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Lifetime Passes

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In this darkly comedic YA graphic novel, a group of teens starts a program to bring senior citizens to a local theme park to take advantage of the unofficial park policy: If someone dies on the property, the rest of their party is given lifetime passes! Sixteen-year-old Jackie Chavez loves her local amusement park, Kingdom Adventure, maybe more than anything else in the wo In this darkly comedic YA graphic novel, a group of teens starts a program to bring senior citizens to a local theme park to take advantage of the unofficial park policy: If someone dies on the property, the rest of their party is given lifetime passes! Sixteen-year-old Jackie Chavez loves her local amusement park, Kingdom Adventure, maybe more than anything else in the world. The park is all she and her friends Nikki, Daniel, and Berke—although they aren’t always the greatest friends—talk about. Kingdom Adventure is where all Jackie’s best memories are, and it’s where she feels safe and happy. This carries even more weight now that Jackie’s parents have been deported and forced to go back to Mexico, leaving Jackie in the United States with her Tía Gina, who she works with at the Valley Care Living seniors’ home. When Gina tells Jackie that they can’t afford a season pass for next summer, Jackie is crushed. But on her next trip to Kingdom Adventure, she discovers a strictly protected secret: If a member of their party dies at the park, the rest of their group gets free lifetime passes. Jackie and her friends hatch a plot to bring seniors from Valley Care Living to the park using a fake volunteer program, with the hopes that one of the residents will croak during their visit. The ruse quickly gets its first volunteer—a feisty resident named Phyllis. What starts off as a macabre plan turns into a revelation for Jackie as Phyllis and the other seniors reveal their own complex histories and connections to Kingdom Adventure, as well as some tough-to-swallow truths about Jackie, her friends, and their future. With artist Claudia Aguirre, Terry Blas has crafted a graphic novel that is dark and deeply moving. This book is Cocoon meets Heathers—a twisted satire about a magical land and the people who love it, even to the point of obsession. Jackie’s summer is about to turn into a wild ride filled with gallows humor, friendship, and fun—or is it?


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In this darkly comedic YA graphic novel, a group of teens starts a program to bring senior citizens to a local theme park to take advantage of the unofficial park policy: If someone dies on the property, the rest of their party is given lifetime passes! Sixteen-year-old Jackie Chavez loves her local amusement park, Kingdom Adventure, maybe more than anything else in the wo In this darkly comedic YA graphic novel, a group of teens starts a program to bring senior citizens to a local theme park to take advantage of the unofficial park policy: If someone dies on the property, the rest of their party is given lifetime passes! Sixteen-year-old Jackie Chavez loves her local amusement park, Kingdom Adventure, maybe more than anything else in the world. The park is all she and her friends Nikki, Daniel, and Berke—although they aren’t always the greatest friends—talk about. Kingdom Adventure is where all Jackie’s best memories are, and it’s where she feels safe and happy. This carries even more weight now that Jackie’s parents have been deported and forced to go back to Mexico, leaving Jackie in the United States with her Tía Gina, who she works with at the Valley Care Living seniors’ home. When Gina tells Jackie that they can’t afford a season pass for next summer, Jackie is crushed. But on her next trip to Kingdom Adventure, she discovers a strictly protected secret: If a member of their party dies at the park, the rest of their group gets free lifetime passes. Jackie and her friends hatch a plot to bring seniors from Valley Care Living to the park using a fake volunteer program, with the hopes that one of the residents will croak during their visit. The ruse quickly gets its first volunteer—a feisty resident named Phyllis. What starts off as a macabre plan turns into a revelation for Jackie as Phyllis and the other seniors reveal their own complex histories and connections to Kingdom Adventure, as well as some tough-to-swallow truths about Jackie, her friends, and their future. With artist Claudia Aguirre, Terry Blas has crafted a graphic novel that is dark and deeply moving. This book is Cocoon meets Heathers—a twisted satire about a magical land and the people who love it, even to the point of obsession. Jackie’s summer is about to turn into a wild ride filled with gallows humor, friendship, and fun—or is it?

30 review for Lifetime Passes

  1. 5 out of 5

    Amethyst

    Firstly, I would like to mention that the arc I received was quite bad quality and black and white, but I am sure once it will have colour, it will be stunning. Secondly, i think it needs to be said, that this book is a little falsely advertised. Based on the synopsis it is supposed to be dark and twisted, but it was far from that, in fact at the end I would even call it wholesome and heartfelt. The characters are the point where it really went south tho, they are really irritating and flat, plus Firstly, I would like to mention that the arc I received was quite bad quality and black and white, but I am sure once it will have colour, it will be stunning. Secondly, i think it needs to be said, that this book is a little falsely advertised. Based on the synopsis it is supposed to be dark and twisted, but it was far from that, in fact at the end I would even call it wholesome and heartfelt. The characters are the point where it really went south tho, they are really irritating and flat, plus the interaction between them was kinda unnatural and badly written. The only character that was developed decently was Phyllis, I loved reading about her past and see how she shaped those around her. Overall, it was a fun and short little book, but if you are looking for something dark (as the synopsis claims to be) then this is probably not the book you are looking for.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jinghay (these.blank.pages)

    I wasn't sure about how to feel about this comic at first since the characters were pretty flat and unlikeable.. I mean taking elderly residents to a theme park in the hopes that one of them passes away, just so you can get life-time passes to a theme park? I'm sorry but no theme park is worth that, even if you have sentimental memories there.. The only thing that made this comic salvageable later was the character growth in Jackie and Daniel partway through, along with the bonding moments betwe I wasn't sure about how to feel about this comic at first since the characters were pretty flat and unlikeable.. I mean taking elderly residents to a theme park in the hopes that one of them passes away, just so you can get life-time passes to a theme park? I'm sorry but no theme park is worth that, even if you have sentimental memories there.. The only thing that made this comic salvageable later was the character growth in Jackie and Daniel partway through, along with the bonding moments between them and the elderly residents. It was interesting to see the complex history that each resident had with the theme park. I'd also like to mention that the arc I read had a pretty bad quality on top of being black white, however I'm sure it would look absolutely stunning in colour. Rating: 3.5/5 Thank you so much Netgalley and ABRAMS Comics for providing the ARC in exchange for a review. All opinions are my own.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nessa [October Tune]

    Thank you NetGalley and Abrams ComicArts for the review copy! I thought the concept of this graphic novel was... interesting. A bunch of kids trying to get lifetime passes to a theme park by taking elderly people with them, hoping one of them would die at the park. Not going to lie, I was prepared to hate all four of the teens we were introduced to. Luckily, the story took a turn and I ended up really enjoying it. The art, unfortunately, wasn't great but that was mostly due to me having a review Thank you NetGalley and Abrams ComicArts for the review copy! I thought the concept of this graphic novel was... interesting. A bunch of kids trying to get lifetime passes to a theme park by taking elderly people with them, hoping one of them would die at the park. Not going to lie, I was prepared to hate all four of the teens we were introduced to. Luckily, the story took a turn and I ended up really enjoying it. The art, unfortunately, wasn't great but that was mostly due to me having a review copy. The finished version will of course have fully coloured art, and I am considering buying myself a copy when it comes out just so I can reread it with the finished artwork. So yeah, didn't take off any points because of that! Definitely recommend this one!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Thank you NetGalley and Abrams ComicArts for this early digital copy in exchange for an honest review! 3.5 Stars (rounded up to 4). When I originally started this graphic novel I was not expecting to enjoy it as much as I did. (Sidenote: The eARC I received was in black and white so some of it was a little harder to read and I feel like I wasn't able to completely enjoy the artwork as much as I would have if it were in color. However, I will be purchasing a copy for my collection when this book is Thank you NetGalley and Abrams ComicArts for this early digital copy in exchange for an honest review! 3.5 Stars (rounded up to 4). When I originally started this graphic novel I was not expecting to enjoy it as much as I did. (Sidenote: The eARC I received was in black and white so some of it was a little harder to read and I feel like I wasn't able to completely enjoy the artwork as much as I would have if it were in color. However, I will be purchasing a copy for my collection when this book is released and I can't wait to see the gorgeous art in color, because one of the reasons I requested this book was the cover. I mean look at it, it is GORGEOUS!!!) The reason I didn't rate this book 4 or 5 stars is because for me it did have a slow start and all of the characters were very unlikeable. Also, their motives for wanting to bring senior citizens to an amusement park with the hopes that one of them would die and then they would receive Lifetime Passes to said park didn't sit that well with me... HOWEVER, I am so glad that I stuck with it and by the end I feel like this was both a really great story and it was actually really heartfelt. I really enjoyed Jackie as a main character, but my favorite character was definitely Phyllis Adler. I loved learning about her backstory and her connection to the park. I also really enjoyed Jackie and Daniel's friendship and I wish we got to see more of it. In conclusion, while I did have some problems with this graphic novel I still really recommend it if you are looking for a quick, easy, and heartfelt read! :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    I received a free e-ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm going to keep this pretty short. The premise was interesting, but I feel like marketing it as 'darkly comedic' is perhaps setting it up to fall short of readers' expectations. I wasn't a fan of this work for a few reasons: 1) The quality of the images wasn't great and I didn't love the art style - this is partially just a digital ARC issue, but was exacerbated by the fact the entire thing was in grey sc I received a free e-ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I'm going to keep this pretty short. The premise was interesting, but I feel like marketing it as 'darkly comedic' is perhaps setting it up to fall short of readers' expectations. I wasn't a fan of this work for a few reasons: 1) The quality of the images wasn't great and I didn't love the art style - this is partially just a digital ARC issue, but was exacerbated by the fact the entire thing was in grey scale. It would have been easier to read if it was presented in full colour, or more in the style of manga/comics with line drawings and limited shading/screen tones. 2) The group of young characters grated on me - the way they spoke varied between irritating, inane, and sometimes just downright rude. It was hard to enjoy the story when I wasn't gelling with the characters, who lacked depth. I did like learning about the elderly people living at the nursing home, but it wasn't enough to turn this around for me.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This was a super cute graphic novel about a teenage girl who lives with her aunt do to some unforeseen circumstances with her parents. She meets a group of so called friends and they all enjoy going to an amusement park that is in their town. There's a fun fact about this amusement park though, if someone dies there the amusement park gives whoever is with the person lifetime passes for the park. Our main character and their friends get to know some elderly people at the retirement home that the This was a super cute graphic novel about a teenage girl who lives with her aunt do to some unforeseen circumstances with her parents. She meets a group of so called friends and they all enjoy going to an amusement park that is in their town. There's a fun fact about this amusement park though, if someone dies there the amusement park gives whoever is with the person lifetime passes for the park. Our main character and their friends get to know some elderly people at the retirement home that the main character's aunt works at. The students all begin to bond with the residents and take them on adventures! I recommend this book to anybody and I will most likely purchase a copy of this book when it is released!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I received an eARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review I wish this arc would have been in color to really see the piece as a whole, but even black and white was great! The illustrations were simple enough but conveyed a lot of emotion and helped to tell a really beautiful story about identity and family. The story itself had an interesting premise, though I do think the summary misleads the reader a bit. This book focuses way less on the whole scheme of bringing the elde I received an eARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review I wish this arc would have been in color to really see the piece as a whole, but even black and white was great! The illustrations were simple enough but conveyed a lot of emotion and helped to tell a really beautiful story about identity and family. The story itself had an interesting premise, though I do think the summary misleads the reader a bit. This book focuses way less on the whole scheme of bringing the elderly to the park than it does on the topics of standing up for yourself, immigration, family, and love. Definitely not a bad thing, but still a little bit misleading. I liked the characters well enough but none of them really stood out to me. I enjoyed the writing style and how it complemented the themes/lessons in the book as well as the artwork and the primary setting. There were fewer funny parts than I'd imagined but also a lot more substance than I'd imagined. This was a very fast and entertaining story that isn't afraid to tug on the heartstrings and approach some darker realities. Overall an enjoyable read!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    My mother worked for Disney during the Depression. They did not let woman become animators. They could be betweenness and paint the cells, but they were not real animators. This graphic novel is based a little bit on Disneyland and the animation studios that flourished at that time. The only problem is, the impractablilty and impossiblity of a woman somehow keeping it secret that she was animating movies, somehow by herself, but ok, I can suspend my disbelief for the moment of this odd story. The My mother worked for Disney during the Depression. They did not let woman become animators. They could be betweenness and paint the cells, but they were not real animators. This graphic novel is based a little bit on Disneyland and the animation studios that flourished at that time. The only problem is, the impractablilty and impossiblity of a woman somehow keeping it secret that she was animating movies, somehow by herself, but ok, I can suspend my disbelief for the moment of this odd story. The premise is that this secret animtor grew so popular that her animations made enough money to build a type of disneyland in the 1960s, that is still around to this day. The second part of the premise is that teenagers love to hang out there every day that they can during the summer. I find that hard if not impossible to beleive, but once again, I will suspend my disbelief over that as well. The teenagers want to go to the park every day, so much, that they come up with a scheme where they take elderly people for a care facility in the off chance that they might die while there, and the lawyers would give them season passes to hush it up. The bits I liked where was when we got to meet the elderly people who had, of course, lived interesting lives. What I didn't like were the teenagers who seemed to be so callous and mean. It is an ok story, even if the teenagers all seem to be caricatures. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    I received this and as an eARC to read for free in exchange for my honest review. Thank you to NetGalley and Simon and Abrams ComicArts - Surely for giving me access. WOW. While good, this is definitely a twisted and interesting way of getting lifetime passes to an amusement park. We follow Jackie, who can no longer afford her season pass to Kingdom Adventure. So she devises a plan with her friends to take the elderly to the park in hopes on will kill over while they are there so they all can rec I received this and as an eARC to read for free in exchange for my honest review. Thank you to NetGalley and Simon and Abrams ComicArts - Surely for giving me access. WOW. While good, this is definitely a twisted and interesting way of getting lifetime passes to an amusement park. We follow Jackie, who can no longer afford her season pass to Kingdom Adventure. So she devises a plan with her friends to take the elderly to the park in hopes on will kill over while they are there so they all can receive lifetime passes. Now, if that has you turn off from wanting to read it, there is more to the story than just that. Jackie starts to grow and befriends one of the elderly, Phyllis. As they bond and get to know each other, Jackie realizes this isn't what she want and gains a conscience. What starts out as a greedy way to get free passes, turns into a story about growth, friendship, and love of lost ones alive or deported.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Maja Brixley

    3 wholesome stars This is a book a group of friends who loves going to an amusement park, and they decide to try get lifetime passes to go there. First of all, I think that the marketing for this book is completely wrong. Its advertised as a darkly comedic ya graphic novel. And while the ya team fits, I don't think it had a lot of dark elements to it. But that being said, I think the story was cute, but I just wish that we got to see all the characters more flushed out. I loved that we got to see 3 wholesome stars This is a book a group of friends who loves going to an amusement park, and they decide to try get lifetime passes to go there. First of all, I think that the marketing for this book is completely wrong. Its advertised as a darkly comedic ya graphic novel. And while the ya team fits, I don't think it had a lot of dark elements to it. But that being said, I think the story was cute, but I just wish that we got to see all the characters more flushed out. I loved that we got to see and read Phyllis and Allen's backstory. Also the arc copy I got was very bad quality and it was very difficult to see the pictures sometimes. I wouldn't recommend this if you are looking for a dark graphic novel, but if you are looking for something cute and kind of wholesome, this is pretty good. Thanks to Netgally and the author for a arc of this book, in exchange for an honest review

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eule Luftschloss

    trigger warning (view spoiler)[ trauma, deportation, grief, mention of racism and antisemitism and bullying (hide spoiler)] The plan is simple: Take old people to a park, and if one of them happens to die, all of them will get lifetime passes. Simple means nothing can go wrong, right? It starts out as dumb shit teenagers would do, and moves on to multigenerational friendships, a theme I really like. The oldies, who live in the residence the protagonist's aunt works in, and the young people befrien trigger warning (view spoiler)[ trauma, deportation, grief, mention of racism and antisemitism and bullying (hide spoiler)] The plan is simple: Take old people to a park, and if one of them happens to die, all of them will get lifetime passes. Simple means nothing can go wrong, right? It starts out as dumb shit teenagers would do, and moves on to multigenerational friendships, a theme I really like. The oldies, who live in the residence the protagonist's aunt works in, and the young people befriend each other, get to know each other, and are able to help with different problems. The characters are three dimensional people, apart from two of the four teenagers but they are very shallow people, so it could be that. There just isn't more to them for the time being. I liked this very much, especially the resolution at the end appears perfect. The arc was provided by the publisher.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This graphic novel might be better described as heartfelt than darkly comedic, but I can certainly see why a comic about teens trying to get lifetime passes to their favorite amusement park through a loophole involving party members dying would be described that way. And while that premise may sound a bit off-putting, the graphic novel is an absolute delight. I'm soft for the young / old friendship trope anyway, and the ways in which these characters find true friendship and belonging while doin This graphic novel might be better described as heartfelt than darkly comedic, but I can certainly see why a comic about teens trying to get lifetime passes to their favorite amusement park through a loophole involving party members dying would be described that way. And while that premise may sound a bit off-putting, the graphic novel is an absolute delight. I'm soft for the young / old friendship trope anyway, and the ways in which these characters find true friendship and belonging while doing something that starts off quite selfishly is really very sweet. It definitely had me tearing up by the end. The story does deal with deportation, grief, and death, though the overall message is very uplifting. I'll definitely be looking forward to reading more from this new imprint and these two talented creators!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shayla Moffatt

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book, I'm glad I got to read it early through netgalley. It was not quite what I expected, but in a good way. The main character has a well throughout character arc, as do her friends, and I really enjoyed her friendship with Ms. Adler. It had good messages represented throughout it and discussed some topics that are important to talk about, especially in a way that is easily accessible, like deportation, anti-Semitism and racism. I think people should pick up this book I thoroughly enjoyed this book, I'm glad I got to read it early through netgalley. It was not quite what I expected, but in a good way. The main character has a well throughout character arc, as do her friends, and I really enjoyed her friendship with Ms. Adler. It had good messages represented throughout it and discussed some topics that are important to talk about, especially in a way that is easily accessible, like deportation, anti-Semitism and racism. I think people should pick up this book, as it's not only enjoyable but informative in a way as well.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Frank Chillura (OhYouRead)

    I went into this only knowing a slight bit about the synopsis, but ended it so pleasantly surprised. I thought the character’s motives were a little vain, so when it comes to be that Nikki and Daniel are nothing like their awful friends, it put a huge smile on my face. I loved the immigration backstory for Nikki and Phyllis’ life as a costumer for movies in the 50’s. This definitely helped define them as characters and cement my love for them both. I did NOT see the ending coming, so maybe that ma I went into this only knowing a slight bit about the synopsis, but ended it so pleasantly surprised. I thought the character’s motives were a little vain, so when it comes to be that Nikki and Daniel are nothing like their awful friends, it put a huge smile on my face. I loved the immigration backstory for Nikki and Phyllis’ life as a costumer for movies in the 50’s. This definitely helped define them as characters and cement my love for them both. I did NOT see the ending coming, so maybe that made my experience that much more enjoyable.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Hillis

    The premise of this book wasn’t like anything I’d ever read before. This book has a very diverse cast — a first generation citizen, a queer character, and lots of fun old people! I love the character growth and the moral of the story. The art in the review copy wasn’t the best quality, but I definitely want to see the finished copy in hand. Thank you Abrams ComicArts and NetGalley for an advanced reading copy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elia

    So, I was not sure about this one because the description sounded so dark! A group of teens starts taking old people to an amusement park hoping one of them will DIE so they can get free passes? Gross right? But it turned out to be a touching little story about life, death, aging, time, and even freaking immigration. Who knew?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Violeta

    Digital ARC provided by Netgalley Amazing art and interesting characters. Even if I was not enjoying since the beginning the main character - Jackie, I liked how the story evolved and how the author triggered awareness about old people, aging, immigrants, gay representation. The story has it all. I do not want to give spoilers therefore I will say only that Jackie, our main character wants lifetime passes to a Disneyland-type theme park in her community and has heard a rumor that if someone in th Digital ARC provided by Netgalley Amazing art and interesting characters. Even if I was not enjoying since the beginning the main character - Jackie, I liked how the story evolved and how the author triggered awareness about old people, aging, immigrants, gay representation. The story has it all. I do not want to give spoilers therefore I will say only that Jackie, our main character wants lifetime passes to a Disneyland-type theme park in her community and has heard a rumor that if someone in their group dies on the park's property, she and her friends will be given the passes. The characters are complex and they will for sure make everyone who reads the graphic novel relate in a certain aspect with what they are confronted in their daily activities, events since it’s life with all the pretty and nasty colors.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Thank you NetGalley and Abrams ComicArts for this early digital copy in exchange for an honest review! Sixteen-year-old Jackie Chavez loves her local amusement park, Kingdom Adventure, maybe more than anything else in the world - but this summer might be her last. When she finds out that her Tía Gina, can’t afford a season pass for next summer, Jackie's crushed. But during a sneak backstage Jackie finds out about an odd park policy - if a member of a party dies at the park, the rest of their grou Thank you NetGalley and Abrams ComicArts for this early digital copy in exchange for an honest review! Sixteen-year-old Jackie Chavez loves her local amusement park, Kingdom Adventure, maybe more than anything else in the world - but this summer might be her last. When she finds out that her Tía Gina, can’t afford a season pass for next summer, Jackie's crushed. But during a sneak backstage Jackie finds out about an odd park policy - if a member of a party dies at the park, the rest of their group gets free lifetime passes. With that in mind, Jackie and her friends hatch a plot to bring seniors from Valley Care Living, where Tia Gina works, into the park using a fake volunteer program, with the hopes that one of the residents will die during their visit. The only wrench in their plan is Phyllis who is far too eager to go to the park. I was really excited to get my hands on these comics because I've been following Terry Blas' work for a few years now as a Latino comic creator. I came into the book a little hesitant because I don't like horror comics and the cover originally made it seem like it would be more sinister than it is. Granted a plot to induce death in the elderly is pretty sinister but its gradual evolution into something more moving is worth the read. The book touches on themes of identity, family separation, loss in different forms, and learning how to identify real friendships and their boundaries. There are a lot of points that resonate with me as a Latine-American, and it's a worthy addition to any shelf.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    With such an interesting premise and a promise of “Cocoon meets Heather’s”, I was expecting more dark humour from this story. Instead, the only dark comments come from Jackie’s two immensely unlikeable friends. Parts of the dialogue were stilted info dumps, and characters have a tendency to say explicitly how they feel and what their motives are, rather than to show us with their actions. Overall, it feels like the potential of the premise is wasted, and the story contains no surprises.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Farah (learnthuman)

    Lifetime Passes is a YA graphic novel that follows 16-year-old Jackie Chavez and her group of friends who hatch a morbidly problematic plan to ensure guaranteed future visits to their local amusement park, Kingdom Adventure: bring in senior residents of Valley Care Living nursing home into the park with hopes that one of them dies in the park and that the park offers them lifetime passes to avoid controversy. This rather morbid premise for a YA graphic novel would take many aback but after readin Lifetime Passes is a YA graphic novel that follows 16-year-old Jackie Chavez and her group of friends who hatch a morbidly problematic plan to ensure guaranteed future visits to their local amusement park, Kingdom Adventure: bring in senior residents of Valley Care Living nursing home into the park with hopes that one of them dies in the park and that the park offers them lifetime passes to avoid controversy. This rather morbid premise for a YA graphic novel would take many aback but after reading it all, it was quite a light and meaningful read for young teens that touches on issues of race, sexuality, mortality, immigration, preservation of memories, friendship, gratitude and compassion for others in the community and much more. Jackie’s character in particular was quite nuanced and developed and through her and her interactions with the other characters, we were able to see how those issues and topics fleshed out. The senior residents' narratives are also ones that were noteworthy, as they strongly paralleled those of the teenagers, showing that age is not really a boundary that prevents both groups from interacting, understanding, and learning from each other. Overall, the graphic novel successfully was able to convey most of the emotions and the points that they intended to send across to the reader clearly. However, some of the characters, particularly the self-centred teenage characters were portrayals and narratives that did not sit well with me. I personally felt their characters were too animated and out of place, especially since the novel addressed grounded realistic issues and topics. In addition, some of the plot points concerning them, particularly near the end, felt very abrupt and quite extreme for the narrative. Definitely shock worthy but it could have been much lighter and realistic than how it was narrated. In general, I would recommend this as a substantial light read for younger readers that ticks many boxes for diverse representation and nuanced social commentary. I would note, however, that readers should be cautious and critical of some of the characters behaviour and some plot points presented in the graphic novel. Thank you NetGalley and Abrams ComicArts for providing an eARC of this graphic novel in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Lovitt

    Lifetime Passes is a humorously dark graphic novel written by Terry Blas, with gorgeous illustrations by Claudia Aguirre. It tells the story of sixteen-year-old Jackie Chavez, a DACA recipient grappling with her parents’ deportation while balancing a tenuous friendship with a toxic friend group. What starts out as a slice of life turns into an unexpected rollercoaster ride of emotions. Jackie lives with her Tía Gina and when she isn’t helping out at the care facility where Gina is a nurse, Jackie Lifetime Passes is a humorously dark graphic novel written by Terry Blas, with gorgeous illustrations by Claudia Aguirre. It tells the story of sixteen-year-old Jackie Chavez, a DACA recipient grappling with her parents’ deportation while balancing a tenuous friendship with a toxic friend group. What starts out as a slice of life turns into an unexpected rollercoaster ride of emotions. Jackie lives with her Tía Gina and when she isn’t helping out at the care facility where Gina is a nurse, Jackie is spending time with her friends at the amusement park Kingdom Adventure—a Disney World-inspired theme park. One summer day, the friend group cooks up a plan to use the seniors as their ticket to landing lifetime passes, leading Jackie on a journey of self-discovery and learning the worth of cross-generational friendship. During the first half of Lifetime Passes, I was confident that I was not going to like it. I was already mentally tabulating the little things that I would include in my review, the critiques of the insufferable Berke and Nikki, but the latter half of the book handled them better than my sharply crafted words ever could have. Blas clearly has a lot to say about Disney adults, despite the cast of characters being teenagers. He highlights their obsessive and twisted passion for the theme park, to the detriment of their interpersonal relationships with blistering criticism. Additionally, two of the characters—the ones that drew my ire—are “YouVid” vloggers and social media-obsessed narcissists. The satirical caricatures of these characters are perfectly designed to make the readers despise them. There is a lot of nuance to this graphic novel that would be spoiled if I go into too many details, but Lifetime Passes is a story you have to stick with. There will be moments where you find yourself abhorring the characters on the page and their duplicitous intentions, and even the just desserts that they’re served come with twisted emotions of their own. For a book advertised and marketed as dark and satirical, the final note is surprisingly warm and heartwarming. Lifetime Passes is like one of those red and green wrapped hard candies that old folks always have on hand—you’re skeptical of them at first, but in the end, they’re always delicious and you miss them when they’re gone.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tisha "Manic Reads"

    "Lifetime Passes" is an interesting book that takes the myth that if you are in a party and someone dies at a Disney park, you get lifetime passes for the trouble. The art style is interesting and unique in my opinion, and I am trying not to judge it too harshly because it is just an uploaded copy, but the quality is highly diminished to where the details are not visible and it really makes the whole experience less enjoyable. Even the sample for the color version was hard to read, so I couldn't "Lifetime Passes" is an interesting book that takes the myth that if you are in a party and someone dies at a Disney park, you get lifetime passes for the trouble. The art style is interesting and unique in my opinion, and I am trying not to judge it too harshly because it is just an uploaded copy, but the quality is highly diminished to where the details are not visible and it really makes the whole experience less enjoyable. Even the sample for the color version was hard to read, so I couldn't say if that would be any better. I feel like the description is a little misleading, with very little in way of humor or the like. It didn't remind me of "Heathers" at all besides that Jackie is a bit jaded like Veronica and she has a terrible group of friends. It is an enjoyable book overall but feels a bit like an after school special. As a huge Disney fan, the in jokes were a little enjoyable, though I don't think anyone who doesn't know something about the behind the scenes of the parks would get it. The "tunnels" or there being multiple people playing a character are a few of the things that people unprepared don't like to hear about because it "breaks the magic" (doesn't really bother me though). To a certain point it gets a little ham fisted and it feels more like someone wanted to write about Disney park experience but couldn't get the rights so they wrote this instead. It does make for an interesting story overall though, and I did end up liking the lead, Jackie, more than I thought I was going to. It was interesting learning about her history as well as Mrs. Adler's, but the ending didn't quite feel earned. I feel like this could have been a better novel with more details than a comic, but the visuals were rather nice. A solid story, just slightly messy surroundings. **Thanks to Netgalley and Abrams ComicArts - Surely for the ARC in exchange for the honest review**

  23. 4 out of 5

    David Gibson

    The short version: A heart warming story about what’s under the surface when we care to look a little deeper that aims straight for the feels and mostly succeeds. The long version: First off, I have to admit it, I’m a sucker for judging a book by its cover...and the short blurb describing it. When I came across this graphic novel, I thought the premise sounded ripe for wacky shenanigans and your classic things got way out of hand moments. If I had read the elongated description I would have had a The short version: A heart warming story about what’s under the surface when we care to look a little deeper that aims straight for the feels and mostly succeeds. The long version: First off, I have to admit it, I’m a sucker for judging a book by its cover...and the short blurb describing it. When I came across this graphic novel, I thought the premise sounded ripe for wacky shenanigans and your classic things got way out of hand moments. If I had read the elongated description I would have had a better expectation going in. So, considering I was a little disappointed this didn’t go off the rails (in a good way), I was very pleasantly surprised how thoroughly enjoyable it was overall. I wasn’t expecting this one to touch on so many deeply emotional themes, but it does a nice job in being straightforward without crossing over into forced. The main character, Jackie, is very well developed and even in the short span of a graphic novel I felt like I got to know her very well. The plot pushes along at a good pace and overall the dialogue is nice and tight, though it is a bit on the nose at times. The copy I read wasn’t finalized so the artwork wasn’t fully colored or finished but from what I got it looks like it will be very good bringing the magical kingdom to life. The main drawback is that in its description the humor of the graphic novel is oversold. There were some mildly humorous moments, but I wouldn’t put this in the humor category. To me it was primarily a drama, and a well done one. I would recommend it to any lover of graphic novels. Overall a 4 out of 5, mostly because Component Ratings Theme/Idea: 4 out of 5 Characters: 4.5 out of 5 Dialogue: 4 out of 5 Character Develeopment: 4 out of 5 Artwork: 4.5 out of 5 (Based on how I assume it will look finished) Humor: 2.5 out of 5 Theme: 4.5 out of 5 Ending: 5 out of 5

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey Lewis

    Lifetime Passes is one of those teen summer feel-good stories. It starts with a pretty morbid backstory: some teens want lifetime passes to a Disneyland-type theme park in their community and have heard a rumor that if someone in their group dies on the park's property, they will be given the passes. Jackie Chavez's parents were recently deported, so she spends her time helping the aunt she lives with at the local nursing home, where she cooks up the idea that these old people are basically just Lifetime Passes is one of those teen summer feel-good stories. It starts with a pretty morbid backstory: some teens want lifetime passes to a Disneyland-type theme park in their community and have heard a rumor that if someone in their group dies on the park's property, they will be given the passes. Jackie Chavez's parents were recently deported, so she spends her time helping the aunt she lives with at the local nursing home, where she cooks up the idea that these old people are basically just lifetime passes waiting to happen. As the story unfolds, we learn more about the characters and the importance of home, family, and memories. It is a bit corny and the conflict is sort of one sided with a kind-of obvious (and again, corny) twist, but it was good fun and definitely contains important life lessons so younger readers may not be as aware of how blatantly mushy the book is. I actually was not expecting to like this as much as I did and even found myself shedding a tear during one part, despite all its cheesiness and the fact that I saw it was coming a mile away. I would like to see this made into a movie at some point. I wish the ARC had been higher quality and again, my biggest complaint with graphic novel ARCs is that many of them are slightly pixelated and have black and white rather than in full-color, but the illustrations seemed good enough and I was able to determine character's features, races, and expressions easily from the line art. Note: I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley. I was not compensated in any other fashion for the review and the opinions reflected below are entirely my own. Special thanks to the publisher and author for providing the copy.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I am grateful to have received an e-ARC of this book through NetGalley. The premise of this books sounds super cool. A bunch of teenagers taking th elderly of a care home to an adventure park so if one of them dies, they all get free passes. I was intruiged by the story and really excited to read this. My first and biggest problem was the quality of the ARC I received. I'm sure the finished version is way better but I couldn't enjoy it properly. The whole book was black and white and the drawings I am grateful to have received an e-ARC of this book through NetGalley. The premise of this books sounds super cool. A bunch of teenagers taking th elderly of a care home to an adventure park so if one of them dies, they all get free passes. I was intruiged by the story and really excited to read this. My first and biggest problem was the quality of the ARC I received. I'm sure the finished version is way better but I couldn't enjoy it properly. The whole book was black and white and the drawings were such bad quality that I had a hard time understanding the pictures. With higher quality and colour it would have gotten 4 stars. Besides that I quite enjoyed the story. It was fast paced and a very quick read like most graphic novels. They touched on some heavy topics like deportation, adoption and death. It was still a funny book though. I couldn't really connect with the characters though, even though they had interesting backstories. There are way too many characters who all just have little time in the book so you can't really get to know them. I don't think I remember any the names except for the protagonist Jackie and the old Lady Phyllis. I liked the old women but besides her most characters felt a bit hollow and cliche. What I would really enjoy would be a movie! I think this story would be beautiful as a movie and I truly hope they will one day produce it. I think it's a too detailed story for the comic and too short for a novel but a movie would be perfect. Generally I would recommend it if you like graphic novels. It's a fun read and if you are actually paying for it I'm sure it will also be nice to look at.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Grace Morrison

    Thank you NetGalley for letting me read an ARC of this book. This graphic novel wasn't what I expected it to be, but I was pleasantly surprised by the turn it took in the end. Although the concept of trying to get lifetime passes to an amusement park by volunteering to take the elderly to the park in hopes that they die is a just a *bit* morbid, this book didn't end up being very dark. To me, it seemed like it was a half-hatched plan made by a teenager who is in a rough place rather than a malici Thank you NetGalley for letting me read an ARC of this book. This graphic novel wasn't what I expected it to be, but I was pleasantly surprised by the turn it took in the end. Although the concept of trying to get lifetime passes to an amusement park by volunteering to take the elderly to the park in hopes that they die is a just a *bit* morbid, this book didn't end up being very dark. To me, it seemed like it was a half-hatched plan made by a teenager who is in a rough place rather than a malicious scheme. Jackie, the main character, is living with her tía who works at an elderly home. Jackie's tía informs her that she can no longer afford to pay for Jackie's summer pass to the amusement park. Jackie later gets together with her friends and they hatch the twisted plan to get lifetime passes. She gets permission from the nursing home to take the elderly to the amusement park, but only if she helps with other programming (which, although this is a plot device, really bugged me because they didn't offer any kind of compensation service). Jackie ends up bonding with some of the residents who show her that her friends aren't that great and that her future has a lot of potential. It gets pretty heavy on the life lessons toward the end, but I enjoyed that. I think there's a lot of value in learning from our elders. This book really showed how the elderly are often misperceived and overlooked, especially by younger people. I also liked the end; I think it tied up everything neatly. Overall, I'd recommend this book for those who like a quick read and enjoy good character development arcs.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessi

    TW: Death, Serious Injury I love a unique graphic novel concept, and that’s exactly what Terry Blas and Claudia Aguirre have created. Lifetime Passes is about a group of friends who spend their summers at a local amusement park. But Jackie, a DACA kid being raised by her aunt, is devastated to learn that her aunt can’t afford the season pass this year. Desperate to spend the summer at the park with her friends, Jackie hatches a plot to earn a lifetime pass. If someone in a park-goer’s party dies TW: Death, Serious Injury I love a unique graphic novel concept, and that’s exactly what Terry Blas and Claudia Aguirre have created. Lifetime Passes is about a group of friends who spend their summers at a local amusement park. But Jackie, a DACA kid being raised by her aunt, is devastated to learn that her aunt can’t afford the season pass this year. Desperate to spend the summer at the park with her friends, Jackie hatches a plot to earn a lifetime pass. If someone in a park-goer’s party dies whilst in the park, the entire party may be given lifetime passes for their silence. Jackie uses her aunt’s position at the Valley Care Living facility to take some of the residents on field trips to the park, hoping that one will die during the visit and earn the group passes. The most compelling part of the story to me was the connections that Jackie makes with some of the characters. She really learns a lot about herself and life by talking with others and learning about their struggles. It doesn’t take long for her to understand how selfish and shallow her plot to get lifetime passes is. The graphics in Lifetime Passes are very good – I can’t wait to see them in full-color. I really enjoyed this graphic novel. Though the basic plot was dark, there was also hope, growth, and love. I look forward to reading more from Blas and Aguirre. Lifetime Passes will be released October 5th, 2021. I received an advanced review copy of this book for free via NetGalley, and am leaving this review voluntarily.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wafflepirates

    *Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for providing an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review* The summary calls this darkly comedic, but I don't agree. While the original premise is a bit dark, the overall tone of the book is more lighthearted, even wholesome. Jackie loves Kingdom Adventure, the local theme park more than anything, but when her aunt tells her they can't afford to keep their season passes, she needs to come up with a plan quick. She learns of an unofficial rule of the pa *Thanks to netgalley and the publisher for providing an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review* The summary calls this darkly comedic, but I don't agree. While the original premise is a bit dark, the overall tone of the book is more lighthearted, even wholesome. Jackie loves Kingdom Adventure, the local theme park more than anything, but when her aunt tells her they can't afford to keep their season passes, she needs to come up with a plan quick. She learns of an unofficial rule of the park, if someone in your party dies at the park, the group is given free lifetime passes, and convinces her friends to create a fake volunteer group at a nursing home so that they can take the residents into the park and try to capitalize on any death that may occur. Things don't go exactly to plan, and Jackie forms a bond with Phyllis, one of the residents whose husband helped build the park. Jackie has to face a lot of things in this book, the pain of being raised by her aunt after her parents were deported, a friend group that she just doesn't mesh with anymore, and her growing interest in the nursing home's residents. I think there will likely be some confused readers who are expecting something funnier and darker based on the summary (and there is a bit of a darker bit at the end but it's overwhelmingly not), but this was by no means a bad story, just a different one to what I expected. I will also state that I had a black and white digital copy, and I hope that the final product looks as good as the cover does, because the illustrations were lackluster in my copy.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Hmmm... The premise of this was a knockout – friends need old people to die in their company whilst at a theme park so the whole lot get free admission for life as compensation, which makes a potential heroine out of a girl who works at a care home. But you have to get through some right waffle before the blackness of that even gets mentioned. There's the history of the theme park, even the geography of the there park, there's the yacking the teenagers have to do before anything halfway decent c Hmmm... The premise of this was a knockout – friends need old people to die in their company whilst at a theme park so the whole lot get free admission for life as compensation, which makes a potential heroine out of a girl who works at a care home. But you have to get through some right waffle before the blackness of that even gets mentioned. There's the history of the theme park, even the geography of the there park, there's the yacking the teenagers have to do before anything halfway decent can happen, there're the lacklustre efforts at creating character (one guy's whole being is just Has Youtube Channel, and little else), and more. So for many this 40pp hurdle will be too much. Others might care more for the details of the multicultural gang, and whether the channel is doing well (it's not) and how being a Korean-American makes you shy and lonely. And before too many trips to the park, peppered by the teens being far too insolent for us to care a toss about them, we find the book is about something else entirely. It's about being as well-meaning, as well-intentioned, as possible. And while that's a virtue in people, it really doesn't make for a worthwhile read. I think even if you're in the better position right now, of not expecting this to be at all blackly humorous (it's comedy-free throughout, in fact), you will still feel let-down by the mawkish heartfelt Life Lessons 101 these pages present.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    What would you do if you cou couldn’t get a yearly pass to go to something that you went to all the time with your friends? Jackie loves to go with her friends to the local amusement park. When her aunt tells her she doesn’t have the money to renew her pass, Jackie is upset. Jackie helps her aunt at the senior living facility. When she finds out that you can get a lifetime pass if someone dies in their group, the one living get lifetime passes to the park. So Jackie tells her friend the idea of What would you do if you cou couldn’t get a yearly pass to go to something that you went to all the time with your friends? Jackie loves to go with her friends to the local amusement park. When her aunt tells her she doesn’t have the money to renew her pass, Jackie is upset. Jackie helps her aunt at the senior living facility. When she finds out that you can get a lifetime pass if someone dies in their group, the one living get lifetime passes to the park. So Jackie tells her friend the idea of taking a senior from the senior living facility, they think it’s a great idea for the most part. Jackie gets approval from her aunt and from the director for the senior living facility. The friend are delighted until they realize that seniors don’t walk as fast as they do. Jackie becomes close to one senior and discover things age didn’t know. What are those things? I enjoyed this graphic novel s it was an adventure for Jackie and another friend from the group learned to treasured their time with the senior.s. Jackie learns about herself, what her life is about and true friendship. She learns how to cope with unexpected incidents. The graphic novel starts out with a somewhat dark theme that turns into a happier theme. It is good to live life. Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book from the author/publisher from Netgalley. I wasn’t obligated to write a favorable review or any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.

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