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Button Pusher

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A memoir-driven realistic graphic novel about Tyler, a child who is diagnosed with ADHD and has to discover for himself how to best manage it. Tyler’s brain is different. Unlike his friends, he has a hard time paying attention in class. He acts out in goofy, over-the-top ways. Sometimes, he even does dangerous things—like cut up a bus seat with a pocketknife or hang out of A memoir-driven realistic graphic novel about Tyler, a child who is diagnosed with ADHD and has to discover for himself how to best manage it. Tyler’s brain is different. Unlike his friends, he has a hard time paying attention in class. He acts out in goofy, over-the-top ways. Sometimes, he even does dangerous things—like cut up a bus seat with a pocketknife or hang out of an attic window. To the adults in his life, Tyler seems like a troublemaker. But he knows that he’s not. Tyler is curious and creative. He’s the best artist in his grade, and when he can focus, he gets great grades. He doesn’t want to cause trouble, but sometimes he just feels like he can’t control himself. In Button Pusher, cartoonist Tyler Page uses his own childhood experiences to explore what it means to grow up with ADHD. From diagnosis to treatment and beyond, Tyler’s story is raw and enlightening, inviting you to see the world from a new perspective.


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A memoir-driven realistic graphic novel about Tyler, a child who is diagnosed with ADHD and has to discover for himself how to best manage it. Tyler’s brain is different. Unlike his friends, he has a hard time paying attention in class. He acts out in goofy, over-the-top ways. Sometimes, he even does dangerous things—like cut up a bus seat with a pocketknife or hang out of A memoir-driven realistic graphic novel about Tyler, a child who is diagnosed with ADHD and has to discover for himself how to best manage it. Tyler’s brain is different. Unlike his friends, he has a hard time paying attention in class. He acts out in goofy, over-the-top ways. Sometimes, he even does dangerous things—like cut up a bus seat with a pocketknife or hang out of an attic window. To the adults in his life, Tyler seems like a troublemaker. But he knows that he’s not. Tyler is curious and creative. He’s the best artist in his grade, and when he can focus, he gets great grades. He doesn’t want to cause trouble, but sometimes he just feels like he can’t control himself. In Button Pusher, cartoonist Tyler Page uses his own childhood experiences to explore what it means to grow up with ADHD. From diagnosis to treatment and beyond, Tyler’s story is raw and enlightening, inviting you to see the world from a new perspective.

30 review for Button Pusher

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Tyler Page recounts how his diagnosis of ADHD and his use of Ritalin affected his elementary through high school years in the 1980s and 1990s. It's intended for a younger audience, but I'm not sure they'll find all the doctor office visits and reports and asides about brain development nearly as engaging as I did. There are also extensive scenes about his parent's tempestuous marriage, aggravated by his father's own ADHD issues. This makes me eager to read Page's Raised on Ritalin, which covers t Tyler Page recounts how his diagnosis of ADHD and his use of Ritalin affected his elementary through high school years in the 1980s and 1990s. It's intended for a younger audience, but I'm not sure they'll find all the doctor office visits and reports and asides about brain development nearly as engaging as I did. There are also extensive scenes about his parent's tempestuous marriage, aggravated by his father's own ADHD issues. This makes me eager to read Page's Raised on Ritalin, which covers the history of ADHD and the ongoing struggles Page had with ADHD in adulthood hinted at in the closing pages of this book. It's available to read online at: http://raisedonritalincomic.blogspot....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This memoir of childhood ADHD is NECESSARY. Thanks, Raina, for establishing the medical-graphic-memoir-for-kids niche genre: this book will be crucial and empowering for kids and parents.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Tim Brown

    So very well done. Painfully relatable.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    3 point 5? A solid graphic memoir both of growing up with ADHD and growing up in a home with an adult prone to sudden explosive anger (and likely an undiagnosed mental illness). Interspersed within the narrative are occasional spreads explaining how ADHD (and Ritalin) work and affect the brain. Like 54 Things Wrong with Gwendolyn Rogers, Button Pusher emphasizes that being unable to control one’s impulses, when it happens, is just that—not willful action or a sign of disrespect. I think we proba 3 point 5? A solid graphic memoir both of growing up with ADHD and growing up in a home with an adult prone to sudden explosive anger (and likely an undiagnosed mental illness). Interspersed within the narrative are occasional spreads explaining how ADHD (and Ritalin) work and affect the brain. Like 54 Things Wrong with Gwendolyn Rogers, Button Pusher emphasizes that being unable to control one’s impulses, when it happens, is just that—not willful action or a sign of disrespect. I think we probably can’t hear that message enough. I also appreciated the frank look at a couple raising children, one of whom explodes and one of whom is living with explosions and trying to decide what to do. Kids not only need to see themselves in books, they need to see their families and/or living situations in books. Am purchasing for library. From a digital ARC via #netgalley

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    This was quite good. Not exactly what I was expecting, better in many ways and not quite as powerful in others. But this was still excellent and a very fascinating and compelling read. Throughly enjoyable, relatable and entertaining.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Awesome autobiographical story of a boy with ADHD and how he managed it during his childhood. Loved reading this after Holden’s ADHD diagnosis—super helpful in understanding how it works, as well as Page’s thoughts and feelings.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Tyler Page recounts growing up with ADHD when treating it with medication was still fairly new. He had pretty significant hyperactivity and impulsivity, and in retrospect he could see signs of ADHD in his dad as well. I liked the illustrations and colors, as well as the informational panels about the science of ADHD (which are probably going to be over some younger readers' heads). As a parent of kids with ADHD, the last page made me sad and worried though, a cliffhanger in the worst sense. Tyler Page recounts growing up with ADHD when treating it with medication was still fairly new. He had pretty significant hyperactivity and impulsivity, and in retrospect he could see signs of ADHD in his dad as well. I liked the illustrations and colors, as well as the informational panels about the science of ADHD (which are probably going to be over some younger readers' heads). As a parent of kids with ADHD, the last page made me sad and worried though, a cliffhanger in the worst sense.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lauren P.

    Really great autobiographical graphic novel by Tyler Page about his experiences with ADHD while growing up. I really appreciated his accessible infographics about ADHD and how information and diagnoses have changed over the decades. It was a great reminder to be empathetic because you never know what someone may be dealing with that you can't see. Really great autobiographical graphic novel by Tyler Page about his experiences with ADHD while growing up. I really appreciated his accessible infographics about ADHD and how information and diagnoses have changed over the decades. It was a great reminder to be empathetic because you never know what someone may be dealing with that you can't see.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Autumn

    El Deafo for ADHD. A godsend to schools and libraries that will also be cherished by young readers. It's a high-quality, deeply felt memoir with plenty of family dynamics and late 80s atmosphere, while also serving as an explanatory and accessible medical text for kids with and without ADHD. It will also speak to every kid who's the best artist in their class. This is going to be huge. El Deafo for ADHD. A godsend to schools and libraries that will also be cherished by young readers. It's a high-quality, deeply felt memoir with plenty of family dynamics and late 80s atmosphere, while also serving as an explanatory and accessible medical text for kids with and without ADHD. It will also speak to every kid who's the best artist in their class. This is going to be huge.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this graphic novel memoir, Tyler often gets in trouble at school and at home for his impulsive behavior. He can't sit still in class, is often excessively goofy, and makes a lot of poor choices. His father is very volatile and often explodes in anger, but his mother tries to help Tyler manage his school work. She eventually takes him to be assessed, and the doctor diagnoses him with Attention Deficit Disorder. Family counseling is recommended, and that helps a E ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus In this graphic novel memoir, Tyler often gets in trouble at school and at home for his impulsive behavior. He can't sit still in class, is often excessively goofy, and makes a lot of poor choices. His father is very volatile and often explodes in anger, but his mother tries to help Tyler manage his school work. She eventually takes him to be assessed, and the doctor diagnoses him with Attention Deficit Disorder. Family counseling is recommended, and that helps a tiny bit, but Tyler is eventually put on the drug Ritalin. This seems to work, and is most noticeable when he doesn't take his medication. While things improve at school and Tyler is able to do better at his school work, make friends, and pursue some interests, his father's own ADD makes his relationship with the family fraught. The mother thinks about leaving him and moving back to her own family, but she can not bring herself to do this. After eight years on the medicine, Tyler decides that he doesn't need it any more, and is able to function in high school and college without it. Strengths: Tyler's experiences with attention deficit disorder and hyperactivity are explained in a very clear way. We see how hard it is for him to sit still in class, pay attention, and remember to do his work. His father's adult ADHD is also interesting, and there is mention of the father recieving medical treatment for it as well, although he isn't keen on it. The mother's involvement with the school and therapists is well done, and the notes from the doctors offer a good overview of how things are progressing. There are good historical details about the 1980s, and it's clear that we are not talking about modern methods for dealing with ADHD. Side bar graphics, in blue and white, offer some explanations of the medical terms (like executive fuction disorder) and treatments, which is very useful. Weaknesses: There are a lot of cultural references (video games, clothing styles), but it would have been helpful (since this is a memoir) for there to be a specific date. The author was born about 1977 and was put on Ritalin in 1985, so this takes place in the late 1980s. Since medications have changed, this would have been helpful information to have right up front. It is unfortunately common to not clearly state dates in graphic novel memoirs, perhaps to make the experience seem more timeless and universal? (Greene's A-Okay, Mericle's Bad Sister, Alexander's Other Boys) What I really think: The inclusion of some medical explanations are helpful, even if the note says they are informational and shouldn't be used for diagnosis or treatment! There are always a number of students who take medication for ADHD, and this will speak more to those readers than Edwards' A Tale as Tall as Jacob: Misadventures with My Brother, since that was from the sister's point of view. Like Gerber's Focused, this is a helpful look at a condition that many middle grade readers experience, either for themselves, or through dealing with classmates who struggle with it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Aud

    Maybe not a full 5 stars, but it rounds up to one. We need more memoir graphic novels from boys and men, and this on is particularly good. There are so many people with ADHD that this will have a wide audience just from that, alone. The panels are clear and easy to read. Considering how active Tyler is almost all the time, that's no mean feat. The colors are also well-chosen: retro and eye-catching, but not hard to read for pages on end. The short "chapters" with scientific information about ADHD Maybe not a full 5 stars, but it rounds up to one. We need more memoir graphic novels from boys and men, and this on is particularly good. There are so many people with ADHD that this will have a wide audience just from that, alone. The panels are clear and easy to read. Considering how active Tyler is almost all the time, that's no mean feat. The colors are also well-chosen: retro and eye-catching, but not hard to read for pages on end. The short "chapters" with scientific information about ADHD and such are well-presented and laid out well. They are easy for readers to understand. The parts about the dad's "switch on and off temper" were alarming, but will not be outside of some readers' experiences. I do wish that the possible ramifications of going off medication without consulting a doctor had been discussed. To this day, there is stigma against taking meds. I just wish that this one facet had been examined more deeply, or at least not glossed over. I also wish that some "adult issues" Tyler himself had dealt with had been discussed at least a tiny bit in the author's note at the end. The way that note ends feels maybe a tiny bit ominous? These are personal qualms, however, and I try not to judge books for what I wish they are instead of what they present, which in this case is Tyler's own story, which he tells well. A really good book, which I will happily hand out to people.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carin

    Tyler pushes everyone’s buttons. He’s a fun-loving, creative kid, but he seems to get out of hand a lot. And when asked why he does certain, destructive things, he doesn’t know why. His parents take him to the doctor, and he’s diagnosed with ADD and put on Ritalin, and it works! This all takes place in the 1980s in the early day of both diagnoses and treatment. It works until it doesn’t, and they make adjustments, and we go on. Some days Tyler forgets to take his pills and it’s noticeable. What’ Tyler pushes everyone’s buttons. He’s a fun-loving, creative kid, but he seems to get out of hand a lot. And when asked why he does certain, destructive things, he doesn’t know why. His parents take him to the doctor, and he’s diagnosed with ADD and put on Ritalin, and it works! This all takes place in the 1980s in the early day of both diagnoses and treatment. It works until it doesn’t, and they make adjustments, and we go on. Some days Tyler forgets to take his pills and it’s noticeable. What’s also noticeable is his dad’s rage and how he seems to share some of Tyler’s traits (although luckily Tyler doesn’t have his dad’s anger). He takes antidepressants but it doesn’t seem like nearly enough. Tyler’s mother is a freaking saint. It makes perfect sense as a creative kid that Tyler would write a graphic memoir instead of a traditional one. It’s also somewhat easier to represent his ADD visually, instead of just verbally. This book is for kids and explains things in a simplistic way they should be able to understand. It was enlightening for someone who doesn’t have much experience with ADD. An enjoyable read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    TheNextGenLibrarian

    A memoir-driven graphic novel about a boy growing up with ADHD and a tough home life. 🧠 Tyler is an incredibly bright kid, but he has a hard time paying attention in class. After trying several different options such as counseling (both group and family), Tyler’s doctor recommends Ritalin. The meds help and need adjusting as Tyler grows. The book ends on a bit of a cliffhanger and I hope a sequel is on the horizon. 💊 As an educator I have seen the effects ADHD medication can have on students. It c A memoir-driven graphic novel about a boy growing up with ADHD and a tough home life. 🧠 Tyler is an incredibly bright kid, but he has a hard time paying attention in class. After trying several different options such as counseling (both group and family), Tyler’s doctor recommends Ritalin. The meds help and need adjusting as Tyler grows. The book ends on a bit of a cliffhanger and I hope a sequel is on the horizon. 💊 As an educator I have seen the effects ADHD medication can have on students. It can be a game changer in the classroom, but can also have negative side effects too such as appetite suppressant, numbing of feelings, etc. Page does a fantastic job of showing what it’s like growing up with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as how honest he is about his upbringing and home life. We are close to the same age so all the things Tyler liked as a youth were a fun throwback for me as well. This MG book will be a home run in my library. Fans of Hey Kiddo and El Deafo are going to connect with this one as well. CW: domestic abuse, verbal abuse, anger outbursts, physical assault, fat shaming 4.5 ⭐️

  14. 5 out of 5

    Agent_bugs

    Fascinating graphic novel memoir about growing up as an ADHDer and using ritalin to help calm symptoms. Where Button Pusher particularly shines is in its infograph asides which contextually explain helpful facts about ADHD with both medical and social factors covered. Personally I think that it could have talked more about adult diagnosis and the underdiagnosis of anyone who wasn't/isn't a hyperactive white boy - particularly at one point Tyler is shown watching a late 80s news segment about ADHD Fascinating graphic novel memoir about growing up as an ADHDer and using ritalin to help calm symptoms. Where Button Pusher particularly shines is in its infograph asides which contextually explain helpful facts about ADHD with both medical and social factors covered. Personally I think that it could have talked more about adult diagnosis and the underdiagnosis of anyone who wasn't/isn't a hyperactive white boy - particularly at one point Tyler is shown watching a late 80s news segment about ADHD which only talks about hyperactive boys and this isn't challenged at all in the following infograph - but I also realise that's slightly unfair as this is a personal memoir and Tyler Page obviously does not have personal experience of the above. Therefore overall I give this 5 stars as it has a lot going for it. The art is nice and clean while getting the emotions across, the story is cohesive, and the infographs are informative and used at exactly the right points in the story. I think this would be a great introduction for people interested in learning about ADHD, and is accessible for both kids and adults.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alicia

    I don't know if the title is what helps further Page's message as a graphic memoir about his growing up in the 80s/90s with a verbally abusive (and in a few cases physically abusive) household where he was not in control of himself-lacking the executive functioning skills and was then prescribed Ritalin at a time where diagnoses was skyrocketing but for Page, there were underlying issues that caused some of his problems especially at school which through regular doctors visits, family and indivi I don't know if the title is what helps further Page's message as a graphic memoir about his growing up in the 80s/90s with a verbally abusive (and in a few cases physically abusive) household where he was not in control of himself-lacking the executive functioning skills and was then prescribed Ritalin at a time where diagnoses was skyrocketing but for Page, there were underlying issues that caused some of his problems especially at school which through regular doctors visits, family and individual therapy, and medication he was able to control. It paints a picture of the time period, individual experiences that others can relate to, and how he worked toward learning more about himself and thus helping to control his impulsivity. It's oddly paced at times while he interrupts the narrative to include scientific data in infographic-like renderings about what executive function is, what ADHD is, etc.

  16. 4 out of 5

    BiblioBrandie

    A graphic memoir about growing up with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and being "raised on Ritalin." This story starts when Tyler is around 8 and in elementary school, right before his first ADD (prior to change to ADHD) diagnosis, and ends with him leaving for college. Throughout this graphic memoir Page presents the challenges and complexities he has faced dealing with ADHD and ends by mentioning how it follows him into adulthood. He also details the violence and disorder in h A graphic memoir about growing up with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and being "raised on Ritalin." This story starts when Tyler is around 8 and in elementary school, right before his first ADD (prior to change to ADHD) diagnosis, and ends with him leaving for college. Throughout this graphic memoir Page presents the challenges and complexities he has faced dealing with ADHD and ends by mentioning how it follows him into adulthood. He also details the violence and disorder in his family, the the scenes where he is being spanked will be hard for some readers. In addition to his storytelling and graphics, Page includes infographic pages packed with comprehensive information about the disorder and about Ritalin. I found it very enlightening and informative and think it will be a hit with the graphic novel readers in my school. Enjoyed the author's note, photographs, and art notes in the end matter.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Becky Tuttle

    This was a great graphic novel I found in the library’s new release section. Author Tyler Page shares his childhood experience being diagnosed with and managing ADHD. The autobiographical book also includes tough dynamics between his parents especially involving just father’s anger issues (TW for domestic violence). Page sprinkles in informative sections about the history of ADHD as a diagnosis, the science behind the disease, and the evolution of social and medical perceptions of the ADHD and i This was a great graphic novel I found in the library’s new release section. Author Tyler Page shares his childhood experience being diagnosed with and managing ADHD. The autobiographical book also includes tough dynamics between his parents especially involving just father’s anger issues (TW for domestic violence). Page sprinkles in informative sections about the history of ADHD as a diagnosis, the science behind the disease, and the evolution of social and medical perceptions of the ADHD and its treatment. The book is a bit repetitive but I also wanted more resolution about his transition to adulthood and family in present day. I liked the art and found the book very useful and hopeful for those who have a connection to ADHD.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Zeman

    A well written and illustrated graphic novel-memoir that tells the author’s story of what it was like growing up with ADHD, from the time he was diagnosed at age 8to when he left for college. He discusses the impact his diagnosis had on his life at school, at home and his relationships. He includes useful information for those who do not understand ADHD and for those who may have been diagnosed with ADHD. His memoir lets the reader and those with ADHD know that there are others out there going t A well written and illustrated graphic novel-memoir that tells the author’s story of what it was like growing up with ADHD, from the time he was diagnosed at age 8to when he left for college. He discusses the impact his diagnosis had on his life at school, at home and his relationships. He includes useful information for those who do not understand ADHD and for those who may have been diagnosed with ADHD. His memoir lets the reader and those with ADHD know that there are others out there going through the same thing as them and that it’s ok, that with the right treatment they will be able to properly manage ADHD. Thanks NetGalley for the ARC.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristin DeGarmo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I enjoyed Button Pusher. I appreciate that the author did a lot of research on ADHD and is able to explain it in simplistic terms for readers who don’t know what it’s like to have ADHD (like me). I felt this graphic novel is more of a YA graphic novel than a Young Reader/Middle Grade because of some of the violence with the Dad (cursing, etc). Not that I don’t think a Young Reader wouldn’t be able to understand the content or relate. I think this is important for all kinds of readers to read bec I enjoyed Button Pusher. I appreciate that the author did a lot of research on ADHD and is able to explain it in simplistic terms for readers who don’t know what it’s like to have ADHD (like me). I felt this graphic novel is more of a YA graphic novel than a Young Reader/Middle Grade because of some of the violence with the Dad (cursing, etc). Not that I don’t think a Young Reader wouldn’t be able to understand the content or relate. I think this is important for all kinds of readers to read because those who have ADHD can relate and those without it can begin to understand what it’s like for those with ADHD. I’m glad I read this book and would recommend it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Deena Lipomi

    Tyler is diagnosed with ADD (now ADHD) in third grade and put on Ritalin, which helps him manage his impulsive and sometimes dangerous actions, but by high school he seems to function OK without it, though he implies his future in college and beyond takes some other turns. The author shows how much his father's anger and parental fighting affected him and his brother, which also reflects on the hereditary element of his ADHD. The images of Tyler constantly moving around and goofing in school and Tyler is diagnosed with ADD (now ADHD) in third grade and put on Ritalin, which helps him manage his impulsive and sometimes dangerous actions, but by high school he seems to function OK without it, though he implies his future in college and beyond takes some other turns. The author shows how much his father's anger and parental fighting affected him and his brother, which also reflects on the hereditary element of his ADHD. The images of Tyler constantly moving around and goofing in school and the doctor's office are funny and make his point. A well done graphic memoir with inserted pages of real facts about ADHD, it's history, and treatment.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Eileen Winfrey

    Autobiographical journey of the author's life from elementary school through high school through the lens of his diagnosis and treatment of ADD/ADHD. Plenty of setting (family life, friendship drama, school struggles) as well as informative infographics with clinical information. I thought it was interesting and real and read it all the way through in one sitting. I'll probably pass it up to middle or high school because Tyler tells his story all the way through college - it will better resonate Autobiographical journey of the author's life from elementary school through high school through the lens of his diagnosis and treatment of ADD/ADHD. Plenty of setting (family life, friendship drama, school struggles) as well as informative infographics with clinical information. I thought it was interesting and real and read it all the way through in one sitting. I'll probably pass it up to middle or high school because Tyler tells his story all the way through college - it will better resonate with an older audience.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anya the Writer

    An important book with an important message. I thought the author conveyed the message of ADHD thoughtfully, carefully, and meaningfully. It was a perspective that you don't usually see in books for kids. I think it's important that people feel like they aren't alone in the world, like there are people like them, and like they belong, and this book conveys that perfectly. I would recommend this to anyone interested in learning about ADHD or anyone who doesn't really know much about it. Side note: I An important book with an important message. I thought the author conveyed the message of ADHD thoughtfully, carefully, and meaningfully. It was a perspective that you don't usually see in books for kids. I think it's important that people feel like they aren't alone in the world, like there are people like them, and like they belong, and this book conveys that perfectly. I would recommend this to anyone interested in learning about ADHD or anyone who doesn't really know much about it. Side note: I also loved the cover!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    A well done book that shows the complexities of ADHD and relationships. I was angry for people not realizing what was going on with Tyler. I was upset that his father was so destructive. And yet I got where it all came from because of the time and lack of knowledge of this very real challenge children (and adults) have. The science parts were well done. Not sure about this for a young reader. But an older middle grader may be able to read the violent parts (father and mom) with more understanding A well done book that shows the complexities of ADHD and relationships. I was angry for people not realizing what was going on with Tyler. I was upset that his father was so destructive. And yet I got where it all came from because of the time and lack of knowledge of this very real challenge children (and adults) have. The science parts were well done. Not sure about this for a young reader. But an older middle grader may be able to read the violent parts (father and mom) with more understanding.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Lintemuth

    Phenomenal graphic memoir about growing up with ADHD and the authors experience with ritilin and for me as an adult who was recently diagnosed it was fascinating. I really appreciated recognizing so many of the things I felt and did as a kid, but because it was (and still is) highly underdiagnosed in girls and women my experiences were so different. I can't recommend this book enough for fans of graphic memoirs and especially those who are interested in ADHD/neurodiversity. Tyler does an amazing Phenomenal graphic memoir about growing up with ADHD and the authors experience with ritilin and for me as an adult who was recently diagnosed it was fascinating. I really appreciated recognizing so many of the things I felt and did as a kid, but because it was (and still is) highly underdiagnosed in girls and women my experiences were so different. I can't recommend this book enough for fans of graphic memoirs and especially those who are interested in ADHD/neurodiversity. Tyler does an amazing job pairing his experiences with a lot of great data and science.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ms. BUSH

    I really liked this graphic novel but I'm not sure I would classify it as middle grades. There is exploration of ADHD symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment that students could relate to but there was also a lot of memoir details from his own life (parents not getting along, issues with body image, angry dad, "growing out" of ADHD) that aren't related to everyone's experience with ADHD. If this book is meant to provide an ADHD window or mirror for middle grades, they may miss that. I really liked this graphic novel but I'm not sure I would classify it as middle grades. There is exploration of ADHD symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment that students could relate to but there was also a lot of memoir details from his own life (parents not getting along, issues with body image, angry dad, "growing out" of ADHD) that aren't related to everyone's experience with ADHD. If this book is meant to provide an ADHD window or mirror for middle grades, they may miss that.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    I loved the incorporation of ADHD background, symptoms, path to diagnosis, and treatment. It is a bit difficult to read now, knowing that the author was diagnosed in the late 70s. The book touches briefly on what doctors now know about ADHD, but I still felt like that could have been more deeply addressed. Probably more upper middle grade--not because of inappropriate content, more because of the need to analyze the time period of the book compared to now.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Ladd

    As someone who has close ties to several people with ADHD, I found this graphic novel riveting. The descriptions of how the brain functions, the real experiences of how hard it is for someone to sit still and pay attention, and the autobiographical tale of learning to take Ritalin make this a must have for libraries, schools and families who are coping with this diagnosis.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Great graphic novel depicting one kid's struggle with ADHD. I especially appreciated the pages of info on the background on ADHD and a general education of what it is, etc. Would recommend for seventh graders and up. Especially for adults that may have these children in their lives be it as students or their own children. Great graphic novel depicting one kid's struggle with ADHD. I especially appreciated the pages of info on the background on ADHD and a general education of what it is, etc. Would recommend for seventh graders and up. Especially for adults that may have these children in their lives be it as students or their own children.

  29. 4 out of 5

    ribbonknight

    Read via comics club who reads a lot of graphic medicine. I found the presentation of concepts like “diagnosis” and “executive function” to be fantastic. Many could do with learning these ideas as they are presented. This helped me better understand friends who have this, including probably my partner.

  30. 5 out of 5

    KATHRYNE STEVENS

    I thought the information about ADHD was very interesting and I appreciated Page's description of his own experiences with ADHD. However the "sciencey" pages were difficult to read and I had trouble understanding the pacing of the story. It also ends with a lot unresolved and a promise of a second book. I thought the information about ADHD was very interesting and I appreciated Page's description of his own experiences with ADHD. However the "sciencey" pages were difficult to read and I had trouble understanding the pacing of the story. It also ends with a lot unresolved and a promise of a second book.

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