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Between the Lines

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With vibrant art that shifts to a colorless world and back again, this is a story of a community lost and rediscovered—and how one child’s actions can cascade into something that makes all the difference. A young boy who loves his community notices that as neighbors stop interacting, the colors around them slowly fade. Then a thunderstorm sweeps away the last hints of blueb With vibrant art that shifts to a colorless world and back again, this is a story of a community lost and rediscovered—and how one child’s actions can cascade into something that makes all the difference. A young boy who loves his community notices that as neighbors stop interacting, the colors around them slowly fade. Then a thunderstorm sweeps away the last hints of bluebird skies and lemon-Popsicle days and leaves a rift in the road that doesn’t get fixed. As the adults around him move on, the boy dreams of the way life once was. He decides that he doesn’t want to live in a world without color, so he sets out to change things…


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With vibrant art that shifts to a colorless world and back again, this is a story of a community lost and rediscovered—and how one child’s actions can cascade into something that makes all the difference. A young boy who loves his community notices that as neighbors stop interacting, the colors around them slowly fade. Then a thunderstorm sweeps away the last hints of blueb With vibrant art that shifts to a colorless world and back again, this is a story of a community lost and rediscovered—and how one child’s actions can cascade into something that makes all the difference. A young boy who loves his community notices that as neighbors stop interacting, the colors around them slowly fade. Then a thunderstorm sweeps away the last hints of bluebird skies and lemon-Popsicle days and leaves a rift in the road that doesn’t get fixed. As the adults around him move on, the boy dreams of the way life once was. He decides that he doesn’t want to live in a world without color, so he sets out to change things…

30 review for Between the Lines

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    An okay story. Why did the colors disappear? The rain/lightning? I read it twice and still don't get it. Kindle First (September) An okay story. Why did the colors disappear? The rain/lightning? I read it twice and still don't get it. Kindle First (September)

  2. 5 out of 5

    DivaDiane

    Pretty, but vague The art work is beautiful and detailed, inviting the reader/listeners to explore the illustrations. The story is simple, but IMO a little vague. Neither the text nor the illustrations do an adequate job of explaining why the color drained from the world. Was it the storm? Or was it the mysterious trench that appeared and separate one side of the square from the other? But why? Or was it that the people were separated emotionally/psychologically as well as physically? And was all Pretty, but vague The art work is beautiful and detailed, inviting the reader/listeners to explore the illustrations. The story is simple, but IMO a little vague. Neither the text nor the illustrations do an adequate job of explaining why the color drained from the world. Was it the storm? Or was it the mysterious trench that appeared and separate one side of the square from the other? But why? Or was it that the people were separated emotionally/psychologically as well as physically? And was all it took filling the trench and fixing the road and working together? Received from Amazon First Reads for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kristi

    An interesting take in change. Kindness goes a long way when shared with the world. Rating: G Language: clean read Recommend: yes

  4. 5 out of 5

    Latanya (Crafty Scribbles)

    In this story lies a call to action for young children: Never lose love and care for your community or risk the beautiful color embodying it. Beautiful writing matched with lovely illustrations and a message for the hearts in need of sharing. 4/5

  5. 4 out of 5

    Wayne Sung

    SPOILER WARNING I bought this with my Amazon Prime First Reads discount. I loved the message this book was trying to convey but I didn't feel it conveyed it clearly. The narrator was fitting, a boy in the community who had loved playing with the other kids but got cut off after a big disaster. His character was the only solid piece of the story, I think. The pictures fit in their chalky picture book even street art feel in both color and black and white. I loved the two-page spreads, especially the SPOILER WARNING I bought this with my Amazon Prime First Reads discount. I loved the message this book was trying to convey but I didn't feel it conveyed it clearly. The narrator was fitting, a boy in the community who had loved playing with the other kids but got cut off after a big disaster. His character was the only solid piece of the story, I think. The pictures fit in their chalky picture book even street art feel in both color and black and white. I loved the two-page spreads, especially the lightning piece. But that was coupled by mixed feelings of having to rotate the book in order to see some of them in the right orientation. It breaks the flow somewhat. The plot and world building could use some work unfortunately, because I really wanted to like this book. I get that the community was losing its color but only the synopsis said that it was due to people not interacting with each other. The book text only said the people were too busy to notice the colors were fading. Then there was no real explanation as to why a thunderstorm would wash out all the color in one fell swoop. At first, I thought it was due to the rain but overall I would think rain should have happened before and later when the rain returned it didn’t wash out anything. In fact, the color came back after the rain. I personally think as impressive as the lightning storm was, it probably shouldn’t have been part of the story. It stole the story’s thunder, if you will, by having me at least feel the cause of the color drain was the storm, not the non-interaction of the community. In fact, I only saw details of the non-interaction as a response to the after-storm color drain which easily makes me forget the mention that color was draining already and maybe (not explicitly stated, mind you) due to the community. And when the second storm came, I thought it would indeed be the villain ruining the boy’s hard work in cleaning up the city (not banding together the citizens). In being worried for the people’s safety and their color drain, I totally missed that the community this time weathered the storm sheltered together instead of their separate houses. But even that didn’t explain to me the text “a whisper. A smile. A laugh burst from the dark.” There was just too little transition time textually to make me pivot from the feeling of dread to laughing together. I loved what came after, how the community of people felt warm together again and I could see the color coming back in the shadowy dawn light. But again the colors came back visually after the rain, further misleading me to feel it was the rain that caused the color changes. It would have helped the message of the story more if the colors had started to come back gradually as they were all cleaning up together. (Like the cover, actually. So why didn’t the interior art use that? Now it’s just misleading and somewhat like false advertising.) The boy could have said “Hey look, everyone! It’s working! Let’s keep going and we’ll bring back the color!” But no, the color didn’t come back until after the rain. I felt instead of filling between the lines, I had to read between the lines too much. The overall message of bringing back the community camaraderie is sound but the execution was way too unclear for me to appreciate the story as it should be appreciated.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Robert Rogers

    Beautiful children's book that we adults need to read and heed! A parable of our times. Beautiful children's book that we adults need to read and heed! A parable of our times.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Melki

    Though the book features gorgeous illustrations by the author, the story is a little confusing. The words tell of how the colors are washed away by a thunderstorm, but the artwork hints that a rift between the citizens may be the real cause. Now it's up to one little boy to somehow fix everything. ? It's sure a pretty book, anyway . . . Though the book features gorgeous illustrations by the author, the story is a little confusing. The words tell of how the colors are washed away by a thunderstorm, but the artwork hints that a rift between the citizens may be the real cause. Now it's up to one little boy to somehow fix everything. ? It's sure a pretty book, anyway . . .

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cynda

    The words and imagery are not as clearly connected as I would like. The heart energy is the right place. Read for Dewey's 24-Hour Readaton October 2021. The words and imagery are not as clearly connected as I would like. The heart energy is the right place. Read for Dewey's 24-Hour Readaton October 2021.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Duncan Wilson

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Nice illustrations with a positive message.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. I absolutely loved the illustrations in this children's book. They are beautiful! I love the idea of transitioning from color to black and white, then back again based on choices, and encouraging young readers that their choices can have an important impact on the world. However, I felt that the story was a bit lacking and could have had more about what went wrong, why it went wrong, and how what the little boy did helped the community. I realize it' I received this book as a Goodreads Giveaway. I absolutely loved the illustrations in this children's book. They are beautiful! I love the idea of transitioning from color to black and white, then back again based on choices, and encouraging young readers that their choices can have an important impact on the world. However, I felt that the story was a bit lacking and could have had more about what went wrong, why it went wrong, and how what the little boy did helped the community. I realize it's a children's book and meant to be simple, but I thought the story could have benefited from a few extra pages or sentences to really give more meaning to it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alex Baugh

    It all begins on a busy, diverse city street, when a young boy and his friend begin to notice that the colors and sounds of everyday life are beginning to fade. No one else seems to notice the colors fading and the sounds dimming until one night there was a wild, violent storm. The next day, almost all the color is gone and there is a deep rift separating one side of the street from the other, thus separating the boy from his friend. At first, people question what happened, but soon they just be It all begins on a busy, diverse city street, when a young boy and his friend begin to notice that the colors and sounds of everyday life are beginning to fade. No one else seems to notice the colors fading and the sounds dimming until one night there was a wild, violent storm. The next day, almost all the color is gone and there is a deep rift separating one side of the street from the other, thus separating the boy from his friend. At first, people question what happened, but soon they just begin to accept it and get one with their now colorless lives. Time goes by - a week, a month, a year. But the young boy can't forget his friend and at night, he dreams of how colorful it used to be on his street - "...rust redbrick roads bathed in ripe, orange mornings. Lemon Popsicle yellow melting, sticky sweet. Freshly cut green against bluebird skies. And a sea of stars sprinkled on velvet purple nights." Then one night, there are no more dreams, the young boy has forgotten the colors. There is only one thing left for him to do - But, can one young boy make a difference and do what no one else has tried to do - bring his friends and neighbors together again to work as a team and bring back the colors? You bet he can and does. How does he do it, you might ask. Well, just read the book to discover the answer and maybe find a little inspiration to change something you think needs to be done. Between the Lines is a concept book that can be read in so many different ways for so many different age groups. Whether you see it as a metaphor for COVID-19 or for climate change or even for the divisiveness of the country right now, or if you just see it as a book about bringing people together, one thing stands firm - it just takes one person, even a child, to bring about change and to make a difference. I wasn't sure about the aging for this book, the idea seemed a little to old for 4-and 5-year-olds to really grasp. So I decided to read it to my young readers (average age 4, and English isn't their first language). I read it once, and then we talked about it, then read it again. They liked it, and it understood it at its most basic level. I think slightly older kids will pick up the nuances more than younger readers and making this a book they can grow with. As with all of Lindsay Ward's books, the digitally created artwork for this one is wonderful, ranging from bright, springlike pastels to images that resemble white chalk on a blackboard and back to colorful again. The street is full of friendly diverse children and adults, happily involved in different activities that are then captured in all their confusion, isolation, and sadness when their street is divided and color is lost. Between the Lines is definitely a book to be shared and talked about. This book was gratefully received from Barbara Fisch at Blue Slip Media

  12. 5 out of 5

    Baby Bookworm

    This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily! Hello, friends! Our book today is Between the Lines by Lindsay Ward, a story about the importance of community. In a vibrant, diverse city neighborhood, the young boy who serves as narrator remembers when the colors were swept away from their street. They began fading slowly; then, after a violent storm one night, the neighborhood awoke the next morning to find that all the color had washed away This review was originally written for The Baby Bookworm. Visit us for new picture books reviews daily! Hello, friends! Our book today is Between the Lines by Lindsay Ward, a story about the importance of community. In a vibrant, diverse city neighborhood, the young boy who serves as narrator remembers when the colors were swept away from their street. They began fading slowly; then, after a violent storm one night, the neighborhood awoke the next morning to find that all the color had washed away entirely, and a great rift in the street had divided it right through the center. Time passes, and the colors never return. The boys dreams of them, but they begin to fade even from his memories and dreams. Finally, the boy decides something must be done – and if no one else will do it, he’ll just have to do it himself. Slightly vague but still beautiful. The metaphors that the absent colors represent may be a little dense for younger readers; it took me some pondering to arrive at what I think the fading/reappearing colors and the rift were supposed to represent, and I’m still not 100% sure. However, the greater themes of togetherness and teamwork are more readily understood, and still create a stirring story about how initiative and working together can heal problems within communities. The artwork shines, using the literal lack of color to great effect; for instance, a spread where the boy dreams of color after he (and the reader) have been deprived of it for so long is a powerful jolt. The length is great for a storytime, and JJ loved the intricate art and creative layouts, as well as the story’s message. This one is definitely worth the read; it may require a little consideration afterwards, but it’s a subject worth considering. Overall, Baby Bookworm approved! (Note: A copy of this book was provided to The Baby Bookworm by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.) Be sure to check out The Baby Bookworm for more reviews!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Charlie K Bales

    Perfect for reading to granddaughters (grandchildren) in person or via video chat! 📹 I bought this book to share long distance with my granddaughters. The reviews were good and I agree, the artwork is awesome how it follows the narrative. The narrative is amazingly wonderful and built to grow with the child. A story that at a young age let's the parents focus on colors and shapes, and as the child matures on love, friends and inclusion. So well done. My biggest issue was reading it on my Kindle Fi Perfect for reading to granddaughters (grandchildren) in person or via video chat! 📹 I bought this book to share long distance with my granddaughters. The reviews were good and I agree, the artwork is awesome how it follows the narrative. The narrative is amazingly wonderful and built to grow with the child. A story that at a young age let's the parents focus on colors and shapes, and as the child matures on love, friends and inclusion. So well done. My biggest issue was reading it on my Kindle Fire 7 9th Edition (2019). When I opened it the image was small and double tapping in the center as instructed didn't enlarge the image. It made reading the text impossible. I went to the Aa menu offered and found only the ability to adjust the "Turn Pages with Volume Controls", "About This Book" and brightness controls under the heading "more". In order to read the book on my Kindle Fire 7 9th Edition (2019) I turned off my lock which kept my screen`s orientation in portrait and set my screen to landscape and locked it. For the 1 or 2 pages in portrait in the story it's easy enough to just turn the whole Kindle to read them. I also read the book 📖 on my Samsung Galaxy Tab A 8" 2019 using the latest version of the Kindle app. When I opened the book I again was told the same reading instructions. Again, double tapping didn't enlarge the image, but it did give me access to the Aa menu. This time I was presented with not only the "more" menu, but the "Layout" menu which allowed me to easily set the screen to landscape and then lock the screen again so reading the book in full-screen was easily done. I hope this review helps others. Outside of the technical issues, I found this book to be a great resource for reading to my two granddaughters, ages 5 and 3 years old. I video conference with them, since we live in separate states, so a story with both a great narrative and amazing art is required. Five thumbs up from this grandmother!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This book is truly a wonder. Beginning with the cover, then the end pages and then the story itself, I was completely enthralled. I’m a huge fan of color and this book is all about color, but it’s also about a diverse neighborhood full of people who played together, chatted together and simply enjoyed each other, until life slowly began to change. Everyone was so busy and so caught up in their own lives, they began to forget about their neighbors. No more waving hello, no more meeting for ice cr This book is truly a wonder. Beginning with the cover, then the end pages and then the story itself, I was completely enthralled. I’m a huge fan of color and this book is all about color, but it’s also about a diverse neighborhood full of people who played together, chatted together and simply enjoyed each other, until life slowly began to change. Everyone was so busy and so caught up in their own lives, they began to forget about their neighbors. No more waving hello, no more meeting for ice cream, no more playing in the park together. Unfortunately though, no one seemed to notice how the neighborhood was slowly fading away and becoming divided except for one young boy. Every night he dreamed about the disappearing colors and the sadness in the streets, until one night he didn’t. That’s the morning he awakened determined to be the one who brought back the color and repaired the division between his neighbors. Soon, his enthusiasm and hard work motivated others to pitch in, to help bring back the color and to repair the divide so that once again “laughter and love spilled out… filling the space between the lines” This story warmed my heart. First, I loved seeing the everyday joy and diversity in this city neighborhood. There are no divisions between neighbors, no concerns about differences; they simply enjoy each other. Then, once the joy disappeared, I loved the little boy’s determination to bring it back. This is a book to read and discuss with your children, ages 4+. It’s one that will prompt many different thoughts and questions each time it’s shared. It’s out today!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Stacie

    A young boy begins to notice the color, the joy, leaving his community. It’s subtle and the adults don’t seem to notice. Then a thunderstorm comes and takes away the last hint of color, leaving the community hurt, angry, and distanced from each other. “…rust redbrick roads bathed in ripe, orange mornings. Lemon Popsicle yellow melting, sticky and sweet. Freshly cut green against bluebird skies. And a sea of stars sprinkled on velvet purple nights.” Even though the concept of the story may be difficult A young boy begins to notice the color, the joy, leaving his community. It’s subtle and the adults don’t seem to notice. Then a thunderstorm comes and takes away the last hint of color, leaving the community hurt, angry, and distanced from each other. “…rust redbrick roads bathed in ripe, orange mornings. Lemon Popsicle yellow melting, sticky and sweet. Freshly cut green against bluebird skies. And a sea of stars sprinkled on velvet purple nights.” Even though the concept of the story may be difficult for the younger readers to understand, they will notice how the illustrations go from vibrant colors to black and white and grayscale. They will notice the people on the pages go from happy to sad and stand away from each other. They will feel the sadness on the pages. The young boy misses the colors of his community and the smiles and laughter on the streets and sidewalks. When he no longer dreams in color, he takes it upon himself to sweep away the darkness and replace it with joy. Soon others come out to join him and then…the rains returned and there was laughter again. Lindsay Ward is a prolific children’s author and illustrator that knows how to make children laugh. She often shares stories of friendship, helping others, and inclusion. Her newest story uses poetic prose about a difficult topic to remind all of us that hiding away from others isn’t the way to live. Step out into your community, smile and greet others, help keep your neighborhood looking beautiful, and most of all be kind to each other. Thanks to Ward for the nudge we all need right now.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    The narrator, a young boy, realizes that the colors are fading from his vibrant neighborhood as the residents start avoiding one another and isolating themselves in small, familiar pockets. Worried that the colors he loved so much are gone forever, even from his dreams, the boy decides to take action and begins cleaning up the debris on the streets, trying to heal what's broken. Slowly, other residents join him, bringing color back to the area. The digital artwork features full-color pages befor The narrator, a young boy, realizes that the colors are fading from his vibrant neighborhood as the residents start avoiding one another and isolating themselves in small, familiar pockets. Worried that the colors he loved so much are gone forever, even from his dreams, the boy decides to take action and begins cleaning up the debris on the streets, trying to heal what's broken. Slowly, other residents join him, bringing color back to the area. The digital artwork features full-color pages before the storm arrives and somehow fractures connections among the residents, leaving behind a community that is divided and pages that are filled with grayscale drawings, providing stark evidence of how bleak the world is without those rich colors. After the residents band together and weather yet another storm, the colors return to the area. This picture book serves as a colorful (and colorless) reminder that one individual can make a difference and that we have a lot more in common that we think we do. If we all pull together, we can accomplish great things. For some reason, the book made me think about how divided our nation seems to be when it comes to certain issues and approaches to problems. It could serve as an example to individuals on both sides of the political fence.

  17. 5 out of 5

    ElizrdbthSpeaks

    i got this as a my "kindle first" for September. what an amazing read. i wonder if they will make it a coloring book. gorgeous illustrations. i understand the point immediately. 43 yrs young. i know when i was a young kid my Mom would read to me ... so i truly want and wish for little ones to find great reads as well ... thank you Reading Rainbow "LeVar Burton" for making my life about reading. it was always so exciting to see what book he or all the little ones on the show would tell you about. i got this as a my "kindle first" for September. what an amazing read. i wonder if they will make it a coloring book. gorgeous illustrations. i understand the point immediately. 43 yrs young. i know when i was a young kid my Mom would read to me ... so i truly want and wish for little ones to find great reads as well ... thank you Reading Rainbow "LeVar Burton" for making my life about reading. it was always so exciting to see what book he or all the little ones on the show would tell you about. kids of all sorts, style, coming together to celebrate, READING!! reading is great. and i hope more kids will enjoy that hobby as well. racism ... i knew the point. when you close your heart you miss so much. open your heart, mind and learning to grow and understand. listen. see every one ... use you ears and listen ... be open. I think having a hand held book instead of a kindle (so you can enjoy the illustrations up and close and personal. what fun!!) like i did read it on ... would be so much more exciting and great for your little one. a great gift. giftable.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    This is a book that requires multiple readings before making any judgment. My daughter and I read it and she was delighted to follow along, mostly interested in discovering when the colors would return. My initial reaction was that it was a nice book overall. But when I took the time to read it to myself and really take time with it, I understood the metaphor of the story. The distance that has been created between neighbors and friends over the past couple of years has drained the color from ou This is a book that requires multiple readings before making any judgment. My daughter and I read it and she was delighted to follow along, mostly interested in discovering when the colors would return. My initial reaction was that it was a nice book overall. But when I took the time to read it to myself and really take time with it, I understood the metaphor of the story. The distance that has been created between neighbors and friends over the past couple of years has drained the color from our world in a way that feels impossible to fix. The "lines" have been drawn between people of different groups, ideologies, races, and so on. This book feels like a balm to that pain and offers hope that one day we'll feel joy together again.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    The stunning illustrations in this lovely book use color in brilliant ways. Revolving around a young boys efforts to revitalize his neighborhood, the color seeps out of the illustrations after a devastating storm. As weeks go by the boy and his friend wait for the community to recover. But when a lot of time goes by and the playground and road remain broken the boy takes matters into his own hands and sets out to repair the damage. The digital illustrations combine black and white line drawings The stunning illustrations in this lovely book use color in brilliant ways. Revolving around a young boys efforts to revitalize his neighborhood, the color seeps out of the illustrations after a devastating storm. As weeks go by the boy and his friend wait for the community to recover. But when a lot of time goes by and the playground and road remain broken the boy takes matters into his own hands and sets out to repair the damage. The digital illustrations combine black and white line drawings with stunning full color spreads to highlight the changes in this neighborhood. With several book turn (you have to turn the book to see them properly) pages the book offers much to talk about and admire as well as a powerful message about one person making a difference. Highly recommended.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ericka

    Excellent Book for the 2020s Reviewed in the United States on September 5, 2021 With everything going on from 2020 onward children will sense trouble and that's where this book comes in. It shows a neighborhood torn asunder and then brought back together by the main character. It will help kids understand some of the rifts and gives them clues on repairing them without specifically mentioning current events. This can give children a feeling of power and really improve things when they feel powerle Excellent Book for the 2020s Reviewed in the United States on September 5, 2021 With everything going on from 2020 onward children will sense trouble and that's where this book comes in. It shows a neighborhood torn asunder and then brought back together by the main character. It will help kids understand some of the rifts and gives them clues on repairing them without specifically mentioning current events. This can give children a feeling of power and really improve things when they feel powerless.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gabriella

    Beautiful illustrations! 4.5* A beautiful book that tells the story of a street that lost the colour and life in the street which by working together and by being strong grew back and were stronger than ever! The symbolism in this book can be seen in so many different things it is easily transferable to so many situations that are tearing society apart at the moment. Well written. The formatting changes from landscape to portrait in a few places makes it harder to read due to the multiple turns o Beautiful illustrations! 4.5* A beautiful book that tells the story of a street that lost the colour and life in the street which by working together and by being strong grew back and were stronger than ever! The symbolism in this book can be seen in so many different things it is easily transferable to so many situations that are tearing society apart at the moment. Well written. The formatting changes from landscape to portrait in a few places makes it harder to read due to the multiple turns of the iPad but still a fun book.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    Like many, I had to reread this book multiple times to get even a glimmer of what the author was thinking about that caused the colors to vanish. Was the event some instance that happened in the community that split the neighbors and caused it to be destroyed? I get that everyone working together and caring again brought back the colors. The artwork is amazing, but it is not something kids would really understand or ultimately care about. It is something that would require a lot of discussion on Like many, I had to reread this book multiple times to get even a glimmer of what the author was thinking about that caused the colors to vanish. Was the event some instance that happened in the community that split the neighbors and caused it to be destroyed? I get that everyone working together and caring again brought back the colors. The artwork is amazing, but it is not something kids would really understand or ultimately care about. It is something that would require a lot of discussion on the part of the adult to have with the child to even begin to understand what happened.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Hammelef

    This is another creative and "outside the box" picture book by this talented author/illustrator. I enjoyed the universal theme of not only wanting to make things better for all, but stepping up and taking action. One person can make a difference and inspire others to do their part too. The metaphor of loss of color symbolizing loss of society caring for each other is one of the best I've ever encountered. Bravo! Highly recommended! This is another creative and "outside the box" picture book by this talented author/illustrator. I enjoyed the universal theme of not only wanting to make things better for all, but stepping up and taking action. One person can make a difference and inspire others to do their part too. The metaphor of loss of color symbolizing loss of society caring for each other is one of the best I've ever encountered. Bravo! Highly recommended!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Sturm

    This is a Children's book I received as part of a Goodreads giveaway. It is a wonderful book about community and isolation vs. inclusion. It's lesson is applicable in many issues in life where there is division or exclusion. It may also have special meaning for children who have been experiencing isolation due to the pandemic. I will be gifting it this year to some children special in my life that I want to grow up being as inclusive as possible. This is a Children's book I received as part of a Goodreads giveaway. It is a wonderful book about community and isolation vs. inclusion. It's lesson is applicable in many issues in life where there is division or exclusion. It may also have special meaning for children who have been experiencing isolation due to the pandemic. I will be gifting it this year to some children special in my life that I want to grow up being as inclusive as possible.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Christine Titus

    I like the way this book is set up. It is not like any of the other children's books I've read before, making it quite unique. The illustrations are a big part in telling this story of a community that loses its color and how they overcome this problem. It's a great book to share with children when talking about team work as well as how the power of one person, even a child, can make a huge difference. I like the way this book is set up. It is not like any of the other children's books I've read before, making it quite unique. The illustrations are a big part in telling this story of a community that loses its color and how they overcome this problem. It's a great book to share with children when talking about team work as well as how the power of one person, even a child, can make a huge difference.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Opetoritse

    The main attraction here is certainly the innovative illustration, namely the spectacular use of color and detailed line work, which are also central to the plot. The story itself is a bit too ambiguous with its underlying themes of race relations and community activism for them to land as solidly as one would like, but it's engaging nonetheless, and a few passages rival the illustrations in the vibrance of the language. The main attraction here is certainly the innovative illustration, namely the spectacular use of color and detailed line work, which are also central to the plot. The story itself is a bit too ambiguous with its underlying themes of race relations and community activism for them to land as solidly as one would like, but it's engaging nonetheless, and a few passages rival the illustrations in the vibrance of the language.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jude

    Lovely story about what can be gained by working together I loved the inclusiveness of all the people in this story and how one person can change the course of things. It's a simple story about how people working together can make a difference when things are changed for the worse, proving that each positive effort made by everyone can benefit society as a whole. Lovely story about what can be gained by working together I loved the inclusiveness of all the people in this story and how one person can change the course of things. It's a simple story about how people working together can make a difference when things are changed for the worse, proving that each positive effort made by everyone can benefit society as a whole.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Didn't quite understand it The illustrations are really bright and good. I'm a master's prepared librarian and I didn't understand anything about the storyline. I'll admit that I'm not a children's librarian. My specialty is medical. Maybe that's why I just did not get this one. Also the print is too fine. It's difficult to read in a story time setting. Didn't quite understand it The illustrations are really bright and good. I'm a master's prepared librarian and I didn't understand anything about the storyline. I'll admit that I'm not a children's librarian. My specialty is medical. Maybe that's why I just did not get this one. Also the print is too fine. It's difficult to read in a story time setting.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Said

    Cute story and illustrations and amazing imagination The story is cute and illustrations are very nice. I assume color is used metaphorically for joy / happiness but even if it's not, I really liked the author's imagination and how nice messages are included in a subtle way (such as how the kids start cleaning the streets). I think this would be a great read for kids. Cute story and illustrations and amazing imagination The story is cute and illustrations are very nice. I assume color is used metaphorically for joy / happiness but even if it's not, I really liked the author's imagination and how nice messages are included in a subtle way (such as how the kids start cleaning the streets). I think this would be a great read for kids.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Chipman

    Cute. Sweet. A community divided and friendships fell silent. The little boy and girl want to play together again, so they started cleaning and repairing. The neighborhood started helping. After they survived the rain together, the color and sound was back as they were back together. Nice metaphor.

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