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The Creative Gene: How books, movies, and music inspired the creator of Death Stranding and Metal Gear Solid

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The ferociously talented Hideo Kojima, creator of Metal Gear Solid and Death Stranding, shares his perspective on the stories and movies that influenced his work! Ever since he was a child, Metal Gear Solid and Death Stranding creator Hideo Kojima was a voracious consumer of movies, music, and books. They ignited his passion for stories and storytelling, and the results can The ferociously talented Hideo Kojima, creator of Metal Gear Solid and Death Stranding, shares his perspective on the stories and movies that influenced his work! Ever since he was a child, Metal Gear Solid and Death Stranding creator Hideo Kojima was a voracious consumer of movies, music, and books. They ignited his passion for stories and storytelling, and the results can be seen in his groundbreaking, iconic video games. Now the head of independent studio Kojima Productions, Kojima’s enthusiasm for entertainment media has never waned. This collection of essays explores some of the inspirations behind one of the titans of the video game industry, and offers an exclusive insight into one of the brightest minds in pop culture.


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The ferociously talented Hideo Kojima, creator of Metal Gear Solid and Death Stranding, shares his perspective on the stories and movies that influenced his work! Ever since he was a child, Metal Gear Solid and Death Stranding creator Hideo Kojima was a voracious consumer of movies, music, and books. They ignited his passion for stories and storytelling, and the results can The ferociously talented Hideo Kojima, creator of Metal Gear Solid and Death Stranding, shares his perspective on the stories and movies that influenced his work! Ever since he was a child, Metal Gear Solid and Death Stranding creator Hideo Kojima was a voracious consumer of movies, music, and books. They ignited his passion for stories and storytelling, and the results can be seen in his groundbreaking, iconic video games. Now the head of independent studio Kojima Productions, Kojima’s enthusiasm for entertainment media has never waned. This collection of essays explores some of the inspirations behind one of the titans of the video game industry, and offers an exclusive insight into one of the brightest minds in pop culture.

30 review for The Creative Gene: How books, movies, and music inspired the creator of Death Stranding and Metal Gear Solid

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marija S.

    Be warned if you are considering reading this book because of Kojima's game designer vocation. This is a collection of essays on personal impressions of books, movies, anime, etc. and does not discuss his creative process, gaming industry, work experiences, etc. Be warned if you are considering reading this book because of Kojima's game designer vocation. This is a collection of essays on personal impressions of books, movies, anime, etc. and does not discuss his creative process, gaming industry, work experiences, etc.

  2. 4 out of 5

    cheer

    Hideo Kojima talks to you about his favorite works of art and goes surprisingly deep into his personal life and perception of reality in the process. This book is everything to me now. It reads so clearly as Hideo's voice—the way his bizarre extended metaphors and cheesy references can transition into a paragraph of the most profound philosophical thought I have ever heard is incredible. Kojima is a human being. This is the most personal he has been directly. But reading this book will make you r Hideo Kojima talks to you about his favorite works of art and goes surprisingly deep into his personal life and perception of reality in the process. This book is everything to me now. It reads so clearly as Hideo's voice—the way his bizarre extended metaphors and cheesy references can transition into a paragraph of the most profound philosophical thought I have ever heard is incredible. Kojima is a human being. This is the most personal he has been directly. But reading this book will make you realize just how truly personal every single fiber of the themes of his games truly are. Hideo Kojima has passed on his memes to me, and I will carry them with me wherever I may go. There's no need to feel alone anymore. "Elsewhere on this Earth, there are other people who share the same loneliness." –Hideo Kojima

  3. 4 out of 5

    Arkan Mylos

    Found out that me and the man himself have so much in common when it comes to experiencing art that is literally insane.

  4. 4 out of 5

    James Andrews

    Hideo Kojima is, in my opinion, one of the great auteurs of our time. So, when I saw that he was releasing a book titled The Creative Gene, I had no choice but to instantly pre-order it. (This was probably my first pre-order of any sort of media since the PlayStation 2 era.) Despite my excitement, this book didn't quite meet my expectations. I mostly blame myself for these erroneous expectations, hobbled by the misleading marketing of the English version, which is subtitled "How books, movies, an Hideo Kojima is, in my opinion, one of the great auteurs of our time. So, when I saw that he was releasing a book titled The Creative Gene, I had no choice but to instantly pre-order it. (This was probably my first pre-order of any sort of media since the PlayStation 2 era.) Despite my excitement, this book didn't quite meet my expectations. I mostly blame myself for these erroneous expectations, hobbled by the misleading marketing of the English version, which is subtitled "How books, movies, and music inspired the creator of Death Stranding and Metal Gear Solid." I think it's a stretch to say this book is about how these things inspired Kojima's work. The book is really a series of previously published essays, most of which focus on a specific novel or movie that influenced Kojima and contributed to his creative DNA. We do get occasional glimpses into how these works directly influenced Kojima's art, and those moments are some of the highlights of the book. (As an especially amusing example: The character of The Boss in Metal Gear Solid 3 is inspired by the matronly, eponymous cat from the novel Jennie by Paul Gallico.) But these small insights feel like tangential confessions as Kojima straightforwardly gushes about his favorite works of art. The book's original title in Japanese is The Gifted Gene and My Lovable Memes. To me, the "Lovable Memes" part more closely reflects the reality of the book (taking "meme" in the original definition as an idea or concept that spreads from person to person). It's Kojima unashamedly fanboying out on the "memes" that inspired and shaped his own art, even if he only occasionally explains how the influences materialized. At the very least, this is a great curation of book and movie recommendations. As a Kojima fan, it's a solid 4 stars -- especially if you go in without heightened expectations. The final two essays, plus the interview with Gen Hoshino, were my favorite part. That's where we get the most insight into his creative philosophy, and how he views collaboration, inspiration, and human connection as essential parts of the creative process. As he points out, a "meme" = "Me + Me".

  5. 4 out of 5

    alexis

    A must read for anyone who played Death Stranding and spent the entire time thinking about the overlapping themes and role of women in comparison to the metal gear solid series but was still part of the venn diagram who was charmed by the extreme un-subtlety of names like “Die-Hardman” and screamed out loud when they revealed his birth name twenty minutes before the end of the game.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mattie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My first book of 2022, The Creative Gene by Hideo Kojima! And like Kojima with "BlaRun", I've held my own little Festival with his works 😁 This books gives a brilliant insight to the creative approach, what has shaped and inspired Kojima, what has rescued him, what makes him so relatable and how I just want to bump into him in a bookstore and talk media, books, music and all the good things! You will most certainly notice some quirks of his if you have played or followed his work, I've always fol My first book of 2022, The Creative Gene by Hideo Kojima! And like Kojima with "BlaRun", I've held my own little Festival with his works 😁 This books gives a brilliant insight to the creative approach, what has shaped and inspired Kojima, what has rescued him, what makes him so relatable and how I just want to bump into him in a bookstore and talk media, books, music and all the good things! You will most certainly notice some quirks of his if you have played or followed his work, I've always followed Kojima's media posts, from music to movies and books and this has been a adventure! I have discovered an amazing amount of media through this book, I've learned about the love of being an astronaut, Ludens seems so familiar, the love and escape music and books provide, like Joy Division done for him, Kamen Rider and passing the torch to Taxi Driver rescuing him. As an avid fan of Kojima, he's not just the Metal Gear or Death Stranding guy, he's someone I eagerly look to for recommendations on books, movies and music as well! Death Stranding to me is what the Yamato movie was to him at that time, a bridged understanding, a connection of many! Thank you for sharing your thoughts and memes Kojima-San!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Dorman

    Kojima speaks about the works that influenced him with such a contagious admiration. He is a creator first, but an audience second, held at the whim of the artists whose light touches changed his creative pathways. Every summary bleeds with an adorable level of reverence for these sometimes esoteric pieces (at least to an American). I would love to see a more detailed autobiography from Kojima, but learning about his life through his favorite media was a clever way to explore himself.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Victor Calderin

    I appreciated Kojima's thesis on how our connections to each other are built on the DNA of the pop culture we consume, like a spiderweb of the things we love. I appreciated Kojima's thesis on how our connections to each other are built on the DNA of the pop culture we consume, like a spiderweb of the things we love.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ville Pääkkö

    This book is mostly Kojima listing different sources of inspiration he had and talking about how and why those things inspired him. The parts where he talked about his own life and his way of thinking were by far the most interesting things in this book. I would have loved to hear a lot more about him and his working methods but this book was still a good read and had some really interesting thoughts. Definitely inspires me to learn more about game design and keep absorbing other peoples memes!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    An important piece of advice that I’ve begun to really follow more and more as I’ve grown older is that one should never meet their idols. At the very best case scenario, you’ll find they’re a great person, they’ve shared their time with you, and they will really honor your value as a person who has invested their own time in that idol’s career. What a rush. On the other end of the spectrum, you’ll find this person is disconnected from the world, isolated within their own ego, is drunk or addled An important piece of advice that I’ve begun to really follow more and more as I’ve grown older is that one should never meet their idols. At the very best case scenario, you’ll find they’re a great person, they’ve shared their time with you, and they will really honor your value as a person who has invested their own time in that idol’s career. What a rush. On the other end of the spectrum, you’ll find this person is disconnected from the world, isolated within their own ego, is drunk or addled, is crude, rude, dismissive, the list goes on. But somewhere in between, somewhere in the space of humility, we will find that our idols are deeply human, just like us. The glow simmers into a tone, the praise just becomes rumor. We find that the people we have created all of these silent myths in our mind about are only straw cities waiting on an ember of reality to raze it from ground to sky. They just become us, they become the people that we could have been, the people that we could still be. And on some level, that’s deeply inspiring. But on another, in my mind, I think we need these proto-human idols. We need larger than life figures who we believe have ‘powers’ beyond our own, who have seen through the algorithm of the human element and are able to squeeze through the cracks of contemporary progress, instead elevating, escalating and innovating in ways that are simply not within our DNA’s vocabulary. In Kojima’s book, I do believe that this is the closest I will ever come to meeting him. And in some ways, I’m a little crestfallen. A couple of years ago I made a list in a notebook of all of the people who I see as creative heroes, people whose vision was one that still reached out of some split in time and space and snatched ideas that I could never have culminated, even in years of silent thought and creation. Their abstract concepts are so unique and so courageous that I absolutely adore not only the fictions that stir from them, but also the fact that the brain that created them resides within these people. It feels like a cosmic reactor frenzying at all times, at all moments, and all that needs to happen is for them to feel inspired and to grab an idea and their dedication, their skill, and their talent will amass to construct all the ductwork, the magnificence, the blueprints, the energy and they will stand beside their creation momentarily, only stepping away next to create something else new. Now, I get that even our most genius creative minds don’t operate like that, and I know that’s a bit of a fairy tale way to look at things, but I know that these people have the potential to be this kind of creator. Hideo Kojima was (and will always be) on that list. The creator of the sprawling and mind-dissecting opus of Metal Gear Solid and the high-concept world uniter Death Stranding among other titles, the way this man writes stories and narratives and characters is unlike anyone else I have ever seen. The way he shares on social media from an optimistic creative standpoint and shines light on some of his contemporaries, the way he shares the music that makes him want to create certain games or scenes, the way he will show off new additions to his film library, all of these little things really personally inspire me to always fuel the machine, to always reach out and find new units with which to spark fire inside the mind. He has always had a sort of naivety about him in the way he communicates, a sort of child-like awe and go-get-em attitude that I also am impressed by as someone who has been run through the game industry’s ringer, but also as someone who has had so many eyes on him from so many directions. He just seems to “Get it” and he seems to always be working on something new, and if not, he is “fueling the machine” to make more. To find the next spark. Initially, reading this book dimmed some of the shine of what I believed this man to be. The language he uses in this book is very basic, very straightforward. There is no flourish and there is a kindly passion bared on the page that feels very shallow. Nearly one-dimensional. It’s a sense of naivety through to the point of a hint of adolescence and simplicity. He is talking about films, books, albums he has loved. I love that! However, we rarely get to see these pieces of media as ones that have made him look at his own work, past and present, in different ways, works that have resonated deeply within him for ideas he may use in the future. Reading this book, I am led often to wonder about the way we recommend or claim things. I will speak from personal experience, but the arc of my consumption and the shapes of banners I waved began low at its base, claiming things that were initially relatable, excitable, easy to identify with. I liked to recommend things that I knew would sink in instantly and easily. At my absolute summit, I strived to find the most niche and abstract films, books, bands, albums to hand off to friends. My imagination ran wild with the sense of blind ambition this would inspire in others, to have a seed planted in their mind and heart that something like this could exist, something that was difficult to find, something that was obscured from all normal vision. I thought it would spread like a viral contagion, the passion and longing for new things that existed below the surface, if only they too could take that one extra step to discover a new director or a new record label. It isn’t until now that I am getting to the stage that I believe Kojima is at while writing this book, that regardless of how he found these books, these films, no matter if these things are standing in a spotlight in front of the eyes of billions or something he found as a one-of-a-kind artifact, he just wants to share his joy about it. That’s the type of language I’m finding within this book: joyous. His excitement for each unit is bright and tangible. In my own sharing of different media, mainly music, I have often said that when I send out a playlist or hand out a mixtape, the ultimate goal is for someone to find just one song or band that they’re going to keep with them, and sort of remember the process of how they found it and hope to do the same in their life going forward (with anything, not just music). I think Kojima is accomplishing this, doing almost exactly what I tend to do with these bi-annual releases I make. He’s sharing the stuff he loves and giving personal connection to why he wants others to check it out. Am I reading this book for a new upgrade of how I understand the language, to be swooned by incredible turn-of-phrase? No. No way. I read this book to see the types of fuel that this powerhouse creative feeds his machinery with. And this book delivers. I do love this aspect of that. Especially because this book is a collection of older essays that he’s written in the past. I think the most misleading thing about this book is that I assumed (something I take full accountability for) that this book would feel a little bit more like a course in how to siphon that fuel and turn it outward into something of your own design. I had visions of reading how he took these books, these films, these records, and how he channeled it into specific elements of his own games, how different lines in a novel changed the way he wrote a MGS scene. How he constructed an entire 8 hour portion of Death Stranding around a single time he heard a Chvrches song. This is not that book. So for that reason, I do feel a bit disappointed. The title itself and the subtitle I think are absolute misnomers. I don’t believe we discuss any Creative Gene, whether it be genetic or memetic, nor do we discover how these movies, books or music inspired the creator. We learn what he likes. We learn that he is inspired by them. And that’s fine! But we definitively do not learn how these inspire him. The core tenet of this book, though, is one that I think is one that I believe is crucial for fans of any media to learn. I think it was attempted to be instilled in us during high school english classes, and truly an art form of its own that gets a lot more time in college courses. That is the idea of thinking critically and abstractly about media on its own. Some may argue that thinking about what art is takes away from what art does (or vice versa), but I don’t think I have enjoyed music, film or literature quite as much as I have when I have two or three parallel lines or analogues being built alongside it while I’m experiencing it. This book does a wonderful job of giving early insight on how to understand why we consume the media that we do. How it creates landmarks across our life of not only how the plots of books, how the sound of songs or how the scenes in movies exist as memories in their current form, but also who we were before and after we experienced them, the way that those moments shaped our lives coming out of them and the way that they changed the way we think about all things that occurred before and after them. Kojima’s kind and direct language is an enjoyable beginner’s course for how to do this. In fact, I know that while I’m reading this book, I’m thinking and wondering what my book of this very nature would be as well and I’m sure plenty of others have had similar thoughts. I don’t recommend this book unless you really love Kojima and can’t get enough of his content. I came away from it with a couple of books added to the Want to Read list and a few movies in the queue, but nothing that changed how I saw creativity or creation, nor was it able to change the way I felt about existing media or a fresh take on anything that I wanted to watch or listen to. There was no hidden gem within, no shining nugget at the core of the experience.

  11. 4 out of 5

    D.K. Lawhorn

    I loved getting to read Kojima's thoughts on the books, movies, and music that have inspired him throughout his life, as well as many personal details that bring this God of the video game industry back down to earth a bit. He led me to buying five books already and watching two movies. A very solid translation, as well. I loved getting to read Kojima's thoughts on the books, movies, and music that have inspired him throughout his life, as well as many personal details that bring this God of the video game industry back down to earth a bit. He led me to buying five books already and watching two movies. A very solid translation, as well.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    I had a lot fun reading about one favourite creators talking about the books, films and music he liked growing up. I also agree with what he said in the beginning of this book about 1 out of 10 books you read will be a hit and other 9 not being so much but not to let it put you off. I also consider every book I didn’t enjoy much to not be time wasted.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Parsa

    Worthless and a waste of time like his recent game death stranding. I'm a huge fan of his games and the MGS series. Although he has a big ego and he probably reckons himself as a big and creative guy ( which he is) but at the same time writing a book about what he actually likes and what he read over the years is another level of patheticness. I played most of his games. He doesn't understand narrative and storytelling at all. He knows how to make a good atmosphere but when it comes to the narra Worthless and a waste of time like his recent game death stranding. I'm a huge fan of his games and the MGS series. Although he has a big ego and he probably reckons himself as a big and creative guy ( which he is) but at the same time writing a book about what he actually likes and what he read over the years is another level of patheticness. I played most of his games. He doesn't understand narrative and storytelling at all. He knows how to make a good atmosphere but when it comes to the narrative he shows weakness all the time. That's not a surprise why he has such a shitty taste in books and movies.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Christa

    The Creative Gene is quite the gift from Hideo Kojima - giving insight on films, music and books that have inspired some of his works. Kojima-San is a man that has intrigued me for years so reading this was a no brainer. Recently with his release of Death Stranding (the first Kojima game I have ever played) I was blown away by his storytelling and dedication to the works he creates. Kojima-San is no stranger to sharing things he has watched/listened to/played or read on his Twitter and he has led The Creative Gene is quite the gift from Hideo Kojima - giving insight on films, music and books that have inspired some of his works. Kojima-San is a man that has intrigued me for years so reading this was a no brainer. Recently with his release of Death Stranding (the first Kojima game I have ever played) I was blown away by his storytelling and dedication to the works he creates. Kojima-San is no stranger to sharing things he has watched/listened to/played or read on his Twitter and he has led me to discover many new artists and authors that now I really enjoy. This book was a fascinating journey to look into his head and learn more about his life. I recommend this to any fan of his!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chris Ringelberg

    Whether you live, breath, and sleep his games or consider him the biggest nutjob in the industry, if you like or play video games, you know/have heard of Hideo Kojima. Creator of the Metal Gear series and Death Stranding, the guy has been behind some of video game’s biggest hits and his book, The Creative Gene, lends an inside behind-the-scenes look into the media and memes (not as what we consider memes today) that influenced him like his games do so now to us. What were originally articles for Whether you live, breath, and sleep his games or consider him the biggest nutjob in the industry, if you like or play video games, you know/have heard of Hideo Kojima. Creator of the Metal Gear series and Death Stranding, the guy has been behind some of video game’s biggest hits and his book, The Creative Gene, lends an inside behind-the-scenes look into the media and memes (not as what we consider memes today) that influenced him like his games do so now to us. What were originally articles for magazines, each chapter or passage is a deep dive into a piece of material- book, movie, music, etc. -and how Kojima came to find it, how it influenced him, and how or what that influence did later on for him. While many would just see this as a collection of media reviews (and source of more books to add to their list to read), Kojima really breaks down how much a book or movie can impact someone. That there can be more than just the continuous consumption of words strung together for pages on end, and then moving on to the next one, not internalizing anything but reading for the sake or simple enjoyment of it. Media and memes can mean something and anything to anyone. Whether it’s the small reminder to a past memory or event. Or the continued drive of a dream of yours to achieve. Kojima shows in his excerpts just how easily this can happen with anything and what they meant or still mean to him or in some cases, to more than him. It is, like I said, a look also into what influenced his creativity and thoughts behind his games. What made him think of doing it this way, or having this be a theme. The book deeply humanizes him and brings him down from the pedestal many put him on to show that he is merely like any one of us. No different, no better, only influenced by the memes he’s experienced in his life. I loved reading about how someone else can feel and attribute connections to media like I’ve sometimes done, feeling that I’m not alone and justified in myself for doing so. I’ve also now got several items to read or watch now that I’ve never heard of (and given how hard some are to find translated to English, may never get to read). There were even a few chapters that I skipped as I’m very soon to read/watch that said piece of media and didn’t want any spoilers or influences on how I’ll consume it, but this was also matched with one or two pieces that I had read or seen and seeing another person’s connection to it. While not easily a book I could suggest to many who don’t know who Kojima is, this book is a great source of not only great pieces of media but also the connections made with them. Which is the ultimate goal of the book, really. To connect to the reader and new readers the connections made by someone else to connect with them and so on and so forth. So allow me then, through my connection to the book in this review, to now suggest this book to you to form your own connection and meme with it and pass it on. Now…I got find where I can find some classic Japanese novels out here in Middle of Nowhere Iowa. Talk about being stranded out here 😉 . (that’s a death stranding joke)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Thurston

    The Hideo Kojima simp that I am was floored to learn that he wrote a book. I consume literally anything he says or creates, even if it sucks or it’s stupid. My bias of this book and his other works are strong, yet I think this is actually a pretty nice read. In typical Kojima fashion, he not so subtly flexes on the reader that he himself is a ridiculously avid reader, one who makes a point to visit a bookstore every single day. Kojima is also honest with us that he hated reading until 11 years The Hideo Kojima simp that I am was floored to learn that he wrote a book. I consume literally anything he says or creates, even if it sucks or it’s stupid. My bias of this book and his other works are strong, yet I think this is actually a pretty nice read. In typical Kojima fashion, he not so subtly flexes on the reader that he himself is a ridiculously avid reader, one who makes a point to visit a bookstore every single day. Kojima is also honest with us that he hated reading until 11 years old. This segways us into the lengthy front half of The Creative Gene dedicated to the many books, movies, and shows that Kojima loves. Kojima has always proudly worn his inspirations on his sleeves, occasionally to a fault, but it’s nice to just read him talk about why he personally enjoys them so much. Some of his synopses of his favorite books were so good that I added them to my want to read list on this app! I’m a sucker for listening to people passionately talk about their hobbies, interests, and favorite media in depth, so I enjoyed this section a lot. I got to learn much more about Hideo Kojima’s life growing up in detail that I have never even heard before. This section may drag a bit too long for some, but it can easily be skipped if that’s not what you’re here for. The latter half of the book delves into the philosophy and wisdom that Kojima has to offer (intellectual or ridiculous is up to the reader to discern). Kojima reflects on his constant struggles with loneliness, the pressure to keep performing and growing as a director and writer, and why his obsession with memes (poorly aged I might add) and ideas propagated so frequently through his videogames. Kojima forms a great argument in MGS2 and in this book: no matter how lonely or isolated we may feel, everyone is vaguely connected by the exchange of information, opinions, ideals, stories, and of course, memes. It’s a palpable sentiment in both works; I strongly agree that the morals, ideals, and wisdom people pass along to the next generation is far more important than their genetics. Hideo Kojima briefly shares with us his devout worship of 2001: A Space Odyssey and why he believes it is perfect fiction. Following through, Kojima then shares with the reader his dreams of traveling into space, with the later realization that his dream was truly to become an astronaut. It’s an endearing read, and I do hope Kojima is blessed with the opportunity to break the atmosphere someday. All considered, this book isn’t a revolutionary autobiographical work. However, it does serve as a really cool insight into the mind of Hideo Kojima. That’s what all his fanboys (myself included) have always craved, and that’s what we get here. Therefore, as a sort of autobiographical work of fan service, this book definitely accomplishes its goal. If you love Kojima, or have enjoyed any of his works, I definitely give this a solid recommendation.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Dufresne

    Hi, I hope all is progressing well. I remember my oldest brother parking his car backward (front of the vehicle facing opposing traffic) on a one way street at night, us getting out of the car, walking to the trunk in a drizzle, him opening the nearly empty trunk then retrieving a bag to hand me with a vocal happy birthday, and me glad about having a birthday present, a Playstation game, Metal Gear Solid, my christening moment into the series. Aside from my attraction to Naomi Hunter (especially si Hi, I hope all is progressing well. I remember my oldest brother parking his car backward (front of the vehicle facing opposing traffic) on a one way street at night, us getting out of the car, walking to the trunk in a drizzle, him opening the nearly empty trunk then retrieving a bag to hand me with a vocal happy birthday, and me glad about having a birthday present, a Playstation game, Metal Gear Solid, my christening moment into the series. Aside from my attraction to Naomi Hunter (especially since she looks like Nina/Anna Williams from Tekken—a resemblance of approachable, cool, intelligent, pretty, toughness—), Mei Ling, Nastasha Romanenko (mainly her voice), Metal Gear Solid (One) is so well put together between a phenomenal story, phenomenal gameplay, and voice acting. Metal Gear Solid (One) is a legendary stamp in gaming history. After completing the game, I remember searching for Hideo Kojima online, finding a Wikipedia page with no picture (though I remember the words being enough), and, at the time with different aspirations of being a video game designer (which I may be in a different sense in the long run of life), I recall Hideo Kojima being the second person I look up after Nobuou Uematsu (besides an entity like Square Enix—just to acknowledge, show appreciation in a way, mainly by reading about them/any project(s)). I will always have an appreciation for Metal Gear games I've come to play. Presently, I don't play video games as much as I work creatively, read, research, write, or watch movies though I have an appreciation for a good video game which is sound cause all one really has in such a temporary life are artifacts and memories until death, everything else seems complementary. So, when I find out about The Creative Gene, I decide to read it. The Creative Gene by Hideo Kojima, translations by Nathan A. Collins, is a collection of publications from Hideo Kojima about his becoming and philosophy as a person and game designer. The book has creative, personal, and professional tidbits that combine as a message to creators and fans as well as a text that allows one to get a better idea of Hideo Kojima as a person as well as creator through his contextual relationship(s) with different forms of media. I like the text. Onward and Upward, Kevin Dufresne www.Piatures.com IG: @Dufreshest

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ruslan Sliusarenko

    In the book Hideo Kojima reveals his fascination with the "Evangelists Film Commentators". This is the name he uses for various personalities that would appear on TV and present movies. The audience would then watch the movie that was showcased, essentially feeling "blessed" for the viewing session. In my mid-teens there was the same type of program on late-night TV. I would often not be able to finish the movie that was shown to the end (as it was late) but remembering that program makes me fee In the book Hideo Kojima reveals his fascination with the "Evangelists Film Commentators". This is the name he uses for various personalities that would appear on TV and present movies. The audience would then watch the movie that was showcased, essentially feeling "blessed" for the viewing session. In my mid-teens there was the same type of program on late-night TV. I would often not be able to finish the movie that was shown to the end (as it was late) but remembering that program makes me feel a heavy presence of nostalgia and companionship, almost as if I had watched those movies and fell asleep beside the person that presented them. I think Kojima wanted to connect with the readers in the same way those "Evangelist Film Commentators" would connect with him. The book is a collection of short essays, in which Kojima briefly goes over the literature that became memorable and inspiring to him. To my surprise, "The Creative Gene" is mostly focused on books, and not movies which, according to Kojima himself, are the "70% of [his] body". Some of the literature he presents had me very surprised. It would be great if at some point Kojima would make the same book but instead talk more about movies and video games... maybe it is problematic because of the copyrights issues? Regardless, The Creative Gene is a fascinating look into the mind and, to rephrase the title, the creation of Kojima's gene. The essays written before 2010 feel as if the author wasn't fully confident in his skills or importance. In contrast, the essay that closes this book is strikingly different. Kojima's writing appears more dominant and father-like. Is this how much Hideo has changed since he left Konami? On top of the incredible value of being able to connect the dots and just learn more about the thought process of Kojima, this book can also serve as a great catalogue of interesting literature. I'll try to read some of the works he suggested. The Creative Gene by Hideo Kojima is a must for anyone interested in one of the most important figures in the gaming industry.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Robbie

    This book has re-contextualised a lot of Hideo Kojimas games for me. The family dynamic and historical events he experienced growing up have played a huge part in the storytelling of his works. Reading about his fathers passing and how it influenced how he raised his own children is a massive part of the emotional connection I felt while playing Death Stranding. How language is an integral part of his cultural identity is at the core of Metal Gear Solid V. He often uses big action set pieces in h This book has re-contextualised a lot of Hideo Kojimas games for me. The family dynamic and historical events he experienced growing up have played a huge part in the storytelling of his works. Reading about his fathers passing and how it influenced how he raised his own children is a massive part of the emotional connection I felt while playing Death Stranding. How language is an integral part of his cultural identity is at the core of Metal Gear Solid V. He often uses big action set pieces in his games to lure us in and then deliver a rich and often emotional story. That’s not to say he always nails it, but the heart is always there, no matter how big the cheese. Death Stranding is his best game, and one of the bast games I’ve ever played. This isn’t a review of Death Stranding but it feels like the culmination of everything he talks about in this series of essays so it’s worth mentioning. My personal experience of playing Death Stranding is different to the experience of others. However, the people I know that have enjoyed it the most, myself included, all share one specific trait. I’m not going to say what that trait is as to not potentially taint or spoil anyone else’s experience, I think going into it with an open mind and a welcoming heart is absolutely essential. This book stands alone as a series of highly interesting essays about books and movies written by a guy with an interesting upbringing and a deep knowledge of popular culture. If you’re like me and have played a good number of his games, it is a Rosetta Stone.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nicolaj

    This was a fun little read. Essentially, it’s a collection of various book and movie essays Hideo Kojima, director of the Metal Gear series and Death Stranding, have written for magazines circa 2007 – 2013. That may not seem like much, but a few things stood out to me. Most notable are his own personal stories for everything. He writes of how books helped him cope with the early death of his father, raising his children or coming to terms with himself, some of which can be quite touching. Elsewh This was a fun little read. Essentially, it’s a collection of various book and movie essays Hideo Kojima, director of the Metal Gear series and Death Stranding, have written for magazines circa 2007 – 2013. That may not seem like much, but a few things stood out to me. Most notable are his own personal stories for everything. He writes of how books helped him cope with the early death of his father, raising his children or coming to terms with himself, some of which can be quite touching. Elsewhere, he writes about feeling safe while listening to Joy Division or how the moon landing motivated him to pursue previously thought impossible dreams. Also, for an essay collection, it’s surprisingly coherent to the overall theme of “Memes” … the term as coined by Richard Dawkins (ideas can spread to others through words, speech, etc.) that is. In this way, “The Creative Gene” is about how books, movies and music passes along ideas, information (etc.) to people, that either inspires them or helps them get through whatever situation they find themselves in life. It's odd to read an autobiography that is almost entirely read as media recommendations, but Kojima makes it work better than it has any right to. Also, plus points for Kojima for once being short and straight to the point, which isn't something he's always good at.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nelson

    The Creative Gene by Hideo Kojima turned out to be a lot more inspiring to me than I expected. I went in looking for a collection of essays of a random assortment of topics that inspired one of my favorite game developers. What I got was a bit more of personal philosophies, illuminating perspectives, and inspiration that I think can be applied to any creative type, truly. I found myself speeding through this book, but savoring it too. Kojima brings a very down to earth perspective, showing a lot The Creative Gene by Hideo Kojima turned out to be a lot more inspiring to me than I expected. I went in looking for a collection of essays of a random assortment of topics that inspired one of my favorite game developers. What I got was a bit more of personal philosophies, illuminating perspectives, and inspiration that I think can be applied to any creative type, truly. I found myself speeding through this book, but savoring it too. Kojima brings a very down to earth perspective, showing a lot of himself but also allowing a glimpse into one of many creative processes. But I found it to be a lot more than that. It was almost someone showing their soul and their loves and their interests. It is just an outpouring of such a thing and that...that is special to do that. It takes a lot to share it with friends, let alone potentially thousands, if not millions, of strangers and it's special to see and to read that. It may come off as random and esoteric at times, but I feel that these are truly important to this creator and as one myself, I found it immensely valuable and freeing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shadow Steve

    "A World without books is inconceivable" - Hideo Kojima Have you played Metal Gear & Death Stranding? Hideo Kojima is an absolute genius when it comes to making his own games by watching various pop culture shows movies listens to music even reading books. He must be a pop culture icon The Creative Gene helps me learn what I need to know about Hideo Kojima even though it'll be difficult for me to remember but it'll help you learn on how he made Metal Gear and Death Stranding and his writing is tru "A World without books is inconceivable" - Hideo Kojima Have you played Metal Gear & Death Stranding? Hideo Kojima is an absolute genius when it comes to making his own games by watching various pop culture shows movies listens to music even reading books. He must be a pop culture icon The Creative Gene helps me learn what I need to know about Hideo Kojima even though it'll be difficult for me to remember but it'll help you learn on how he made Metal Gear and Death Stranding and his writing is truly incredible... even though it's translated If you're a huge Kojima fan or just enjoyed the games or just into pop culture The Creative Gene is a must read This review is dedicated to my Insta gaming brother @retro.gamer.guy for being my inspiration to get into Kojima games based on his posts back in 2019 & to all you guys and girls for supporting me on social media while i share my passionate love for games books and tokusatsu

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

    This is not the book I want from Kojima. The book I want would be about his life especially about his time at Konami and designing various games. I would especially love insight into his last couple years at Konami, however this book is an interesting read and does provide some insight into who Hideo Kojima is. The majority of the book is Kojima's thoughts on various pieces or creators of media. He talks about where he was when he first consumed them, important events (both personal and public) This is not the book I want from Kojima. The book I want would be about his life especially about his time at Konami and designing various games. I would especially love insight into his last couple years at Konami, however this book is an interesting read and does provide some insight into who Hideo Kojima is. The majority of the book is Kojima's thoughts on various pieces or creators of media. He talks about where he was when he first consumed them, important events (both personal and public) that made him revisit them, and what they mean to him. You begin to get a picture of who Kojima is through these essays, the unfortunate thing is it isn't as deep as I would like to go. If you love Hideo Kojima and would be interested in adding some stuff to your to read, to watch, and to listen to lists this is worth a look. He made a lot of the media sound very interesting and I added most of them to my lists.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Trasky

    I'm not a huge critical thinker. I also love Hideo Kojima's works and his outlook on life. It is fair to say this book really struck a chord with me. My score reflects how this book made me feel, rather than how 'quality' it may be (which is also subjective). I'm not often a reader, however this book has inspired me to seek out more literature and other types of media, and how this connects us. Though this is arguably the only real problem with the book; as much as I could listen to or read Koji I'm not a huge critical thinker. I also love Hideo Kojima's works and his outlook on life. It is fair to say this book really struck a chord with me. My score reflects how this book made me feel, rather than how 'quality' it may be (which is also subjective). I'm not often a reader, however this book has inspired me to seek out more literature and other types of media, and how this connects us. Though this is arguably the only real problem with the book; as much as I could listen to or read Kojima waffle on about things he loves and why, it also makes me wish I was engaging with that piece of media instead, so I could then share this experience with him. I am forever grateful for the impact his works have had on me, and I now think its time to seek out the works that have impacted him.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Kisner

    It’s no secret that Kojima is my all time favorite artist, and I had to buy this immediately! It’s basically a collection of his writings on various pieces of media that have made an impression on him over the years covering various novels, manga, films, and music. He’s fantastic at breaking things down, and tucked into his musings are little anecdotes about his past and glimpses into his home life. We have very similar taste, I had already read/seen about 40% of the stuff he talks about! I orde It’s no secret that Kojima is my all time favorite artist, and I had to buy this immediately! It’s basically a collection of his writings on various pieces of media that have made an impression on him over the years covering various novels, manga, films, and music. He’s fantastic at breaking things down, and tucked into his musings are little anecdotes about his past and glimpses into his home life. We have very similar taste, I had already read/seen about 40% of the stuff he talks about! I ordered a bunch of books to add to my reading backlog, which is always a good thing (I LOVE finding out what makes other people tick). If you are a fan of Kojima’s works it’s a great read just to see the inner workings of his mind.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Liam_McG

    If you are a fan of Hideo Kojima, this book is a must. I always cherish any details I can get about the mysterious man and here you get to peak behind the curtain a little into his mind with some insights about his past and how he thinks through essays about different inspirations in his life. This works very well as a list of recommendations and I found myself adding plenty of books to my amazon wishlist based on how Kojima had described them (although I was a bit annoyed that he spoiled a few If you are a fan of Hideo Kojima, this book is a must. I always cherish any details I can get about the mysterious man and here you get to peak behind the curtain a little into his mind with some insights about his past and how he thinks through essays about different inspirations in his life. This works very well as a list of recommendations and I found myself adding plenty of books to my amazon wishlist based on how Kojima had described them (although I was a bit annoyed that he spoiled a few things here and there). If you don't know Hideo then you won't really get anything out of this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Christine Craft

    This was an awesome collection of short essays where Hideo Kojima explores the different media that influenced his personal life, philosophies, and work. It was a great read and I greatly enjoyed reading his musings on books, films, manga, T.V shows, and music that ended up being significant to him. The best part of this collection is that you'll get some great recommendations to check out for yourself. If you're a fan of Hideo Kojima, I would highly recommend this book if you're curious to lear This was an awesome collection of short essays where Hideo Kojima explores the different media that influenced his personal life, philosophies, and work. It was a great read and I greatly enjoyed reading his musings on books, films, manga, T.V shows, and music that ended up being significant to him. The best part of this collection is that you'll get some great recommendations to check out for yourself. If you're a fan of Hideo Kojima, I would highly recommend this book if you're curious to learn about Hideo Kojima through his media consumption.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amir Benhaida

    What a bummer, this book is a cash grab. Nothing more, nothing less. A bunch of articles written through the last decade by the famous game developer hideo kojima. He writes about books, movies, paintings, games and we are intended to be amazed by that I guess ? I should write a book about my grocerie stores adventures, how I vanquish my fear of spending money. And a book about how sophisticated I am when I get up from bed and get to work in time. Boring, self indulgent book. Not worth your time What a bummer, this book is a cash grab. Nothing more, nothing less. A bunch of articles written through the last decade by the famous game developer hideo kojima. He writes about books, movies, paintings, games and we are intended to be amazed by that I guess ? I should write a book about my grocerie stores adventures, how I vanquish my fear of spending money. And a book about how sophisticated I am when I get up from bed and get to work in time. Boring, self indulgent book. Not worth your time or your money. Stay away!

  29. 5 out of 5

    David Portnov

    The Creative Gene is a translation/compilation of essays by Hideo Kojima on his relationship with specific pieces of media and media that he enjoyed at specific times in his life. I found a lot of the essays to be pretty inspiring and they really help the reader get to know Kojima as a person. It's probably his most personal writing to date. If you're at all interested in what makes Kojima's brain tick or who he is as a person, this is the book for you. If you don't know who Hideo Kojima is, the The Creative Gene is a translation/compilation of essays by Hideo Kojima on his relationship with specific pieces of media and media that he enjoyed at specific times in his life. I found a lot of the essays to be pretty inspiring and they really help the reader get to know Kojima as a person. It's probably his most personal writing to date. If you're at all interested in what makes Kojima's brain tick or who he is as a person, this is the book for you. If you don't know who Hideo Kojima is, then you will by the end of the book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jake Roblez

    Short essays from one of my favorite creative minds. The book goes over his thoughts on other books, movies, music, media, philosophy, etc... Several of discussed entries have been added to read and watch lists. The introduction, which is the best part of this novel, opened my eyes to a new world in regard to how reading effects us. If you are a super Kojima fan, this is essential reading. If you are simply curious, at least check out the forward. 1 thumb up.

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