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100 Things We've Lost to the Internet

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The acclaimed editor of The New York Times Book Review takes readers on a nostalgic tour of the pre-Internet age, offering powerful insights into both the profound and the seemingly trivial things we've lost. "A deft blend of nostalgia, humor and devastating insights."--People Remember all those ingrained habits, cherished ideas, beloved objects, and stubborn preference The acclaimed editor of The New York Times Book Review takes readers on a nostalgic tour of the pre-Internet age, offering powerful insights into both the profound and the seemingly trivial things we've lost. "A deft blend of nostalgia, humor and devastating insights."--People Remember all those ingrained habits, cherished ideas, beloved objects, and stubborn preferences from the pre-Internet age? They're gone. To some of those things we can say good riddance. But many we miss terribly. Whatever our emotional response to this departed realm, we are faced with the fact that nearly every aspect of modern life now takes place in filtered, isolated corners of cyberspace--a space that has slowly subsumed our physical habitats, replacing or transforming the office, our local library, a favorite bar, the movie theater, and the coffee shop where people met one another's gaze from across the room. Even as we've gained the ability to gather without leaving our house, many of the fundamentally human experiences that have sustained us have disappeared. In one hundred glimpses of that pre-Internet world, Pamela Paul, editor of The New York Times Book Review, presents a captivating record, enlivened with illustrations, of the world before cyberspace--from voicemails to blind dates to punctuation to civility. There are the small losses: postcards, the blessings of an adolescence largely spared of documentation, the Rolodex, and the genuine surprises at high school reunions. But there are larger repercussions, too: weaker memories, the inability to entertain oneself, and the utter demolition of privacy. 100 Things We've Lost to the Internet is at once an evocative swan song for a disappearing era and, perhaps, a guide to reclaiming just a little bit more of the world IRL.


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The acclaimed editor of The New York Times Book Review takes readers on a nostalgic tour of the pre-Internet age, offering powerful insights into both the profound and the seemingly trivial things we've lost. "A deft blend of nostalgia, humor and devastating insights."--People Remember all those ingrained habits, cherished ideas, beloved objects, and stubborn preference The acclaimed editor of The New York Times Book Review takes readers on a nostalgic tour of the pre-Internet age, offering powerful insights into both the profound and the seemingly trivial things we've lost. "A deft blend of nostalgia, humor and devastating insights."--People Remember all those ingrained habits, cherished ideas, beloved objects, and stubborn preferences from the pre-Internet age? They're gone. To some of those things we can say good riddance. But many we miss terribly. Whatever our emotional response to this departed realm, we are faced with the fact that nearly every aspect of modern life now takes place in filtered, isolated corners of cyberspace--a space that has slowly subsumed our physical habitats, replacing or transforming the office, our local library, a favorite bar, the movie theater, and the coffee shop where people met one another's gaze from across the room. Even as we've gained the ability to gather without leaving our house, many of the fundamentally human experiences that have sustained us have disappeared. In one hundred glimpses of that pre-Internet world, Pamela Paul, editor of The New York Times Book Review, presents a captivating record, enlivened with illustrations, of the world before cyberspace--from voicemails to blind dates to punctuation to civility. There are the small losses: postcards, the blessings of an adolescence largely spared of documentation, the Rolodex, and the genuine surprises at high school reunions. But there are larger repercussions, too: weaker memories, the inability to entertain oneself, and the utter demolition of privacy. 100 Things We've Lost to the Internet is at once an evocative swan song for a disappearing era and, perhaps, a guide to reclaiming just a little bit more of the world IRL.

30 review for 100 Things We've Lost to the Internet

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    I’m a fan of Paul’s NYT book review podcast, so I was excited to see she’d written a book. I enjoyed it. Paul does a good job of describing the good and the bad that has come from the massive shift the internet has brought to pretty much every part of our way of life. In Paul’s telling the changes are mostly bad, though I’m glad this book never turns into lament for “how things used to be.” This book is very New York heavy (and sometimes very French heavy?) but I found myself relating to a lot of I’m a fan of Paul’s NYT book review podcast, so I was excited to see she’d written a book. I enjoyed it. Paul does a good job of describing the good and the bad that has come from the massive shift the internet has brought to pretty much every part of our way of life. In Paul’s telling the changes are mostly bad, though I’m glad this book never turns into lament for “how things used to be.” This book is very New York heavy (and sometimes very French heavy?) but I found myself relating to a lot of what she writes: “How is it that activities that in a zillion years be roped into doing in real life - paging through an old acquaintance’s baby album, suffering through an odd slide show from Turkey - become strangely alluring online?” And it also got me reminiscing things I probably would have never thought about again: “That moment at the beginning of the first day of school when books were handed out - if you were lucky you got one of the shiny new ones, maybe even an updated edition, but if you were unlucky you had to write your name on the inside back cover under the name of the student who had your bio textbook last year - was a thing of the past. No getting excited or annoyed about which upperclassmen had your textbook before. No spending time trying to discern something about the previous owner by deciphering old doodles.”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This book of short essays on things that the internet has removed from modern life is a very fun read. By turns wistful and funny, if you're old enough to remember the 1980's this is a treat. This book of short essays on things that the internet has removed from modern life is a very fun read. By turns wistful and funny, if you're old enough to remember the 1980's this is a treat.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carey

    DNF at 21% I went in thinking this would be a thought provoking meditation on the ways in which life has changed with the digital age, but it's just one self-indulgent rant after another. I myself am a baby Gen Xer - I remember a time before the internet, but it's existed for the entirety of my adult life. I get it. Things have changed rapidly. That can be alarming or scary, but we grumble, adapt, and move on. I was already frustrated by the nostalgia in this book for things no one in their right DNF at 21% I went in thinking this would be a thought provoking meditation on the ways in which life has changed with the digital age, but it's just one self-indulgent rant after another. I myself am a baby Gen Xer - I remember a time before the internet, but it's existed for the entirety of my adult life. I get it. Things have changed rapidly. That can be alarming or scary, but we grumble, adapt, and move on. I was already frustrated by the nostalgia in this book for things no one in their right mind misses, like getting lost, being bored, or wasting money on rolls of film full of shitty pictures you don't know are shitty for weeks or months. But then we get to the school library and that is where I say fuck this book. Nostalgia for shushy librarians and silent libraries that acted as nothing more than moldering book repositories is gross. The library has evolved and is continuing to evolve into something better and more important than just a place to store books. I might not even be as pissed off about this as I am except that I was listening to the audio and the way the narrator spits out "media center" along with other newer terms for spaces that used to be libraries grated on me. Nostalgia is a tricky thing. It often lies. This book wallows in it. I'm really disappointed because I wanted to like it so much.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brianna

    This isn’t my typical read but I’m glad I found it while scrolling through NetGalley. Most of Paul’s list was way before my time, so I got to relive those while reading through the list. Most of the things he discussed are important concepts, since we’ve slowly been losing certain aspects of life thanks to the Internet.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Milan

    '100 Things We've Lost to the Internet' by Pamela Paul contains 100 short essays some of them amusing, some insightful and some not that interesting. I skipped a few essays which felt too US-centric. I don't agree with the author on the few things that she says that we've lost, for example: bedtime reading, solitude, vacation, etc. But yes, we've lost quite a few things to the internet which people would rather call nostalgia, but were a part of life pre-internet days. I'm not surprised to know '100 Things We've Lost to the Internet' by Pamela Paul contains 100 short essays some of them amusing, some insightful and some not that interesting. I skipped a few essays which felt too US-centric. I don't agree with the author on the few things that she says that we've lost, for example: bedtime reading, solitude, vacation, etc. But yes, we've lost quite a few things to the internet which people would rather call nostalgia, but were a part of life pre-internet days. I'm not surprised to know that people share so much of their lives publicly, at least I don't. As she says, "Perhaps it’s we humans who have fallen behind the technology we created, we humans who find it hard to remember what we would like to remember, to hold on to it as something that belongs to us and us alone and keep it for ourselves. It’s we humans who are unable to forget the things we’ve lost and to let them go. It’s we who still wonder how to make these choices, when we still have them." Anything that we share on the internet stays there forever, whether we want it or not. There is no closure on the internet. She rightly says, "There is no blissful certainty that as you sail through life committing the typical human being’s battery of errors, misunderstandings, flubbed introductions, and inadvertently offensive remarks, nobody is entering them into the permanent record." Once something is shared, it goes out of your hand. " The Internet is unforgiving and unforgetting about even the most minor gaffe, the kind of thing that used to blow over by morning." People love to share their pictures and they let algorithms do the sorting for them but a very few realize that "This these companies do happily, because to them, each photo is a data point, helping improve their facial recognition technology, enhance their customer profiles, identify influencer relationships between consumers, and locate trends." A few memorable lines from the book: • You tend to lose the big picture when you’re seeing it only on a small screen. • Only offline do you find out what people truly think. • People demonstrably learn more when they put pencil to paper than when they swipe a screen. • On paper, you can cross things out when you’re done in a satisfying way that hitting delete doesn’t deliver. • To give someone a mixtape was a genuine act of courtship, devotion, or friendship, and now it’s gone. • While we are digitally present all the time, we are hardly ever fully present in the moment.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Greg Talbot

    "Connection" may be the most loaded word of the post-internet age. Pamela Paul describes 100 things in our pre-wired world that explore the ways we connected with materials (magazines, Christmas cards) and experiences (making memories, starting up life in a new city) . Written in skimmable, and easily digestible chapters, this catalog provides a mixed bag of the world we lost, and the one we are in currently. The book has a fun, unhurriedness about it, and it is agreeable in the content it provid "Connection" may be the most loaded word of the post-internet age. Pamela Paul describes 100 things in our pre-wired world that explore the ways we connected with materials (magazines, Christmas cards) and experiences (making memories, starting up life in a new city) . Written in skimmable, and easily digestible chapters, this catalog provides a mixed bag of the world we lost, and the one we are in currently. The book has a fun, unhurriedness about it, and it is agreeable in the content it provides. It hardly scratches the dark ways social media undermines mental health , political civility, and truth. That's a different kind of book, but the items Paul focuses on are largely Internet 1.0. And it's a very deliberate choice, but she explores what we missed, instead of what is gained through the integration of technologies. There is more than surface here, and there are a lot of things to ponder of the lost world. Our remembered selves are more fragmented, our social media more determinate, and our relationships largely more distant and alienated. Still, I think this book could have provided deeper trend analysis...sharing deeper insights into the world we lost. Also, the technology that has created the change...network speeds, social media, cell phone platforms, is never explored. A fun read. Something to click open and scroll through, when you can't find a paper magazine in sight.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Peter O'Kelly

    A couple reviews to consider: • https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-... • https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-re... A couple reviews to consider: • https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-... • https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-re...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    Pamela Paul’s 100 Things We’ve Lost to the Internet is an amiable, browsable series of brief essays exploring, usually though not always with a pang of regret, those things and actions made obsolete by the internet, such as phone calls, paper maps, filing, and more. Or as she puts it in the introduction: “the things we achingly miss, the things we hardly knew existed, the things to which we can give a hard adios.” Paul also early on acknowledges that a number of these will be idiosyncratic losses Pamela Paul’s 100 Things We’ve Lost to the Internet is an amiable, browsable series of brief essays exploring, usually though not always with a pang of regret, those things and actions made obsolete by the internet, such as phone calls, paper maps, filing, and more. Or as she puts it in the introduction: “the things we achingly miss, the things we hardly knew existed, the things to which we can give a hard adios.” Paul also early on acknowledges that a number of these will be idiosyncratic losses, defined by her own background: her age, her socio-economic status, etc. She notes early on that “my own grievances reflect my experience as a Gen Xer … the priorities of a reader … the hopes and anxieties of a mother of three in New York.” She also quickly forestalls any charges that she is a luddite; she happily recognizes the many benefits of the web, and even, with regard to some of the lost objects/acts, bids them farewell with a cheery “good-riddance.” The pieces themselves are brief, a few a mere couple of sentences or paragraphs with most coming in at 2-3 pages and mostly covering just what one (at least one of a certain age range) would expect. Along with the above, that includes answering machines, getting lost, taking photographs, flea markets, old-style TV watching, etc. There’s a sense therefore of familiarity to a number of the pieces, and I found my favorites were the more unexpected ones, such as ignoring people or solo travel. Their tone is mostly light and light-hearted, whimsical at times, self-deprecating at moments, sometimes funny, other times sad. But the emotions are always moderate—never too high, never too low. The writing is always clear and precise, the voice engaging and conversational, the pieces reading almost as a cross between an informal blog and more formal essays. They mostly skim the surface, dipping a few times a bit deeper, but never for too long. I did at times find myself wishing for a bit more substance, a deeper dive into the ramifications of what was lost. But that’s clearly not Paul’s goal here so it can hardly be lodged as a writing critique, more a wistful “it would have been nice” desire, given just how smooth a writer she is. Because of that, and the similarity in tone and subject, I’d recommend it be read over several days/nights rather than straight or nearly straight through. And since there’s no grand arc, one can feel free to open up to whatever topic strikes their fancy. Well written, well covered if not exhaustive in terms of content, a welcome wry and observant voice. Recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matt Schiavenza

    Pamela Paul’s collection of vignettes attempts to document what we’ve lost in the last 20 or so years to the internet, which — let’s be honest — has been a big disappointment. It’s a worthy subject of a book, and I suspect it won’t be the last of its kind. But its structure — 100 short essays about a range of subjects — undermines its potential and left me wanting more. Paul’s essays can be divided into two basic categories. The first are technologies that the internet has rendered obsolete, such Pamela Paul’s collection of vignettes attempts to document what we’ve lost in the last 20 or so years to the internet, which — let’s be honest — has been a big disappointment. It’s a worthy subject of a book, and I suspect it won’t be the last of its kind. But its structure — 100 short essays about a range of subjects — undermines its potential and left me wanting more. Paul’s essays can be divided into two basic categories. The first are technologies that the internet has rendered obsolete, such as Rolodexes and kitchen phones and paper maps. These items are remembered fondly, even if Paul acknowledges that the internet has made life far more convenient. The second category features more abstract concepts, like empathy, that social media has eroded, or sick days when one wasn’t expected to “keep an eye on” email or Slack. Is Paul’s book a nostalgic look at a bygone era or a searing examination of how the internet has cost us in ways we can’t quantify? The answer is both, or neither. I wish she had given us one or the other. There are other questions I wished Paul would have addressed, but didn’t. Is the problem the internet itself, or just social media? Are the items in her book truly lost or can they be restored again? I don’t want to criticize Paul for not writing the book I wished she wrote, but I do think this is a subject worth more critical examination. Humans love lists, and structuring a book as 100 short essays — most of which can be read on the toilet — is an easy sell to an attention-deprived audience. (Thanks, internet). But as charming and articulate as Paul is, this book feels like a swing and a miss.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laila

    This irritated me. We didn’t “lose” birthday cards, Christmas cards, bedside reading, record albums, movie theaters, etc. You can still choose to experience those things! No, we don’t have marathon phone call sessions on the one corded family phone anymore, trying to drag the phone as far away as the cord will stretch. But that’s okay. I don’t know, I guess I wanted this to be deeper and more philosophical.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cher

    Fun read for those of us old enough to remember not only pre-internet days but the days before personal computers. I feel as though it explains more how things have changed than things that are totally lost, although her observations are often so true (lol I used an online thesaurus to find a word). Fun and thought-provoking.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    A book that makes sense! We have lost so much to the web. I would be fine with going back to the 80s.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Marisa Gettas

    DNF at 11% — I'm needing something to listen to as my pain treatment is wearing off, and eye-reading is challenging. I didn’t enjoy the narration and the content wasn’t grabbing me. DNF at 11% — I'm needing something to listen to as my pain treatment is wearing off, and eye-reading is challenging. I didn’t enjoy the narration and the content wasn’t grabbing me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    3.5 stars

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Fluffy and fun

  16. 5 out of 5

    Allen Adams

    The ubiquity of the internet. It is part of our everyday lives, like it or not. Over the past quarter-century, the online explosion has radically altered the world and the way we move through it. For many of you, that has always been the world. If you were born anytime after 1990 or so, you likely have no memories of a world without the internet. Sure, you might recall the frustrating early days of dial-up modems and slow-loading websites, a time when your entire afternoon might be spent download The ubiquity of the internet. It is part of our everyday lives, like it or not. Over the past quarter-century, the online explosion has radically altered the world and the way we move through it. For many of you, that has always been the world. If you were born anytime after 1990 or so, you likely have no memories of a world without the internet. Sure, you might recall the frustrating early days of dial-up modems and slow-loading websites, a time when your entire afternoon might be spent downloading a single song. But the internet is and has always been omnipresent. However, those of us who are older have clear and distinct memories of a different time and place. A time and place where the internet felt more like science fiction than simple reality. We’ve said good-bye to a lot of things from those bygone days – some of them minor, some incredibly significant – but the one factor they all have in common is that they don’t appear to be coming back. Thus we get “100 Things We've Lost to the Internet.” Pamela Paul, editor of The New York Times Book Review, offers up a collection of snapshots from the before times, quick-hit glimpses at a vast array of items and experiences that are simply … gone. They exist only in old photographs (remember those?) or increasingly dusty memories. These habits and learned behaviors, these compulsions and desires – vanished, never to be experienced by those who came after. These short essays explore the vast array of alterations wrought by the internet, all of them presented with a combination of wistfulness and self-effacing humor. Because here’s the thing – while we might miss a lot of this stuff, we also have to concede that in a lot of ways, we’re better off … even if we perhaps don’t want to admit it. And some of it? Well … some of it we sure would like to have back. From the very first entry – titled “Boredom” and reflective of the dichotomous nature of this conversation – we hit the ground running. On its face, it seems odd to bemoan the dearth of boredom – who wants to be bored? But as so many people are learning, that absence of boredom – having the breadth of the internet at one’s fingertips at all times – precludes the imaginative outbursts that boredom prompts. When there’s no need to figure out something to do, we instead … do nothing, idly scrolling our way through the hours. You might not like being bored, but in some ways, you kind of need to be every once in a while. A lot of these entries might read as minor, but others are reflective of broader changes. Number 20, for instance, is “The Phone in the Kitchen.” In an age of smartphones, precious few even have a landline anymore. But if you were a teenager back then – as I was – then that phone was a central cog in your social life. We’ve got entries on handwritten letters and penmanship and spelling – all dinosaurs in their way. As a longtime accumulator of random knowledge, certain entries – “Being the Only One,” “Figuring Out Who That Actor Is” – hit me where I live; remembering trivia is no longer nearly as impressive when everyone has the capability to find the answer in seconds. On and on the list goes, with every minor shift adding to the pile. What “100 Things We’ve Lost to the Internet” does so well is illustrate the growth of that pile; while any individual item might be no big deal, the collected set is significant. It’s a list of ways in which the world now is different from the world then – no small thing when dealing with a culture as susceptible to nostalgia as our own. Obviously, Paul isn’t saying that everything back then was better. Time marches on, after all, and it’s tough to argue against the many benefits that the internet has brought into our lives. But that isn’t really the point. It’s not about whether it used to be better, it’s that it used to be different. And so much of who we are is shaped by the experiences of our formative years; what does it mean when the shape taken by those years is so drastically different from one generation to the next? “100 Things We've Lost to the Internet” is a fun read for those of us who share some of Paul’s memories and experiences. We remember what it was like and we like to remember. The landscape has shifted, and no doubt it will shift again as technology’s exponential advancement continues on apace. This book serves as a reminder of the simple truth that when gains are made, sometimes something is lost.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Susanne Latour

    ‘The more our devices aim to bring us together, the more people worry they are tearing us apart.’ 100 Things We Lost to the Internet is a collection of brief essays of changes that the internet has brought to our lives. I found this book not only to be about the losses but some positives to those losses ie: using a paper map or triptik’s from CAA compared to google maps/GPS. The tone of the essays are light and funny at times. One of my favourites was ‘The Period’ and how when texting and even e ‘The more our devices aim to bring us together, the more people worry they are tearing us apart.’ 100 Things We Lost to the Internet is a collection of brief essays of changes that the internet has brought to our lives. I found this book not only to be about the losses but some positives to those losses ie: using a paper map or triptik’s from CAA compared to google maps/GPS. The tone of the essays are light and funny at times. One of my favourites was ‘The Period’ and how when texting and even emailing nobody uses a period anymore to end their sentences and it is quite often replaced by an exclamation mark or two. I went back and look at some of my own text conversations and found this to be so true. A sad essay was the loss of school libraries in the US. I’m not sure if this is the same across the world and Canada where I live but the statistics she gives of some individual states is really sad as reading has been such a big part of my life. Some topics were very nostalgic for me like the corded telephone in the kitchen, getting your own phone line, cassette tapes and CD’s and the TV guide. Overall a fun read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kristopher Powell

    Interesting, frequently nostalgic, sometimes depressing. I frequently feel lucky to have been an almost-formed adult in the analog age. It was good being reminded, you know, how crappy it was getting lost pre-smartphone, when you might drive 30 min in the wrong direction. At the same rate, many of these are heartbreaking, especially the statistics about boys reading and the death of family dinners. I do have to say that there is some absolutism that I hope is wrong about "what people do now," kn Interesting, frequently nostalgic, sometimes depressing. I frequently feel lucky to have been an almost-formed adult in the analog age. It was good being reminded, you know, how crappy it was getting lost pre-smartphone, when you might drive 30 min in the wrong direction. At the same rate, many of these are heartbreaking, especially the statistics about boys reading and the death of family dinners. I do have to say that there is some absolutism that I hope is wrong about "what people do now," knowing that I have retreated from social media myself to undo a number of the losses described. Partially that was for myself and partially to be a better parent for a generation that seems like they'll catch the worst of our digital economy and social media. While this was a novel read for a geriatric millennial/gen-x-er, you can't help but be convinced that we're being carried forward on a digital wave towards a worse and less satisfying life. Also, of note, I intentionally bought this book from Booked in Chestnut Hill, because good bookstores are one of the things that I miss the most that we have lost to the Internet.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Zibby Owens

    Remember when TV was just a TV? If you missed a show, that was it! This delightfully written and wonderfully illustrated guide to all things pre-internet is a great conversation started for people on either side—or kind of in the middle—of a wholly digital world. Pamela Paul is the NY Times Book Review editor. She brilliantly captured something we’ve all barely noticed has gone by: life before the internet. Remember when car keys were actual keys? Remember going to movie theaters without phones Remember when TV was just a TV? If you missed a show, that was it! This delightfully written and wonderfully illustrated guide to all things pre-internet is a great conversation started for people on either side—or kind of in the middle—of a wholly digital world. Pamela Paul is the NY Times Book Review editor. She brilliantly captured something we’ve all barely noticed has gone by: life before the internet. Remember when car keys were actual keys? Remember going to movie theaters without phones lighting up in the dark? And do you remember calling people, and if nobody answered, you left a message or called back? (For younger listeners of this podcast, yes, there was a time of home answering machines). The genius of this book was that it was an excellent read for me, but I think it will be an interesting read for any generation, especially people who have grown up as digital natives. To listen to my interview with the author, go to my podcast at: https://zibbyowens.com/transcript/pam...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    This book was great fun! I really appreciate the balance Paul has created here. It could easily have been a book bemoaning all of the horrible changes brought by the internet and then the internet on phones, but it isn't. Often something lost has both a positive side to the loss and a sad one, while other things are great to wave goodbye to (#8. Filing). While this book has a pretty light and fun tone, Paul does hit on some pretty weighty issues brought on by the ubiquity of the internet. (#48. C This book was great fun! I really appreciate the balance Paul has created here. It could easily have been a book bemoaning all of the horrible changes brought by the internet and then the internet on phones, but it isn't. Often something lost has both a positive side to the loss and a sad one, while other things are great to wave goodbye to (#8. Filing). While this book has a pretty light and fun tone, Paul does hit on some pretty weighty issues brought on by the ubiquity of the internet. (#48. Civility, #54. Empathy, #93. Humility, and a few others that I forgot to note as I was listening.) I laughed out loud during her description of #94. Cliff Notes: "travel to the stationary store to visit the spinning yellow rack of shame." (Not quite a direct quote, but close.) She ends the book appropriately, #100 Closure. However, after her discussion of closure, the book just ends. There's no wrap-up, final commentary, or closure, which is my only gripe for this fun read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    Paul has an incredible list of "things" that have been lost to the internet-- in actuality many of the things are actually ideas or concepts. In the list, a couple of my personal favorite items were the reminders of my using my grandparent's rotary phone and taking a picture with a camera. Paul has a fun way of explaining the way things were and comparing it to them to technology of today. This is a great book for young adults to perhaps explain 'quirks' they see from older generations. It appea Paul has an incredible list of "things" that have been lost to the internet-- in actuality many of the things are actually ideas or concepts. In the list, a couple of my personal favorite items were the reminders of my using my grandparent's rotary phone and taking a picture with a camera. Paul has a fun way of explaining the way things were and comparing it to them to technology of today. This is a great book for young adults to perhaps explain 'quirks' they see from older generations. It appears that most of this book was written before the worldwide closures due to COVID-19. In many ways the internet was not all that bad and made it possible to keep people connected during a trying time. I am intrigued to see what (if any) edits are made in the published edition. ***Thank you NetGalley for providing me with access to this e-preview. This review is based on an ARC.***

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Cory

    I like to call these type of books "bathroom books" because the chapters are short enough and standalone, so you can read 1-2 chapters in a special-room sitting. Not that I did that with this book...it was a rental. People don't do that with books I let them borrow, do they? And already I've ruined this review with vulgar imagery. Anyways, Pamela Paul can include "bathroom books" if she writes the sequel 100 More Things We've Lost to the Internet...I suspect most people bring their cellphone into I like to call these type of books "bathroom books" because the chapters are short enough and standalone, so you can read 1-2 chapters in a special-room sitting. Not that I did that with this book...it was a rental. People don't do that with books I let them borrow, do they? And already I've ruined this review with vulgar imagery. Anyways, Pamela Paul can include "bathroom books" if she writes the sequel 100 More Things We've Lost to the Internet...I suspect most people bring their cellphone into the can, which now makes me regret every time I borrowed someone's cellphone. The imagery in this review gets worse and worse so I'll stop here. Great book. 5 stars!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Harper

    Pamela Paul’s examination of what we have lost because of the Internet (and, less often, what we have gained) is thought-provoking and just a little frightening. It makes me sad for all the young people who will never experience some of the true joys available to everyone pre-Internet; it makes me afraid of just what a life lived online is doing to our brains; and it has me about 90 percent convinced to give up social media. I think it ought to be required reading, as impossible as that would be Pamela Paul’s examination of what we have lost because of the Internet (and, less often, what we have gained) is thought-provoking and just a little frightening. It makes me sad for all the young people who will never experience some of the true joys available to everyone pre-Internet; it makes me afraid of just what a life lived online is doing to our brains; and it has me about 90 percent convinced to give up social media. I think it ought to be required reading, as impossible as that would be to enforce, and if that makes me curmudgeonly, well, so be it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sukrit

    A very starrey-eyed look on the things we've lost to the Internet, bordering on fogeyism. I agree with the author on big lifestyle changes that were probably "lost" to the Internet (e.g., boredom, creativity, being lost and finding new places, physical music collections), but some of the things we've "lost" I believe everyone was happy to get rid of! (e.g., living with the uncertainty of who an actor in a movie is, flipping through pages of encyclopedia to find information) A very starrey-eyed look on the things we've lost to the Internet, bordering on fogeyism. I agree with the author on big lifestyle changes that were probably "lost" to the Internet (e.g., boredom, creativity, being lost and finding new places, physical music collections), but some of the things we've "lost" I believe everyone was happy to get rid of! (e.g., living with the uncertainty of who an actor in a movie is, flipping through pages of encyclopedia to find information)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Dipra Lahiri

    Will resonate with those above 40; many items and behaviour that have been lost due to the advent of the internet, social media, apps and 24-7 connectivity. What stands out is that we are losing our 'alone' time with ourselves, to think, to reflect, and the impact of this on the digital generation will probably be understood in a few decades. Will resonate with those above 40; many items and behaviour that have been lost due to the advent of the internet, social media, apps and 24-7 connectivity. What stands out is that we are losing our 'alone' time with ourselves, to think, to reflect, and the impact of this on the digital generation will probably be understood in a few decades.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Least

    Just ok for me since I’m old enough to have seen and thought about all of this and so learned nothing new from this book. I prefer technology impact books with more depth. But it’s a useful book for anyone old enough to care about the myriad ways their lives and the lives of others have been transformed and are old enough to care.

  27. 4 out of 5

    John Wood

    This is a fascinating list with a short description and explanation for each item. Although some things are not entirely gone, this book vividly illustrates how quickly technology changes our lives. Many things may not necessarily be improvements. It also makes you realize how several things are foreign concepts to younger people and future generations.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    3.5 100 short chapters on the many things that have changed since the advent of the internet and cell phones. If you grew up in the 80s her words will resonate with you. Some of her insights made me nostalgic but also grateful for the ease technology gives us. Either way, we can only move forward.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mike Hales

    A simple enough book, ironically read on an iPad but full of lots of lovely ah-ha, yessir moments. Some things I do miss - photo albums, some I certainly do not (landlines, TV schedules) but a fine collection of moments that is well written, stimulating and occasionally thought provoking.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Aman

    As a 90s kid, I found this book to be a delightful, nostalgic trip down memory lane. Many of the chapters also resonate with my personal belief that we’ve lost more than what we’ve gained with the advent of smartphones and social media.

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