captain kept her locked in a room. When she had a chance to escape do to a fire on the boat she tries to escape but is pushed off the boat into the river. A bunch of slaves find her and she travels to help them to safety. When she gets them most of the way she wants to go to New York to find her parents. She has little money and sings at stations for coins. As she walks to get to the next station she hears a baby crying and goes to help. When she sees the child alone she cares for the child till her father finally comes home. Will Fanny finally get to New York or will she help the widow Walter Kuhn care for his child ? This is a beautiful story and a book hard to put down. Kim Vogel Sawyer really knows how to draw you in. I hope she writes more so we can learn about Enoch and his family.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jan

    Kim Vogel Sawyer is an author whose books I have read in the past, so I was delighted to receive an advance copy of her book Freedom's Song. Fanny is a talented singer who was brought to America from Ireland by a riverboat owner to sing on his riverboat. The difficulty? She came on an indenture agreement which she thought was for 7 years, but the holder of the indenture, Sloan, has a plan to hold her contract for 35 years (7 years for Fanny and each member of her family). Fanny feels trapped, an Kim Vogel Sawyer is an author whose books I have read in the past, so I was delighted to receive an advance copy of her book Freedom's Song. Fanny is a talented singer who was brought to America from Ireland by a riverboat owner to sing on his riverboat. The difficulty? She came on an indenture agreement which she thought was for 7 years, but the holder of the indenture, Sloan, has a plan to hold her contract for 35 years (7 years for Fanny and each member of her family). Fanny feels trapped, and longs to escape. Freedom's Song is the story of Fanny's escape - and how she grows personally during that process. But it's also the story of Walter Kuhn, who is a significant part of Fanny's growth and ultimate freedom from Sloan. Freedom's Song met my expectations, and I encourage others to read it. #netgalley #freedomssong

  26. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This is the story of a girl who was purchased as an indentured servant by an unscrupulous riverboat captain. She sang to the customers and then returned to her quarters under guard. When there is a fire on the boat, she manages to escape and meets up with a group of runaway slaves. They help each other and manage to get to freedom. This is an interesting story that highlights the underground railroad and the plight of all people who are not free. I love the combining of cultures and the historic This is the story of a girl who was purchased as an indentured servant by an unscrupulous riverboat captain. She sang to the customers and then returned to her quarters under guard. When there is a fire on the boat, she manages to escape and meets up with a group of runaway slaves. They help each other and manage to get to freedom. This is an interesting story that highlights the underground railroad and the plight of all people who are not free. I love the combining of cultures and the historical accuracy. Once again, Kim Vogel Sawyer has written a wonderful story! I have voluntarily reviewed a copy of this book that I received from NetGalley. All views expressed are only my honest opinion

  27. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Another absolutely heartrending story by Kansas native KVS. I absolutely love every book I read by this author. Freedom’s song was such a warm story that not only touches on physical freedom but ultimately our spiritual freedom in Christ. I personally devoured this story and was left thirsty for more. Thank you to netgalley and the publisher for the ability to read and review this book. All opinions are my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    MaryEllen

    The characters are well done. The plot is really interesting. It was wonderful to watch the character growth for the main characters and great to see them realizing God's hand on their lives. The characters are well done. The plot is really interesting. It was wonderful to watch the character growth for the main characters and great to see them realizing God's hand on their lives.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    Fanny Beck is an indentured servant for Sloan Kirkpatrick, a riverboat captain. Fanny’s father indentured her in exchange for passage for the rest of his family to America. Unfortunately, Fanny’s father did not realize the fine print indentured Fanny for seven years for each family member which is 35 years instead of the seven Fanny believes. When a fire on the ship gives Fanny a chance to escape, she grabs it. It sends her on a journey where she encounters people in need including Walter Kuhn, Fanny Beck is an indentured servant for Sloan Kirkpatrick, a riverboat captain. Fanny’s father indentured her in exchange for passage for the rest of his family to America. Unfortunately, Fanny’s father did not realize the fine print indentured Fanny for seven years for each family member which is 35 years instead of the seven Fanny believes. When a fire on the ship gives Fanny a chance to escape, she grabs it. It sends her on a journey where she encounters people in need including Walter Kuhn, a widower with a young daughter. Walter needs someone to watch his daughter until his mail order bride arrives. Fanny wants to get to New York to reunite with her family, but she needs to earn more funds for the train ride. In the meantime, Sloan is scouring the Midwest looking for a singer for his riverboat. What is God’s plan for Fanny? Freedom’s Song by Kim Vogel Sawyer is a heartwarming historical novel. I thought it was well-written with realistic, developed characters. Sloan is an opportunistic riverboat captain who takes advantage of a man’s inability to read or write. Fanny is a sweet woman who has led a hard life. She just wants to rejoin her family whom she has not seen in seven years. Fanny is a woman of great faith. She relies on God to direct her journey. The romance element is sweet. I like that it happened slowly and was not rushed. I enjoyed the “embarrassing” moments between Fanny and Walter. This is a clean story which I appreciated (no intimate situations or foul language). The theme of freedom (physical, emotional, and spiritual) was woven throughout the story. It was well-done. I wish there had been an update on Enoch and his family. They were such wonderful characters and I wanted to know how their journey ended. I liked that the story had emotion, suspense, romance, drama, and faith. There is some predictability to the story, but that did not diminish my reading pleasure. I can tell the author did her research for this story. She captured the time period and included good details that enhance the story (the difficulties of traveling by stagecoach for example). Freedom’s Song is an inspiring, emotional story that was a joy to read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cathy R Morgan

    Indentured to a river-boat owner at the age of 14 in exchange for him paying her family's passage to New York, Fanny is almost at the end of what she believes to be a seven-year term, but Sloan has made it clear that he doesn't plan to let her go. Kept as a virtual prisoner for all these years, Fanny escapes when a fire causes chaos and she falls overboard. Meeting up with a group of escaped slaves, they help each other to work their way north, she heading for New York and they for Canada. But s Indentured to a river-boat owner at the age of 14 in exchange for him paying her family's passage to New York, Fanny is almost at the end of what she believes to be a seven-year term, but Sloan has made it clear that he doesn't plan to let her go. Kept as a virtual prisoner for all these years, Fanny escapes when a fire causes chaos and she falls overboard. Meeting up with a group of escaped slaves, they help each other to work their way north, she heading for New York and they for Canada. But she's delayed on her way by meeting a man with a young daughter who is struggling to manage his work while waiting for his parents to send a new wife. In the end, Fanny will be forced to come to terms with what true freedom really is, and where it comes from... This may sound strange, but one of the things that 'made' this book for me was actually the bad guy. So often bad guys are just that - bad. Sloan is presented as a thoroughly selfish person who's turned his back on Christianity, but who begins to review his past dealings with Fanny (and to some extent his past life) when he believes her dead and reads some of her letters. It's not that he turns into a good guy, just that we can begin to see the honest appraisal of his own actions that make him turning into a good guy at some stage a possibility. And I think it's that honest appraisal that feels so rare and I particularly appreciate. Having said that, I also enjoyed watching Walter and Fanny together - and when you throw in his daughter, what could be better? I guess the one thing I would have liked to see done differently is having some closure about Enoch and co. - but one can't have everything. All in all, a heart-warming and thought-provoking story, a little heavier than some, but well worth reading. Note that I received a complimentary copy of the book from NetGalley. I was not required to write a positive review and this is my considered opinion of the book.

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