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City of Incurable Women

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“Where are the hysterics, those magnificent women of former times?” wrote Jacques Lacan. Long history’s ghosts, marginalized and dispossessed due to their gender and class, they are reimagined by Maud Casey as complex, flesh-and-blood people with stories to tell. These linked, evocative prose portraits, accompanied by period photographs and medical documents both authentic “Where are the hysterics, those magnificent women of former times?” wrote Jacques Lacan. Long history’s ghosts, marginalized and dispossessed due to their gender and class, they are reimagined by Maud Casey as complex, flesh-and-blood people with stories to tell. These linked, evocative prose portraits, accompanied by period photographs and medical documents both authentic and invented, poignantly restore the humanity to the nineteenth-century female psychiatric patients confined in Paris’s Salpêtrière hospital and reduced to specimens for study by the celebrated neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot and his male colleagues.


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“Where are the hysterics, those magnificent women of former times?” wrote Jacques Lacan. Long history’s ghosts, marginalized and dispossessed due to their gender and class, they are reimagined by Maud Casey as complex, flesh-and-blood people with stories to tell. These linked, evocative prose portraits, accompanied by period photographs and medical documents both authentic “Where are the hysterics, those magnificent women of former times?” wrote Jacques Lacan. Long history’s ghosts, marginalized and dispossessed due to their gender and class, they are reimagined by Maud Casey as complex, flesh-and-blood people with stories to tell. These linked, evocative prose portraits, accompanied by period photographs and medical documents both authentic and invented, poignantly restore the humanity to the nineteenth-century female psychiatric patients confined in Paris’s Salpêtrière hospital and reduced to specimens for study by the celebrated neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot and his male colleagues.

30 review for City of Incurable Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    There’s the story of your life and then there are the parts no one can ever know. Not even you. from City of Incurable Women by Maud Casey The hospital was a city unto itself, the largest asylum in Europe, comprised of women diagnosed as ‘incurable’ hysterics. The medical professionals took advantage of this endless supply of powerless women, conducting experiments, which they photographed. They had their ‘favorite’ women who could hold a pose for the required length of time to expose the photogra There’s the story of your life and then there are the parts no one can ever know. Not even you. from City of Incurable Women by Maud Casey The hospital was a city unto itself, the largest asylum in Europe, comprised of women diagnosed as ‘incurable’ hysterics. The medical professionals took advantage of this endless supply of powerless women, conducting experiments, which they photographed. They had their ‘favorite’ women who could hold a pose for the required length of time to expose the photographic plate, some patients becoming actresses to obtain attention and preferential treatment. Each woman was photographed at admittance, a card created describing her physically and her ailment. The doctors experiments were bizarre. They inscribed words and dates upon their skin and photographed the raised lesions. They set the women in a bed and photographed them in ‘ecstasy.’ The effects of poverty, tragedy, and trauma were diagnosed as hysteria. Ovarian compression was one treatment. After all, female hormones were the cause of hysteria. I read Maud Casey’s The City of Incurable Women in one sitting. Casey has given voices and stories to the women in the photographs, unforgettably haunting and poetic. The photographic images of the women, their records, and paintings depicting the doctors studying the women, remind that this may be fiction, but these were women and girls who lived and suffered. Girls born in poverty, girls who were sexually assaulted, orphans. In the before, we were all kinds of girls. A daughter, for example, who missed 150 days of school because of bad reading habits[…]one of the twenty-one moral causes of death, alongside nostalgia, misery, love, and joy. from City of Incurable Women by Maud Casey Casey reminds us of centuries of women who were treated without compassion. “We were saints. We were witches. We were burned at the stake. We are on fire still,” she concludes. It sends shivers up my spine. I have chosen female doctors for thirty-five years. I can only imagine how the treatment of female patients would have been different had more women been allowed to practice in the 19th c. And, although important advances did come out of this hospital, science–even faulty theories–compressed compassion and skirted psychological insight. These women were human Guinea pigs and valued only as test subjects. This beautifully written, haunting novel gives voice to a few women of the millions throughout history who were marginalized and shut away. It is staggering to consider. I received an ARC from the publisher. My review is fair and unbiased.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne Blaine

    I appreciate what the author was trying to do here in giving voices to the women who were locked up as hysterics in a Parisian mental hospital. But in blurring the lines between historical fiction and poet fabrication, I felt a little too lost to fully empathize. I love poetic prose, but the portraits of each woman were not distinct enough for me to be able to see them as individuals. I know that at times the author may have been trying to draw a red thread through the narratives, but for me it I appreciate what the author was trying to do here in giving voices to the women who were locked up as hysterics in a Parisian mental hospital. But in blurring the lines between historical fiction and poet fabrication, I felt a little too lost to fully empathize. I love poetic prose, but the portraits of each woman were not distinct enough for me to be able to see them as individuals. I know that at times the author may have been trying to draw a red thread through the narratives, but for me it had the effect of flattening the experiences of these women into a single voice. It’s an interesting read and the photos and documents show the depth of the author’s research, but I think I personally would have preferred a non-fiction approach in this case.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    My review for the Minneapolis Star Tribune: https://www.startribune.com/review-ci... Incurable can be a fun hyperbolic adjective when used whimsically — for instance, an incurable romantic — but it becomes a chilling description when applied to actual medical conditions, fatalistic and revelatory of gaps in knowledge and the biases that exist within this supposedly objective field.In her seventh book, "City of Incurable Women," Maud Casey explores these blind spots as they historically affected w My review for the Minneapolis Star Tribune: https://www.startribune.com/review-ci... Incurable can be a fun hyperbolic adjective when used whimsically — for instance, an incurable romantic — but it becomes a chilling description when applied to actual medical conditions, fatalistic and revelatory of gaps in knowledge and the biases that exist within this supposedly objective field.In her seventh book, "City of Incurable Women," Maud Casey explores these blind spots as they historically affected women suffering from mental illnesses and psychosomatic disorders that baffled their male doctors, men whose curiosity "often swerved into cruelty."The author of six previous books, her most recent novel, "The Man Who Walked Away," was based on the real-life case history of Albert Dadas, a 19th-century psychiatric patient in the hospital of St. André in Bordeaux, prone to wandering in a trance-like state. Here — through extensive research, archival documents and black-and-white photographs — Casey crafts a collection of linked narrative pieces inspired in part by Georges Didi-Huberman's book "The Invention of Hysteria: Charcot and the Photographic Iconography of the Salpêtrière," about Jean-Martin Charcot, a neurologist who coined the diagnosis of hysteria at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris where he worked between the 1860s and the 1890s.Originally a gunpowder factory (hence the name) the Salpêtrière was converted to a hospice for poor women in 1656 and the vastness of the sprawling compound is what prompted Didi-Huberman to refer to it as a "city of incurable women," a concept Casey uses to contemplate the connections between physical and psychic spaces.She quotes Charcot himself in his "Lectures on Diseases of the Nervous System" as noting that the massive asylum contained a population of over 5,000, "including a great number called incurables who are admitted for life," meaning that "In other words, we are in possession of a kind of living pathological museum, the resources of which were considerable."Mixing truth and imagination, Casey reveals both the grim facts of the place — "one doctor for every five hundred patients. Three different kinds of diets: two meals, one meal, and starvation" — and the complexity of the women these doctors reduce to objects of study and repulsed fascination.Casey conjures a collective voice for these so-called hysterics, writing of their lives "in the before" in a way that returns their subjectivity to them: "When we turned ten, it was time to learn the catechism, time for our First Communion. Some of us left school because of an infestation that destroyed the crops. Some of us took work behind the doors of the silk factory."Elsewhere, she uses the first person to deliver monologues in the personae of individual patients, including Jane Avril, the famed can-can dancer from the Moulin Rouge, who spent time in the Salpêtrière as a teenager.Casey's dedication reads "for my fellow incurables" and this short, enchantingly strange book feels animated by compassion. In the section on Geneviève Legrand, she writes, "Bodies, you think, are like haunted houses." These accounts haunt the reader with their subjects' strength of spirit, even amid their thwarted dreams and desires.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Scarlett Readz and Runz....Through Novel Time & Distance

    Oh, the fallacies of women's hysteria! Quite an interesting read that delves into the medical field at its emergence of psychology through documenting cases of women during tests, trials and captivity in facilities. Alluding to more sinister practices and the inexplicable, perplexity of female creatures aflicted on the not so domestic side of life with some eccentricities, they endure constant societal judgement and so forth. There isn't a climax to this story but it is told from a fictional cha Oh, the fallacies of women's hysteria! Quite an interesting read that delves into the medical field at its emergence of psychology through documenting cases of women during tests, trials and captivity in facilities. Alluding to more sinister practices and the inexplicable, perplexity of female creatures aflicted on the not so domestic side of life with some eccentricities, they endure constant societal judgement and so forth. There isn't a climax to this story but it is told from a fictional character's pov and her experiences through youth while offering her mind to the reader in a world where her family doesn't want her anymore, stirred up with her keen observations of the men in the medical field, as she navigates the path of least resistance and isn't the least unaware of how she is being taken advantage of. Nove and quick read!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Corrie

    I both listened and read City of Incurable Women by Maud Casey on Scribd (both versions are available) to get the best experience as the book contains photographs and records you would otherwise miss. The narration of Hope Newhouse (her flawless French made my jaw drop) is such a treat. She gave an utterly brilliant performance. This novella is part fiction and part fact as it explores a world inspired by 19th-century female psychiatric patients who, diagnosed with ‘incurable’ hysteria, were conf I both listened and read City of Incurable Women by Maud Casey on Scribd (both versions are available) to get the best experience as the book contains photographs and records you would otherwise miss. The narration of Hope Newhouse (her flawless French made my jaw drop) is such a treat. She gave an utterly brilliant performance. This novella is part fiction and part fact as it explores a world inspired by 19th-century female psychiatric patients who, diagnosed with ‘incurable’ hysteria, were confined in Paris’ Salpêtrière hospital. These women and girls were reduced to specimens for study by the celebrated neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot and his male colleagues. What was said about the book: “In exquisite prose, Maud Casey has built a city inside a book, a city that is a hospital, a museum, a dance, a body in ecstasy just outside the frame. On every page of this achingly beautiful book, Casey brings a wise and feral attention to the so-called incurables of the ‘era of soul science’—Augustine, Louise, Marie, Geneviève, and a chorus of nameless others singing their private beginnings and public ends.” “Lyrical. . . . Through thorough research and a cutting pen, Casey elevates these women back to their deserved place in history, bringing to life those who were reduced to mere photographs.” 5 Stars

  6. 4 out of 5

    Zenda

    This was interesting, humanizing the stories in these pictures and medical records shown in this novel.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle Jarrett

    The City of Incurable Women is forceful in evoking emotion and reflection. Casey takes us into the minds and bodies of women confined in Paris's Saltpetriere hospital in the mid to late 1800's. We all know the diagnosis of Hysteria came from the word uterus, thereby limiting mental illness to only half of the population. One of the treatments for hysteria was "ovarian compression." Beginning each vignette of the chosen woman's history is a picture of the woman/girl with a card as to her diagnosis The City of Incurable Women is forceful in evoking emotion and reflection. Casey takes us into the minds and bodies of women confined in Paris's Saltpetriere hospital in the mid to late 1800's. We all know the diagnosis of Hysteria came from the word uterus, thereby limiting mental illness to only half of the population. One of the treatments for hysteria was "ovarian compression." Beginning each vignette of the chosen woman's history is a picture of the woman/girl with a card as to her diagnosis and symptoms. The diagnosis is always hysteria. The symptoms vary: St. Vitus dance, constriction of muscles, atrophy of tongue, genital sensation, and others of equal absurdity. Casey reports on the "doctor's best girls" where we learned "to bend and not break" and "the color of the era of soul science is the red of our blood." Who came to the hospital? Orphans, unacknowledged daughters of wealthy men, children of prostitutes and/or mothers of these children. Some came from another form of abusive institutionalization, the convents. So often Joan of Arc is mentioned as a prototype for the patients/inmates. Many are admitted to the hospital because of poverty, unacknowledged sexual abuse and incest, and other victimization of the patriarchy. The City of Incurable Women is tragic and compelling. Facts and fiction unite in truth often caused by penisteria. O, wait. Not a diagnosis...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Maud Casey’s The City of Incurable Women brings me back to an old fascination of mine: the women incarcerated at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital after being diagnosed with hysteria and other related maladies. Casey’s unusual book blends contemporary photos and doctors’ notes with fictional passages that give voice to women who bore their society’s expectations of their gender and their projected fears of women who broke those expectations. This is not an easy book to read—due to the subject matte Maud Casey’s The City of Incurable Women brings me back to an old fascination of mine: the women incarcerated at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital after being diagnosed with hysteria and other related maladies. Casey’s unusual book blends contemporary photos and doctors’ notes with fictional passages that give voice to women who bore their society’s expectations of their gender and their projected fears of women who broke those expectations. This is not an easy book to read—due to the subject matter and the experimental writing style—but I found it fascinating... Read the rest of my review at A Bookish Type. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss, for review consideration.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Wagner

    *I received this book through LibraryThing Early Reviewers.* This brief volume is centered around the fictionalized women who were psychiatric patients at the Salpetriere hospital in Paris. One of the most interesting things included in this book are the 19th-century photographs and snippets of documents which add layers to the stories and a visual sense of what the world was like for the women depicted. I can't say I really liked this book, but it did provide insight into a world I had rarely en *I received this book through LibraryThing Early Reviewers.* This brief volume is centered around the fictionalized women who were psychiatric patients at the Salpetriere hospital in Paris. One of the most interesting things included in this book are the 19th-century photographs and snippets of documents which add layers to the stories and a visual sense of what the world was like for the women depicted. I can't say I really liked this book, but it did provide insight into a world I had rarely encountered previously.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nikki

    My words cannot do this novel justice. What Casey has written is lyrical beauty, discussing the deepest emotions of women institutionalized in Paris’s Salpêtrière hospital, their experiences only partially fictionalized. The various portraits Casey paints give justice to the forgotten women, their forgotten lives and forgotten emotions, who were locked away and hidden by history. Each page teems with the emotional release these women were denied; each page is brilliant ecstasy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    This small unique book recounts some of the tragic stories of marginalized women committed to Paris' Salpetriere insane asylum in the 19th century. Through medical documents and photographs, their histories unfolded as male doctors treated them in unconventional, bizarre ways. One treatment was ovarian compression, hailed, unbelievably, as innovative and effective. Many of these patients were orphans or products of a dysfunctional, poverty-stricken home life. Some had been sexually assaulted and This small unique book recounts some of the tragic stories of marginalized women committed to Paris' Salpetriere insane asylum in the 19th century. Through medical documents and photographs, their histories unfolded as male doctors treated them in unconventional, bizarre ways. One treatment was ovarian compression, hailed, unbelievably, as innovative and effective. Many of these patients were orphans or products of a dysfunctional, poverty-stricken home life. Some had been sexually assaulted and others were incarcerated for seemingly innocuous reasons like bad reading habits. Although fictionalized, Maud Casey has cast a light on an unimaginable period in mental health history. The stories are haunting and profound. My thanks to LibraryThing and the publisher for the opportunity to read this book, which I may have overlooked and serves as a poignant reminder of how far the treatment of real mental illness has come.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Gwyneth

    Filled with the feelings and emotions of being woman and sharing the female identity with all women. Poetically beautiful prose in many voices that all feel personal and coming from inside myself.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Green-Kingery

    Though this is a very small book--only 121 pages--it illuminates an egregious and somewhat obscure (at least to me) account of the young women who lived at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris and were treated by Dr. Jean-Martin Charcot for "hysteria" and other related maladies. While it is a work of fiction, it is based on real events that are not all that well-known. Although I have long known that women's healthcare has always lagged behind that for their male counterparts and that women's Though this is a very small book--only 121 pages--it illuminates an egregious and somewhat obscure (at least to me) account of the young women who lived at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris and were treated by Dr. Jean-Martin Charcot for "hysteria" and other related maladies. While it is a work of fiction, it is based on real events that are not all that well-known. Although I have long known that women's healthcare has always lagged behind that for their male counterparts and that women's illnesses have often been considered as little more than pschosomatic in nature, this little book was still a disturbing eye-opener. It made clear how at the mercy of men these young women were and how much they became objects of fascination and manipulation, not only to doctors, but also to invited lay observers. If the doctor singled out a patient, she would be called upon to to be the subject of Dr. Charcot's lectures and salons. They would be hypnotized and asked to do embarassing or unsafe things. If, on the other hand, they were not one of the doctor's "best girls", it is true they were not put under such scrutiny, but neither did they receive as much medical attention or as nice of accomodations. In other words, they were pitted against one another to "perform" for the doctor and his "colleagues". There were even costume balls at which doctors, artists, writers, statesmen and important businessmen would come and interact socially with the patients. Such was the fascination with these women labeled hysterics that the surrealist artists wrote a manifesto in the publication La Revolution Surrealiste celebrating them and lamenting their disappearance on the 50th anniversary of the diagnosis of hysteria. In my opinion, the extreme instance of objectivity of women as exemplified in this story is chilling in light of current events involving certain aspects of women's health. How has our gender forgotten from whence we came and what a hard road it was?

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jesal

    I finished 'City of Incurable Women,' yesterday. When I finished it I was quiet, stunned by how different it was. Here's an attempt to unpack it. Casey boldly lets language take the lead and lets it go where it wants to go... and as a result the story is self-propelled, reflecting in some ways a kind of freedom to BE, that many 'incurable' women had, I mean the freedom to exist in all their rawness. So much of the book also felt like poetry: the compression, the leaps, the rhythm, half-way throu I finished 'City of Incurable Women,' yesterday. When I finished it I was quiet, stunned by how different it was. Here's an attempt to unpack it. Casey boldly lets language take the lead and lets it go where it wants to go... and as a result the story is self-propelled, reflecting in some ways a kind of freedom to BE, that many 'incurable' women had, I mean the freedom to exist in all their rawness. So much of the book also felt like poetry: the compression, the leaps, the rhythm, half-way through the book I realised that I'm somehow reading the sentences aloud, even if in my head and they had a spoken word beat to them. The stream of consciousness narration worked well, in getting me closer to understanding the women's intelligence and humanity, in a way that wasn't sentimental (for it would've been easy for a writer to do so) since they did go through just SO much in their young lives. Maybe that's why their constant recalling of the golden past, was understandable on an empathic level, not a pitiable one. Loved the loose structure at the end, where we hear again from the glimpses of women in the previous chapters. Overall a very different, original work, narrated poetically, bringing us closer to understanding countless women who were labeled 'hysterical' and abandoned, forgotten, silenced in the early nineteenth century. We hear their voices again! Softly triumphant!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Turk

    American novelist Maud Casey's book, "City of Incurable Women," has written a series of carefully imagined, poetic and deeply affecting stories told by the women hospitalized in Paris's Salpêtriére hospital in the late 1800's. These women were broadly referred to as hysterics by the doctors who studied them, and tested various treatments and cures to alleviate their physical and mental manifestations. Casey illustrates each story with the photographs taken of each patient, and catalogued in the American novelist Maud Casey's book, "City of Incurable Women," has written a series of carefully imagined, poetic and deeply affecting stories told by the women hospitalized in Paris's Salpêtriére hospital in the late 1800's. These women were broadly referred to as hysterics by the doctors who studied them, and tested various treatments and cures to alleviate their physical and mental manifestations. Casey illustrates each story with the photographs taken of each patient, and catalogued in the hospital's library along with a card briefly describing them by age and symptoms. Casey imagines the fuller stories of their lives, the state of their minds and spirits, their holy anger, their stifled sexuality, their lost children. The publisher is the non-profit Bellevue Literary Press. I recommend reading story of how the book came to be on their website: blpress.org.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

    Casey uses real, historical photographs of women admitted to an asylum in France in the late 1800s and she pairs them with fictional accounts of the women's lives. Women who were orphans, trauma survivors, epileptic, or had heavy menses were labeled as suffering from hysteria. They undergo 'treatment', such as ovarian compression. While the story is an interesting one, it's hard to read without running back and forth reading about the historical accounts of some of the procedures and such. I wou Casey uses real, historical photographs of women admitted to an asylum in France in the late 1800s and she pairs them with fictional accounts of the women's lives. Women who were orphans, trauma survivors, epileptic, or had heavy menses were labeled as suffering from hysteria. They undergo 'treatment', such as ovarian compression. While the story is an interesting one, it's hard to read without running back and forth reading about the historical accounts of some of the procedures and such. I wouldn't have understood the story if not for using google to explain. I found the story difficult to follow, lots of jumps from one woman to the next without really explaining. It took me awhile to realize that the story was about the picture shown a few pages before.

  17. 5 out of 5

    leukonoe

    you live if you dance to the voice that ails you all your bodies ghost-filled. bodies, you think, are like haunted houses. Nice phrases hop in from time to time, the topic is interesting and well explored. Why to draw the story from the mouths of the Great Asylum’s patients if they voices get so entangled? There were good moments, but I’m more of a fan of first hand, first person stories, rather than imagining what the narration could be. I’d be eager to read the non-fiction version of this.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    A look at a women's asylum, it's a series of connected shorts or maybe even vignettes. They very much try to get an impression of several women. Interspersed are some photographs or case reports. It's interesting. I'd have liked more narrative really. Ultimately, I think this one is going to prove pretty forgettable. A look at a women's asylum, it's a series of connected shorts or maybe even vignettes. They very much try to get an impression of several women. Interspersed are some photographs or case reports. It's interesting. I'd have liked more narrative really. Ultimately, I think this one is going to prove pretty forgettable.

  19. 5 out of 5

    lark benobi

    It's a very short book but it took me a long time to read because I kept stopping and thinking, wow, that is so gorgeously put...and so is this...and so is this...and then I'd want to go write some sentences instead of continuing to read...anyway it's marvelous. Read it. It's a very short book but it took me a long time to read because I kept stopping and thinking, wow, that is so gorgeously put...and so is this...and so is this...and then I'd want to go write some sentences instead of continuing to read...anyway it's marvelous. Read it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Davida Chazan

    This very unusual book is actually a collection of highly poetic short stories about women in a mental institution, as they were many years ago. Not an easy read, but boy, can this woman write! https://tcl-bookreviews.com/2022/03/2... This very unusual book is actually a collection of highly poetic short stories about women in a mental institution, as they were many years ago. Not an easy read, but boy, can this woman write! https://tcl-bookreviews.com/2022/03/2...

  21. 4 out of 5

    June

    We again learn that early male Doctor's usually diagnosed female patient's health issues without easily recognizable symptoms, from their default male predilection. Focus on her vagina. I would say, "Typical." But why be redundant? We again learn that early male Doctor's usually diagnosed female patient's health issues without easily recognizable symptoms, from their default male predilection. Focus on her vagina. I would say, "Typical." But why be redundant?

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I really like Casey's writing, and the portraits of these maligned women were beautiful in their way. But in other ways, the subject matter just made me angry--and 'men of science' being the creepiest sort of abuser. I would be interested in reading some of her other works. I really like Casey's writing, and the portraits of these maligned women were beautiful in their way. But in other ways, the subject matter just made me angry--and 'men of science' being the creepiest sort of abuser. I would be interested in reading some of her other works.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Angela Esposito

    Poetry, written as a first hand account. If you are looking for a book that spoon feeds you a story, or of you're not good with metaphors...this is not the book for you. Great book, but parts dragged a bit. Poetry, written as a first hand account. If you are looking for a book that spoon feeds you a story, or of you're not good with metaphors...this is not the book for you. Great book, but parts dragged a bit.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Allison Wyss

    I wrote about how the inclusion of photographs and other artifacts, as well as allusions to outside texts, deepens the experience of reading this book while gesturing to something beyond it. https://bit.ly/CityArtifacts I wrote about how the inclusion of photographs and other artifacts, as well as allusions to outside texts, deepens the experience of reading this book while gesturing to something beyond it. https://bit.ly/CityArtifacts

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I liked the premise of this book and the addition of pictures and clippings, but the stories were unremarkable and forgettable. It is a short book and I gave up half way because I didn't remember any of the previous stories. I liked the premise of this book and the addition of pictures and clippings, but the stories were unremarkable and forgettable. It is a short book and I gave up half way because I didn't remember any of the previous stories.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hayden Brook

    For work

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    2.5 rounded up to 3 stars.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sara (theMuseofNightmares) [ON HIATUS]

    'City of Incurable Women' Now they're just calling out my hometown. 'City of Incurable Women' Now they're just calling out my hometown.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kate Guinan

    Really wanted to like it, just couldn't get into it. Maybe I'll try again one day. Really wanted to like it, just couldn't get into it. Maybe I'll try again one day.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    I believe this is an interesting topic with history aligned with it. Unfortunately the story is out of focus and difficult to follow since it really deals with the mentioned topic.

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