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Pando: A Living Wonder of Trees

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Pando is an inspiring tribute to a Utah grove of quaking Aspen trees connected by their roots to form one of the world's oldest and largest living things. Author Kate Allen Fox engages readers' senses to help convey the vastness of Pando, the challenges it faces, and how we all can be part of the solution. With lyrical poetry, Fox summarizes the science, action, and compas Pando is an inspiring tribute to a Utah grove of quaking Aspen trees connected by their roots to form one of the world's oldest and largest living things. Author Kate Allen Fox engages readers' senses to help convey the vastness of Pando, the challenges it faces, and how we all can be part of the solution. With lyrical poetry, Fox summarizes the science, action, and compassion needed to save this wonder of nature.


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Pando is an inspiring tribute to a Utah grove of quaking Aspen trees connected by their roots to form one of the world's oldest and largest living things. Author Kate Allen Fox engages readers' senses to help convey the vastness of Pando, the challenges it faces, and how we all can be part of the solution. With lyrical poetry, Fox summarizes the science, action, and compas Pando is an inspiring tribute to a Utah grove of quaking Aspen trees connected by their roots to form one of the world's oldest and largest living things. Author Kate Allen Fox engages readers' senses to help convey the vastness of Pando, the challenges it faces, and how we all can be part of the solution. With lyrical poetry, Fox summarizes the science, action, and compassion needed to save this wonder of nature.

30 review for Pando: A Living Wonder of Trees

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    Pando, a 43.6 hectare clonal colony of an individual male quaking aspen in south-central Utah, is the largest living organism in the world. It's essentially a forest in which all the trees are genetically identical, originating from one single ancestor. Pretty amazing. In this beautiful little book Kate Allen Fox shows how Pando has developed over thousands of years, and what is threatening it now. Her text is accompanied by Turine Tran’s wonderful illustrations. This is another of these education Pando, a 43.6 hectare clonal colony of an individual male quaking aspen in south-central Utah, is the largest living organism in the world. It's essentially a forest in which all the trees are genetically identical, originating from one single ancestor. Pretty amazing. In this beautiful little book Kate Allen Fox shows how Pando has developed over thousands of years, and what is threatening it now. Her text is accompanied by Turine Tran’s wonderful illustrations. This is another of these educational children’s picture books that I like so much. However, I feel like the text of this one was a little too basic. For instance, it is mentioned that tree-eating deer are a threat to Pando, and that there are efforts to move livestock in order to protect the aspen grove. But why do we have to interfere with the ecosystem in that way? Because of our interference with the ecosystem in the first place. Bears, wolves and mountain lions, which once kept the mule deer’s population in check, are largely gone from the area, because of hunting. This information is missing from the text. Other manmade problems are mentioned but could have been elaborated on a little further. In general, the text is fine, just not detailed enough for my liking. Some of the illustrations are truly breathtaking though. Thanks to NetGalley and Capstone Editions for providing me with a digital ARC in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    Pando A Living Wonder of Trees by Kate Allen Fox Capstone This is a delightful and peaceful book to read! Not only is it very informative, it made me feel closer to nature without going anywhere! The author gently guides the reader through the Aspen forest of Utah. Explains, and shows, how they are like one big organism. The tree roots are all locked and tangled together. The leaves shudder and whisper in the wind. The art is tranquil and serene. It matches the books sober vibe and hope, peace, and Pando A Living Wonder of Trees by Kate Allen Fox Capstone This is a delightful and peaceful book to read! Not only is it very informative, it made me feel closer to nature without going anywhere! The author gently guides the reader through the Aspen forest of Utah. Explains, and shows, how they are like one big organism. The tree roots are all locked and tangled together. The leaves shudder and whisper in the wind. The art is tranquil and serene. It matches the books sober vibe and hope, peace, and joy flow from the pages. It's a soothing book and just as importantly, it can pass vital knowledge along. What better way than with beautiful words and lovely images? I want to thank the publisher and NetGalley for letting me read this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    This is a wonderfully illustrated educational book for young and old. Pando is Latin for "I spread" making in an apt name for a patch of aspen forest in Utah that spans 43.6 hectars. The almost incredible thing about this forest: it's a clonal colony, meaning that all the trees are genetically identical, originating vegetatively instead of sexually from a single ancestor. Thus, technically, this isn't a forest but one single organisam (a male quaking aspen tree) and it is said to have a massive This is a wonderfully illustrated educational book for young and old. Pando is Latin for "I spread" making in an apt name for a patch of aspen forest in Utah that spans 43.6 hectars. The almost incredible thing about this forest: it's a clonal colony, meaning that all the trees are genetically identical, originating vegetatively instead of sexually from a single ancestor. Thus, technically, this isn't a forest but one single organisam (a male quaking aspen tree) and it is said to have a massive underground root system. This is an aerial photo of Pando showing about 80% of the tree in Fish Lake Utah. Pando is the worlds largest tree by size, by weight and the largest aspen clone ever verified. As most parts of mother nature this, too, is fighting for its survival. This book, therefore, is showing us what Pando is and what is threatening this unique phenomenon. One threat is that hunting has resulted in wolves, cougars and other predators being effectively gone from Pando so they can no longer keep the deer population in check, which in turn results in the trees getting eaten. Unfortunately, while the author did mention the deer being a problem, she neglected to mention how that came about - a vital piece of information since knowing how a threat comes about usually is half of the solution already. Unfortunately, this lack of full disclosure happened not just once in the book. I don't know if the author thought children wouldn't get it (an inexcusable error in my opinion) or if there was a maximum word count given by the publisher, but it did mar my enjoyment somewhat. What really makes this book stand out was not necessarily what it is about (though Pando itself IS awesome) but how the subject was presented. It's like with food: no matter how nutritious, you won't eat it unless it looks yummy too. It's the same here. Fortunately, Turine Tran did an excellent job! So yeah, lots of information (though some really needed a little bit more elaboration) and gorgeous illustrations make this a great addition to any shelf - especially if you like to learn about and see awesome places from around the world and learn about what you can to to help protect them. Thanks go to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with the ARC.

  4. 4 out of 5

    donna backshall

    "All these trees are one being, called by one name: Pando. In the old language of Latin its name means I spread." With some of the most exhilarating illustrations you can imagine, by Turine Tran, Pando: A Living Wonder of Trees asks us to care about the 40,000 aspens that comprise Pando in Utah, and its shrinking environment. Can we save Pando? And by saving Pando, can we perhaps save ourselves? "Like trees linked by their roots people, animals, and plants are all connected. We can make a world where we "All these trees are one being, called by one name: Pando. In the old language of Latin its name means I spread." With some of the most exhilarating illustrations you can imagine, by Turine Tran, Pando: A Living Wonder of Trees asks us to care about the 40,000 aspens that comprise Pando in Utah, and its shrinking environment. Can we save Pando? And by saving Pando, can we perhaps save ourselves? "Like trees linked by their roots people, animals, and plants are all connected. We can make a world where we all have room to grow." It might be a bit of a stretch to ask a small child to understand and find the compassion to stand up for Pando. But with the right guidance from an impassioned parent, I can see this book inspiring activism and the kind of effort needed to preserve this treasure.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeanie

    A beautiful illustrated book for children on the Aspen tree known as the Pando. I learned a few things myself and it is a reminder what a beautiful fragile world we live in. A great book to share with your children and then plan a trip to see living breathing Aspen trees. Interesting facts and beautifully displayed. A Special thank you to Capstone Publishing and Netgalley for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tamishly

    The best illustrated picture/storybook on trees. The information is crisp yet given in such a fun, short sequence. The artwork is what I would call perfection. It's almost moving when you're reading the book. I just felt like I was watching a short animation watching the trees grow from just a seed to a wide, vast forest! Such a good, mesmerizing storybook! Thank you, author/artist and the publisher, for the advance reading copy. The best illustrated picture/storybook on trees. The information is crisp yet given in such a fun, short sequence. The artwork is what I would call perfection. It's almost moving when you're reading the book. I just felt like I was watching a short animation watching the trees grow from just a seed to a wide, vast forest! Such a good, mesmerizing storybook! Thank you, author/artist and the publisher, for the advance reading copy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This gorgeous picture book describes one of the 40 Wonders of America: Pando. Pando, amazingly enough, is an Aspen grove that started as a single seed and grew into 47,000 clones sharing a single root system. The poetic narrative is almost as beautiful as the sparkling illustrations. This is not only a book I want to purchase to add to my child's library, but one that will ride with us in our RV now that we will have to go see this amazing feat of nature for ourselves. This book will be instrume This gorgeous picture book describes one of the 40 Wonders of America: Pando. Pando, amazingly enough, is an Aspen grove that started as a single seed and grew into 47,000 clones sharing a single root system. The poetic narrative is almost as beautiful as the sparkling illustrations. This is not only a book I want to purchase to add to my child's library, but one that will ride with us in our RV now that we will have to go see this amazing feat of nature for ourselves. This book will be instrumental in saving Pando, sharing the awe and wonder of this place with children and their caregivers. I received a digital ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to NetGalley and Capstone Editions.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy Turner

    ARC kindly received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This book was beautiful. The illustrations were breathtaking, and the poetry was stunning. I really like how there were facts interspersed between the verses, however they took up very little space on each page, allowing the poem and the illustrations to (quite rightly) remain the focus. There was a lot more information and a glossary at the back of the book, meaning this was an imaginative mix of a non-fiction book, poetry, an ARC kindly received from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This book was beautiful. The illustrations were breathtaking, and the poetry was stunning. I really like how there were facts interspersed between the verses, however they took up very little space on each page, allowing the poem and the illustrations to (quite rightly) remain the focus. There was a lot more information and a glossary at the back of the book, meaning this was an imaginative mix of a non-fiction book, poetry, and beautiful artwork. Pando is not something I had heard of before, but now something I would like to research! Although this book is aimed at children, and I read it with an intention of sharing it with my class, I think it could be enjoyed by all ages.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Pando is a great non-fiction about a very specific living creature: The Trembling Giant, an aspen grove that is not a bunch of trees, but one single organism, with many clones. But not any aspen grove either - the oldest and biggest aspen grove of our planet! Which is also currently in danger of dying out... Really well written to explain to an younger audience what Pando is, and also introduces the idea of the importance of environment conservation and taking care of it. The illustrations are bea Pando is a great non-fiction about a very specific living creature: The Trembling Giant, an aspen grove that is not a bunch of trees, but one single organism, with many clones. But not any aspen grove either - the oldest and biggest aspen grove of our planet! Which is also currently in danger of dying out... Really well written to explain to an younger audience what Pando is, and also introduces the idea of the importance of environment conservation and taking care of it. The illustrations are beautiful too Thank you to NetGalley and publisher for an eARC in exchange for honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shawn Ly’s Book Notes & Quotes

    Beautifully illustrated, a magical look into Pando (an Aspen forest in Utah). With shimmering light and enticing perspectives, I wish I could hop into this book and spend some time in the scenes made by illustrator Turine Tran.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I want to thank the author, Capstone publisher, and #netgalley for an e-ARC in exchange for my honest review. My two kids and I all really enjoyed the full-page hand-painted pictures of aspens that filled every page in this beautiful book. We learned about how aspens are linked together under the ground, and how sensitive they are to the actions of people and animals around them. This story was an accessible way to talk to the kids about climate change and how humans are affecting the planet. My I want to thank the author, Capstone publisher, and #netgalley for an e-ARC in exchange for my honest review. My two kids and I all really enjoyed the full-page hand-painted pictures of aspens that filled every page in this beautiful book. We learned about how aspens are linked together under the ground, and how sensitive they are to the actions of people and animals around them. This story was an accessible way to talk to the kids about climate change and how humans are affecting the planet. My older kid liked the little fact bubbles present on many pages. I found it odd that the copy of this book that I received included photographs in the last few pages that had "shutterstock" watermarks embedded in the images. I hope the publisher is planning to either replace these with fully-licensed images, or just remove them altogether in lieu of more of the gorgeous illustrations.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    A visually flawless look at one of the most remarkable instances of nature – thousands and thousands of aspens, all cloned from the one same seed millennia ago (it's so old, humans have had the wheel for not quite half its life). The text wishes us to experience the wonder of the thing, and also to worry about how it's come up against a brick wall called human 'progress', and faces an uncertain future. Now, I have no problem with the text being in poetic structure, for it slows the reader down, A visually flawless look at one of the most remarkable instances of nature – thousands and thousands of aspens, all cloned from the one same seed millennia ago (it's so old, humans have had the wheel for not quite half its life). The text wishes us to experience the wonder of the thing, and also to worry about how it's come up against a brick wall called human 'progress', and faces an uncertain future. Now, I have no problem with the text being in poetic structure, for it slows the reader down, makes us concentrate more and get the gist more eloquently – or we would if it were not for most pages having a footnote to interject, which in the visual language of comic books seems to have been voiced by a bunch of fallen leaves. These scientific notes are also very welcome, but they also really distract from the mood of the rest of the piece. If a better way to balance the art and the facts, if you like, had been found, this would have been wonderful. Three and a half stars.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christine Van Zandt

    Trees give us so many things, from a fun place to climb to much-needed shade and cleaner air. PANDO: A LIVING WONDER OF TREES shows us something about trees that we may not already know and, wow, is it amazing! Though trees seem like individuals, beneath the soil some trees have linked roots. The word "pando" means "I spread," and, boy have these aspens spread! It's mind-boggling to think that one seed started it all and that these 47,000 trees go back about 12,000 years. Today, however, the expan Trees give us so many things, from a fun place to climb to much-needed shade and cleaner air. PANDO: A LIVING WONDER OF TREES shows us something about trees that we may not already know and, wow, is it amazing! Though trees seem like individuals, beneath the soil some trees have linked roots. The word "pando" means "I spread," and, boy have these aspens spread! It's mind-boggling to think that one seed started it all and that these 47,000 trees go back about 12,000 years. Today, however, the expansion has stopped due to how humans are changing the environment. Considering the magnificence of nature will (hopefully) plant a seed in our minds reminding to conserve natural resources.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    TREEmendous! I love learning about Pando and how we all can help Utah's endangered grove of quaking Aspen. An outstanding children’s STEM book about connectivity and resilience. Kids need more books like this, especially now. TREEmendous! I love learning about Pando and how we all can help Utah's endangered grove of quaking Aspen. An outstanding children’s STEM book about connectivity and resilience. Kids need more books like this, especially now.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlyn

    Written with beautiful, lyrical and underscored by luscious art, PANDO will help remind us all how connected we are and will hopefully inspire everyone who reads it to take care of our world. With wonderful and interesting facts dispersed throughout, this is a great addition to every library from public to school to home.

  16. 5 out of 5

    EiFL

    Pando is a picture book about a colony of quaking Aspens in Utah. The artwork is lovely, consisting of rich, realistic illustrations that drew my eyes around each page. The text is simple yet poetic, with a somewhat playful tone. I enjoyed the factoids sprinkled throughout the book, which added a layer of information without interrupting the flow of the story. I would recommend this book to any nature lover, young or old. Thank you to NetGalley and the author/publisher for providing this ARC in Pando is a picture book about a colony of quaking Aspens in Utah. The artwork is lovely, consisting of rich, realistic illustrations that drew my eyes around each page. The text is simple yet poetic, with a somewhat playful tone. I enjoyed the factoids sprinkled throughout the book, which added a layer of information without interrupting the flow of the story. I would recommend this book to any nature lover, young or old. Thank you to NetGalley and the author/publisher for providing this ARC in exchange for an honest review

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sherry Roberts

    Just finished this beautiful book. Although it is very informational, it is not "in your face" informative about the plight of this "living wonder of trees." The content is beautifully written, as well as, informative. The illustrations are also amazing. It is a gentle, soft story about Pando and what we need to do to save it. This is the perfect story for parent/child to read together and talk about. Sherry Roberts Just finished this beautiful book. Although it is very informational, it is not "in your face" informative about the plight of this "living wonder of trees." The content is beautifully written, as well as, informative. The illustrations are also amazing. It is a gentle, soft story about Pando and what we need to do to save it. This is the perfect story for parent/child to read together and talk about. Sherry Roberts

  18. 4 out of 5

    G. Connor Salter

    The book's an interesting mix of great illustrations and text like you'd see in a children's book that doesn't preach too much, but also little information sidebars at the bottom which you'd usually see in a very different kind of children's book. Somehow, these elements work together and the book ends up being pretty good. The book's an interesting mix of great illustrations and text like you'd see in a children's book that doesn't preach too much, but also little information sidebars at the bottom which you'd usually see in a very different kind of children's book. Somehow, these elements work together and the book ends up being pretty good.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte Offsay

    This book is fascinating! It tells the story of how one single seed grew and grew into what is now 47,000 trees that cover ground the size of 100 football fields! With lyrical language and fascinating facts, this one had my children pouring over every page and inspired to celebrate and preserve the world around us. The how-to help backmatter sparked plans and conversations that squeeze my heart. I highly recommend adding this one to your shelves! ⁠

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This book is absolutely stunning. Kate Allen Fox’s words are beautiful and informative, taking the reader on a journey through the aspen tree grove known as Pando. I love the perfect balance of poetic wording, informational facts, and a call to help preserve this wonder. Readers will be drawn in not only by Kate’s exquisite words but also by Turine Tran’s lovely illustrations. I can easily see this book being used in classrooms and libraries for younger and older children, as well as being a favo This book is absolutely stunning. Kate Allen Fox’s words are beautiful and informative, taking the reader on a journey through the aspen tree grove known as Pando. I love the perfect balance of poetic wording, informational facts, and a call to help preserve this wonder. Readers will be drawn in not only by Kate’s exquisite words but also by Turine Tran’s lovely illustrations. I can easily see this book being used in classrooms and libraries for younger and older children, as well as being a favorite for parents and grandparents to read to little ones to reinforce the importance of taking care of our earth. PANDO: A Living Wonder of Trees could not have come at a better time; a time when these natural wonders need us the most.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sophia Gholz

    A lyrical ode to one of the great wonders of nature. Fox’s poetic approach to Pando’s story is both lovely to read and incredibly inspiring. Paired with gorgeous illustrations by Turine Tran, each page turn sweeps the reader deeper into the beauty that is Pando. The back matter and side bars add interesting facts that will engage readers of all ages. This is a wonderful nonfiction picture book that will make a great addition to every class, library and home.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Meghan Browne

    Kate Fox's lyrical words mirror the magic of Pando, a ginormous grove of aspens and the largest living organism on earth. This fabulous nonfiction book is gorgeously illustrated, and the text utilizes many meta(non)fiction techniques to break the third wall and draw the child reader close to Pando so that they can relate to this incredible subject. Fox's back matter and glossary make this text a fantastic choice for school and library use. Kate Fox's lyrical words mirror the magic of Pando, a ginormous grove of aspens and the largest living organism on earth. This fabulous nonfiction book is gorgeously illustrated, and the text utilizes many meta(non)fiction techniques to break the third wall and draw the child reader close to Pando so that they can relate to this incredible subject. Fox's back matter and glossary make this text a fantastic choice for school and library use.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Solis

    Wow! This book is so informative and so beautiful! I loved learning about Pando and all the ways we can protect him in the future. The text flowed like informational poetry, and the illustrations left me breathless. Now I must go visit Pando, but first I need to take a walk and be a part of nature. So inspiring!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Emilee (emileereadsbooks)

    Thanks to Netgalley and Capstone Editions for a free digital copy for my review. Pando is a grove of quaking aspen tress in Utah consisting of 40,000 trees that are all connected. This is a lovely book giving information about this forest and the danger it's in, in a beautiful way. Thanks to Netgalley and Capstone Editions for a free digital copy for my review. Pando is a grove of quaking aspen tress in Utah consisting of 40,000 trees that are all connected. This is a lovely book giving information about this forest and the danger it's in, in a beautiful way.

  25. 4 out of 5

    E.Jessica

    This is a lovely melding of fact and poetic exploration of Pando, a living clone of male aspen trees in Utah. Beautifully illustrated, the text, on the longer side for PBs, intersperses fact with more evocative description and explanation of what Pando is and why it's important to protect him and other clones like him. I love the backmatter as well and the concrete ideas for how little readers can be thoughtfully involved in conservation efforts. If your kiddos like NF explorations of natural wo This is a lovely melding of fact and poetic exploration of Pando, a living clone of male aspen trees in Utah. Beautifully illustrated, the text, on the longer side for PBs, intersperses fact with more evocative description and explanation of what Pando is and why it's important to protect him and other clones like him. I love the backmatter as well and the concrete ideas for how little readers can be thoughtfully involved in conservation efforts. If your kiddos like NF explorations of natural world phenomena, this book will be a treat.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marianne Tabner

    Pando: A Living Wonder of Trees inspires and educates using gorgeous illustrations ; beautiful, yet very engaging lyrical language describing PANDO, that is a clonal colony of an individual male quaking aspen, the biggest and oldest tree in the world is so fascinating! Even more interesting is how these trees share one root system for literally thousands of years... and how we can be part of the solution working together to preserve and regenerate this tree for many generations to come. A fantas Pando: A Living Wonder of Trees inspires and educates using gorgeous illustrations ; beautiful, yet very engaging lyrical language describing PANDO, that is a clonal colony of an individual male quaking aspen, the biggest and oldest tree in the world is so fascinating! Even more interesting is how these trees share one root system for literally thousands of years... and how we can be part of the solution working together to preserve and regenerate this tree for many generations to come. A fantastic science unit for children in grades 3-5. Well done Kate Allen Fox. A Special thank you to Kate Allen Fox for the ARC and the opportunity to post an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Leventhal

    This book is absolutely beautiful. A perfect mix of poetic text, gorgeous illustrations, and factual information is a win-win all around. As I read, I felt as if I were in the middle of this amazing cloning phenomenon of Aspen trees. It takes a special writer to pull a young reader into non-fiction, and Ms. Fox has done that brilliantly. The lovely illustrations by Turine Tran perfectly complement the text, and for a while, the reader is not reading facts but is experiencing wonder. There are so This book is absolutely beautiful. A perfect mix of poetic text, gorgeous illustrations, and factual information is a win-win all around. As I read, I felt as if I were in the middle of this amazing cloning phenomenon of Aspen trees. It takes a special writer to pull a young reader into non-fiction, and Ms. Fox has done that brilliantly. The lovely illustrations by Turine Tran perfectly complement the text, and for a while, the reader is not reading facts but is experiencing wonder. There are so many layers to this book including a call to action to help protect Pando. I highly recommend this book.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robin Newman

    Kate Allen Fox has written a gorgeous lyrical tribute to Pando, a collection of 47,000 aspen trees that grew from a single seed and are interconnected by their roots. But Pando, this "living wonder of trees," needs to be protected from outside threats or it will fail to thrive and die. Fox's thought-provoking and informative text would be a terrific classroom read-aloud. Highly recommended. Kate Allen Fox has written a gorgeous lyrical tribute to Pando, a collection of 47,000 aspen trees that grew from a single seed and are interconnected by their roots. But Pando, this "living wonder of trees," needs to be protected from outside threats or it will fail to thrive and die. Fox's thought-provoking and informative text would be a terrific classroom read-aloud. Highly recommended.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    A beautiful celebration to the wonders of nature and specifically the Aspen ‘Pando’. I think this picture-book will inspire children from all around the world not just the US or Canada. Told beautifully against a brightly illustrated background; lovely textured illustrations by Turine Tran. The beginning text (page 4) reads similarly to the end of the story (page 26), suggesting a cycle of life; an endless loop. The use of information at the base of the spreads and in a different font, instead of A beautiful celebration to the wonders of nature and specifically the Aspen ‘Pando’. I think this picture-book will inspire children from all around the world not just the US or Canada. Told beautifully against a brightly illustrated background; lovely textured illustrations by Turine Tran. The beginning text (page 4) reads similarly to the end of the story (page 26), suggesting a cycle of life; an endless loop. The use of information at the base of the spreads and in a different font, instead of using it within the text of the story, is very easy for a child to understand and I learnt quite a lot about the Pando myself. It’s good to read ‘hope’ half way through the book, not just the end, thus creating an environment of problems to solve or debate, that the children can get involved in, whether at home, at school or in the local community or countrywide campaigns. Plenty of material referenced at the end of the book, which is always useful for this kind of book, but I think it is a shame that shutter-stock watermarked photographs are used as reference material. With such lovely illustrations throughout, of these aspen trees, I don’t think this is necessary and actually cheapens the overall appeal of the book. There is at least one beautiful photograph here with no watermark on it. Just one would be enough but if more imagery is required, an illustration of the landscape would have been far better or spot illustrations to break up the text.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Meneniareads

    Free ARC from Netgalley. Pando is the word for a type of self cloning trees. This book is about the huge and wonderful pando forest in Utah. I like learning things from beautiful children's nonfiction books! I'd never heard of this before and it was really interesting. And sad that it's threatened by human behavior! Save the pando forest! Free ARC from Netgalley. Pando is the word for a type of self cloning trees. This book is about the huge and wonderful pando forest in Utah. I like learning things from beautiful children's nonfiction books! I'd never heard of this before and it was really interesting. And sad that it's threatened by human behavior! Save the pando forest!

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