Hot Best Seller

The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland

Availability: Ready to download

Ireland has long been regarded as a 'land of saints and scholars'. Yet the Irish experience of Christianity has never been simple or uncomplicated. The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland describes the emergence, long dominance, sudden division, and recent decline of Ireland's most important religion, as a way of telling the history of the island and its peoples. Througho Ireland has long been regarded as a 'land of saints and scholars'. Yet the Irish experience of Christianity has never been simple or uncomplicated. The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland describes the emergence, long dominance, sudden division, and recent decline of Ireland's most important religion, as a way of telling the history of the island and its peoples. Throughout its long history, Christianity in Ireland has lurched from crisis to crisis. Surviving the hostility of earlier religious cultures and the depredations of Vikings, evolving in the face of Gregorian reformation in the 11th and 12th centuries and more radical protestant renewal from the 16th century, Christianity has shaped in foundational ways how the Irish have understood themselves and their place in the world. And the Irish have shaped Christianity, too. Their churches have staffed some of the religion's most important institutions and developed some of its most popular ideas. But the Irish church, like the island, is divided. After 1922, a border marked out two jurisdictions with competing religious politics. The southern state turned to the Catholic church to shape its social mores, until it emerged from an experience of sudden-onset secularization to become one of the most progressive nations in Europe. The northern state moved more slowly beyond the protestant culture of its principal institutions, but in a similar direction of travel. In 2021, fifteen hundred years on from the birth of Saint Columba, Christian Ireland appears to be vanishing. But its critics need not relax any more than believers ought to despair. After the failure of several varieties of religious nationalism, what looks like irredeemable failure might actually be a second chance. In the ruins of the church, new Columbas and Patricks shape the rise of another Christian Ireland.


Compare

Ireland has long been regarded as a 'land of saints and scholars'. Yet the Irish experience of Christianity has never been simple or uncomplicated. The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland describes the emergence, long dominance, sudden division, and recent decline of Ireland's most important religion, as a way of telling the history of the island and its peoples. Througho Ireland has long been regarded as a 'land of saints and scholars'. Yet the Irish experience of Christianity has never been simple or uncomplicated. The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland describes the emergence, long dominance, sudden division, and recent decline of Ireland's most important religion, as a way of telling the history of the island and its peoples. Throughout its long history, Christianity in Ireland has lurched from crisis to crisis. Surviving the hostility of earlier religious cultures and the depredations of Vikings, evolving in the face of Gregorian reformation in the 11th and 12th centuries and more radical protestant renewal from the 16th century, Christianity has shaped in foundational ways how the Irish have understood themselves and their place in the world. And the Irish have shaped Christianity, too. Their churches have staffed some of the religion's most important institutions and developed some of its most popular ideas. But the Irish church, like the island, is divided. After 1922, a border marked out two jurisdictions with competing religious politics. The southern state turned to the Catholic church to shape its social mores, until it emerged from an experience of sudden-onset secularization to become one of the most progressive nations in Europe. The northern state moved more slowly beyond the protestant culture of its principal institutions, but in a similar direction of travel. In 2021, fifteen hundred years on from the birth of Saint Columba, Christian Ireland appears to be vanishing. But its critics need not relax any more than believers ought to despair. After the failure of several varieties of religious nationalism, what looks like irredeemable failure might actually be a second chance. In the ruins of the church, new Columbas and Patricks shape the rise of another Christian Ireland.

37 review for The Rise and Fall of Christian Ireland

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kim Shay

    I was a little worried in the first part of the book that this was going to be a volume that put all the blame on religious crisis on the Catholic Church in Ireland. Knowing that the author is protestant, a few of his comments about the penal laws in Ireland gave me a moment's pause. However, Gribben finished this book powerfully in his discussion of the religious changes brought on by the Troubles, their end, the rapid secularization of the Republic, and the stagnation of religious life in the I was a little worried in the first part of the book that this was going to be a volume that put all the blame on religious crisis on the Catholic Church in Ireland. Knowing that the author is protestant, a few of his comments about the penal laws in Ireland gave me a moment's pause. However, Gribben finished this book powerfully in his discussion of the religious changes brought on by the Troubles, their end, the rapid secularization of the Republic, and the stagnation of religious life in the North. This last chapter was the strongest, in my opinion. Gribben's comment in the final chapter was dead on: "To the extent that the Catholic and protestant churches attempted to dominate and control the people on the island, they undermined Christian faith." American evangelicals and conservative evangelicals ought to take a lesson from Ireland: religious nationalism is destined to fail. I found it interesting that some of the hyper-conservative Catholic practices which were part of Ireland in DeValera's era sounded a lot like what conservative evangelicals attempt to do: control the population with moralism. The revelations of clerical abuse which rocked Ireland in the 90's is now finding its own expression in US evangelical churches. Protestant or Catholic, church abuse is church abuse, and it's about power, not doctrine. All in all, this was an excellent read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    A fascinating, thought provoking and well researched book. We know about Ireland as country where Catholicism impacted the development, where people was persecuted, and is disappearing now. The book cover a very long timeframe and there's a lot of discussions about the relationship between christianity and political power. I appreciated the whole book but I think that the last chapter is the most interesting as it talks about future. Highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for A fascinating, thought provoking and well researched book. We know about Ireland as country where Catholicism impacted the development, where people was persecuted, and is disappearing now. The book cover a very long timeframe and there's a lot of discussions about the relationship between christianity and political power. I appreciated the whole book but I think that the last chapter is the most interesting as it talks about future. Highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim Chambers

    I didn’t fancy this book to much and found it very boring picking up somewhat in the second half as it moved into more modern times. It could just as easily have been called The Rise and Fall of Catholic Ireland.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jana Byars

  5. 5 out of 5

    Clémence Power

  6. 4 out of 5

    Charles Roche

  7. 5 out of 5

    Peter Blair

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Kelso

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  11. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Kane

  12. 4 out of 5

    Clovis Mackintosh

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shawn

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Knowles

  15. 5 out of 5

    Luis A.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Eva

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gailey

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anuga

  19. 5 out of 5

    Zach McDonald

  20. 4 out of 5

    Aidan McGuire

  21. 5 out of 5

    Craig Mccullough

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zach Hollifield

  23. 5 out of 5

    James Ritchey

  24. 4 out of 5

    Grant

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  26. 4 out of 5

    Peter Newman

  27. 4 out of 5

    Russell

  28. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Fitzpatrick

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cathal

  30. 4 out of 5

    Övgü Ülgen

  31. 5 out of 5

    Marcás

  32. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  33. 5 out of 5

    Risteárd Caomhánach

  34. 4 out of 5

    alectmpl

  35. 5 out of 5

    Adam Marischuk

  36. 4 out of 5

    Joost Nixon

  37. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Mitchell

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...