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Consumed: On Colonialism, Climate Change, Consumerism, and the Need for Collective Change

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Aja Barber wants change. In the 'learning' first half of the book, she will expose you to the endemic injustices in our consumer industries and the uncomfortable history of the textile industry; one which brokered slavery, racism and today's wealth inequality. And how these oppressive systems have bled into the fashion industry and its lack of diversity and equality. She wi Aja Barber wants change. In the 'learning' first half of the book, she will expose you to the endemic injustices in our consumer industries and the uncomfortable history of the textile industry; one which brokered slavery, racism and today's wealth inequality. And how these oppressive systems have bled into the fashion industry and its lack of diversity and equality. She will also reveal how we spend our money and whose pockets it goes into and whose it doesn't (clue: the people who do the actual work) and will tell her story of how she came to learn the truth. In the second 'unlearning' half of the book, she will help you to understand the uncomfortable truth behind why you consume the way you do. She asks you to confront the sense of lack you have, the feeling that you are never quite enough and the reasons why you fill the aching void with consumption rather than compassion. And she makes you challenge this power disparity, and take back ownership of it. The less you buy into the consumer culture the more power you have. CONSUMED will teach you how to be a citizen not a consumer.


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Aja Barber wants change. In the 'learning' first half of the book, she will expose you to the endemic injustices in our consumer industries and the uncomfortable history of the textile industry; one which brokered slavery, racism and today's wealth inequality. And how these oppressive systems have bled into the fashion industry and its lack of diversity and equality. She wi Aja Barber wants change. In the 'learning' first half of the book, she will expose you to the endemic injustices in our consumer industries and the uncomfortable history of the textile industry; one which brokered slavery, racism and today's wealth inequality. And how these oppressive systems have bled into the fashion industry and its lack of diversity and equality. She will also reveal how we spend our money and whose pockets it goes into and whose it doesn't (clue: the people who do the actual work) and will tell her story of how she came to learn the truth. In the second 'unlearning' half of the book, she will help you to understand the uncomfortable truth behind why you consume the way you do. She asks you to confront the sense of lack you have, the feeling that you are never quite enough and the reasons why you fill the aching void with consumption rather than compassion. And she makes you challenge this power disparity, and take back ownership of it. The less you buy into the consumer culture the more power you have. CONSUMED will teach you how to be a citizen not a consumer.

30 review for Consumed: On Colonialism, Climate Change, Consumerism, and the Need for Collective Change

  1. 5 out of 5

    Aja

    Is it poor taste to say your own book is actually quite alright if you do say so yourself? Probably. But taste is one of those concepts that simply depends on the person you ask.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Romany

    You like fast fashion. You buy too much. You stumble over Aja Barber on Instagram and buy this book. All of a sudden, you’re a climate activist, fighting for the rights of garment workers in countries you’ve never heard of, let alone visited.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    'Consumed' landed on my doorstep on Saturday and I couldn't put it down. Aja Barber writes engagingly about the mechanisms of fast fashion, their roots in colonialism and racism, the appalling waste and exploitation of workers, the western world's attitude to consumption and the harm it causes. She is direct and honest throughout, and her tone feels rousing and encouraging. I love that she targets systems rather than individuals. While she makes it clear we as individuals have power and influenc 'Consumed' landed on my doorstep on Saturday and I couldn't put it down. Aja Barber writes engagingly about the mechanisms of fast fashion, their roots in colonialism and racism, the appalling waste and exploitation of workers, the western world's attitude to consumption and the harm it causes. She is direct and honest throughout, and her tone feels rousing and encouraging. I love that she targets systems rather than individuals. While she makes it clear we as individuals have power and influence, and calls on us to be acutely aware of our privileges, she doesn't blame us unduly for the way things are and motivates us to fight systems and organisations. She defends a socialist model, which I love - a state of being where we recognise that we have enough and treasure our possessions. More wouldn't make us happy. This book is full of common sense, compassion and humanity, gives you plenty to reflect on, and will surely lead to welcome change. Read it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Kissling

    Wow, this book really needed an editor. The writing is sloppy and both individual chapters and the book as a whole are poorly organized. This added to overall disappointment: The subtitle and some of the recommendations lead me to expect a deeper analysis. I learned very little from this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kyra

    So torn on this one! So I really really like Aja. Originally I started following her on Instagram and had no idea that a book was in the works. When it was published I waited a few weeks (as Aja would suggest) to make sure that I really wanted it and sure enough it did not leave my mind, so I got myself a copy. Unfortunately I think maybe I overestimated this book - and this could be entirely based on the knowledge level I had going into it. I thought that Aja's book would be on the level of their So torn on this one! So I really really like Aja. Originally I started following her on Instagram and had no idea that a book was in the works. When it was published I waited a few weeks (as Aja would suggest) to make sure that I really wanted it and sure enough it did not leave my mind, so I got myself a copy. Unfortunately I think maybe I overestimated this book - and this could be entirely based on the knowledge level I had going into it. I thought that Aja's book would be on the level of their Instagram posts - snappy, sharp and approaching the issue comprehensively from all angles. The book, however, feels like it was configured all wrong. I think that Attenborough's 'A Life On Our Planet' is a great way to format books like these: start off with your witness statement (how the issue has personally impacted you), then delve into the reality of the issues (here is where the facts come in handy) and then a 'how we fix it' to tie it all up at the end. All of these elements were present in Aja's book, however they came in at random moments, accompanied by asides which were often productive discussion topics (e.g. the mispronunciation of ethnic names) but were put into sections about different issues entirely, which only detached you from what you had been reading previously. I think this book tried to tackle too much and that may also contribute to it being underwhelming for me - the fashion industry (as a job industry) is a separate discussion from the fashion industry as environmentally destructive. Both important, but not clearly defined as separate issues in this book, which from the title kind of sounds like its only about the latter. The discussion on colonialism was also very disorganized and chaotic purely because it didn't use case studies in a very productive way in my opinion. Ideally you would open this section with a brief summary of how fashion links to colonialism and then dive into specific examples (Kantamanto Market in Ghana, The impact of the East India Trading Company and British colonialism on Indian textile production which we now exploit and cheapen). Instead, the chapter is a hodge-podge of other people's opinions and explanations, meaning the chapter is void of much consistency and linearity. Generally, I think that the discussion became too rudimentary because it bounced around from one country, one case, one time in history to another without outlining where the link was in a very comprehensive way. The book, in my opinion, gets much better towards the end of this chapter and then into the following ones - however I still have one remaining critique, and that is simply that the book is really repetitive in this part. I think an editor could have chopped this remaining section down a tonne simply by removing expressions or paragraphs which had already been said in a slightly different way earlier on. It still would have been as impactful and thought-provoking for the reader. Generally this book taught me a couple new things and reaffirmed some of the beliefs which I already held and goals I had set myself. Aja's tone is super friendly and transparent throughout which I think would be great for somebody just starting out with reading about fast fashion, consumption and the impacts on the climate. I found that their enthusiasm about the topic was apparent in their writing, but I think for me I got stuck on some of the elements which I think could honestly have been saved with a touch more editing. Nonetheless, a book with subject matter as important and relevant as this has to get at least 3 stars, especially when its coming from somebody like Aja, who has devoted her career to discussing sustainable and ethical fashion choices whilst simultaneously being a voice for the POC whose voices we unfortunately do not hear when they are working too many hours producing shitty clothing for Boohoo.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Adelia

    I wish everyone would read this 🥺

  7. 4 out of 5

    Vickiej18

    If you shop in any capacity I think this books is an incredibly important read. The purpose of this books is a 5 star book. I found it hard to read at times and uncomfortable when thinking about my own shopping habits. I think as we approach Christmas this book has really made me think about how I buy for others. Aja's passion and drive for change is infectious from the start and never comes across as preachy. When it just Aja's words it feels as if a REALLY clever and informed friend is sharing If you shop in any capacity I think this books is an incredibly important read. The purpose of this books is a 5 star book. I found it hard to read at times and uncomfortable when thinking about my own shopping habits. I think as we approach Christmas this book has really made me think about how I buy for others. Aja's passion and drive for change is infectious from the start and never comes across as preachy. When it just Aja's words it feels as if a REALLY clever and informed friend is sharing with you there worries for the world. Aja's compassion means that you never feel judged or in the wrong but being shown the realities of fast fashion. Aja addresses her own past habits and how she shops now. The advice was geared towards more of life change then a temporary challenge. However, I found the books sometimes was hard to follow. Sentences were somethings 4/5 lines long. I then found myself spending longer unpicking the sentence and what it was saying than reading and being self reflective. The use of quotes would sometimes be really impactful and used to illustrate points well, however at times it felt as if I was reading more quotes than I was of Aja's own voice. Please don't let this review put you off reading the book. It is one I think it honestly worth reading. Even if just slowly, over a week, month or year.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rachael

    Aja Barber's book came along at the perfect time for me. After months of lockdown purchases, simply for the rush of receiving a package during isolation, I was struggling to break the cycle. Now whenever I feel like making a purchase I think about this book. The reason this book works so well is Aja's educational and encouraging tone. She never tries to make the reader feel guilty or stupid, instead she demands better for the reader and asks the reader to afford themselves the same respect. The o Aja Barber's book came along at the perfect time for me. After months of lockdown purchases, simply for the rush of receiving a package during isolation, I was struggling to break the cycle. Now whenever I feel like making a purchase I think about this book. The reason this book works so well is Aja's educational and encouraging tone. She never tries to make the reader feel guilty or stupid, instead she demands better for the reader and asks the reader to afford themselves the same respect. The only reason I did not give this book 5 stars is the poor editing. The heading levels are confusing, some references are significantly outdated and illustrations are placed in unusual spots on the page - a small let down for a wonderful text. I will return to this book again and again throughout my life.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a very good summary of several interrelated topics: colonialism, racism, environmentalism, and consumerism through lens of fashion/using fashion as jumping off point. The book explores both the ways in which these topics, and all of us, are interrelated, as well as making a persuasive case for taking steps to change our relationship with fashion and consumerism as a tangible, achievable, low-energy entry, and effective way to start/increase our contributions to positive change.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    I've been following Aja Barber on Instagram on and off (off is when I decide to take a vacation from social media), and this was my chance to dig a bit deeper and to support her work. While I am aware of the global impact of and the human suffering tied to fast fashion, Barber opened my eyes to the deep roots of colonialism in the fashion industry. The book is informative, yet conversational and accessible. Basically, it's what I'd hoped No Logo would be. Buy the book, write the letters, and let's I've been following Aja Barber on Instagram on and off (off is when I decide to take a vacation from social media), and this was my chance to dig a bit deeper and to support her work. While I am aware of the global impact of and the human suffering tied to fast fashion, Barber opened my eyes to the deep roots of colonialism in the fashion industry. The book is informative, yet conversational and accessible. Basically, it's what I'd hoped No Logo would be. Buy the book, write the letters, and let's do this work together!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tara Morrison

    An incredible book that touches upon a multitude of subjects (consumerism, capitalism, colonialism, environmentalism, racism, garment working conditions) and thoroughly explains how they all intersect. Most importantly, it’s a book that educates, sparks action, and motivates realistic behavior changes (my shopping consumption has dramatically decreased since). Can’t recommend this book enough.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    Finally, a book that doesn’t just tell you what the problem is, but offers realistic, applicable and personalized strategies for change!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul Harris

    Good read, felt like a comfortable conversation between my friends and I over dinner. Bit unfocused in parts, but overall solid advice for being judicious in consumption, and taking steps to champion social causes.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ellen Hibbs

    I eagerly awaited the release of this book and it did not disappoint. A very interesting read, focusing on the fashion industry and the unhealthy way in which this has developed over the last few decades. This is something that I've been interested in for the last couple of years and trying to learn more about and this book was great for that. Barber considers the whole process of fashion from producing to then disposing/recycling. I found it particularly interesting about the market in Ghana. Th I eagerly awaited the release of this book and it did not disappoint. A very interesting read, focusing on the fashion industry and the unhealthy way in which this has developed over the last few decades. This is something that I've been interested in for the last couple of years and trying to learn more about and this book was great for that. Barber considers the whole process of fashion from producing to then disposing/recycling. I found it particularly interesting about the market in Ghana. The Sustainability in Action section which finished the book was a great way to end. It's left me with lots to think about. Finally, I enjoyed the way Barber wrote, it felt personable, like it was a friend talking to you.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    To me, this is more of a 3.5/5 book, but I'm content with pushing it up to 4/5 because a.) Barber should not be penalized for my personal preferences, and b.) critiques aside, I'd rather people read this book than NOT read this book, and a higher rating is more likely to have this happen. Imagine making a necklace: there are beads, there's the string that binds them, and the closure that allows you to wear it. In a book like Consumed, the individual points are the beads, those points are bound to To me, this is more of a 3.5/5 book, but I'm content with pushing it up to 4/5 because a.) Barber should not be penalized for my personal preferences, and b.) critiques aside, I'd rather people read this book than NOT read this book, and a higher rating is more likely to have this happen. Imagine making a necklace: there are beads, there's the string that binds them, and the closure that allows you to wear it. In a book like Consumed, the individual points are the beads, those points are bound together by a thesis statement--the string--and the conclusion (or next step/call to action) is the closure. Barber does a decent job providing you with all those elements, and in the end, you are, technically, left with a necklace you can wear, but the beads don't quite match with each other, the string is more like fraying yarn than thread or wire, and the clasp is just a hand-tied knot, albeit a very tight one. It's inelegant and haphazard, but it has character, it's certainly unique, you can still wear it, and there's always a person out there who likes that style. As other have commented, this book needed a MUCH better editor. I'm ambivalent about the overall tone of the book--extremely casual and conversational--but it makes sense given her experience working in television and her presence on social media. I personally found it off-putting, but that's a personal preference, and not necessarily a failing of the book. Hell, that might actually be an *asset*, since it'll make it easier to reach people. This is an important book, and this a good book, and it should be read by as many people as possible, but the potential for it to have been a GREAT book is far too distracting for me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    S

    The Good: This book contains a wealth of information that will have you rethinking your buying habits. The first 4 chapters are like a cold shower that shocks you awake. I will certainly be rereading them when I need to check in with my buying habits and commitment to change. The first 4 chapters also point the reader in many directions for further learning, and the book ends with a great list of resources. Finally, I greatly appreciated her inclusion of fatphobia and racial capitalism in later The Good: This book contains a wealth of information that will have you rethinking your buying habits. The first 4 chapters are like a cold shower that shocks you awake. I will certainly be rereading them when I need to check in with my buying habits and commitment to change. The first 4 chapters also point the reader in many directions for further learning, and the book ends with a great list of resources. Finally, I greatly appreciated her inclusion of fatphobia and racial capitalism in later chapters, only wishing there were more on those topics. The Bad: Two points of criticism--(1) the book is poorly edited, and (2) the book shifts tone a lot and can be pedantic. I often found myself asking "who is her editor?" The organization, tone, and language would have benefited from a more discerning eye. What bothered me more, though, is that I couldn't tell who she envisioned her reader to be. The book can certainly be instructive, and I understand the need to be straightforward considering how dire the human and environmental stakes are here. But the book shifts into an off-putting accusatory tone at times that assumes a lot about the reader. Its treatment of important topics like "intersectionality" and "cultural appropriation" are cursory at best, reductive at worst, giving the impression that the reader is presumed to know nothing. All that is to say, the book might have been more generous to its audience. If you're on the fence, I say read the first 4 chapters and review her list of suggested resources.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex Pearl

    ‘Consumed’ is Aja’s magnum opus, it is call to action for humanity and a plea to treat the planet, each other and ourselves in fairer, more equitable and more sustainable ways. Aja is a force for good and rose to popularity as a sustainable fashion blogger. Having worked for years in the fashion sector, she knows every part of the business and it’s global impact. This book has much to teach us about the plethora of ways in which our buying power effects global distributions of wealth, the pillag ‘Consumed’ is Aja’s magnum opus, it is call to action for humanity and a plea to treat the planet, each other and ourselves in fairer, more equitable and more sustainable ways. Aja is a force for good and rose to popularity as a sustainable fashion blogger. Having worked for years in the fashion sector, she knows every part of the business and it’s global impact. This book has much to teach us about the plethora of ways in which our buying power effects global distributions of wealth, the pillaging of natural resources, and the exploitation of other humans by maintaining socioeconomic disadvantage across boarders and demographics. In the first half of the book Aja present compelling arguments showing how the fast fashion industry represents the newest face of colonialism across the globe. Unequal bargaining power and western dominance, operate insidiously to keep unforgivable levels of global inequality entrenched. I was horrified to read that if you follow the trade routes of the fast fashion industry, the routes map identically with historical colonial routes across the globe! Indeed according to Oxfam ‘almost half of humanity is living on less than $5.50 a day’. The second part of the book is a guide to practical and pragmatic steps one can take to untangle yourself from the western capitalist culture which keeps us buying, consuming and disposing of items, as well as our own financial and moral resources. This book is definitely worth a read!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ningyu Chen

    I relate to the author as someone who is interested in clothing and fashion, but also wanting to slow the cycle of consumption and addiction to consuming things. This book is good at breaking down the consumption cycle from the point of society, fashion manufacturing, sustainability, and healing your relationship with yourself (which is the most important part). I recommend starting from Chapter 4 onwards for the fashion-related content. Just skip the beginning. The first three chapters went int I relate to the author as someone who is interested in clothing and fashion, but also wanting to slow the cycle of consumption and addiction to consuming things. This book is good at breaking down the consumption cycle from the point of society, fashion manufacturing, sustainability, and healing your relationship with yourself (which is the most important part). I recommend starting from Chapter 4 onwards for the fashion-related content. Just skip the beginning. The first three chapters went into colonialism, racism, generational wealth, and many, many other social issues at once. It felt way too cursory if you already have knowledge about these areas, and even accusatory. Yes, they're important, but I kept on thinking "...and how does this relate to the fashion cycle?" This is an issue throughout the book but the later chapters does a better job of pulling these social justice topics into the dialogue of consumption and fast fashion.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alessandro

    I really liked the narrative approach of the author and reading about their personal history in connection to the topic(s). It was good to sit back and just listen. If you already have facts about the intercept of consumerism, racism, fast fashion & environment you will not learn a lot of new stuff - but the unique perspective is interesting per se. Otherwise I would totally recommend it for a prime approach to the subject. The author presents some interviews and conversations with others, which I really liked the narrative approach of the author and reading about their personal history in connection to the topic(s). It was good to sit back and just listen. If you already have facts about the intercept of consumerism, racism, fast fashion & environment you will not learn a lot of new stuff - but the unique perspective is interesting per se. Otherwise I would totally recommend it for a prime approach to the subject. The author presents some interviews and conversations with others, which in my opionion amplifies the platform and depersonalises the message, something rare with writers - even activists. The evocative writing also helps to overcome the sense of frustration, disgust, rage and powerlessness that comes when first learning about this system and it gently shows the reader other possibilities. Good job!

  20. 5 out of 5

    S Hill

    Consumed is brilliant - educational and informative, and written in a way that feels like a conversation with a friend, rather than a lecture or textbook. It provides tangible actions you can take to reduce and reconsider your own consumption, as well as ways to challenge the broader system, and does so in a way that's relatable, not preaching. I usually find non-fiction takes me weeks (or months) to get through, but read Consumed in a matter of days instead, as it really held my attention. I am Consumed is brilliant - educational and informative, and written in a way that feels like a conversation with a friend, rather than a lecture or textbook. It provides tangible actions you can take to reduce and reconsider your own consumption, as well as ways to challenge the broader system, and does so in a way that's relatable, not preaching. I usually find non-fiction takes me weeks (or months) to get through, but read Consumed in a matter of days instead, as it really held my attention. I am a bit fan of the author's writing style and honesty - would thoroughly recommend regardless of where you may be on your own journey into learning about sustainability, fast fashion and the way these interplay with complex issues like race, fatphobia and wealth.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Louisa

    With this powerful book, Aja Barber rolls the important, topical and fundamental issues of colonialism, climate change and consumerism (as indicated on the cover) into one, addressing them in an intersectional, accessible, engaging and unapologetically bold way. The book covers a fair amount of ground (from the interwoven systems which perpetuate race and class inequality, to the vastly complex issue of fast fashion), using personal, academic and anecdotal evidence - although it is not overly lo With this powerful book, Aja Barber rolls the important, topical and fundamental issues of colonialism, climate change and consumerism (as indicated on the cover) into one, addressing them in an intersectional, accessible, engaging and unapologetically bold way. The book covers a fair amount of ground (from the interwoven systems which perpetuate race and class inequality, to the vastly complex issue of fast fashion), using personal, academic and anecdotal evidence - although it is not overly long, so not overbearing/whelming. I’ve followed Aja on Instagram for a couple of years now and have a lot of respect for her and her no holds barred approach to important issues - particularly when it comes to the evils of fast fashion. As such, I knew her book was going to be great, and I immediately ordered it as soon as it came out. I only wish the people this book was truly intended for (I.e. the CEOs of fast fashion companies, the ‘influencers’ they interact with, and the ‘influenced’) would do the same. I felt Aja’s anger whilst reading, and am left (even more) disgusted by the fast fashion corporations which have massively contributed to the humanitarian and climate crisis we find ourselves in, through their blatant disrespect and disregard for their garment workers and the environment! Unfortunately, I feel that most of those who buy and read Consumed will already care about these issues (or they’ll be on their radar), despite the language and phrasing Aja uses throughout being almost directed at those who won’t actually read this book (with the most power to incite actual change). Nonetheless, I highly, highly recommend; whilst there are lots of books available which separately address the negative effects of fast fashion, racism, consumerism and so on, this book approaches these issues in a refreshing and intersectional manner that will have you angry but better educated on the need for fast action when it comes to our planet and working towards a more sustainable future.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Big thanks to Aja Barber and the publisher for doing the goodreads giveaway- this is both how I found out about the book and how I was fortunate enough to win a copy! Im coming back to write a full review soon- hovering between 3 and 4 stars. I feel like the book strayed from the fast fashion topic a bit too much and I would have rather gone more in depth than have like 43 other causes kinda tenuosly tied in, but the author made a lot of strong points, had the correct take resellers, and did teac Big thanks to Aja Barber and the publisher for doing the goodreads giveaway- this is both how I found out about the book and how I was fortunate enough to win a copy! Im coming back to write a full review soon- hovering between 3 and 4 stars. I feel like the book strayed from the fast fashion topic a bit too much and I would have rather gone more in depth than have like 43 other causes kinda tenuosly tied in, but the author made a lot of strong points, had the correct take resellers, and did teach me a bit I didnt know before when this is not the first book I've read on the topic even if that first book was the waste of paper that was Fashionopolis.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    This is the book you'll want to put in the hands of everyone you know. My route to Aja's work was unexpected: I found her from a yarn instagram account who did a video with her on styling your hand-knit items. She then introduced me to the world of "fast fashion" (and so much more) through her account. I later become a Patreon member because everything this woman writes, and researches, and stands for is so important for people and the planet. I have been excited for this book to come out, and i This is the book you'll want to put in the hands of everyone you know. My route to Aja's work was unexpected: I found her from a yarn instagram account who did a video with her on styling your hand-knit items. She then introduced me to the world of "fast fashion" (and so much more) through her account. I later become a Patreon member because everything this woman writes, and researches, and stands for is so important for people and the planet. I have been excited for this book to come out, and it was even better than I could have anticipated. Buy this book, and also listen to it on audio, where she does an amazing job reading it, and you'll come to love this woman as much as I do.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay

    This is the book you'll want to put in the hands of everyone you know. My route to Aja's work was unexpected: I found her from a yarn instagram account who did a video with her on styling your hand-knit items. She then introduced me to the world of "fast fashion" (and so much more) through her account. I later become a Patreon member because everything this woman writes, and researches, and stands for is so important for people and the planet. I have been excited for this book to come out, and i This is the book you'll want to put in the hands of everyone you know. My route to Aja's work was unexpected: I found her from a yarn instagram account who did a video with her on styling your hand-knit items. She then introduced me to the world of "fast fashion" (and so much more) through her account. I later become a Patreon member because everything this woman writes, and researches, and stands for is so important for people and the planet. I have been excited for this book to come out, and it was even better than I could have anticipated. Buy this book, and also listen to it on audio, where she does an amazing job reading it, and you'll come to love this woman as much as I do.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Aja’s book was as insightful and informative as I expected, and written with a great deal of compassion and humour. Although the issues caused by overconsumption are global in scale and effect, and can seem overwhelming, the focus is not on individual guilt (though she has plenty to say on the guilt of multinational companies and their billionaire owners/investors), and the ideas about how we can take responsibility and play our part in changing the system left me feeling encouraged and hopeful. Aja’s book was as insightful and informative as I expected, and written with a great deal of compassion and humour. Although the issues caused by overconsumption are global in scale and effect, and can seem overwhelming, the focus is not on individual guilt (though she has plenty to say on the guilt of multinational companies and their billionaire owners/investors), and the ideas about how we can take responsibility and play our part in changing the system left me feeling encouraged and hopeful. Definitely a book I’ll be revisiting, and recommending.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nisha

    A MUST READ. Aja Barber somehow accomplishes the feat of writing a book that is really enjoyable and enlightening, while unpacking the dark consequences and roots of consumerism that we prefer not to think about. Narrating it herself with a great performance that’s lighthearted, serious or snarky wherever it needs to be, she’s made the audiobook even more special. I got through it in two days and wanted more. Highly recommended! And thank you, Aja, for taking the time to write this wonderful boo A MUST READ. Aja Barber somehow accomplishes the feat of writing a book that is really enjoyable and enlightening, while unpacking the dark consequences and roots of consumerism that we prefer not to think about. Narrating it herself with a great performance that’s lighthearted, serious or snarky wherever it needs to be, she’s made the audiobook even more special. I got through it in two days and wanted more. Highly recommended! And thank you, Aja, for taking the time to write this wonderful book, and then even read it out loud to our lazy selves.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Wil

    Wow! Highly informative and practically useful. You may feel the weight of colonialism or consumerism, but fear not! Aja Barber will provide her loved experience so you don’t feel so alone as well as tips and suggestions of what we all can do as individuals. Must read especially ahead of holiday shopping!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    This book was a fast read, but also gave me a lot to think about. It definitely will make you look at consumerism, and in particular fast fashion, not only sucks all of us in, but effects so many different facets of life around the globe.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steph Hay

    This book is great. Hands up I am already a big fan of Aja and I have read a lot around ethical and sustainable fashion but this book adds so much to that conversation, it focuses on the systems, consumerism and the actions to take. I really recommend this book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beate

    Excellent read. Will change not only your clothes-shopping, but your entire consumerist behaviour if you give it a chance. This book made me think for along time after I had finished it.

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