Hot Best Seller

Born in a Second Language

Availability: Ready to download

Born in a Second Language troubles the spectrum between silence (or the limitations of the mouth) and music. Language is an embodied practice, especially present through our hands. Words, specifically names, are a means of conjuring a certain kind of existence, and defining who one will become. Thus, different languages unlock different worlds, and the names speakers answer Born in a Second Language troubles the spectrum between silence (or the limitations of the mouth) and music. Language is an embodied practice, especially present through our hands. Words, specifically names, are a means of conjuring a certain kind of existence, and defining who one will become. Thus, different languages unlock different worlds, and the names speakers answer to open them up to different becomeings. Born in a Second Language is curious about the sonic, imagistic and linear implications on the page of speaking multiple languages when political, historical and cultural weights contend. It’s compelled by disappearance and how translation is often a mode through which it occurs across borders – a way in which we obliterate, often due to what is untranslatable and considered unwelcome, as we come into new selves in order to survive new territory. Translation is not only a tool to understand language, but also a process that alters identity as speakers move through space and time. In the work, “home” is one’s body, gender, a mother, mother tongue, Brenda Fassie etc. How home is defined impacts each speaker’s positionality and perspective; it allows for understanding the connection between the interior and exterior worlds of the speakers. While the use of past geographical homes and history is, in some poems, nostalgic and in homage, the greater project aims to examine how these elements aren’t stagnant temporally but rather persist in and shape speakers presently.


Compare

Born in a Second Language troubles the spectrum between silence (or the limitations of the mouth) and music. Language is an embodied practice, especially present through our hands. Words, specifically names, are a means of conjuring a certain kind of existence, and defining who one will become. Thus, different languages unlock different worlds, and the names speakers answer Born in a Second Language troubles the spectrum between silence (or the limitations of the mouth) and music. Language is an embodied practice, especially present through our hands. Words, specifically names, are a means of conjuring a certain kind of existence, and defining who one will become. Thus, different languages unlock different worlds, and the names speakers answer to open them up to different becomeings. Born in a Second Language is curious about the sonic, imagistic and linear implications on the page of speaking multiple languages when political, historical and cultural weights contend. It’s compelled by disappearance and how translation is often a mode through which it occurs across borders – a way in which we obliterate, often due to what is untranslatable and considered unwelcome, as we come into new selves in order to survive new territory. Translation is not only a tool to understand language, but also a process that alters identity as speakers move through space and time. In the work, “home” is one’s body, gender, a mother, mother tongue, Brenda Fassie etc. How home is defined impacts each speaker’s positionality and perspective; it allows for understanding the connection between the interior and exterior worlds of the speakers. While the use of past geographical homes and history is, in some poems, nostalgic and in homage, the greater project aims to examine how these elements aren’t stagnant temporally but rather persist in and shape speakers presently.

30 review for Born in a Second Language

  1. 5 out of 5

    Althea

    3.5/5 Stars This was a gorgeous poetry collection that deals with very powerful subjects including language and the dilution of language through translation, immigration and family. Akosua's writing is beautiful and lyrical, though I think some of it did go over my head as I'm still pretty new to poetry in general, but I do highly recommend picking this collection up - it's award winning for a reason! Thanks to Netgalley and Button Poetry for an eARC in return for an honest review! 3.5/5 Stars This was a gorgeous poetry collection that deals with very powerful subjects including language and the dilution of language through translation, immigration and family. Akosua's writing is beautiful and lyrical, though I think some of it did go over my head as I'm still pretty new to poetry in general, but I do highly recommend picking this collection up - it's award winning for a reason! Thanks to Netgalley and Button Poetry for an eARC in return for an honest review!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Fern Adams

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book of poetry. Afiriyie-Hwedie is a Zambian- Ghanaian poet who grew up in Botswana and has lived in the USA too. In this collection she explores themes of identity, belonging and what it means to be multicultural and live a life of belonging that spans countries, languages and heritage. What I really loved about this book is it’s extremely new and inventive in style. The poet is very courageous with playing around with structure and bringing in various different elemen I thoroughly enjoyed this book of poetry. Afiriyie-Hwedie is a Zambian- Ghanaian poet who grew up in Botswana and has lived in the USA too. In this collection she explores themes of identity, belonging and what it means to be multicultural and live a life of belonging that spans countries, languages and heritage. What I really loved about this book is it’s extremely new and inventive in style. The poet is very courageous with playing around with structure and bringing in various different elements (immigration forms, numbering, short poems, essay type poems…) and it really works well. I loved how not only does she talk about a variety of languages and multiculturalism but she brings that into her poetry too with the vast amount of different poetry types. She’s extremely good at vividly portraying situations, stories in a few words and making the reader think about the world around them and what makes it up. I really hope that she writes a lot more poetry! Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for sending me an arc in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joumana

    Born In A Second Language left me absolutely breathless. I was struck by how much power the poems wields in such short spaces. Akosua is a master at playing with language, surprising us and making us long with the poem. Buy this chapbook!!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Poptart19 (ren)

    4 stars Evocative poems about identity, language, music, & home. I felt every one. [What I liked:] •I enjoyed learning about the poet’s languages, Twi & Setswana & Nyanja & English. The way she wove the ideas & sounds of them together enriches everything. She really gets across how language is tied to home & relationships & places & identities, how it shapes us as people, how it’s so much more than just words. •I felt every single one of these poems. They have such a strong sense of being, a life 4 stars Evocative poems about identity, language, music, & home. I felt every one. [What I liked:] •I enjoyed learning about the poet’s languages, Twi & Setswana & Nyanja & English. The way she wove the ideas & sounds of them together enriches everything. She really gets across how language is tied to home & relationships & places & identities, how it shapes us as people, how it’s so much more than just words. •I felt every single one of these poems. They have such a strong sense of being, a life force that transcends time: the poet is a smiling school girl & a fierce woman. Her connections to her family, especially to her mother & grandmother, are so vital in these poems. The words & ideas feel so real, but in a precious & special way. •The writing is wonderful. No words are wasted. Each line peels back a layer so you can see inward, builds up a layer so you can climb high. The poems are evocative & rich. [What I didn’t like as much:] •Some of the more experimental formats I had a harder time engaging with. For example, “Please Select the Best Answer” looks like a flow chart, but I couldn’t figure out how it was meant to be read (what sequence, how things connected). I still got meaning out of it, but I’m wondering if I missed something. [I received an ARC ebook copy from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. Thank you for the book!]

  5. 5 out of 5

    Hirdesh

    Thanks Netgalley for ARC copy. It's very peculiar kind of poetry book. In beginning I didn't like it though , it has numerous deep emotional poems. Overall I wouldn't recommend it to read. Thanks Netgalley for ARC copy. It's very peculiar kind of poetry book. In beginning I didn't like it though , it has numerous deep emotional poems. Overall I wouldn't recommend it to read.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Eliza

    ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Review - Born in a Second Language by Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie⁠ ⁠ This review has been made possible thanks to @NetGalley and Button Poetry for providing me with an Advance Reader's Copy in exchange for an honest review.⁠ ⁠ I love the subject matter, as someone who also feels trapped between several languages and cultures, I related to it very much. I liked how the author played with shape poems throughout the collection. There was a good mix of prose poetry and I really enjoyed seein ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Review - Born in a Second Language by Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie⁠ ⁠ This review has been made possible thanks to @NetGalley and Button Poetry for providing me with an Advance Reader's Copy in exchange for an honest review.⁠ ⁠ I love the subject matter, as someone who also feels trapped between several languages and cultures, I related to it very much. I liked how the author played with shape poems throughout the collection. There was a good mix of prose poetry and I really enjoyed seeing the same phrases or images repeating themselves through the collection. ⁠ ⁠ Some of my favourite poems include for those for whom this need not be translated, which is one of the strongest starts to a poetry collection I've ever read and it's full of emotion and conviction. I also enjoyed I know a place where I can spread myself out and be enough to fill a room, What my hands have learned, I am deciding which language to spend the night in, and it goes without saying. I feel like this collection was a fantastic all-around look at the experience of not belonging to one country, culture or language and the limbo state the author found herself in while living in these various places. ⁠ ⁠ Born in a Second Language is out today!

  7. 4 out of 5

    sahar

    "i am three languages short of knowing myself / i only know one language well enough to miss you in it." "i am three languages short of knowing myself / i only know one language well enough to miss you in it."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joy

    Poetry from a culture other than one’s own can be incredibly difficult. The cadences and references fall on a completely unfamiliar ear, and one is uncertain in attempts to connect and make meaning. Afiriyie-Hwedie’s collection has moments of distilled poignancy as well as sections that seem overworked and insular. The voice of a young person seeking identity across cultures and within the tenets of Christianity will resonate with some contemporary readers. On the whole, this one was just ok for Poetry from a culture other than one’s own can be incredibly difficult. The cadences and references fall on a completely unfamiliar ear, and one is uncertain in attempts to connect and make meaning. Afiriyie-Hwedie’s collection has moments of distilled poignancy as well as sections that seem overworked and insular. The voice of a young person seeking identity across cultures and within the tenets of Christianity will resonate with some contemporary readers. On the whole, this one was just ok for me. Thank you to Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie, Button Poetry, and NetGalley for an Advance Reader Copy in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Soula Kosti

    3.5 ✨ In Born in a Second Language, I couldn't deeply connect with each poem, but I overall enjoyed this debut poetry collection by Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie. Maybe it's my fault because I went into this with high expectation as the premise mentioned that these poems will explore language and translation through the immigrant experience which is something that intrigues and concerns me. The poem "It goes without saying" is a true masterpiece and gives me chills every time I read it. "In America 3.5 ✨ In Born in a Second Language, I couldn't deeply connect with each poem, but I overall enjoyed this debut poetry collection by Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie. Maybe it's my fault because I went into this with high expectation as the premise mentioned that these poems will explore language and translation through the immigrant experience which is something that intrigues and concerns me. The poem "It goes without saying" is a true masterpiece and gives me chills every time I read it. "In America, there is less consideration of u in a sentence How c o l o u r becomes c o l o r Word flattened like somebody's version of this poor earth And We the people Is often them not u, the people" Thank you to NetGalley and Button Poetry for providing this ARC in exchange for my honest review!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sobbin’ Scenes

    4.5 stars The title piqued my interest as someone who bilingualism is a huge part of identity. However, my bilingual experience is from two colonizer languages; the author's is not. Even so, I still related to some of the poems like I am deciding which language to spend the night in, and as for other poems I wasn't be able to relate to, I could empathize. So even when she spoke of religion that I don't partake in, the author would make me put my feet in her shoes and understand. The poems were tho 4.5 stars The title piqued my interest as someone who bilingualism is a huge part of identity. However, my bilingual experience is from two colonizer languages; the author's is not. Even so, I still related to some of the poems like I am deciding which language to spend the night in, and as for other poems I wasn't be able to relate to, I could empathize. So even when she spoke of religion that I don't partake in, the author would make me put my feet in her shoes and understand. The poems were thoughtful and powerful, yet in a delicate manner. The author reflects on home, belonging, god, and immigration in this short anthology. Overall, lovely quick read that I think anyone could enjoy. I received an ARC through Netgalley. Thank you!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie has written a provocative book of poetry. Originally from Botswana, Ms. Afiriyie-Hwedie has a Masters of Fine Arts degree from the University of Michigan. Her poetry speaks of finding her way through American life as an immigrant, a woman, and a speaker of many languages. I want to return to her poetry many times. I particularly enjoyed the following it goes without saying (the first lines follow) "My British English troubles my American English I pause before I say w Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie has written a provocative book of poetry. Originally from Botswana, Ms. Afiriyie-Hwedie has a Masters of Fine Arts degree from the University of Michigan. Her poetry speaks of finding her way through American life as an immigrant, a woman, and a speaker of many languages. I want to return to her poetry many times. I particularly enjoyed the following it goes without saying (the first lines follow) "My British English troubles my American English I pause before I say words like 'be-u-tea-ful Confused by how I learned to say it in Botswana . . . . . Outdooring Ceremony "If the ocean is always ahead of itself, did it foresee its naming? Did it foresee how it would become what it was called? I liked her poetry immensely and recommend it to you. I want to thank NetGalley and Button Poetry for the chance to read and review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anwen Hayward

    (Review of an ARC via Netgalley) This was a really beautiful and evocative collection about language and cultural identity, and how America (and the white Western world in general) seeks to dampen both. Afiriyie-Hwedie's language here is really just phenomenal; she has an almost supernatural ability to tell the story of a whole life in one line of poetry, and although this collection is very short it feels complete, like not a single page or word is wasted. All the poems here are tightly crafted (Review of an ARC via Netgalley) This was a really beautiful and evocative collection about language and cultural identity, and how America (and the white Western world in general) seeks to dampen both. Afiriyie-Hwedie's language here is really just phenomenal; she has an almost supernatural ability to tell the story of a whole life in one line of poetry, and although this collection is very short it feels complete, like not a single page or word is wasted. All the poems here are tightly crafted and layered with so many meanings that I think you could probably read this entire collection cover to cover multiple times and have a different experience every time. Having said that, I did find some of the poems were a little hard to parse and I wasn't sure I fully comprehended all of them, but I chalked that up to the poet's experience being so very different from mine; there are things she's experienced and writes about that are a completely new frame of reference for me, a white monoglot who's lived in the same country my whole life. I still enjoyed the language of the poems, even those I didn't entirely understand. As far as poetry collections go, this is one of the most impressive in terms of poetic technique and language that I've read this year, and it's obvious that Afiriyie-Hwedie is one of those poets who's going to end up on every MFA syllabus going, and she should.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Gicely

    3.5/5✨: This poetry collection was definitely one of the good ones. This book delves into the topics of immigrants, family, sense of belonging, as well as the way history and language effect your understanding of your place and how it alters your worldview. I think this collection was done beautifully and effectively as to the themes it portrays, I think from a technical standpoint, the poetry is really well done and the way forms are used to tell the story beyond just the soundwork and meaning 3.5/5✨: This poetry collection was definitely one of the good ones. This book delves into the topics of immigrants, family, sense of belonging, as well as the way history and language effect your understanding of your place and how it alters your worldview. I think this collection was done beautifully and effectively as to the themes it portrays, I think from a technical standpoint, the poetry is really well done and the way forms are used to tell the story beyond just the soundwork and meaning of the words in the poem is done well. I would recommend this collection to people who enjoy these topics. The only reason I did not rate this collection of poems as high as I would another lovely poetry book, is that it wasn't my cup of tea. Poetry I've found is much more subjective enjoyment/understanding than a regular fiction tale, so while I think it's well done, the style wasn't my vibe on a personal level so I could not rate it as high especially since a lot of the poetry was very big brain energy and I had a harder time understanding it so I had to re-read a bit (but that's on me for needing simplicity). However, I would recommend reading these to see if it suits you, especially my favorite poems "Provenance" and "It goes without saying".

  14. 5 out of 5

    Callum McLaughlin

    The majority of the poems in this collection focus on Afiriyie-Hwedie’s complicated relationship with language, musing on how much our cultural identity is tied up in our mother tongue; how a disconnect from one can make us feel estranged from the other. It’s a fascinating topic, and Afiriyie-Hwedie tackles it with nuance, employing a suitably beautiful and engaging writing style. Structurally, a few of the more playful pieces felt a tad too gimmicky for my taste, and as a whole, the collection d The majority of the poems in this collection focus on Afiriyie-Hwedie’s complicated relationship with language, musing on how much our cultural identity is tied up in our mother tongue; how a disconnect from one can make us feel estranged from the other. It’s a fascinating topic, and Afiriyie-Hwedie tackles it with nuance, employing a suitably beautiful and engaging writing style. Structurally, a few of the more playful pieces felt a tad too gimmicky for my taste, and as a whole, the collection does feel a little short – though with such a tight thematic focus, I can appreciate the desire to avoid too much repetition. All-in -all, this is a compact, perceptive collection that is worth checking out. Thank you to the publisher for a free advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Raven

    This review is based on NetGalley ARC provided in exchange for an honest, unbiased opinion. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher! ‘Born in a Second Language’ is a collection of poetry centered around language and its connections to one’s identity, from a multicultural standpoint. It beautifully yet bluntly deals with themes such as identity, belonging, racism and multiculturalism. It drives home the message that language is not only about communication, but it is also an important part of who This review is based on NetGalley ARC provided in exchange for an honest, unbiased opinion. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher! ‘Born in a Second Language’ is a collection of poetry centered around language and its connections to one’s identity, from a multicultural standpoint. It beautifully yet bluntly deals with themes such as identity, belonging, racism and multiculturalism. It drives home the message that language is not only about communication, but it is also an important part of who we are, especially for those who have had to leave their homelands behind. I had such a good time reading this book, and I highly recommend it!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Seher

    Thank you, NetGalley for a chance to read and review this! I liked this collection and can sort of empathize with the author on how it feels to try and communicate when you're stuck between two languages; all of us who are bilingual can. Of course I haven;t moved anywhere and been stuck in just one, so can't fully. However, poetry is deeply personal and I didn't vibe with this collection although I objectively tell you that its better than a lot of other modern poetry I've read this year. I didn' Thank you, NetGalley for a chance to read and review this! I liked this collection and can sort of empathize with the author on how it feels to try and communicate when you're stuck between two languages; all of us who are bilingual can. Of course I haven;t moved anywhere and been stuck in just one, so can't fully. However, poetry is deeply personal and I didn't vibe with this collection although I objectively tell you that its better than a lot of other modern poetry I've read this year. I didn't understand the references at all, which was probably the biggest barrier for me; or perhaps I am not part of the intended audience.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    If I kick off the label of genre and my expectations, this book could be a pretty good read for all multilingual people, people of colour and immigrants out there. Even when you ain't them, you still can enjoy this because this had been very honest and didn't hold back when it came of express feelings and dilemmas. Some of the poems are remarkably appealing. Specially the couple of poems on mother, I loved them. But I was looking for something wholesome and this isn't that. This more of felt lik If I kick off the label of genre and my expectations, this book could be a pretty good read for all multilingual people, people of colour and immigrants out there. Even when you ain't them, you still can enjoy this because this had been very honest and didn't hold back when it came of express feelings and dilemmas. Some of the poems are remarkably appealing. Specially the couple of poems on mother, I loved them. But I was looking for something wholesome and this isn't that. This more of felt like a very personal collection of essays and poems. This just wasn't my cup of poetry. Lastly, I would like to thank NetGalley and the publishers for providing this ARC.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    I started and finished this book today, but I definitely need more time to reflect upon everything I’ve read on these pages. This is a collection of personal poems written by a black woman, immigrant in the USA. She explores the challenges and injustices she faces in her life, often being reminded that she’s not home, that her English isn’t the “good” one, that because of her color she’s excluded from groups, and many other issues that unfortunately are still present in our society nowadays. I’m I started and finished this book today, but I definitely need more time to reflect upon everything I’ve read on these pages. This is a collection of personal poems written by a black woman, immigrant in the USA. She explores the challenges and injustices she faces in her life, often being reminded that she’s not home, that her English isn’t the “good” one, that because of her color she’s excluded from groups, and many other issues that unfortunately are still present in our society nowadays. I’m white, but I’m also a woman and I have family living abroad, so I could relate to some of her poems too. "It goes without saying" really touched me. Great read! * I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Neelam Babul

    This was a fabulous and splendid collection of poems dealing with very powerful and sensitive subjects including language and the dilution of language through translation, immigration and family. Akosua's writing is beautiful and lyrical, though I do not reach a lot of poetry books, I do highly recommend picking this collection up. There is something for everyone in this book and I am sure the author is going to recognized as a great poet. I thank Netgalley, the author and the publisher for prov This was a fabulous and splendid collection of poems dealing with very powerful and sensitive subjects including language and the dilution of language through translation, immigration and family. Akosua's writing is beautiful and lyrical, though I do not reach a lot of poetry books, I do highly recommend picking this collection up. There is something for everyone in this book and I am sure the author is going to recognized as a great poet. I thank Netgalley, the author and the publisher for providing a free copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Schwartz

    Incredibly moving. I will be buying copies for my friends, even though they are monolinguals. The hierarchy of English is something that infuriates me on a cellular level. Although I am a native English speaker, I do speak two additional languages (not as a heritage speaker). I do feel a different connection to different words based on the language that I’m speaking, so I was able to personally connect to multiple poems. Thank you to Netgalley for this arc ebook in exchange for an honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Roger DeBlanck

    Afiriyie-Hwedie offers up a set of powerful poems that honor family and language and give voice to the struggles and hardships of the immigrant experience. The shorter pieces resonated with me more than the longer ones, which experimented with style and shape. These verses honoring her mother from “In my version” echo the compassionate tone found throughout the entire volume: “Other times, I look beyond God for a woman like my mother. * I cannot tell the woman from the wound. Both are so concerned with y Afiriyie-Hwedie offers up a set of powerful poems that honor family and language and give voice to the struggles and hardships of the immigrant experience. The shorter pieces resonated with me more than the longer ones, which experimented with style and shape. These verses honoring her mother from “In my version” echo the compassionate tone found throughout the entire volume: “Other times, I look beyond God for a woman like my mother. * I cannot tell the woman from the wound. Both are so concerned with your safety they sit with you until you heal. And bleed and bleed and bleed.”

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Hanson

    This is a powerful collection of poetry centering on being born in a second language, understanding identity, and troubling American conventions. I found myself lost in thought with the rhythm of the stanzas and appreciating structural choice across the variety of poems. This collection can be revisited multiple times to explore different thematic lenses, which is absolutely to be appreciated of button poetry. Thank you to Netgalley and this beautiful writer for the ARC.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    A compact selection of 36 poems exploring that of being born with a second language and a dive into ones identity in relation to language, culture, immigration and also being woman Akosua Zimba Afiriyie-Hwedie’s poetry has also introduced me to Branda Fassies music whom is mentioned in a few poems. Two poems that made me stop and pause for thought were Port of Entry and It goes without saying. An eye-opening and enjoyable short collection of poetry.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Brown

    Afiriyie-Hwedie has such a graceful command over her language - the focus on translation, identity, and belonging, as well as highlighting hypocrisies in the UK and US regarding immigration and suppression of culture, was amazing and incredibly measured.

  25. 5 out of 5

    James Morehead

    Challenging in language and form, wonderful use of found poetry and concrete devices. Beautifully designed suiting the visual nature of the poetry. Recommended reading as a physical book - can't imagine this book would work as an ebook. Challenging in language and form, wonderful use of found poetry and concrete devices. Beautifully designed suiting the visual nature of the poetry. Recommended reading as a physical book - can't imagine this book would work as an ebook.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Raven Black

    A voice not often heard talks of her experiences with language, religion, family, immigration and living. Heavy in the theme if language and its importance and power, this is a short but packed poetry book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mariel Pabroa

    I am in love with the poems herein. Love how the poet was able to create poems that are beautifully written with so much depth in it that talks about language and how it holds a lot about a person's whole being. Definitely recommends this and will surely reread the poems in this collection. I am in love with the poems herein. Love how the poet was able to create poems that are beautifully written with so much depth in it that talks about language and how it holds a lot about a person's whole being. Definitely recommends this and will surely reread the poems in this collection.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This poetry collection was very interesting to see the way that the poet felt about their culture. I really enjoyed the language that was used in the collection. It definitely was a collection that I would recommend to anyone and anybody just getting into poetry or interested in learning about another culture! It was very entertaining and you will not be disappointed if you read it!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Larissa Lee

    This collection presents a deep and heartfelt connection to the author's experience as an immigrant in America. Her culture is woven throughout each piece, and it made me ache with her. American born, I can't truly understand this poet's experience. However, when I lived overseas as a military dependent for years and returned to the States, I had a similar feeling of disconnect mixed with a desire to feel at home - America is uniquely disconcerting, even on a good day. Beautifully done! This collection presents a deep and heartfelt connection to the author's experience as an immigrant in America. Her culture is woven throughout each piece, and it made me ache with her. American born, I can't truly understand this poet's experience. However, when I lived overseas as a military dependent for years and returned to the States, I had a similar feeling of disconnect mixed with a desire to feel at home - America is uniquely disconcerting, even on a good day. Beautifully done!

  30. 4 out of 5

    TKP

    A short poetry anthology written by, and for, people who each foot in a different culture. It really spoke to me, especially the immigration form poem.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...