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The Fever Poems

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“These poems know a great deal about beauty and violence: ‘twenty years / was about as much good as / circling / a black eye’. Kylie Gellatly shows us what vividness is, how it lives in our shapes, our pain, our imaginary (and real) selves: ‘man taken / to be a trench / that might have been a cannon ball’. This poetry composes musics with silences. It is both a song and wh “These poems know a great deal about beauty and violence: ‘twenty years / was about as much good as / circling / a black eye’. Kylie Gellatly shows us what vividness is, how it lives in our shapes, our pain, our imaginary (and real) selves: ‘man taken / to be a trench / that might have been a cannon ball’. This poetry composes musics with silences. It is both a song and whisper, an erasure and exhalation. It is both a journey across us, and inward: ‘the ship was the rib of reason / […] the ship was beginning to be an alarm / the ship was right there on the floor while this book was written.’ Herein history is envious of a dreamscape. And yet: the dream aspires to be dailiness, and fears it. Which is to say: this is a book of fevers the likes of which you feel most familiar with, yet have not seen before. Recognize yourself in them.” –Ilya Kaminsky, author of Deaf Republic “Musical and deeply felt, these poems—untitled and running wild—chase down the heart. No tangible space is without the immaterial here. The Elements are resilient, and I feel pushed and pulled by them. Gellatly’s debut book is beautiful, haunted and mystical. Her poems are like ‘the strange contrast between death and dawn,’ and ‘the fool’s divine spark / forever coming loose’ in the reader’s hands.” –Bianca Stone, author of The Möbius Strip Club of Grief “In Kylie Gellatly‘s The Fever Poems, water is silk that rubs against the night. Events are figments of the speaker’s imagination and graves shape time. Extremely contemporary in their fixation on illness, isolation, and anxiety, these poems spill down and across the page like slate off a cliffside. There is an unwavering generosity to the introspection of this speaker: through her eyes, floating ash becomes ‘hundreds of baled papers, bent up like two bears dancing.’ This is a collection that understands and beautifully, painfully relays that what we have—with each other, with the land—is ‘the last of the last.’” –Taneum Bambrick , author of Vantage “‘I was sore at heart,’ writes Kylie Gellatly in The Fever Poems, and the reader is invited into a sprawling, curious, visionary, deeply empathetic, epic debut. Her poems shine goldly in the space between elemental earth—salt, rock, wind, weather—and the human, conscious choice of living. With echoes of Jorie Graham and W. S. Merwin, Gellatly navigates the complexities of language, ‘a pledge made / into paper / weathered / in our hands,’ ‘choked with the monsters of parentheses’. This is a collection for our time of pandemic, uncertainty, and an urgent need for a revision of our relationship with the natural world—Gellatly recognizes the swinging pendulum of power between the earth’s force and human interference, and, without castigation, illuminates us.” –Jenny Molberg, author of Refusal “Kylie Gellatly’s The Fever works like a ship, navigating the tempests of our fragile moment. The poems enact a wandering/wondering through fire and fog, investigating meaning through a naturalist’s lens, balancing an elemental pull with the fierce heat of being human. This collection is an invitation to a sensorial meditation, one where fever is less a symptom of sickness than a door to discovery.” –Erin Adair-Hodges, author of Let’s All Die Happy “Through such repetitive assertions about both captive and liberator, the speaker acts as a ceremonial guide to her own spectrality. How does one fall apart and come back together? What does it mean to insistently personify one’s own interiority as a ship, as the poet does in a collage at the end of the book: "the ship was an off-year stripped bare" and "the ship was beginning to be an alarm"? What feels radical about this book is its insistence that everything, even our sadness, can be externalized and mapped out into the wild, and be brought back home, too.What feels radical about this book is its insistence that everything, even our sadness, can be externalized and mapped out into the wild, and be brought back home, too.” — Megan Fernandes, Poetry Foundation “There’s an attunement to the natural world, its rhythms, pains, and opportunities for transcendence. An urgency defines the collection; Gellatly, who lives in Western Mass and is a Frances Perkins Scholar at Mount Holyoke, draws our attention again and again to the limits of time: “but even / sound is an unbroken expanse / among / the greater taking — / of time and fever and nothing more.” A tension rings through these poems, too, the discomfort of being separate, the fear and alarm that comes from not knowing what will come next. “The return of the sun / has aroused a feeling / akin to birdskin badly bitten.” — Nina MacLaughlin, The Boston Globe “The part of me that feels different after reading The Fever Poems is the part of me that feels seen. Not the logic-brain part. Not the ego-brain part. The part that knows grief is somatic—that it has a vibration, that it's a frequency living in the spine. The part that knows dimensions aren't cut and dry. The part that knows memory is a place the way a fish tank is a place; that memory is a sinking ship; that memory is [redacted].” — Audrey Gidman, DIAGRAM


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“These poems know a great deal about beauty and violence: ‘twenty years / was about as much good as / circling / a black eye’. Kylie Gellatly shows us what vividness is, how it lives in our shapes, our pain, our imaginary (and real) selves: ‘man taken / to be a trench / that might have been a cannon ball’. This poetry composes musics with silences. It is both a song and wh “These poems know a great deal about beauty and violence: ‘twenty years / was about as much good as / circling / a black eye’. Kylie Gellatly shows us what vividness is, how it lives in our shapes, our pain, our imaginary (and real) selves: ‘man taken / to be a trench / that might have been a cannon ball’. This poetry composes musics with silences. It is both a song and whisper, an erasure and exhalation. It is both a journey across us, and inward: ‘the ship was the rib of reason / […] the ship was beginning to be an alarm / the ship was right there on the floor while this book was written.’ Herein history is envious of a dreamscape. And yet: the dream aspires to be dailiness, and fears it. Which is to say: this is a book of fevers the likes of which you feel most familiar with, yet have not seen before. Recognize yourself in them.” –Ilya Kaminsky, author of Deaf Republic “Musical and deeply felt, these poems—untitled and running wild—chase down the heart. No tangible space is without the immaterial here. The Elements are resilient, and I feel pushed and pulled by them. Gellatly’s debut book is beautiful, haunted and mystical. Her poems are like ‘the strange contrast between death and dawn,’ and ‘the fool’s divine spark / forever coming loose’ in the reader’s hands.” –Bianca Stone, author of The Möbius Strip Club of Grief “In Kylie Gellatly‘s The Fever Poems, water is silk that rubs against the night. Events are figments of the speaker’s imagination and graves shape time. Extremely contemporary in their fixation on illness, isolation, and anxiety, these poems spill down and across the page like slate off a cliffside. There is an unwavering generosity to the introspection of this speaker: through her eyes, floating ash becomes ‘hundreds of baled papers, bent up like two bears dancing.’ This is a collection that understands and beautifully, painfully relays that what we have—with each other, with the land—is ‘the last of the last.’” –Taneum Bambrick , author of Vantage “‘I was sore at heart,’ writes Kylie Gellatly in The Fever Poems, and the reader is invited into a sprawling, curious, visionary, deeply empathetic, epic debut. Her poems shine goldly in the space between elemental earth—salt, rock, wind, weather—and the human, conscious choice of living. With echoes of Jorie Graham and W. S. Merwin, Gellatly navigates the complexities of language, ‘a pledge made / into paper / weathered / in our hands,’ ‘choked with the monsters of parentheses’. This is a collection for our time of pandemic, uncertainty, and an urgent need for a revision of our relationship with the natural world—Gellatly recognizes the swinging pendulum of power between the earth’s force and human interference, and, without castigation, illuminates us.” –Jenny Molberg, author of Refusal “Kylie Gellatly’s The Fever works like a ship, navigating the tempests of our fragile moment. The poems enact a wandering/wondering through fire and fog, investigating meaning through a naturalist’s lens, balancing an elemental pull with the fierce heat of being human. This collection is an invitation to a sensorial meditation, one where fever is less a symptom of sickness than a door to discovery.” –Erin Adair-Hodges, author of Let’s All Die Happy “Through such repetitive assertions about both captive and liberator, the speaker acts as a ceremonial guide to her own spectrality. How does one fall apart and come back together? What does it mean to insistently personify one’s own interiority as a ship, as the poet does in a collage at the end of the book: "the ship was an off-year stripped bare" and "the ship was beginning to be an alarm"? What feels radical about this book is its insistence that everything, even our sadness, can be externalized and mapped out into the wild, and be brought back home, too.What feels radical about this book is its insistence that everything, even our sadness, can be externalized and mapped out into the wild, and be brought back home, too.” — Megan Fernandes, Poetry Foundation “There’s an attunement to the natural world, its rhythms, pains, and opportunities for transcendence. An urgency defines the collection; Gellatly, who lives in Western Mass and is a Frances Perkins Scholar at Mount Holyoke, draws our attention again and again to the limits of time: “but even / sound is an unbroken expanse / among / the greater taking — / of time and fever and nothing more.” A tension rings through these poems, too, the discomfort of being separate, the fear and alarm that comes from not knowing what will come next. “The return of the sun / has aroused a feeling / akin to birdskin badly bitten.” — Nina MacLaughlin, The Boston Globe “The part of me that feels different after reading The Fever Poems is the part of me that feels seen. Not the logic-brain part. Not the ego-brain part. The part that knows grief is somatic—that it has a vibration, that it's a frequency living in the spine. The part that knows dimensions aren't cut and dry. The part that knows memory is a place the way a fish tank is a place; that memory is a sinking ship; that memory is [redacted].” — Audrey Gidman, DIAGRAM

29 review for The Fever Poems

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Stunning found visual poetry, using an explorer's arctic diary as a source text. Stunning found visual poetry, using an explorer's arctic diary as a source text.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca Valley

    Gellatly’s debut collection is a stunning lyrical feat, a book of found poetry that becomes an entirely new world, though it uses only borrowed language. Gellatly’s poems talk about love and survival and the pressing fear of fever, and her visual poems are also works of art. More forthcoming at www.readdrizzle.blog. Gellatly’s debut collection is a stunning lyrical feat, a book of found poetry that becomes an entirely new world, though it uses only borrowed language. Gellatly’s poems talk about love and survival and the pressing fear of fever, and her visual poems are also works of art. More forthcoming at www.readdrizzle.blog.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ash Nicholson

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aleah Larsen

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Hassinger

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dennis Sweeney

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hayden Arp

  10. 5 out of 5

    julie

  11. 4 out of 5

    Casey

  12. 4 out of 5

    Anna Maria

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kim Gellatly

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amelia Scarponi

  16. 4 out of 5

    Prateek Joshi

  17. 5 out of 5

    Devin

  18. 5 out of 5

    Pomme

  19. 5 out of 5

    Holly

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yoby

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mezza

  22. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  23. 4 out of 5

    Greenbean Barnacle

  24. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

  25. 4 out of 5

    Eva Township

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cebo Cele

  27. 4 out of 5

    Grace

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aikomo

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

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