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Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs: 100 Discoveries That Changed the World

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Blending high adventure with history, this chronicle of 100 astonishing discoveries from the Dead Sea Scrolls to the fabulous "Lost City of the Monkey God" tells incredible stories of how explorers and archaeologists have uncovered the clues that illuminate our past. Archaeology is the key that unlocks our deepest history. Ruined cities, golden treasures, cryptic inscriptio Blending high adventure with history, this chronicle of 100 astonishing discoveries from the Dead Sea Scrolls to the fabulous "Lost City of the Monkey God" tells incredible stories of how explorers and archaeologists have uncovered the clues that illuminate our past. Archaeology is the key that unlocks our deepest history. Ruined cities, golden treasures, cryptic inscriptions, and ornate tombs have been found across the world, and yet these artifacts of ages past often raised more questions than answers. But with the emergence of archaeology as a scientific discipline in the 19th century, everything changed. Illustrated with dazzling photographs, this enlightening narrative tells the story of human civilization through 100 key expeditions, spanning six continents and more than three million years of history. Each account relies on firsthand reports from explorers, antiquarians, and scientists as they crack secret codes, evade looters and political suppression, fall in love, commit a litany of blunders, and uncover ancient curses. Pivotal discoveries include: King Tut's tomb of treasure Terracotta warriors escorting China's first emperor into the afterlife The glorious Anglo-Saxon treasure of Sutton-Hoo Graves of the Scythians, the real Amazon warrior women New findings on the grim fate of the colonists of Jamestown With a foreword from bestselling author Douglas Preston, Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs is an expertly curated and breath-taking panorama of the human journey.


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Blending high adventure with history, this chronicle of 100 astonishing discoveries from the Dead Sea Scrolls to the fabulous "Lost City of the Monkey God" tells incredible stories of how explorers and archaeologists have uncovered the clues that illuminate our past. Archaeology is the key that unlocks our deepest history. Ruined cities, golden treasures, cryptic inscriptio Blending high adventure with history, this chronicle of 100 astonishing discoveries from the Dead Sea Scrolls to the fabulous "Lost City of the Monkey God" tells incredible stories of how explorers and archaeologists have uncovered the clues that illuminate our past. Archaeology is the key that unlocks our deepest history. Ruined cities, golden treasures, cryptic inscriptions, and ornate tombs have been found across the world, and yet these artifacts of ages past often raised more questions than answers. But with the emergence of archaeology as a scientific discipline in the 19th century, everything changed. Illustrated with dazzling photographs, this enlightening narrative tells the story of human civilization through 100 key expeditions, spanning six continents and more than three million years of history. Each account relies on firsthand reports from explorers, antiquarians, and scientists as they crack secret codes, evade looters and political suppression, fall in love, commit a litany of blunders, and uncover ancient curses. Pivotal discoveries include: King Tut's tomb of treasure Terracotta warriors escorting China's first emperor into the afterlife The glorious Anglo-Saxon treasure of Sutton-Hoo Graves of the Scythians, the real Amazon warrior women New findings on the grim fate of the colonists of Jamestown With a foreword from bestselling author Douglas Preston, Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs is an expertly curated and breath-taking panorama of the human journey.

30 review for Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs: 100 Discoveries That Changed the World

  1. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Any history buff would adore this book. I learned so much about so many different civilizations, lost cities and treasures, and their cultural significance. Sure, there were some that were familiar, like King Tut and Stonehenge, but many more that I knew nothing about, especially in the New World. I didn’t realize there was scant (if any) archeological proof that the biblical kings David and Solomon existed. Each city or tomb is presented in 4-6 page bite-sized chunks with lovely photos. It’s ch Any history buff would adore this book. I learned so much about so many different civilizations, lost cities and treasures, and their cultural significance. Sure, there were some that were familiar, like King Tut and Stonehenge, but many more that I knew nothing about, especially in the New World. I didn’t realize there was scant (if any) archeological proof that the biblical kings David and Solomon existed. Each city or tomb is presented in 4-6 page bite-sized chunks with lovely photos. It’s chronological, starting from the most ancient to the most recent and everything from shipwrecks to mummies to caches of gold are offered. It’s really an archeological delight, and I highly recommend it to anyone who has ever had Indiana Jones aspirations. I received a complimentary copy of this book via TLC Book Tours.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Andrej

    An encyclopedia of famous archaeological sites, ordered chronologically from footprints of an Australopithecus to the Titanic. Each short chapter describes briefly the circumstances of the find, the culture that produced the site, and why the site is important or interesting. The book is well written and comprehensive in scope, but don't expect much detail. An encyclopedia of famous archaeological sites, ordered chronologically from footprints of an Australopithecus to the Titanic. Each short chapter describes briefly the circumstances of the find, the culture that produced the site, and why the site is important or interesting. The book is well written and comprehensive in scope, but don't expect much detail.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    A good summary and introduction to many fascinating archeological finds. As an avid reader of National Geographic and Smithsonian over the years, as a way to feed my interest in the field, many of these short pieces were on digs I was fairly familiar with, though more-recent discoveries and advances in scientific applications delivered quite a few surprises and good information. They failed, however, to make note of my second-grade dig on Edgewater Island near Charleston, probably because I didn A good summary and introduction to many fascinating archeological finds. As an avid reader of National Geographic and Smithsonian over the years, as a way to feed my interest in the field, many of these short pieces were on digs I was fairly familiar with, though more-recent discoveries and advances in scientific applications delivered quite a few surprises and good information. They failed, however, to make note of my second-grade dig on Edgewater Island near Charleston, probably because I didn't publish my paltry findings. The saddest thing about many of these stories is the amount of knowledge lost to the world because of looters. I would love to see some of these collections and sites. I have visited a few, and I can stand there and watch the process almost as if I am in a trance. Some of the best lectures I have heard are from field archeologists explaining what they were doing and what they were finding. Probably the best thing this collection can do is inspire future archaeologists. It seemed that the work relied heavily on NG. I wish there had been a few more pictures of the finds, but that can easily be remedied by looking up the different collections of finds online, which I have actually been doing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Santiago Endara

    A well researched chronological account of the most relevant archaeological discoveries, from the first hominids to the Titanic. Each discovery is recounted in around 4 pages. Some of the facts I was surprised to discover reading this book: 1) Most ancient tombs have been already looted throughout the ages and archaeologists are either finding what is left by looters or if they are really lucky, an unopened one. 2) New technologies are considerably helping in discovering archaeological sites. Suc A well researched chronological account of the most relevant archaeological discoveries, from the first hominids to the Titanic. Each discovery is recounted in around 4 pages. Some of the facts I was surprised to discover reading this book: 1) Most ancient tombs have been already looted throughout the ages and archaeologists are either finding what is left by looters or if they are really lucky, an unopened one. 2) New technologies are considerably helping in discovering archaeological sites. Such technologies are among others, satellite images, devices that can analyze the composition of the underground soil, DNA testing, etc. 3) With the help of new technologies, spectacular archaeological discoveries are still possible in our times. I think that the chapters in this book were written by different people, so I found some accounts better written than others and therefore, more appealing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    Very Western-centric. About half-way through and only a handful of sites after the human evolution centre were outside the Western World. Do no recommend.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Audrey H

    Not for me. More of a coffee table book than a piece of nonfiction - there are 100 small chapters that range across various ancient tombs and archeological sites. I flipped through this, but I'm not interested in reading from cover to cover. Not for me. More of a coffee table book than a piece of nonfiction - there are 100 small chapters that range across various ancient tombs and archeological sites. I flipped through this, but I'm not interested in reading from cover to cover.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leah Cossette

    An amazing look at some of the great archeological discoveries of history. Though my personal favorites were the lost cities and ancient tombs mentioned in the title, the entries range from prehistory to the Titanic. My only complaint is that I wish there had been more. Because there are 100 entries, each item receives only a few pages. Kid me would have loved paging through this book, but adult me wants to know a little more about every single discovery.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Do you love histories mysteries or know of someone that does? Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs is the perfect book for any history lover. This new book from National Geographic is a large hardcover book that chronicles “100 discoveries that changed the world.” The book covers the time period from 3.6 million years ago from bones of our ancestors like Lucy to almost present day with the finding of the Titanic. Each section tells the story of a great archaeological discovery along with fantastic pictures Do you love histories mysteries or know of someone that does? Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs is the perfect book for any history lover. This new book from National Geographic is a large hardcover book that chronicles “100 discoveries that changed the world.” The book covers the time period from 3.6 million years ago from bones of our ancestors like Lucy to almost present day with the finding of the Titanic. Each section tells the story of a great archaeological discovery along with fantastic pictures. From the legend of Troy, to the search for King David, to the disappearance of the H.L. Hunley, this book tells the story of some of histories greatest mysteries and how they were discovered by explorers or archaeologists. I enjoyed that this book covered great finds from all over the world throughout our entire history. It’s up to date with more current finds. I knew some of the discovers, but not most. It is a very intriguing book to read. I’ve always loved these types of discoveries. Reading about them makes me feel like Indiana Jones from the comfort of my own home. I liked that the book had a great introduction and afterward. In the afterward, there was also a list of prospects that may hold more surprises from the Great Wall of China to the unknown tomb of Alexander the Great. A section is also included on current technologies that are used to discover the past such as aerial imager and ground penetrating radar. A good index is also included. I love indexes and I am always happy when they are included in a history book. Overall, Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs is a fascinating look into one hundred great discoveries that help us to learn about our history. It’s a great book for history and archaeology lovers or those who would like to learn more. Book Source: Review Copy from Hachette Book Group as part of the TLC Book Tour. Thank-you! I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own. This review was first posted on my blog at: https://lauragerold.blogspot.com/2021...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Booksoverhoes

    Większość z tego, co obecnie wiemy o przeszłości, ewolucji człowieka i zalążkach cywilizacji - ktoś kiedyś musiał odkryć. Odkopać w ruinach miast, które dawno zaginęły w mrokach historii, powoli, warstwa po warstwie zdejmować pędzelkiem kurz dziejów ze starożytnych artefaktów, odcyfrowywać niezrozumiałe manuskrypty, podążać w głąb dżungli za starymi legendami. I o tym właśnie jest ta książka. Niektóre z przedstawionych tu odkryć są bardzo znane (jak grobowiec Tutenchamona albo terakotowa armia), Większość z tego, co obecnie wiemy o przeszłości, ewolucji człowieka i zalążkach cywilizacji - ktoś kiedyś musiał odkryć. Odkopać w ruinach miast, które dawno zaginęły w mrokach historii, powoli, warstwa po warstwie zdejmować pędzelkiem kurz dziejów ze starożytnych artefaktów, odcyfrowywać niezrozumiałe manuskrypty, podążać w głąb dżungli za starymi legendami. I o tym właśnie jest ta książka. Niektóre z przedstawionych tu odkryć są bardzo znane (jak grobowiec Tutenchamona albo terakotowa armia), jednak z wieloma z nich spotkałam się po raz pierwszy. A nawet te najbardziej rozpoznawalne pomniki historii zostały przedstawione w nieoczywisty sposób - na przykład zamiast skupiać się na piramidach, autorzy mówili o realiach życia ludzi, którzy je zbudowali! I tak oto całe cywilizacje, kultury i budowle minionych tysiącleci, o których nigdy wcześniej nie słyszałam, wyłaniały się ze stron tej książki - tak samo, jak wcześniej z mroków historii wydobywali je archeolodzy. Polecam zaopatrzyć się podczas czytania w mapę, żeby móc śledzić tereny, na których powstawały i upadały kolejne kultury. Polecam też dawkować sobie lekturę, bo nie jest to książka, którą się połyka, a raczej chłonie. Kocham pozycje z cyklu National Geographic - zachwycają od strony wizualnej, są kopalniami ciekawych informacji i za każdym razem poruszają tematy, które niezwykle mnie interesują. Ale mam z nimi jeden przeogromny problem - jest w nich sporo błędów. Tu niepoprawny szyk zdania, tam dziwna składnia, z jednej strony atakują nas powtórzenia, z drugiej źle odmienione wyrazy, błędna kolejność przymiotników, albo w ogóle nieodpowiednio użyte słowa. Wspominałam o tym już przy "Pytaniach z kosmosu" i, choć tym razem było trochę lepiej, dalej niesamowicie mnie to raziło. Czasem brakowało mi też wyjaśnienia pewnych terminów.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ManOfLaBook.com

    For more reviews and bookish posts visit: https://www.ManOfLaBook.com Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs: 100 Discoveries That Changed the World edited by Ann R. Williams tells of fantastic discoveries which helped us understand our past. Ms. Williams is a writer and archaeologist from Washing, DC. I had a really good time flipping through Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs: 100 Discoveries That Changed the World. Each one of the many sections of this book is altogether short, 3-5 pages including pictures. The ad For more reviews and bookish posts visit: https://www.ManOfLaBook.com Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs: 100 Discoveries That Changed the World edited by Ann R. Williams tells of fantastic discoveries which helped us understand our past. Ms. Williams is a writer and archaeologist from Washing, DC. I had a really good time flipping through Lost Cities, Ancient Tombs: 100 Discoveries That Changed the World. Each one of the many sections of this book is altogether short, 3-5 pages including pictures. The advantage of this format is that you can basically go to sections you’re interested in, and skip others. From the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, to Machu Picchu in Peru, and on to Jamestown in Virginia, Tel Dan in Israel, as well as many others. All fascinating, all worth more than one visit, and certainly all deserve to be in books such as this. I discovered that I was in in 10-15 places the book mentions, not including the King Tut exhibit in Philadelphia. Being in a place gives one a different viewpoint, then just reading about it. Luckily, several others are within reach (long weekends) and I certainly intend to make the voyage – time, work, school, and family permitting. I’m sure the stars will align at some point, even though it might take some time. Besides enjoying the sections about places I’ve been to (and, indeed, wish I would have read them before going), there are several other wonderful places that I either always wanted to go to, or discovered in this book. The pyramids in Egypt, Petra in Jordan, as well as Mesa Verde in Colorado just to name a few.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lizabeth Tucker

    A collection of "100 Discoveries That Changed the World" as the subtitle states. Divided into chapters covering certain period of times that were essential in the development of humans and civilizations. Then there are sub-chapters, so to speak, that focus on more specific finds, from the first steps of humankind to the discovery of the Titanic. Much has changed over the centuries both with the development of technology and the change in attitudes over the way important discoveries are handled, b A collection of "100 Discoveries That Changed the World" as the subtitle states. Divided into chapters covering certain period of times that were essential in the development of humans and civilizations. Then there are sub-chapters, so to speak, that focus on more specific finds, from the first steps of humankind to the discovery of the Titanic. Much has changed over the centuries both with the development of technology and the change in attitudes over the way important discoveries are handled, both culturally and in regards to the items taken. A little bit of this is reflected in this book as well. This is one very chunky book, but a great way to lightly explore some of the most important archaeological finds of humankind. This is really better suited to someone wanting a light overview or perhaps searching for the next topic they can find a more detailed account of, whether in book or video form. There is no real age restriction on this book. In fact, I think this would be perfect for middle school readers who are discovering the fascination of archaeology and anthropology. 4 out of 5.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    A fantastic, fascinating read detailing 100 discoveries across the world that has helped us understand our history. The book is packed full of known and unknown civilizations from Romans and Incas to little known groups in Cambodia and Zimbabwe. The book is divided into several chunks focusing on a time period from 10000BC to the sinking of the Titanic. What I found kost interesting was the new cultures and little known ones that piqued my interest and it took me a while to read and finish this A fantastic, fascinating read detailing 100 discoveries across the world that has helped us understand our history. The book is packed full of known and unknown civilizations from Romans and Incas to little known groups in Cambodia and Zimbabwe. The book is divided into several chunks focusing on a time period from 10000BC to the sinking of the Titanic. What I found kost interesting was the new cultures and little known ones that piqued my interest and it took me a while to read and finish this book because I would stop to Google to see the places like the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, said to be Jesus resting place. Another interesting part of the book is the afterword which details a few parts of discovery ongoing along with modern techniques that are being used in archaeology and may change or enhance our understanding of our past and what we think we know. A high quality and engrossing book, perfect for general readers and history buffs. I read on kindle but I will be getting a copy for my shelves too.

  13. 4 out of 5

    R.

    3 stars, strictly following this website's ratings guidance; i.e., "liked it" but didn't love it. * Understandable that describing 100 important archaeological discoveries into a single volume necessarily requires brevity. * However, 3-4 pages per discovery inevitably feels like short shrift for some if not many entries. Perhaps it is better to regard this book as a starter's guide to (mostly western) archaeology. * The writing itself is adequate, but not particularly inspiring, given the historica 3 stars, strictly following this website's ratings guidance; i.e., "liked it" but didn't love it. * Understandable that describing 100 important archaeological discoveries into a single volume necessarily requires brevity. * However, 3-4 pages per discovery inevitably feels like short shrift for some if not many entries. Perhaps it is better to regard this book as a starter's guide to (mostly western) archaeology. * The writing itself is adequate, but not particularly inspiring, given the historical importance ascribed to the contents, and actually begins to feel repetitive if too many entries are read consecutively. * While acknowledging the book length of ~500 pages, it also felt strange for a National Geographic publication to offer no maps and only one photograph per discovery. To misquote, when it comes to subject matter of this sort, "show, don't just tell." * Enjoyed flipping through it and reading some of it, but definitely wished for more in many ways, particularly visually and geographically.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rangga Sukmawijaya

    Seratus penemuan penting yang pernah terjadi di bidang arkeologi diceritakan secara singkat-singkat di buku ini. Masing-masing hanya sekitar tiga sampai empat halaman. Disusun berdasarkan usia temuan (bukan kronologi peristiwa penemuan), buku ini dimulai dari penemuan jejak kaki di Tanzania yang berusia 3,6 juta tahun dan ditutup dengan penemuan bangkai kapal Titanic yang tenggelam di tahun 1912. Inilah penemuan-penemuan yang banyak menginspirasi kisah-kisah petualangan di sejarah literasi dunia Seratus penemuan penting yang pernah terjadi di bidang arkeologi diceritakan secara singkat-singkat di buku ini. Masing-masing hanya sekitar tiga sampai empat halaman. Disusun berdasarkan usia temuan (bukan kronologi peristiwa penemuan), buku ini dimulai dari penemuan jejak kaki di Tanzania yang berusia 3,6 juta tahun dan ditutup dengan penemuan bangkai kapal Titanic yang tenggelam di tahun 1912. Inilah penemuan-penemuan yang banyak menginspirasi kisah-kisah petualangan di sejarah literasi dunia. Di dua belas bab, kita diajak berpetualang bersama para arkeolog, dengan berbagai peralatan mereka, dan kesulitan-kesulitan yang mereka hadapi dalam usaha mereka mengungkapkan kehidupan masa lalu manusia.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Westen

    A nice kind of round-up of some of the most stunning archeological discoveries in the world. If you're a history buff, like I am, then you might find the beginning a bit boring. The book goes in chronological order, so much of the beginning covers the familiar discoveries in Egypt and Mesopotamia and you've been reading about since middle school. I love that the Sutton Hoo burial, the Oseberg Ship, and Cahokia all made the list. A nice kind of round-up of some of the most stunning archeological discoveries in the world. If you're a history buff, like I am, then you might find the beginning a bit boring. The book goes in chronological order, so much of the beginning covers the familiar discoveries in Egypt and Mesopotamia and you've been reading about since middle school. I love that the Sutton Hoo burial, the Oseberg Ship, and Cahokia all made the list.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Linda Brunner

    Confirmation that there are many mysterious about our magnificent world yet to be discovered. And that we really know so very little about the many layers of time and culture that have preceded us. Tantalizing.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Donald Yann

    Good summaries of archeological finds.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Matylda Saresta

    https://mniejniz0minirecenzje.blogspo... https://mniejniz0minirecenzje.blogspo...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Leonard

    Quick, easy and interesting read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nikolai Atanasov

    Стоте най-важни архелогически открития в света. От останките на австралопитеци до Титаник.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

  22. 4 out of 5

    Min

  23. 4 out of 5

    Nabel2

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Potts

  25. 4 out of 5

    Cheri Amarna

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jennie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lois Merritt

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  30. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

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