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Black and Blue: A Memoir of Racism and Resilience

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The story of an Aboriginal woman who worked as a police officer and fought for justice both within and beyond the Australian police force. A proud Kurnai woman, Veronica Gorrie grew up dauntless, full of cheek and a fierce sense of justice. After watching her friends and family suffer under a deeply compromised law-enforcement system, Gorrie signed up for training to become The story of an Aboriginal woman who worked as a police officer and fought for justice both within and beyond the Australian police force. A proud Kurnai woman, Veronica Gorrie grew up dauntless, full of cheek and a fierce sense of justice. After watching her friends and family suffer under a deeply compromised law-enforcement system, Gorrie signed up for training to become one of a rare few Aboriginal police officers in Australia. In her ten years in the force, she witnessed appalling institutional racism and sexism, and fought past those things to provide courageous and compassionate service to civilians in need, many Aboriginal themselves. With a great gift for storytelling and a wicked sense of humour, Gorrie frankly and movingly explores the impact of racism on her family and her life, the impact of intergenerational trauma resulting from cultural dispossession, and the inevitable difficulties of making her way as an Aboriginal woman in the white-and-male-dominated workplace of the police force. Black and Blue is a memoir of remarkable fortitude and resilience, told with wit, wisdom, and great heart.


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The story of an Aboriginal woman who worked as a police officer and fought for justice both within and beyond the Australian police force. A proud Kurnai woman, Veronica Gorrie grew up dauntless, full of cheek and a fierce sense of justice. After watching her friends and family suffer under a deeply compromised law-enforcement system, Gorrie signed up for training to become The story of an Aboriginal woman who worked as a police officer and fought for justice both within and beyond the Australian police force. A proud Kurnai woman, Veronica Gorrie grew up dauntless, full of cheek and a fierce sense of justice. After watching her friends and family suffer under a deeply compromised law-enforcement system, Gorrie signed up for training to become one of a rare few Aboriginal police officers in Australia. In her ten years in the force, she witnessed appalling institutional racism and sexism, and fought past those things to provide courageous and compassionate service to civilians in need, many Aboriginal themselves. With a great gift for storytelling and a wicked sense of humour, Gorrie frankly and movingly explores the impact of racism on her family and her life, the impact of intergenerational trauma resulting from cultural dispossession, and the inevitable difficulties of making her way as an Aboriginal woman in the white-and-male-dominated workplace of the police force. Black and Blue is a memoir of remarkable fortitude and resilience, told with wit, wisdom, and great heart.

30 review for Black and Blue: A Memoir of Racism and Resilience

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer (JC-S)

    ‘I come from a long line of strong women.’ At the beginning of the book, at the end of her Author’s Note, Ms Gorrie writes: ‘Please be aware that this book contains material that readers may find confronting and disturbing, and that could cause sadness or distress, or trigger traumatic memories, especially for Aboriginal people, and those who have survived past abuse, violence, or childhood trauma.’ I thank Ms Gorrie for this warning: being forewarned enables a reader to proceed with caution into w ‘I come from a long line of strong women.’ At the beginning of the book, at the end of her Author’s Note, Ms Gorrie writes: ‘Please be aware that this book contains material that readers may find confronting and disturbing, and that could cause sadness or distress, or trigger traumatic memories, especially for Aboriginal people, and those who have survived past abuse, violence, or childhood trauma.’ I thank Ms Gorrie for this warning: being forewarned enables a reader to proceed with caution into what is a confronting, important but uncomfortable read. The book is split into two parts. The first part deals with Ms Gorrie’s life before joining the Queensland Police Service, the second with her experience of ten years in the Queensland Police Service, and beyond. This is a very personal story, of growing up in a society which (to my shame) makes judgements about people based on colour and ethnicity often without considering culture, family ties and responsibilities. Some people sink beneath the burden of abuse and mistreatment, others will find a path through to achieve a more meaningful life for themselves, but all are scarred by their experiences. In telling us her story, Ms Gorrie gives context. We learn about why, for example, her grandparents lived the way they did. We learn (or remember) the impact of alcohol abuse and violence on families. ‘When you are getting beaten, it does something to you. It takes away your self-esteem, your confidence, your self-respect and your self-worth. But more importantly, it takes away your voice.’ Disempowerment and abuse can become entrenched within family groups and across generations. Most of us will copy the behaviour of those responsible for our upbringing. Most, but not all. And this, for me, is one of the reasons why Ms Gorrie’s book is important. ‘I joined the police for many reasons: first, to see if I could get in, and more importantly, because I had seen the way the police mistreated my people and naively thought that if I joined, I would be able to stop this.’ Sadly, Ms Gorrie’s idealism is undermined by the reality she worked within. And injury forces retirement. ‘When I first joined the police, I had this idea that I could change the attitude of the Aboriginal community towards police. Little did I know I couldn’t do that until I changed the police attitude towards Aboriginal people.’ As I read this book, my admiration for Ms Gorrie increased. She tells a difficult story with humour and insight and in doing so provides hope for others. ‘The pain and suffering of the stolen generations is passed down from generation to generation. My grandmother lived this fear, my father experienced the fear, and I feared the experience.’ I would recommend this book to all Australians. Jennifer Cameron-Smith

  2. 4 out of 5

    Scribe Publications

    Loved it. I read it in one sitting — couldn’t put it down. I thought of A.B. Facey as I read her astounding journey. What an incredible woman. Melissa Lucashenko, Miles Franklin Award-winning author of Too Much Lip The power of storytelling is to share the lives of people who change the world. Ronnie Gorrie’s journey as an Aboriginal woman shows the different levels of power in our country and is as radical as it is moving. A loving, affecting, and honest account of her life. Reading Ronnie’s word Loved it. I read it in one sitting — couldn’t put it down. I thought of A.B. Facey as I read her astounding journey. What an incredible woman. Melissa Lucashenko, Miles Franklin Award-winning author of Too Much Lip The power of storytelling is to share the lives of people who change the world. Ronnie Gorrie’s journey as an Aboriginal woman shows the different levels of power in our country and is as radical as it is moving. A loving, affecting, and honest account of her life. Reading Ronnie’s words is like hearing the yarn of a friend. Nakkiah Lui A memoir full heart, humour and fire, from an author who’s always had a keen sense of justice. Happy Magazine Gorrie’s account of her time in the police force includes details of police misconduct that are rarely written about by former insiders … Rather than providing a systemic analysis, Gorrie tells her story as raw, unfiltered recollection. Fernanda Dahlstrom, Kill Your Darlings Every now and then, a story comes along that astonishes with its degree of truth, trauma and resilience. Veronica Gorrie’s memoir, Black and Blue, is one such, chronicling a life of inconceivable pain, abuse and discrimination … Her book should be mandatory reading material for all emerging and current cops … Women who have historically been silenced: now more than ever, we need to be reading their stories. Jessie Tu, Sydney Morning Herald [Veronica Gorrie] speaks about the institutionalised racism and sexism … from the perspective of an Aboriginal woman … [i]t's like you're having a yard with her. Alice Skyes, singer-songwriter, The Sun-Herald

  3. 5 out of 5

    Declan Fry

    1. When a marginalised person writes, it is not art. When a marginalised person writes, it is ethnography. When a marginalised person writes, it is “truth-telling.” It is “bearing witness.” When a marginalised person writes, their writing is asked to bear a load it cannot see or witness: its invalidation as art. Continue: https://insidestory.org.au/killing-th... 1. When a marginalised person writes, it is not art. When a marginalised person writes, it is ethnography. When a marginalised person writes, it is “truth-telling.” It is “bearing witness.” When a marginalised person writes, their writing is asked to bear a load it cannot see or witness: its invalidation as art. Continue: https://insidestory.org.au/killing-th...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Zora

    A super timely and powerful memoir by proud Gunai/Kurnai woman Veronica Gorrie which is right up there with the best Aboriginal memoirs, most recently Archie Roach's, but going back, Ruby Langford's, those of Sally Morgan and Jackie and Rita Huggins and many others. Gorrie spent ten years as a rare Aboriginal woman in policing and she was very good at her job but what it has left her with PTSD and regrets. The system is racist to its core and broken. But this is not only a memoir about that scar A super timely and powerful memoir by proud Gunai/Kurnai woman Veronica Gorrie which is right up there with the best Aboriginal memoirs, most recently Archie Roach's, but going back, Ruby Langford's, those of Sally Morgan and Jackie and Rita Huggins and many others. Gorrie spent ten years as a rare Aboriginal woman in policing and she was very good at her job but what it has left her with PTSD and regrets. The system is racist to its core and broken. But this is not only a memoir about that scarring experience, as important a story as that is. It's the story of her whole life, including as the title also references, being a DV survivor. But Gorrie is also a mum, a daughter, a partner, sister, friend, music lover, an Aboriginal woman and now she's a writer, and a fine storyteller. Go buy it and spread the word.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Caitlin Alexander

    Finished this in an afternoon. Gorrie writes with unflinching honesty about her experiences as an Aboriginal woman, mother, and police officer. A must read for all Australians.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Millie Baylis

    I tore through this book and found myself audibly gasping at so many of the stories it holds. It’s not fair that one woman has been through so much in one lifetime, and not right that’s not unusual, yet the huge compassion and humour that Ronnie emerges with and shares is remarkable. Her writing is forthright and clear – this is a no-bullshit book, and one that will surely have a big impact. No one could read it and still believe that the police are not a deeply racist institution, or not feel mo I tore through this book and found myself audibly gasping at so many of the stories it holds. It’s not fair that one woman has been through so much in one lifetime, and not right that’s not unusual, yet the huge compassion and humour that Ronnie emerges with and shares is remarkable. Her writing is forthright and clear – this is a no-bullshit book, and one that will surely have a big impact. No one could read it and still believe that the police are not a deeply racist institution, or not feel more conscious of the lifelong (and intergenerational) after-effects of white + colonial + male violence... But it’s about so much more than that too! I loved the stories of Ronnie as a child and teenager the most. There are heaps of sweet moments, like her singing with her siblings in “Australia’s Jackson five”, or stealing bubblegum jeans, or when she got her first period and her dad went and bought every brand of pads in the supermarket for her.  I also loved the way she clearly and plainly showed how alcoholism is a health issue not a criminal one; and how poverty and trauma are at the root of so many criminalised behaviours. Mostly though, as well as being a book about racism and survival, this is a book full of so much love. About family and the messy loving of those who cause us pain – the learning to forgive others and ourselves. I could bang on but go read her words instead.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tehcup

    So powerful and yet heartbreaking. I am left with the urge to cry.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Partridge

    Veronica Gorrie is one tough lady, with a straightforward, no-holds-barred writing style. Gorrie shows us the daily reality of racial discrimination, violence and police brutality, as the author and other social activists endeavour to help individuals and change the system which brutalises and kills Aboriginal people. As you read this book, keep asking yourself, would this targeting and treatment ever happen to white Australians? An eye-opening read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Vannessa

    Veronica Gorrie's story is fascinating, both of growing up Black in country Victoria and her time in the police force in Queensland. She's pretty clear that, institutionally, the police force is no place for Black/First Nations. Veronica Gorrie's story is fascinating, both of growing up Black in country Victoria and her time in the police force in Queensland. She's pretty clear that, institutionally, the police force is no place for Black/First Nations.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marj

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 2.5 rounded up The author has suffered so much - a mother who didn't love or want her, sexual abuse, domestic violence, lack of food, neglect, racism and generational trauma. To add to this her children have also suffered from domestic violence and lack of food. Although the autobiography is incredibly sad, I often found the writing choppy and clunky. At times, during the second half, I found myself skimming pages as yet another police job was mentioned, briefly discussed, then passed over for an 2.5 rounded up The author has suffered so much - a mother who didn't love or want her, sexual abuse, domestic violence, lack of food, neglect, racism and generational trauma. To add to this her children have also suffered from domestic violence and lack of food. Although the autobiography is incredibly sad, I often found the writing choppy and clunky. At times, during the second half, I found myself skimming pages as yet another police job was mentioned, briefly discussed, then passed over for another job.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn (sixminutesforme)

    Gorrie is a Gunai/Kurnai woman and in this shares her journey growing up and raising her family, and ultimately to working in the police force and the ongoing trauma that has had on her life since. Dr Chelsea Watego’s introduction frames the memoir to follow perfectly in articulating that Gorrie “is here to tell the truth of the Queensland Police Service, of the good and the bad. She so powerfully captures the hopelessness she felt when, having met the markers of success within the police force, Gorrie is a Gunai/Kurnai woman and in this shares her journey growing up and raising her family, and ultimately to working in the police force and the ongoing trauma that has had on her life since. Dr Chelsea Watego’s introduction frames the memoir to follow perfectly in articulating that Gorrie “is here to tell the truth of the Queensland Police Service, of the good and the bad. She so powerfully captures the hopelessness she felt when, having met the markers of success within the police force, she was discarded when her body could no longer withstand it.” This is stunning storytelling—Gorrie shares this intimate conversation in her writing style that kindles a connection with the reader almost instantly. The writing is direct and deeply personal, a self reflection of a career and life as much as it is an account of the institutional racism and sexism permeating society and the profession specifically. So much of those broader traumas inform the personal as Gorrie writes them, though she notes clearly in her author note that she does not profess to speak beyond her own personal experience. The connection Dr Watego makes to Gorrie’s narrative approach and the difference between the Black Witness and the White Witness (first articulated by Amy McQuire in 2019) in that “she does not extract others’ stories to centre herself as the lead character or heroine. She affords a generosity to those she speaks of, even those who brutalise her, and unlike the White Witness, she refuses to pathologise them.” I thought about this a lot while reading the memoir, thinking about *how* Gorrie was telling as much as in the *what* of her story. Also be sure to check out @_declanfry review of this in Inside Story (“Killing the cop in your head—forty ways of looking at Veronica Gorrie’s Black and Blue”)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ash Scoular

    Couldn’t put this down. It feels like Ronnie is sitting and having a big chat with you; a chat that is boldly honest and filled with stories of fierce love, fortitude and advocacy on a winding road to police abolitionism. Ronnie Gorrie is a legend and is also just a really lovely person 🙂 Read it and take care doing so xx

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tamzen

    Hard to rate Enjoyment - 1 star (but that's the point) Importance - 5 stars Recognise my privilege in being in a good enough place to read this. Content warnings abound. Grateful to the author for reliving trauma to educate people like me. White people, we've got to do better. Hard to rate Enjoyment - 1 star (but that's the point) Importance - 5 stars Recognise my privilege in being in a good enough place to read this. Content warnings abound. Grateful to the author for reliving trauma to educate people like me. White people, we've got to do better.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kt

    5 stars 🚨Trigger warnings - domestic violence and racism🚨 Veronica Gorrie has lived a life that most people couldn’t even begin to comprehend. A strong Aboriginal woman, she had a childhood that no one would envy and after being subjected to unthinkable domestic violence; Gorrie joined the Queensland Police Service (QPS). Hoping to change the system from within after a lifetime of watching her family being on the receiving end of the Police, Gorrie had no idea just how entrenched racism and sexism 5 stars 🚨Trigger warnings - domestic violence and racism🚨 Veronica Gorrie has lived a life that most people couldn’t even begin to comprehend. A strong Aboriginal woman, she had a childhood that no one would envy and after being subjected to unthinkable domestic violence; Gorrie joined the Queensland Police Service (QPS). Hoping to change the system from within after a lifetime of watching her family being on the receiving end of the Police, Gorrie had no idea just how entrenched racism and sexism was in the QPS and just how dramatically this would effect her life going forward. The cover of Black and Blue by Veronica Gorrie states that it is a memoir of racism and resilience and I could not sum it up better if I tried. There were a huge range of contrasting emotions that leapt from the page, making you feel like you were on a rollercoaster that alternated between terror and relief. Combine this with wanting to scream in frustration, gasp in shock, laugh with joy and cheer in support; and you have a memoir that is so very powerful that you won’t be able to put it down or forget it in a hurry. Be aware though, Black and Blue is not for the faint hearted. There is nothing about Gorrie’s life that has been easy and she doesn’t hold back. The writing is raw, emotional and unflinching. She is not backwards in coming forward and with themes of inter generational trauma, family unit breakdown, child neglect, domestic violence, racism, crime, drug and alcohol abuse, sexism, misogyny and corruption; the plot can be heavy going at times. However, to my mind; we need more books like this. We need more survivors telling their stories so that we can take off our rose coloured glasses regarding the failures of so many things as a Nation and put a face to the statistics that we often so easily gloss over as just another number. I cannot imagine the trauma that Gorrie went through putting pen to paper to write Black and Blue; but I hope it was also a cathartic experience for her. This book is many things, but most of all; it’s an incredibly inspiring must read yarn about never giving up no matter how hard, hopeless or traumatising the situation is. To play along with my book bingo and to see what else I’m reading, go to #ktbookbingo and @kt_elder on Instagram.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Peter Stuart

    The author opens by clearly stating she has been diagnosed with PTSD. It does not come with a warning that the contents however may trigger others, so, how is this work ? It is Brutal in its telling Graphic in aspects of its detail Distressing in its content Infuriating in its circumstance Aggravating and exasperating across its spectrum The author chooses to share several components of her life. Minimal is the joy in her words and prevalent is the pain. It’s a semi engaging read, yet I found it alm The author opens by clearly stating she has been diagnosed with PTSD. It does not come with a warning that the contents however may trigger others, so, how is this work ? It is Brutal in its telling Graphic in aspects of its detail Distressing in its content Infuriating in its circumstance Aggravating and exasperating across its spectrum The author chooses to share several components of her life. Minimal is the joy in her words and prevalent is the pain. It’s a semi engaging read, yet I found it almost wholly confrontational on several levels across many domains of her life and indeed the elements of the Australian societies she has lived in, some of the decisions taken by the author and some of those taken around her. I found myself needing breaks. It was not a work I could read solely or in a few sessions. Can I recommend it. Yes. However, it should it come with a warning that the content could potentially trigger those suffering through the effects of current and/or previous health issues, instances of violence and PTSD. So too should it contain links to professional organizations that can assist those who may be triggered by its contents. And the lack of these, an editorial oversight perhaps, has made me rate it down to 3 stars.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gill Kidd

    A tough book to read. I realised that I could recognise many situations as individual events that as a white person I would have seen many times but not known the effect of continually combining so many negatives. I kept thinking - why does the author and her family make so many bad life choices? But that is the point. Many life events weigh you down so much you think there aren’t many choices or at least none that you think are possible for you. And then to make the huge leap to being a police A tough book to read. I realised that I could recognise many situations as individual events that as a white person I would have seen many times but not known the effect of continually combining so many negatives. I kept thinking - why does the author and her family make so many bad life choices? But that is the point. Many life events weigh you down so much you think there aren’t many choices or at least none that you think are possible for you. And then to make the huge leap to being a police officer and all that encompasses. She should have been rewarded. Should have been accepted. It makes a statement about peer pressure within an organisation or power. Who could have broken and stood up and defended her? It shows the strength she built within herself and her family. I hope that if I recognise a situation like this I would have the strength to support and be guided in what words to use to convey support. This is a book that I will long remember and hope truly that it may change my thinking. Thank you Veronica

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    The raw honesty and humanity that Veronica Gorrie delivers in her memoir are startling and beautiful. She does not flinch away from the hurtful memories of her past but embraces them as moments that defined her and her journey, specifically what led her to become a police officer. The dark moments are tempered with a sparkling wit, which makes you feel as if you are chatting to her over coffee. She also offers insight into the anger, systemic racism, and generational trauma that Australian indig The raw honesty and humanity that Veronica Gorrie delivers in her memoir are startling and beautiful. She does not flinch away from the hurtful memories of her past but embraces them as moments that defined her and her journey, specifically what led her to become a police officer. The dark moments are tempered with a sparkling wit, which makes you feel as if you are chatting to her over coffee. She also offers insight into the anger, systemic racism, and generational trauma that Australian indigenous people experience in modern Australia, but also their rich, vibrant, and joyful culture and communities. An utterly beautiful memoir and one of many I hope that will emerge as in Gorrie's own words "everyone has a story - we just need to listen to them long enough."

  18. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Arnold

    I read this book while I was away in the bush with dear friends. Each moment I was alone, I would pick it up and become so engrossed, unable to put it down, my face grimacing and tearing as I read the author’s experiences and stories. I had a big cry at the end. What was shared about the QLD Police did not surprise me one bit, but it didn’t make it any less heartbreaking. Thank you for sharing your story with us, Veronica Gorrie - and your integrity and humility in doing so. Here’s for abolition I read this book while I was away in the bush with dear friends. Each moment I was alone, I would pick it up and become so engrossed, unable to put it down, my face grimacing and tearing as I read the author’s experiences and stories. I had a big cry at the end. What was shared about the QLD Police did not surprise me one bit, but it didn’t make it any less heartbreaking. Thank you for sharing your story with us, Veronica Gorrie - and your integrity and humility in doing so. Here’s for abolitionism.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    There's been a number of memoirs by First Nations People released in Australia in the past couple of years, and Black and Blue is a particularly strong entry. The personal and intergenerational trauma explored and exposed here is devastating. The resilience and strength of character displayed by the author is outstanding (though I believe that white Australia offers little option but to be resilient or to be judged harshly). I hope that more First Nations People will have opportunities to tell t There's been a number of memoirs by First Nations People released in Australia in the past couple of years, and Black and Blue is a particularly strong entry. The personal and intergenerational trauma explored and exposed here is devastating. The resilience and strength of character displayed by the author is outstanding (though I believe that white Australia offers little option but to be resilient or to be judged harshly). I hope that more First Nations People will have opportunities to tell their stories because diverse voices is one way we stop homogenizing an entire group of people.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    'Black and Blue' covers Veronica Gorrie's journey as a young kid, and up through some study and a career in the police force, in the hope to create a different space than what has been on offer to her and her family and friends up until this point. Gorrie is a Gunai/Kurnai woman who has had to break through periods of poverty, and racist and sexist sterotypes holding her back, for the sake of her family, and her own future. This story is easy to follow and read, but the casual racism and sexism 'Black and Blue' covers Veronica Gorrie's journey as a young kid, and up through some study and a career in the police force, in the hope to create a different space than what has been on offer to her and her family and friends up until this point. Gorrie is a Gunai/Kurnai woman who has had to break through periods of poverty, and racist and sexist sterotypes holding her back, for the sake of her family, and her own future. This story is easy to follow and read, but the casual racism and sexism throughout can be quite uncomfortable.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alison Mia

    4.5 stars! This woman’s memoir of growing up through traumatic experiences, her love for her family, and her unbreakable code of ethics shines through. Her time working as a police officer in the QPS is horrifying to read about, and I was gasping at what the white police officers got away with. Gorrie has a very matter-of-fact way of story telling, she talks about trauma in the same tone that she talks about going to the shops. She presents her life as is, and tells the reader to deal with it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    This is an impassioned memoir: I am a little in awe at how Gorrie can write look unflinchingly at her trauma and retell it. There is much content here which can be confronting: both through the violence and abandonment in her childhood and in what she witnessed and experienced in her years in the cops. Gorrie's telling is matter of fact, even when described her own misery, anger and her strength, which shines through in spades. This is an impassioned memoir: I am a little in awe at how Gorrie can write look unflinchingly at her trauma and retell it. There is much content here which can be confronting: both through the violence and abandonment in her childhood and in what she witnessed and experienced in her years in the cops. Gorrie's telling is matter of fact, even when described her own misery, anger and her strength, which shines through in spades.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    The completely conversational way Ronnie relates horrendous life events manages to be disarming and not detached, engrossing and personal instead of merely educational and informative. By the last chapter you know her conclusions are as earned - more - than those of countless social studies, because you've been on a tour of her life. The completely conversational way Ronnie relates horrendous life events manages to be disarming and not detached, engrossing and personal instead of merely educational and informative. By the last chapter you know her conclusions are as earned - more - than those of countless social studies, because you've been on a tour of her life.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    What a gutsy piece of writing. It's confronting and rightly so, the experiences Veronica Gorrie has had should not be a norm but frequently these experiences of racism, violence and DV are not unique nor are the experiencesin the police force. Thank you for writing this memoir. I hope your readers gain insight and respond in light of that insight. What a gutsy piece of writing. It's confronting and rightly so, the experiences Veronica Gorrie has had should not be a norm but frequently these experiences of racism, violence and DV are not unique nor are the experiencesin the police force. Thank you for writing this memoir. I hope your readers gain insight and respond in light of that insight.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    I recommend this book to everyone, particularly every reader in Australia. It will be confronting - but it is a good, good read. It will be upsetting - but it is a good, good read. You will learn a lot, you will extend your awareness and understanding- but it is a good, good read. Available as a paper book, an ebook and an e-audiobook. A brilliant read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hermine

    Full of frank, tough stories that need to be shared so we learn and realise life can be so different with the effects of intergenerational trauma and institutional discrimination on a family. Having said that, I didn’t enjoy the writing style and connected less with the storytelling because of that.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    That was brutal- honest, raw and so real. Finished it in three days- I couldn’t put it down. Heart wrenching trauma shared in story. But at the same time I feel so privileged to hear how Veronica Gorrie came through it strong, and now grandma to two grandchildren is pretty special

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kate Whitfield

    I was floored by so much of this book. A first person account of trauma upon generational trauma, and yet still what shines through is this woman's love and heart and guts beyond my imagining. Every Australian should read this. I was floored by so much of this book. A first person account of trauma upon generational trauma, and yet still what shines through is this woman's love and heart and guts beyond my imagining. Every Australian should read this.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Denita

    This is a book that should be read by everyone. This must have been very hard for her to write but she has been honest in her account. She is a very strong person and one to be much admired. I also had the privilege to be able to listen to a podcast where she was speaking more about her life.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jim Fettes

    Gorrie walks readers through a harrowing journey of pain and violence, through childhood and a relationship with the police, culminating in her politics of abolitionism. Her voice is powerful, her story important. A must read.

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