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Woke, Inc.: Inside Corporate America's Social Justice Scam

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AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! A young entrepreneur makes the case that politics has no place in business, and sets out a new vision for the future of American capitalism. There’s a new invisible force at work in our economic and cultural lives. It affects every advertisement we see and every product we buy, from our morning coffee to a new pair of shoes.  “Stakehold AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! A young entrepreneur makes the case that politics has no place in business, and sets out a new vision for the future of American capitalism. There’s a new invisible force at work in our economic and cultural lives. It affects every advertisement we see and every product we buy, from our morning coffee to a new pair of shoes.  “Stakeholder capitalism” makes rosy promises of a better, more diverse, environmentally-friendly world, but in reality this ideology championed by America’s business and political leaders robs us of our money, our voice, and our identity.   Vivek Ramaswamy is a traitor to his class. He’s founded multibillion-dollar enterprises, led a biotech company as CEO, he became a hedge fund partner in his 20s, trained as a scientist at Harvard and a lawyer at Yale, and grew up the child of immigrants in a small town in Ohio. Now he takes us behind the scenes into corporate boardrooms and five-star conferences, into Ivy League classrooms and secretive nonprofits, to reveal the defining scam of our century.   The modern woke-industrial complex divides us as a people.  By mixing morality with consumerism, America’s elites prey on our innermost insecurities about who we really are. They sell us cheap social causes and skin-deep identities to satisfy our hunger for a cause and our search for meaning, at a moment when we as Americans lack both.   This book not only rips back the curtain on the new corporatist agenda, it offers a better way forward. America’s elites may want to sort us into demographic boxes, but we don’t have to stay there. Woke, Inc. begins as a critique of stakeholder capitalism and ends with an exploration of what it means to be an American in 2021—a journey that begins with cynicism and ends with hope.   


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AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! A young entrepreneur makes the case that politics has no place in business, and sets out a new vision for the future of American capitalism. There’s a new invisible force at work in our economic and cultural lives. It affects every advertisement we see and every product we buy, from our morning coffee to a new pair of shoes.  “Stakehold AN INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER! A young entrepreneur makes the case that politics has no place in business, and sets out a new vision for the future of American capitalism. There’s a new invisible force at work in our economic and cultural lives. It affects every advertisement we see and every product we buy, from our morning coffee to a new pair of shoes.  “Stakeholder capitalism” makes rosy promises of a better, more diverse, environmentally-friendly world, but in reality this ideology championed by America’s business and political leaders robs us of our money, our voice, and our identity.   Vivek Ramaswamy is a traitor to his class. He’s founded multibillion-dollar enterprises, led a biotech company as CEO, he became a hedge fund partner in his 20s, trained as a scientist at Harvard and a lawyer at Yale, and grew up the child of immigrants in a small town in Ohio. Now he takes us behind the scenes into corporate boardrooms and five-star conferences, into Ivy League classrooms and secretive nonprofits, to reveal the defining scam of our century.   The modern woke-industrial complex divides us as a people.  By mixing morality with consumerism, America’s elites prey on our innermost insecurities about who we really are. They sell us cheap social causes and skin-deep identities to satisfy our hunger for a cause and our search for meaning, at a moment when we as Americans lack both.   This book not only rips back the curtain on the new corporatist agenda, it offers a better way forward. America’s elites may want to sort us into demographic boxes, but we don’t have to stay there. Woke, Inc. begins as a critique of stakeholder capitalism and ends with an exploration of what it means to be an American in 2021—a journey that begins with cynicism and ends with hope.   

30 review for Woke, Inc.: Inside Corporate America's Social Justice Scam

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chris Boutté

    I had absolutely no clue who Vivek Ramaswamy was, but when I was interviewing the author Peter Boghossian for my podcast, he told me that I should check this book out. As a person who considers himself pretty left-leaning, I instantly judged Vivek with my first impressions of him. Personally, I’m not sure if capitalism can be fixed, so when I learned that he was a former CEO of a biotech company, and the first clips of him I saw was on Fox News, I had an idea of what type of guy he was. And on t I had absolutely no clue who Vivek Ramaswamy was, but when I was interviewing the author Peter Boghossian for my podcast, he told me that I should check this book out. As a person who considers himself pretty left-leaning, I instantly judged Vivek with my first impressions of him. Personally, I’m not sure if capitalism can be fixed, so when I learned that he was a former CEO of a biotech company, and the first clips of him I saw was on Fox News, I had an idea of what type of guy he was. And on top of that, typically any book that has the word “woke” in the title or subtitle makes me think it’s going to be some ultra-conservative person just trying to play into tribalism. But, I was 1000% wrong, and I’m so glad that I was. Once I started this book, I couldn’t stop reading it. I grabbed my copy on Friday and finished it by Sunday. As someone on the left, I’ve felt insane watching so-called liberals get played by the rich and elite like a bunch of fiddles. In this book, Vivek brings his insider knowledge as a former CEO to showcase how corporate America loves playing into the culture wars because it makes them more money and distracts from all of the real issues. Vivek is a man with principles, and as you read the book, you can tell he’s a legitimately good person who wants to help people. Unfortunately, when it comes to the culture wars, people don’t care if you want to do the greatest good; all they care about is if you’ve properly shown you’re “one of the tribe”. Rather than buckling to the pressure, Vivek left his position as CEO and wrote this extremely important book. Aside from Vivek being a decent guy, he’s a deep thinker. As I read this book, I almost felt like I was reading the words of a philosopher, and I loved it. I don’t completely agree with all of Vivek’s ideas and solutions, but I definitely respect all of them. I think there may be some other root causes and potential solutions, but the point is that we need to recognize what’s happening and work together. In my opinion, this is one of the best books of 2021 alongside Batya Ungar-Sargon’s upcoming book Bad News.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda Galella

    A social construct run amuck, “Woke” or wokeness focuses on anything and everything a person says or does, filtering it for the smallest possible instance that might be a micro aggression, (even if it isn’t), and personifying it for all to see and hear. This new construct has left the social realm and found its way into business and politics. Gone are the days of THE AMERICAN DREAM and E Pluribus Unum. They’ve been replaced with “Woke”corporations, fighting for sustainability or some specific pol A social construct run amuck, “Woke” or wokeness focuses on anything and everything a person says or does, filtering it for the smallest possible instance that might be a micro aggression, (even if it isn’t), and personifying it for all to see and hear. This new construct has left the social realm and found its way into business and politics. Gone are the days of THE AMERICAN DREAM and E Pluribus Unum. They’ve been replaced with “Woke”corporations, fighting for sustainability or some specific politically voteable issue. These same corporations encourage focusing on the differences between people: race, gender, creed, etc., rather than celebrating unity and working for a common productivity. “Woke, Inc.,: Inside the Social Justice Scam” - the title really does say it all for this one and author, Vivek Ramaswamy, does a good job delivering the information. His writing is clear, concise and altho’ he definitely is conservative, there’s no bashing to be found, just reasoned text. Marriage between corporate America, politics and the social construct flavor of the day is ruining one of the pillars of our country. Read “Woke, Inc.” for your own look at what happened and how to fight back📚

  3. 5 out of 5

    Provakar Biswas

    Extraordinary book. Right on point. Really shows the real nature of the world

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cav

    "I used to think corporate bureaucracy was bad because it’s inefficient. That’s true, but it’s not the biggest problem. Rather, there’s a new invisible force at work in the highest ranks of corporate America, one far more nefarious. It’s the defining scam of our time—one that robs you of not only your money but your voice and your identity. The con works like a magic trick, summed up well by Michael Caine’s character in the opening monologue in Christopher Nolan’s movie The Prestige: Every great m "I used to think corporate bureaucracy was bad because it’s inefficient. That’s true, but it’s not the biggest problem. Rather, there’s a new invisible force at work in the highest ranks of corporate America, one far more nefarious. It’s the defining scam of our time—one that robs you of not only your money but your voice and your identity. The con works like a magic trick, summed up well by Michael Caine’s character in the opening monologue in Christopher Nolan’s movie The Prestige: Every great magic trick consists of three parts or acts. The first part is called The Pledge. The magician shows you something ordinary: a deck of cards, a bird or a man.… The second act is called The Turn. The magician takes the ordinary something and makes it do something extraordinary. But you wouldn’t clap yet. Because making something disappear isn’t enough; you have to bring it back. That’s why every magic trick has a third act, the hardest part, the part we call The Prestige..." Woke, Inc. was an interesting look into the strange and dyfunctional arranged marriage of woke leftist "progressivism" with big business corporatism. He drops the above quote in the books' introduction. Author Vivek Ramaswamy is a former American entrepreneur in the biotechnology sector and now an author and pundit. He is the founder and executive chairman of the biopharmaceutical company Roivant Sciences. Prior to founding Roivant in 2014, Ramaswamy co-founded a technology company and was a partner at an investment firm. Vivek Ramaswamy: Ramaswamy begins the book with a high-energy intro, that sets the writing off on a good foot. He also narrates the audiobook version, which is always a nice touch. He lays out the scope of the problem early-on: "Sincere liberals get tricked into adulation by their love of woke causes. Conservatives are duped into submission as they fall back on slogans they memorized decades ago— something like “the market can do no wrong”—failing to recognize that the free market they had in mind doesn’t actually exist today. And poof! Both sides are blinded to the gradual rise of a twenty-first-century Leviathan far more powerful than what even Thomas Hobbes imagined almost four centuries ago. This new woke-industrial Leviathan gains its power by dividing us as a people. When corporations tell us what social values we’re supposed to adopt, they take America as a whole and divide us into tribes. That makes it easier for them to make a buck, but it also coaxes us into adopting new identities based on skin-deep characteristics and flimsy social causes that supplant our deeper shared identity as Americans. Corporations win. Woke activists win. Celebrities win. Even the Chinese Communist Party finds a way to win (more on that later). But the losers of this game are the American people, our hollowed-out institutions, and American democracy itself. The subversion of America by this new form of capitalism isn’t just a bug; as they say in Silicon Valley, it’s a feature..." The broader story told here by Ramaswamy is the long march of woke ideology through corporate America. Recently hitting a tipping point, even Wall St. has joined in on the frenzy of hollow virtue-signaling, and rigid enforcement of leftist political ideology. He writes that this social contagion will ultimately harm the very fabric of our democracy: "But there’s a difference between speaking up as a citizen and using your company’s market power to foist your views onto society while avoiding the rigors of public debate in our democracy. That’s exactly what Larry Fink does when BlackRock issues social mandates about what companies it will or won’t invest in or what Jack Dorsey does when Twitter consistently censors certain political viewpoints rather than others. When companies use their market power to make moral rules, they effectively prevent those other citizens from having the same say in our democracy." Although this moral grandstanding is seemingly very fashionable these days, it is largely window-dressing from companies who value the bottom line more than any social justice cause they purport to support. Ramaswamy provides many examples of this false signaling in the book. In this quote, he talks about Coca-Cola's recent mandated political reeducation, forced on its employees to encourage them to “try to be less white,” whatever that means: "Under the guise of doing good, the corporate con artists hide all of the bad things that they do every day. Coca-Cola fuels an epidemic of diabetes and obesity among black Americans through the products it sells. The hard business decision for the company to debate is whether to change the ingredients in a bottle of Coke. But instead of grappling with that question, Coca-Cola executives implement antiracism training that teaches their employees “to be less white,” and they pay a small fortune to well-heeled diversity consultants who peddle that nonsense. That’s the Goldman playbook. It’s not by accident; it’s by design..." Ramaswamy also talks about many other corporate hypocrites here, including Disney, Apple, Facebook, and Google; among many others. Often no more than naked partisans who happen to be extraordinarily wealthy and powerful, they are some of the chief drivers of this groupthink enforcement. Freedom of speech is a lynchpin value, and is at the core of any healthy free society. Its importance cannot possibly be understated. The right of the individual to speak out against orthodoxy is necessary to help prevent the ideological conformity that is often the end result of people's inborn pro-social wiring. Most of history's greatest man-made atrocities are the result of ideology running unchecked and out of control, having silenced all contrarian voices and opposition. Ramaswamy also spends a bit of time talking about Big Tech, and their recent censorship and discrimination of public figures, as well as individuals who forward content that does not align with the current social orthodoxy. The modern-day power that Silicon Valley has is almost unprecedented in the history of the world. The world turns on information, and the power to dictate to the entire world what is and is not allowed to be discussed, shared or otherwise uploaded and seen by others ultimately rests in the hands of just a few ideologically-motivated uber-wealthy partisans. This should deeply concern you, no matter where on the political spectrum you currently reside... If you believe in Enlightenment values, free inquiry, and other principles that reflect the ethos of Western Civilization, then you do not violate those deontological principles based on tribal allegiances/considerations. Ever. Ramaswamy writes: "These corporate behemoths are doing the work of big government under the mantle of private enterprise—and they’re getting away with it together. It’s the most dangerous kind of woke capitalism of all—the kind where the government explicitly co-opts private institutions to do the government’s own bidding. As we’ve discussed, the unholy marriage between government and corporations isn’t just hypothetical. Nor is it hyperbole—in fact, it may soon have a name. New York University researchers published a report titled “False Accusation: The Unfounded Claim That Social Media Companies Censor Conservatives,” which calls for the Biden administration to form a new “Digital Regulatory Agency” to fight dangerous ideas such as the assertion that social media companies have anti-conservative bias.46 Remind you of Orwell’s Ministry of Truth? Well, it gets worse. According to the New York Times, we now have a “reality crisis.” The solution? Experts are calling for the administration to “put together a cross-agency task force to tackle disinformation and domestic extremism, which would be led by something like a ‘reality czar.’” Importantly, “This task force could also meet regularly with tech platforms, and push for structural changes that could help those companies tackle their own extremism and misinformation problems… it could become the tip of the spear for the federal government’s response to the reality crisis.” Others are calling for a “truth commission.”47 For anyone who’s still wary of my argument that Big Tech censorship is state action disguised as private action, don’t take it from me. Just listen to America’s newspaper of record..." In Chapter 10, Ramaswamy notes that adherents of modern wokeism and related Critical Theories have become religious in their doctrines, aims, and social enforcements. Dubbed by some as "the DIE religion" (Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity), they abandon meritocracy and individualism in favor of group judgments and collective punishment. He writes: "The analogy between Christianity and the Church of Diversity is so strong that it’s evident that wokeness plays a religious role in one’s life, and therefore really is a religion, for legal purposes. Under the woke worldview, being born white, straight, male, or—worse—all three is an original sin that one must spend their life atoning for. Just as Catholics think we inherited the sins of Adam and Eve even if we’ve done nothing wrong, disciples of wokeness think we’ve inherited the sins of the Founding Fathers—the mechanism for group guilt is just called systemic racism instead of original sin. And as I pointed out earlier, the woke left punishes its heretics with the same fervor as any inquisition and for the same reasons—even more important than bringing infidels to the light is keeping the faithful on the straight and narrow path. Any deviation from orthodoxy must be punished..." "...Don’t get me wrong. True diversity is very valuable, both for a nation and for a company. But it’s diversity of thought that’s supposed to matter, not a kind of diversity crudely measured by appearance or accent. At some point we all started using superficial qualities as proxies for intellectual diversity. But the more we focused on those proxies for intellectual diversity, the less we cared about the thing the proxies were supposed to represent. Just as Jesus had become a threat to the institution of the Church in Dostoevsky’s tale, intellectual diversity had become a threat to American corporations, universities, and other institutions. Just as the Grand Inquisitor sentenced Jesus to execution, today’s corporate stewards sacrifice intellectual diversity at their corporate altars in the name of a new Diversity..." Ramaswamy forwards the idea of an addendum to the Civil Rights act of 1964, to include protection against wrongful terminations for political, and/or religious beliefs. If people are truly worried about unfair discrimination, then it follows that they should do this. They won't, of course... If I were to find fault with this book, I would note that Ramaswamy does not provide the naive reader with the foundations of woke. Modern leftist "woke" ideology has philosophical underpinnings; namely at The Frankfurt School in the mid-60s'. Herbert Marcuse, Angela Davis, and a few others were at the tip of this spear, in the efforts to bring this line of thinking to the west. Critical theories, including critical race theory have their roots in Marxism. They can be fairly defined as rebranded, or neo-Marxism. Instead of the class struggle between "landlords" and the peasant class that underpinned Stalinist and Maoist doctrine and societies, the modern critical theorists have substituted landlords with "white" people, and the peasants with people "of colour." The results are what we see today, and what this book is about. ************************ Woke, Inc is an important and timely book. If you have been closely following the culture war, most of what is covered here will not be new to you. The reader new to this discourse, however, is sure to find the book illuminating. Ramaswamy also closes the book with an excellent bit of writing in the last chapter, worth the price of the book alone, IMO. 5 stars.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    While I don’t agree with every conclusion or argument in this book it had a lot of well argued and supported points as well. It was certainly thought provoking.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Abdelfattah

    I have been waiting for this book since I watched the author talking about his theory of the origins of woke religion, great intellectual pleasure

  7. 4 out of 5

    Anthony Gemayel

    This book was thought-provoking in some parts, but disappointingly short-sighted and biased in others. You'd think the author would have stayed away from making basic, rightwing-youtube-channel-comment-level statements like: "“Intersectionality” became the word of the day, and then the decade, even though no one understood exactly what it meant—an ideal feature for any concept to evade falsifiability." Imagine claiming that no one understands intersectionality and putting that in your book as if i This book was thought-provoking in some parts, but disappointingly short-sighted and biased in others. You'd think the author would have stayed away from making basic, rightwing-youtube-channel-comment-level statements like: "“Intersectionality” became the word of the day, and then the decade, even though no one understood exactly what it meant—an ideal feature for any concept to evade falsifiability." Imagine claiming that no one understands intersectionality and putting that in your book as if it's fact. Do you really not understand it or do you just not like it? Could it be that it evades falsifiability because it's basic common sense? A simple example: Being a woman comes with its challenges. Being black comes with its challenges. Being a black woman comes with additional challenges that come from the intersection of challenges. It really is not that deep. Here's another passage that had me confused as to how he could just publish that in a book that claims to be an exposé of the American corporate class: "In a woke world, we are each defined by the innate and the immutable, by the visible and the skin-deep. This narrative now permeates our social consciousness in America. According to this worldview, you are simply a fault line at the intersection of the tectonic plates of group identity. You aren’t really a free agent in the world, but simply a member of your “group” who is supposed to advance your group’s interests. Your race isn’t just the color your skin happens to be. It’s essential to your voice, your ideas, and your identity. This is what woke essentialism is all about: it posits that your genetically inherited attributes are the true essence of who you are." Where did he get this from? What are his sources? What part of intersectionality implies that you are not a free agent? How does acknowledging intersections of social disadvantages lead to the erasure of one's individuality? It's all purely arbitrary musings. He could have left these amateur bits out and it would have made the book a much less tedious read. I sense he was just catering to his rightwing base.

  8. 4 out of 5

    David Steele

    If you’re on the left, you should read this book to understand how millionaire fat cats have co-opted the things you care about and used your cherished beliefs as a smoke screen to distract you from the truly disgusting things that their corporations are actually doing. They are waving rainbow flags and laughing at you, using you as what Marx called “useful idiots”. If you’re on the right, you should read this book to understand how the principles of straight forward, honest capitalism have been If you’re on the left, you should read this book to understand how millionaire fat cats have co-opted the things you care about and used your cherished beliefs as a smoke screen to distract you from the truly disgusting things that their corporations are actually doing. They are waving rainbow flags and laughing at you, using you as what Marx called “useful idiots”. If you’re on the right, you should read this book to understand how the principles of straight forward, honest capitalism have been subverted by crony deals, corruption, and a rigged system that uses the private sector to undertake dirty work that government is quite rightly forbidden from doing. If you use social media, this book will explain exactly what mechanisms are in place to stop you finding out the truth, and how private companies now have the power to decide what is true, and what political opinion is acceptable. If you care anything at all about giving too much power to unelected psychopaths, you should read this book to understand exactly how the Chinese Communist Party, Hollywood and Silicone Valley are equally manipulating the whole shower, laughing all the way to the bank as the next generation tears itself apart. The book also deals extensively with the side effects and pitfalls of the growing divide between left and right, explaining why this is more damaging than you might think. As division leads to fanaticism, comparisons between political ideology and religion are competently and thoughtfully analysed. This book is a great companion to “How to Destroy America in 3 Easy Steps” , “Cynical Theories” and “the Coddling of the American Mind”. There is enough new insight in this book to make it worth reading , even if you’ve already read them all. Although very strongly Americentrist, the issues described in this book are balanced and relevant enough to be directly transferable to Britain (This wasn’t the case with a couple of those other books).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    I don't read these types of books. These types of books are short and fleeting, often outdated even as they are being written, but Vivek seems to have written the perfect time capsule that articulates the Managerial Class at its final moments before its own tyranny or dissolution. This book is a masterclass ammalgamation of every snappy article that you've read or heard of. More than that, in the same way people have a friend that has their pulse on what's the most definitional of culture's unen I don't read these types of books. These types of books are short and fleeting, often outdated even as they are being written, but Vivek seems to have written the perfect time capsule that articulates the Managerial Class at its final moments before its own tyranny or dissolution. This book is a masterclass ammalgamation of every snappy article that you've read or heard of. More than that, in the same way people have a friend that has their pulse on what's the most definitional of culture's unending fluctuations, Vivek not only is that friend but is in the highest perch you could ask for. Vivek understands the periles. More often than not, his analysis is spot on and his reasoning is at the calibre of all American thought, which is applied philosophy in essence. Not only that, Vivek presents solutions. This book is an indespensible guide to a world grown bureaucratic. It reminds me of something precious about the march of old history. In the end, Hegel and Kant will outlive Napolean and his propaganda broadsheet, and the books that were biographies of Napolean will be put to pulp in the old storehouse of forgotten words. Ironically, the closer we get to the world, the more applied our thoughts, the shorter history holds on to them. But that all being said, I hope dearly for future American historians that this book will find a place in their work, because it is a rare glimpse into the upper class before, or during, the fall of an Empire. I don't think of this book really as a final warning anymore, rather its is really just a part of the final swansong from a nation gone mad. At any rate, it's a first rate current event book by a first rate individual and should be treasured as something to be burried for a century or two, and then looked on anew, found by an overly curious wart of a person in some forsaken bookstore or library and, just as I did, say "Oh, so that's how it happened."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Manny

    This is BY FAR they best book regarding "current affairs" i have read this year. Regardless of the party you affiliate with, this is the book to read. As we have seen recently, even the Democrats are open season for Woke,Inc. Anyone that has read my reviews will know that I am a BIG proponent about making "political affiliation" a protected class. This would fix many problem. The moment that someone takes your MAGA hat or rips off your "Feel the Bern" shirt, that would be considered a hate crime This is BY FAR they best book regarding "current affairs" i have read this year. Regardless of the party you affiliate with, this is the book to read. As we have seen recently, even the Democrats are open season for Woke,Inc. Anyone that has read my reviews will know that I am a BIG proponent about making "political affiliation" a protected class. This would fix many problem. The moment that someone takes your MAGA hat or rips off your "Feel the Bern" shirt, that would be considered a hate crime. All we would need is a few sacrificial lambs and people would get the idea real quick. Woke is a religion of zelots. Companies, including the ones that employ us or the ones that host our blog sites and our social media accounts can wipe you off the face of the earth for something you do on your personal time and when not even on the social media platform. This book does a fanominal job in exposing the nefarious and duplicitous tactics of the WOKE, Inc. This cannot continue. Even leftists today, and I mention them by name because they are almost exclusively the leaders of this religion or cult, are waking up to the delosional ways of wokeness. You have people like Bill Maher and recently Nicki Minaj, with 22 Million followers on Twitter which found herself on the wrong side of the woke croud for daring to question the woke narritive. She posted one of the best response I have seen from either side. "Right. I can’t speak to, agree with, even look at someone from a particular political party. Ppl aren’t human any more. If you’re black & a Democrat tells u to shove marbles up ur @$$, you simply have to. If another party tells u to look out for that bus, stand there & get hit" This cannot continue. The "woke" don't even make sense and there is zero consistency. Examples: 1. Only women can have an opinion on abortion, but "men can have babies" and should be cosidered "birthing person". 2. Equal rights for women, but trans women (biological men) can compete for opportunities specifically set aside for biological women. 3. There is a pay gap for women, but you can identify as a man. Do bilogical men that identify as a woman get paid less? I have always said that in a feeding frenzy, phiranha will kill each other. This is what will happen to the woke as well. The weapons you arm those you deploy to do your enforcing, will eventually be turned on you. The author breaks down the legal implecations of the "Woke Religion" and how the Civil Rights act of 1964 and 1968 protect from being persecuted for having a religious belief or DONT follow their religiou beliefs. His comparison of Woke Religion and Christianity is on pointe. I highly recommend this book. He is a conservative, but only because he slipped it in a couple of times. You can assume he is because he is not WOKE and as I mentioned above, the woke are mostly leftists.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jun Y

    Ramaswamy is trying to tackle the “defining challenge of our time” and his target idea is “woke capitalism”. His main argument is that woke capitalism is destroying democracy in America. Unfortunately his diagnosis of the problem is far from complete and leaves out much, for example the history of race in America and the parallel phenomenon of Trumpism. His hopes for “reviving the ideals that bind us together as a nation” also sounds utopian. I think the United States is going to remain socially Ramaswamy is trying to tackle the “defining challenge of our time” and his target idea is “woke capitalism”. His main argument is that woke capitalism is destroying democracy in America. Unfortunately his diagnosis of the problem is far from complete and leaves out much, for example the history of race in America and the parallel phenomenon of Trumpism. His hopes for “reviving the ideals that bind us together as a nation” also sounds utopian. I think the United States is going to remain socially, politically and culturally divided for a long time, with both sides having their own share of racists. The plutocracy that fuels woke capitalism will stay too. Vivek is no fan of big tech as it now stands. He argues for example that people like Jack Dorsey, Twitter boss, are so woke they cannot even see what’s wrong with it. If woke capitalism (which is the amalgamation of stakeholder capitalism, critical race / gender theories from academia, and virtue signalling) is the religious water that Silicon Valley swims in, these multi-billionaire CEOs have to drink it in too, professing their faith and rooting out dissenting employees and heretics. Believing in woke capitalism also comes with added moral clout to dictate cultural norms. But is Silicon Valley all of one kind? Facebook boss, Mark Zuckerberg, one the most powerful men on earth, not only wields immense wealth but control over opinion itself. Does he need to be woke? In the book “An Ugly Truth: Inside Facebook's Battle for Domination”, we see a Mark Zuckerberg who is becoming more and more confident as a leader on his own terms. Today he not only controls Facebook, Whatsapp and Instagram, he is beholden to very few. Nancy Pelosi would probably need to book an appointment and wait. He saved Facebook’s reputation by shrewdly allying himself with the Democrats to help Joe Biden win the presidency and the Senate along as well. Zuckerberg’s aid came in the form of tweaking algorithms to effectively favour Democrats, and deplatforming right-wingers who had real potential to cause violence. He reaps the rewards now financially and he also manages to keep Donald Trump whom he personally dislikes deplatformed and at the fringes. More time to focus on venture capitalism and finding the life-extension technology to enable him to live to a hundred and fifty years. Zuckerberg is at heart a free-speech supremacist with pure ambition, not the typical woke. He consistently claims he is doing his best not to censor anyone for their politics and that algorithms tasked with content moderation can sometimes make mistakes. How are we to fit someone like him into the woke framework? Ultimately, “woke” may be too nebulous a term. Other definitional questions remain. To what extent does activism for climate change and the environment constitute “wokeness”? You could say Elon Musk, with SolarCity and Tesla, is a leading figure in the transition toward a more sustainable energy future. On the other hand, Musk also says that in the long run, underpopulation is going to be a much bigger problem for humanity than overpopulation, which flies in the face of common sense. The implication here, I think, is that he believes that some kind of climate apocalypse is impending. Hence he is also betting on Mars. If woke capitalism is the new form of crony capitalism for the 21st century, it is clear for all to see. Perhaps even the maverick and outsider Elon Musk will succumb to it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Owlseyes

    "Biden is the embodiment of American weakness. (...) New culture in America that celebrates defeat" "Biden is the embodiment of American weakness. (...) New culture in America that celebrates defeat"

  13. 5 out of 5

    Budd Margolis

    I often read from both sides to create my own understanding of issues but this book fails in so many ways I can not really invest the effort to explain. But when you read that the Jan 6 insurrectionists were protesters you know you ion for a far-right ride of typical lazy explanations as if they are worthy of our nation. There are a few good points but they lose validity when faced with so many statements that seek to deny the right of people to force companies to have a conscience. Companies hav I often read from both sides to create my own understanding of issues but this book fails in so many ways I can not really invest the effort to explain. But when you read that the Jan 6 insurrectionists were protesters you know you ion for a far-right ride of typical lazy explanations as if they are worthy of our nation. There are a few good points but they lose validity when faced with so many statements that seek to deny the right of people to force companies to have a conscience. Companies have rights, they take positions, so they must bear responsibility? IF you don't like it then write a book? One point I accept is a need for a compulsory national service not military but service aimed. Many Americans seem to lack respect for one another's cultures, the rights and privileges they have and the need to work together to create a better society. And to get their heads out of screen mode social media obsession. From that point along I added another star. But I wish Goodreads would allow us to select half stars? Woke is not entirely healthy or good for America. There are positive points but far too much of an is image activity and not enough real policy to be effective. I worry about a generation that finds WOKE a means to action and change. We have systems in place and should be working harder to protect voter rights, against suppression and gerrymandering and then, once the nation is properly represented, instead of cheated by social media, lies, tweet attacks, we can have a Congress that actually works and makes lives better instead of lining politicians pockets and empowering corporations. This book only showed me some of the evil behind the anti-WOKE movement and the examples were weak and ineffective.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joel Fletcher

    Great analysis. Thoughtful answers.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brian Katz

    The author did a great job with this book. Very thought provoking for sure. The following are notes that I made at the end of each chapter in the book. Corporations should not be the arbiters of morality. He who has the gold, makes the rules. Money corrupts the political process. Corporations were intended to provide limited liability to shareholders. In exchange, corporations were to limit their activities to the pursuit of commercial profits to prevent corporations from having undue influence The author did a great job with this book. Very thought provoking for sure. The following are notes that I made at the end of each chapter in the book. Corporations should not be the arbiters of morality. He who has the gold, makes the rules. Money corrupts the political process. Corporations were intended to provide limited liability to shareholders. In exchange, corporations were to limit their activities to the pursuit of commercial profits to prevent corporations from having undue influence / power in social and political matters. The managerial class have too much power and are not accountable, causing the company or institute to not realize its goal. Stakeholder capitalism is not about serving shareholders, it’s about serving the managerial class itself, self preservation. Corporations adopted wokeness to cloak itself in moral superiority, to keep power. It allows wokeness a platform for its message. But this marriage gives corporations social and political power that is bad for democracy. The author does not address my key question; how did the woke make white millennials feel guilty about their birthright ? Foreign governments use corporate wokeness or stakeholder capitalism to accomplish things in the US they cannot otherwise do. While doing so, portray themselves as virtuous. China does this as gatekeeper to its market by using US corporate wokeness to attack systematic racism, while at home persecuting religious groups. This makes the US less safe. Silicon Valley restricts speech. Appoint themselves as truth arbiters. Then ban violators of their platform rules. By assuming the role of the state, Silicon Valley companies censor public opinions in ways no government can. The church of diversity is a dangerous place. Cross it and you will be cancelled. He provides a great legal analysis on why political speech should be a protected class under the civil rights act. It’s puzzling why these legal theories have not been tested in the courts, e.g. Google employee being fired by writing a thought provoking memo. Critical Diversity Theory as a replacement for CRT, with focus on diversity of thought. Woke consumerism creates division. As a result, we make decisions based on race, gender or party and not based on what’s good for America. Woke consumers cross the line when they make / force a boycott - decisions on others. The cost of this is disproportionality borne by the poor. Too many times being in the service of others is for self service, hoping to get into college, get a job. Rarely do we serve others for the sake of others. He proposed universal service for high school students in the summer months. Wokeness turns capitalism and democracy on its head. From many, one to from many, one - by dividing us. It perverts the American Dream where your birth characteristics determine who you are and what you can achieve.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Micah Grossman

    Finishing the book left me with a few thoughts: The book could be improved with better research. He should read The Color of Law (Rothstein) and The Sum of Us (McGhee). He waves away systemic racism out of convenience, never actually defining and refuting it. It’s not clear where or why he draws the line on a person making choices vs a company, lead and composed of people, wanting to make choices. I found it curious he implies inflating college applications with fluffy volunteering and social imp Finishing the book left me with a few thoughts: The book could be improved with better research. He should read The Color of Law (Rothstein) and The Sum of Us (McGhee). He waves away systemic racism out of convenience, never actually defining and refuting it. It’s not clear where or why he draws the line on a person making choices vs a company, lead and composed of people, wanting to make choices. I found it curious he implies inflating college applications with fluffy volunteering and social impact projects started up only in the 2000s. That’s been a thing. For a while. McCarthyism blacklisting of smeared/falsely accused individuals is not the same as today’s cancel culture punishing people for actions and words they actually said and did, captured for posterity on the internet. I don’t like either of them, but it’s an apples and oranges comparison. They are not the same. Companies aren’t always in the best position to price the true cost of their goods. He mentions negative externalities once in the book. Yet I don’t get the impression he agrees with pricing and taxing polluters. It seemed very curious to have so much dedicated to labeling the Uyghur genocide in China, yet be so angry at a ‘woke’ consumer who, learning their preferred clothing brand may source cotton through forced labor origins, decides to stop buying their clothes and shares their story with others. So many arguments in the book are shaped into a choice of A vs B, with not much imagination spent on alternative options. So much love for capitalism, yet no acknowledgment of how far we really are from pure capitalism in America. Some entities are too big to fail. We have a federal reserve designed to lesson the swings between winners and losers in business cycles. Like it or not, American society has higher expectations on community well being that cannot be met with capitalism. Everyone must be seen that goes to an ER. Profit alone cannot guide the rules we choose to abide by when engaging with others.

  17. 4 out of 5

    C.V. Rajan

    A fantastic insight into how the unholy nexus of big tech, big business, and the new Left birthed the Woke virus to undermine liberal, free societies by strangling them with that very liberty. Big business wins because they can continue to horde capital and continue their greed with shallow actions like screaming empty platitudes of diversity/inclusion and making corporate boards more diverse irrespective of merit/ability. The Left wins because it gives them institutional power. Big Tech wins be A fantastic insight into how the unholy nexus of big tech, big business, and the new Left birthed the Woke virus to undermine liberal, free societies by strangling them with that very liberty. Big business wins because they can continue to horde capital and continue their greed with shallow actions like screaming empty platitudes of diversity/inclusion and making corporate boards more diverse irrespective of merit/ability. The Left wins because it gives them institutional power. Big Tech wins because they can continue their monopolistic practices in exchange for censoring the dissent against the new Left. The CCP wins by keeping this pot boiling and weakening the USA from within. Who loses? The average American...VERY IMPORTANT BOOK!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lawrence Grandpre

    Interesting if uneven book. Chapters on corporate cooption of court settlement to feed liberal non profits is very important and interesting. Author seem sincere in his support of American capitalism for disrupting Indian cast dynamics, a unique and interesting defense of American style capitalism that is also surprisingly balanced. However, the book overreacted at times, especially in his China bashing and belife that non discrimination law is the answer to wokeness. Mostly, the book is what ha Interesting if uneven book. Chapters on corporate cooption of court settlement to feed liberal non profits is very important and interesting. Author seem sincere in his support of American capitalism for disrupting Indian cast dynamics, a unique and interesting defense of American style capitalism that is also surprisingly balanced. However, the book overreacted at times, especially in his China bashing and belife that non discrimination law is the answer to wokeness. Mostly, the book is what happened when the left fail to make a strong materialist case for identity poltiics, which has become so separate from material change that this author and those reading the book can truly feel it is a religion. When the left is silent on the excesses of neoliberal identity politics we ceed the space for books like this to film the gap. Part of the frustration is the authors own analysis explains the blind spots. The author has never heard thr best argument for Affirmative Action as a means of material income redistribution through thing like perfer black construction contractors bc the social media algorithm perfers the emotive, woke stories of white saviour nonprofits and model minority cars of grit, meaning even good faith attempts to explain to folks the limits of capitalism never reach them bc the same corporate wokeness the author is critiquing. It will take time and effort to push back, but I'd say liberals and leftist should read this book to understand what thousands of people are feeling about the state of the discourse.

  19. 4 out of 5

    John Larrabee

    The author is a first generation American born of Indian immigrants. He finished near the top of his class as a molecular biologist at Harvard and earned a law degree from Yale before starting several biotech companies. I always find it refreshing to read or listen to first or second generation Americans and how our free society and system of government has influenced them. Ramaswamy's parents and others who came to this country to give their children a better life often have a much better grasp The author is a first generation American born of Indian immigrants. He finished near the top of his class as a molecular biologist at Harvard and earned a law degree from Yale before starting several biotech companies. I always find it refreshing to read or listen to first or second generation Americans and how our free society and system of government has influenced them. Ramaswamy's parents and others who came to this country to give their children a better life often have a much better grasp of what makes America unique, and his story is no different. Woke, Inc. is a very well-reasoned and articulate analysis of why this new culture of division is undermining our democracy, and offers insights for coming together as a people despite our differences. Thought provoking and highly recommended regardless of one's ideology.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Izzy

    I certainly don’t accept all of his libertarian nonsense, but there is a lot here about wokeness with which I do agree; the idea of stakeholder capitalism being an abortion of shareholder capitalism is well spelled out; whether woke ness is a religion is another story, but it can seem that way. Ever so much deeper than Maher’s superficial anti woke rants….The most impractical idea, with which I also incidentally agree, is his recommendation for a universal national service program. The anecdotes I certainly don’t accept all of his libertarian nonsense, but there is a lot here about wokeness with which I do agree; the idea of stakeholder capitalism being an abortion of shareholder capitalism is well spelled out; whether woke ness is a religion is another story, but it can seem that way. Ever so much deeper than Maher’s superficial anti woke rants….The most impractical idea, with which I also incidentally agree, is his recommendation for a universal national service program. The anecdotes are well chosen; the characterization of Shkreli if accurate is terribly sad.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shoaib Nagi

    Now what I wanted to some kind of an unbiased, maybe slightly left-learning, criticism of corporate America's woke charade. What I got was the same regurgitated garbage we have come to expect from right-wing grifters. Now what I wanted to some kind of an unbiased, maybe slightly left-learning, criticism of corporate America's woke charade. What I got was the same regurgitated garbage we have come to expect from right-wing grifters.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    Actually more of a 4-star, but I believe the message is important enough to justify the boost.

  23. 4 out of 5

    William Readey

    An insight into the new Woke Religion...very insightful read.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sam Bizar

    Ramaswamy rails against the insidious ways stakeholder capitalism give too much power to the capitalist class, but all too often misunderstands the forces that create these conditions. He waxes nostalgic for a type of capitalism that is unmoored by social responsibility (but also postures as a saint for heading a biotech company and eventually stepping down...for the good of the business?). Surely, though, the answer to undue hegemonic control by the capitalist class in the media and government Ramaswamy rails against the insidious ways stakeholder capitalism give too much power to the capitalist class, but all too often misunderstands the forces that create these conditions. He waxes nostalgic for a type of capitalism that is unmoored by social responsibility (but also postures as a saint for heading a biotech company and eventually stepping down...for the good of the business?). Surely, though, the answer to undue hegemonic control by the capitalist class in the media and government ought to be met with, I don't know, anti-capitalism. Unfortunately, Ramaswamy's counterclaim for why stakeholder capitalism could work is more compelling than any of his own ideas. Early in the book, he explains that (some say) because corporations benefit from inequity and further cause marginalization and environmental harm, it is their responsibility to counteract this inherent fact by taking social stances. He frames this as intuitively foolish, however. Not because of the logical contradiction of being a corporation that both marginalizes and publicly states it works to end marginalization (which is what most rational observers might see). No, it's because it creates the condition for corporate leaders to have too much control in advancing progressive policy decisions -- never mind the fact that capitalists having too much political power has always been the case under capitalism, or that many capitalists still work to advance incredibly right-wing policies. And never mind the fact that the "progressive policies" always seemed to come from the employees (the rank-and-file or lower-tier ladder climbers) or the consumers, not the suited execs at the top of the company in basically any of his real-world examples. (And these examples read as more gossipy big business anecdotes and not firmly researched or analyzed studies of a greedy business.) Ramaswamy's book is mostly just a series of cliched right-wing dog-whistles that posture as anti-establishment populism, valuable for "both sides of the aisle." This book is really a scaremongering tactic meant to inspire fear because the deeply conservative space of capitalism has been infiltrated by young liberals. If Ramaswamy were a leftist, perhaps he would have found these young liberals' decisions to go into finance and the corporate world appalling considering their socially progressive beliefs (and, ahem, that logical contradiction I mentioned earlier). But no, it's the fact that their socially progressive beliefs enter corporate memorandums that he finds disturbing. The saying goes a broken clock is correct twice. Ramaswamy's belief that the current state of capitalism is at odds with democratic institutions is correct; likewise, he is right to raise an eyebrow at corporate entities espousing socially progressive mission statements. The latter is more an effect of how corporations reflect their consumer's choices, creating a funhouse mirror of an ethical consciousness that is just that-- a distorted, reflective surface. (I think of Lockheed Martin changing its logo during Pride month to a rainbow, while they manufacture weapons that will ultimately harm queer people.) The former, however, needs to be pushed further. Capitalism itself is undemocratic. TLDR: There's more economic and political salience in Patti Harrison's biphobic Nilla Wafers tweet than in Ramaswamy's entire tome.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eric Morse

    Dynamite exposé on the “Woke-Industrial Complex”. Ramaswamy strings together perhaps the best essays I’ve read on Wokeism into a cohesive argument that is bound to resonate with those willing to face it. Unlike others who write about the topic, Ramaswamy is steadfast in his beliefs, he draws from his impressive experience in the Ivy League and as an entrepreneur, and, most importantly, he is a natural problem-solver and uses this book to propose several potential solutions for the various problem Dynamite exposé on the “Woke-Industrial Complex”. Ramaswamy strings together perhaps the best essays I’ve read on Wokeism into a cohesive argument that is bound to resonate with those willing to face it. Unlike others who write about the topic, Ramaswamy is steadfast in his beliefs, he draws from his impressive experience in the Ivy League and as an entrepreneur, and, most importantly, he is a natural problem-solver and uses this book to propose several potential solutions for the various problems Wokeism presents. For these reasons, I believe this book might have a chance at actually making a difference in this increasingly bitter ideological battle, even with those on the Left, who would otherwise ignore these issues. If there is a deficiency in this book, it is in the background behind Wokeism and the motive behind the marriage between Wokeism and corporations. For that, you might check out Stephen Hicks’ Explaining Postmodernism or Michael Knowles’ Speechless. But this lack is made up for manifold with insight after insight on the inner workings of corporate social justice. Most striking is Ramaswamy’s suite of proposed solutions. If they aren’t instant home runs, they are definitely capable of moving the base runners. Though there are many proposed solutions throughout the book, I spotlight three here: 1. Viewing the corporate dictum of ‘maximizing shareholder profit’ as a way to protect against the power of corporations, 2. Using the Civil Rights Act to protect against social justice-based workplace discrimination, and 3. Promoting a ‘Critical Diversity Theory’ to install true diversity (i.e., based on diversity of thought) instead of the simplistic and oxymoronic race and gender-based diversity. At first, these proposed solutions might seem a bit unworkable. The reader might think: ‘If it’s really that simple, surely someone would have done it before.’ And yet we live in a time when the simple and sensible have become anathema. Common sense is no longer common. And so it takes a compelling argument like this to make it common again. At the very least, this book will hearten the reader who has witnessed the disease of Wokeism metastasize through the corporate world, saying nothing for fear of being frowned on, censured, or fired. Ramaswamy has seen it too, and he has witnessed it at the highest levels of academia and industry. The fact that he is pushing back, and doing so with such wit and eloquence, is a feat worth celebrating.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone considering giving it a read. The author is very articulate and thoughtful, and he provides an intelligent, thoughtful, and nuanced discussion on an extremely relevant topic (as of 2021). It is an interesting discussion of the times, where corporations apply virtue signaling in ways that are likely to be harmful - and the author articulates clearly both the methods and the madness in current practice. The author has clearly spent considerable ti I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to anyone considering giving it a read. The author is very articulate and thoughtful, and he provides an intelligent, thoughtful, and nuanced discussion on an extremely relevant topic (as of 2021). It is an interesting discussion of the times, where corporations apply virtue signaling in ways that are likely to be harmful - and the author articulates clearly both the methods and the madness in current practice. The author has clearly spent considerable time thinking on the subject, and his experience (Ivy league student, law student, hedge fund analyst, and biotech CEO) really do lend to considerable exposure and experience relevant to the subject. Many of the authors suggestions (he makes suggestions culturally and legally), and his arguments are measured and rational. (However, I was not convinced by his suggestions for mandatory civil service for summer during the teenage years. I do think it is true that service brings people together, but it has to be meaningful service, and the author had just finished describing how he had completed a meaningless service for his college application. I think such a requirement is likely to be easily managed by those with means, and has no practical manner it could be employed across the US. Encouraging such service voluntarily remains reasonable though. However, this is a quibble regarding a small, minor section in book that otherwise adeptly addresses a large, controversial subject. ‘ The book is extremely well written and is engaging. The bottom line: it’s a worthy read on a difficult subject

  27. 4 out of 5

    An Léitheoir Fánach

    Some interesting stories are told of the activities of corporate America, however the author seems to have thrown down all ideas he's found of "wokeism's" origins and made a book on it, using his position as a former CEO as a form of legitimacy. Whilst he makes compelling arguments on how Woke Culture was fabricated as a tool of the Capitalist class, and to paraphrase him, "they would rather you read about white fragility, than Karl Marx". The next minute he makes an argument that the left is in Some interesting stories are told of the activities of corporate America, however the author seems to have thrown down all ideas he's found of "wokeism's" origins and made a book on it, using his position as a former CEO as a form of legitimacy. Whilst he makes compelling arguments on how Woke Culture was fabricated as a tool of the Capitalist class, and to paraphrase him, "they would rather you read about white fragility, than Karl Marx". The next minute he makes an argument that the left is in fact leading woke culture leading to the threat of Communism. His solution? American Nationalism, conforming to "American values", completely ignoring that he just wrote an entire book blaming American values, ie, Capitalism for the prevalence of woke culture. The author appears to have gotten a perspective on the workings of corporate America around woke culture, and then wrote a book on something he seemingly doesn't really know anything about. Either that, or he was cautious at all times not to throw America too far under the bus with his criticisms, constantly referring back to his belief in the "American Dream".

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steve Eubanks

    This is a great recitation of the scam that is corporate wokeism. Do you, for example, think that Nike executives care about police reform in black communities, or are they distracting you from the 12-year-old indentured servants in Laos they use to make their products? Do you think Coca Cola execs really think Georgia’s voting laws are fundamentally racist, or are they deflecting from the obesity and diabetes their products contribute to? As the founder and CEO of a pharmaceutical company, Rama This is a great recitation of the scam that is corporate wokeism. Do you, for example, think that Nike executives care about police reform in black communities, or are they distracting you from the 12-year-old indentured servants in Laos they use to make their products? Do you think Coca Cola execs really think Georgia’s voting laws are fundamentally racist, or are they deflecting from the obesity and diabetes their products contribute to? As the founder and CEO of a pharmaceutical company, Ramaswamy has insider perspectives on this subject. However, I think his proposed solutions are naive. He seems to think the American judiciary isn’t as “woke” as the other institutions. There are a few Hawaiian judges I’d like for him to meet. And his idea of mandatory national service would make a good Harvard essay, but I suggest he visit Middleton, Ohio or Charleston, West Virginia, or Bristol, Tennessee or Cherokee, North Carolina and then tell us how that’s going to fly. Overall, this is a well reasoned account of why wokeism isn’t a cancer; it’s a poison, being fed to us by the richest and most successful people in the history of the human race.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chris Cook

    This book is jaw dropping. This guy came to the US as a kid and EARNED the American Dream. His experience in the business world (from business school forward) is amazing and it’s fascinating to read these stories about situations he personally experienced. It says a lot about the guy that he was willing to walk away from the billion dollar company he founded rather than give in on his principles. Especially when there are so many executives willing to spout any woke nonsense to keep the mob off This book is jaw dropping. This guy came to the US as a kid and EARNED the American Dream. His experience in the business world (from business school forward) is amazing and it’s fascinating to read these stories about situations he personally experienced. It says a lot about the guy that he was willing to walk away from the billion dollar company he founded rather than give in on his principles. Especially when there are so many executives willing to spout any woke nonsense to keep the mob off their backs. Knowing what I do about companies like Nike and Coke, some of these stories didn’t shock me, but there are many more that illustrate the dangerous direction our country is heading. I love that Vivek is using his money and his platform to try to save America from this craziness. Saw him on Tucker Carlson one night and was impressed enough to buy the book. I strongly recommend this one!

  30. 4 out of 5

    R Sticklee

    I feel like I need to listen to the book again. According to Ramaswamy, Woke is a cynical marketing ploy, as well as a religion. It discourages diversity, the very thing it propounds, by focusing solely on skin deep attributes rather than diversity of opinion and perspective. Woke is an invasive, highly destructive movement which smothers dissent and is destroying the American Dream which unites us. He delivers his message with passion and intellectual perspicacity. There are lots of examples sc I feel like I need to listen to the book again. According to Ramaswamy, Woke is a cynical marketing ploy, as well as a religion. It discourages diversity, the very thing it propounds, by focusing solely on skin deep attributes rather than diversity of opinion and perspective. Woke is an invasive, highly destructive movement which smothers dissent and is destroying the American Dream which unites us. He delivers his message with passion and intellectual perspicacity. There are lots of examples scattered throughout to make his argument strong, relatable, and interesting. He also suggests practical antidotes. I learned a lot. After I have had time to digest it I want to read it again. It is valuable. Whether you agree or disagree with his thesis I recommend it.

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