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Destroy All Monsters: A Reckless Book

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The next book in the red-hot Reckless series is here! Bestselling crime noir masters Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips bring us a new original graphic novel starring troublemaker-for-hire Ethan Reckless. It's 1988 and Ethan has been hired for his strangest case yet: finding the secrets of a Los Angeles real estate mogul. How hard could that be, right? Only what starts as a deep The next book in the red-hot Reckless series is here! Bestselling crime noir masters Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips bring us a new original graphic novel starring troublemaker-for-hire Ethan Reckless. It's 1988 and Ethan has been hired for his strangest case yet: finding the secrets of a Los Angeles real estate mogul. How hard could that be, right? Only what starts as a deep dive into the life of a stranger will soon take a deadly turn, and find Ethan risking everything that still matters to him. Another smash hit from the award-winning creators of RECKLESS, PULP, MY HEROES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN JUNKIES, CRIMINAL, and KILL OR BE KILLED —and a must-have for all Brubaker and Phillips fans!


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The next book in the red-hot Reckless series is here! Bestselling crime noir masters Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips bring us a new original graphic novel starring troublemaker-for-hire Ethan Reckless. It's 1988 and Ethan has been hired for his strangest case yet: finding the secrets of a Los Angeles real estate mogul. How hard could that be, right? Only what starts as a deep The next book in the red-hot Reckless series is here! Bestselling crime noir masters Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips bring us a new original graphic novel starring troublemaker-for-hire Ethan Reckless. It's 1988 and Ethan has been hired for his strangest case yet: finding the secrets of a Los Angeles real estate mogul. How hard could that be, right? Only what starts as a deep dive into the life of a stranger will soon take a deadly turn, and find Ethan risking everything that still matters to him. Another smash hit from the award-winning creators of RECKLESS, PULP, MY HEROES HAVE ALWAYS BEEN JUNKIES, CRIMINAL, and KILL OR BE KILLED —and a must-have for all Brubaker and Phillips fans!

30 review for Destroy All Monsters: A Reckless Book

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A councilman, whose dad was involved with a shady developer shortly before dying in suspicious circumstances, wants Ethan Reckless’ help in bringing down said developer. But Ethan will have to do it without his assistant Anna as she’s decided the private investigation game isn’t her bag anymore. It’s the third Reckless book: Destroy All Interest In The Series! Three times turns out to be about two times more than Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips should’ve gone back to the Reckless well - the last b A councilman, whose dad was involved with a shady developer shortly before dying in suspicious circumstances, wants Ethan Reckless’ help in bringing down said developer. But Ethan will have to do it without his assistant Anna as she’s decided the private investigation game isn’t her bag anymore. It’s the third Reckless book: Destroy All Interest In The Series! Three times turns out to be about two times more than Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips should’ve gone back to the Reckless well - the last book was very middling and this third one is unfortunately plain boring. There’s way too much stuff here on Anna, who wasn’t an interesting supporting character and proves to be even less compelling in the spotlight. It was all largely irrelevant guff - she’s leaving, then not leaving, she’s got a new boyfriend, she’s had a falling out with Ethan, blah blah blah. And the main story is equally as forgettable: a cliched “corrupt city officials” storyline that’s remarkable only for being so unimaginative coming from a writer as experienced as Brubaker. As unengaging as this book is, it’s still smoothly-written and Sean Phillips is dependable as always, though none of his pages really stood out as especially memorable, so this is still a well-crafted comic from a technical standpoint. And the Dirty Diaper Caper was an amusing digression. I highly recommend the first Reckless book, which is a banger full of action and fun story, almost exactly the polar opposite of this third snoozer of a book, Destroy All Monsters, which I don’t recommend! Also, is it me or does Ethan on the cover look a lot like a certain ex-president (if they lost the double-chin)…?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Reckless is back! These volumes seem to be coming out trimonthly, and it's quite something to see how the quality never really drops. This book feels like it's more dedicated to character building, the better to pull the rug from under us in future volumes, if the ending is to be believed. What is there left to say? It's Brubaker and Phillips doing Brubaker and Phillips work. By this point, you're either in or you're out. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss) Reckless is back! These volumes seem to be coming out trimonthly, and it's quite something to see how the quality never really drops. This book feels like it's more dedicated to character building, the better to pull the rug from under us in future volumes, if the ending is to be believed. What is there left to say? It's Brubaker and Phillips doing Brubaker and Phillips work. By this point, you're either in or you're out. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Destroy All Monsters is the title of a rock group, and a 1967 kaiju film. I think this is more a reference to the film than the music (though Brubaker likes music as much as old movies), as the literary pop and pulp culture dude and crime comics writer Brubaker keeps us digging in that literary way. What or who are the monsters here? He does research, and expects you to do the same to appreciate his work. As with Alan Moore (but more playfully, as insightfully, but less obsessively than Moore), Destroy All Monsters is the title of a rock group, and a 1967 kaiju film. I think this is more a reference to the film than the music (though Brubaker likes music as much as old movies), as the literary pop and pulp culture dude and crime comics writer Brubaker keeps us digging in that literary way. What or who are the monsters here? He does research, and expects you to do the same to appreciate his work. As with Alan Moore (but more playfully, as insightfully, but less obsessively than Moore), he and artist extraordinaire Sean Phillips thoughtfully urges you to see the layers in every panel. Brubaker says he is trying to make sure the Reckless series is a period piece, and this is 1988, south LA, the decades-abandoned Lynwood neighborhood, so he's done his research on the socio-economic scene there, too. The heart of this particular story is surprisingly sentimental. It’s world-building, coloring in the friendship between Ethan Reckless and Anna. Reckless, a vet, is a kind of fixer. People come to him for jobs they don't want cops to get involved in; they want to find people, sometimes they want revenge. He’s an off-the-grid PI, with his assistant, Anna, who doubles as projectionist at the old movie theater he owns. Usually we get an inventive story, with a couple twists and surprises, but this volume largely focuses on their friendship, two loners coming together over old films. And the work together. She's a little bit girl Friday, she's a little bit Moneypenny, something to ground this wild anti-Bond, this reckless guy. He's 37, feeling old, and she is 20, so he watches over her in her parade of boyfriends. But as the plot thickens, I like seeing the image of Rear Window they watch as they, mirroring the Jimmy Stewart-Grace Kelly duo, try to see whodunnit. He buys her Judy Garland’s Easter Parade for her birthday (now that’s sentimental!). Next book will be crazy violent, I bet, we're being set up for the fall, but this one establishes them as a coupla softies. The actual story is not that memorable, bringing down a corrupt real estate developer, ambitious politicians, though it ties to the larger interest that drives much of Brubaker and Phillips’s work: social and economic and racial justice, as one of the “monsters” in this book is a guy that undermines black and Hispanic businesses, a guy helping create the disaster that is south LA, now neglected for decades. So the primary monster for Brubaker is capitalism, rich guys pulling strings to get what they want. No consequences for their actions. The problem is that when you kill one monster there’s another one waiting to take his place. There’s a suggestion that there’s a white supremacist gang operating within the LA police force. Just ask previous LA crime chroniclers Raymond Chandler and James Ellroy whether they think that is far-fetched. I am sure they would be nodding in approval at Brubaker's mentioning this. They've essentially been saying it all along. Corrupt LA cops can’t catch a break from these crime novelists, thank goodness. I like all the literary/movie/pulp references in this book such as Rear Window, Ethan reading Jim Thompson novels, and one guy, named Runyon, echoes Damon Runyon, a kind of sentimental short story writer of NYC’s down-and-out gamblers and hustlers and petty thieves. Some may see this as just an interlude volume, a set-up for a crazy violent story, as I said, and I think it is, but I thought it was sweet, a change of pace, to show Brubaker's relationship-writing chops. A focus on character. The first of the three Reckless books (so far) is the best, but I think this still showcases the best comics crime writing team ever.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Gorgeous, gritty artwork and an excellent anti-establishment, counter culture kind of Travis McGee type lead character. The story covers a lot of interesting background on Ethan Reckless and his (plutonic) relationship with his partner Anna, providing ample opportunity for some introspection as he wallows in despair, lamenting loss of personal connections in his life. This probably should have been the first volume.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Subham

    Its not the best reckless book but its a fun one and not the best from Ed and Sean. It takes place in the 1980s and tells of the friendship between Ethan and Anna and like how they are growing distant because Anna has got a bf and well other priorities and I love the way they tell the story of Anna and her growing up and all. Plus now they work together on the case of a politician named Issac Presley and how he wants them to take down the guy Gerard Reyner and well the investigation will take the Its not the best reckless book but its a fun one and not the best from Ed and Sean. It takes place in the 1980s and tells of the friendship between Ethan and Anna and like how they are growing distant because Anna has got a bf and well other priorities and I love the way they tell the story of Anna and her growing up and all. Plus now they work together on the case of a politician named Issac Presley and how he wants them to take down the guy Gerard Reyner and well the investigation will take them places and growing closer or distant or the revenge coming back to haunt them and the betrayal and all that forms the backbone of this story and whatever will become of Ethan and Anna. Its a great book for an evening read but storywise not as compelling as the other two but what I like is the momentum of the story and how fast it reads. And I love the evolution of Anna and her inclusion in this story but I would have liked to see some romance between Anna and Ethan.. just having them friends was a disappointment especially considering how close they grew to each other but thats an authors decision. I also liked the social commentary of that era and the conflicts growing at that time and how changes were taking place albeit slowly. The art was good capturing that tone of the late 80s and some references were alright. So yeah good for a one time read!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    A lackluster and half-hearted adventure with an evil real estate developer is tossed in to spice up what really wants to be a character study about the friendship between Ethan Reckless and his assistant Anna. For a guy who claims to be distanced from emotions by an old brain injury, he certainly manages to be petulant and mawkish when Anna begins to drift away from him. I was so happy when I saw this available on Hoopla this afternoon, but now I'm just disappointed and hoping the next one gets t A lackluster and half-hearted adventure with an evil real estate developer is tossed in to spice up what really wants to be a character study about the friendship between Ethan Reckless and his assistant Anna. For a guy who claims to be distanced from emotions by an old brain injury, he certainly manages to be petulant and mawkish when Anna begins to drift away from him. I was so happy when I saw this available on Hoopla this afternoon, but now I'm just disappointed and hoping the next one gets things back on track. (Though the hideous cover previewed here does not bode well.)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Casey

    If I had to be stuck on a delayed train this morning, at least I had a new Reckless book to keep me company. The other reviews so far surprise me a little, but I wonder if it's the introspection and focus on Anna. For me, it was a welcome change of pace to see the vulnerable side of Ethan and the damage that can be done when he trusts. The case was interesting too (for me anyway), especially given the real world research. If I had to be stuck on a delayed train this morning, at least I had a new Reckless book to keep me company. The other reviews so far surprise me a little, but I wonder if it's the introspection and focus on Anna. For me, it was a welcome change of pace to see the vulnerable side of Ethan and the damage that can be done when he trusts. The case was interesting too (for me anyway), especially given the real world research.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    A throw-back to the glory days of pulp fiction I was born to late for, when the best authors would churn out masterworks faster than people could read them. Hopefully they keep it up.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brad Wojak

    This speaks to the part of my soul that loves Rockford Files. Excellent second volume to this series, but could totally be read as a standalone.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Ed Brubaker/Sean Phillips’s third graphic novel to feature their new hero, Ethan Reckless, tells the story of how Ethan met his sidekick, Anna, and how he almost fucked that relationship up. In “Destroy All Monsters”, Reckless is hired by an up-and-coming black councilman who wants him to find dirt on a sleazy real estate developer, which he does, in a big way. Anna, it turns out, is a natural at private investigations, but she quits when Reckless and her get into a fight about her new boyfriend, Ed Brubaker/Sean Phillips’s third graphic novel to feature their new hero, Ethan Reckless, tells the story of how Ethan met his sidekick, Anna, and how he almost fucked that relationship up. In “Destroy All Monsters”, Reckless is hired by an up-and-coming black councilman who wants him to find dirt on a sleazy real estate developer, which he does, in a big way. Anna, it turns out, is a natural at private investigations, but she quits when Reckless and her get into a fight about her new boyfriend, who Reckless thinks is a douchebag. She moves out of the old movie theatre and into an apartment on the other side of the 405, which, apparently, in California, might as well be on the other side of the world. Reckless discovers that he can’t do much without Anna, and Anna starts to realize that Reckless was right about her new boyfriend. Meanwhile, the sleazy real estate developer plans on getting revenge on both of them… Excellent series. Book 4 comes out in April…

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    I grumbled when I saw this was one of the new Image ARCs on Edelweiss; why can't it be the comics I actually like where they keep putting subsequent volumes up for free, instead of the one I only keep reading for the way the art catches the California light? But this is much more satisfying than the first two volumes, with the surf Equalizer material mainly there as a spine for the real story, about change, and loss, and starting to feel old, and how much it sucks when friends leave town (or, in I grumbled when I saw this was one of the new Image ARCs on Edelweiss; why can't it be the comics I actually like where they keep putting subsequent volumes up for free, instead of the one I only keep reading for the way the art catches the California light? But this is much more satisfying than the first two volumes, with the surf Equalizer material mainly there as a spine for the real story, about change, and loss, and starting to feel old, and how much it sucks when friends leave town (or, in the case of a sprawl like LA, just move far enough across it). "I watched a few movies, but I couldn't really pay attention to them. Instead my mind kept going back over all the endings I'd been through in my life. I thought about girlfriends, lovers... Faces and voices lost in time... Then all the houses we lived in when I was young..."

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Back to this series with all of the Brubaker neo-noir. The thing that really stood out to me the most is the different forms of racism. It's not always about supremacy, sometimes it's just targeting the less supported groups because they're the easiest to drain livelihoods. Because that kind of race/class exploitation is a lot more around today. But I have to say seeing Ethan in that daze kind of struck something in me. Between him and Ann, there's a genuine sense of feeling stuck; that despite t Back to this series with all of the Brubaker neo-noir. The thing that really stood out to me the most is the different forms of racism. It's not always about supremacy, sometimes it's just targeting the less supported groups because they're the easiest to drain livelihoods. Because that kind of race/class exploitation is a lot more around today. But I have to say seeing Ethan in that daze kind of struck something in me. Between him and Ann, there's a genuine sense of feeling stuck; that despite the bad parts of life, there's a need to try new things. Yet when that doesn't work out, either of them feel like wondering where it all went wrong. But that also means parts of life that get close to dependency. They still have purpose in the place they met. But then there comes that feeling that it's just not meant to last. On that note I have a few questions. Like who was narrating Ann's pages?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    This is a bit more middling for Reckless, but still pretty fun. Ethan and Anna have a bit of a cliché relationship, but it's not the worst trope to rely on. I think Ethan is a cool character so even when splitting time with a second protagonist, his charisma makes it work. This is a bit more middling for Reckless, but still pretty fun. Ethan and Anna have a bit of a cliché relationship, but it's not the worst trope to rely on. I think Ethan is a cool character so even when splitting time with a second protagonist, his charisma makes it work.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Clint

    Anna, Ethan’s younger punk friend and “sidekick,” has provided a lot of the charming heart of this series, so centering the third book around her makes sense but is a bit of a gamble, too. She could easily be the sort of character who works best as seasoning and not as the main course. Thankfully that wasn’t my experience here, and I loved seeing her (and her friendship with Ethan) flourish in the narrative spotlight. The Phillips duo’s art makes everything look as great as ever. The 80s LA noir Anna, Ethan’s younger punk friend and “sidekick,” has provided a lot of the charming heart of this series, so centering the third book around her makes sense but is a bit of a gamble, too. She could easily be the sort of character who works best as seasoning and not as the main course. Thankfully that wasn’t my experience here, and I loved seeing her (and her friendship with Ethan) flourish in the narrative spotlight. The Phillips duo’s art makes everything look as great as ever. The 80s LA noir conspiracy angle this time is a bit of a departure from the more exotic inclusions of earlier books, tying in city planning corruption and the very real white supremacist organized gangs that have operated in the LA Sheriff’s Dept for decades now. It’s a bit of “wait, that part’s documented as real?!” history that could always use more awareness, like what the Watchmen series did for the Tulsa massacre. The crime plot is lean and acts more as background for the character-focused story instead of the other way around this time, but it’s still entertaining enough.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeik Dion

    Sweet characters. Terrific story. Loving this series.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Yet another brilliant volume of Reckless, and this time it's not the investigation (which is interesting enough, but not particularly shocking), and it's not because of the focus on Ethan, but instead for the focus on Anna and their relationship. It's touching, it's realistic, and in the end it's heartbreaking. Also, I love the continued focus on historical events, and how they influence the narrative. Yet another brilliant volume of Reckless, and this time it's not the investigation (which is interesting enough, but not particularly shocking), and it's not because of the focus on Ethan, but instead for the focus on Anna and their relationship. It's touching, it's realistic, and in the end it's heartbreaking. Also, I love the continued focus on historical events, and how they influence the narrative.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    This one is all about the characters and their growth. I've always thought of the Reckless series as character-driven, and this volume nails all the nuances that make any character great and memorable. The case that Ethan takes on is really interesting and it offers some great twists that keep it from getting too cookie cutter. It also comes after Ethan recalls a previous case that starts out funny and quickly turns dark. It's a bit of foreshadowing for just how twisted the main case in the volu This one is all about the characters and their growth. I've always thought of the Reckless series as character-driven, and this volume nails all the nuances that make any character great and memorable. The case that Ethan takes on is really interesting and it offers some great twists that keep it from getting too cookie cutter. It also comes after Ethan recalls a previous case that starts out funny and quickly turns dark. It's a bit of foreshadowing for just how twisted the main case in the volume is going to be. It's all about power, money, greed, and corruption. This is why I found it doubly interesting that Brubaker considered the friendship between Ethan and Anna to be the main thing to focus on. The case has everything that would make a great noir story, but here, it's a backdrop to everything that's going on in the growing friendship between Ethan and Anna. It's an unexpected yet brilliant writing move. The art remains top-quality. Color and shadow taking shape to tell the story more than actual well-defined images, but it fits the overall ambiance of the story to a T.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rumi Bossche

    Ed Brubaker's and Sean Phillip's third Reckless book is another winner. We follow Ethan Reckless again, a problem solver and sort of private eye, and also ex CIA, on a new case. This third one is still a love letter to noir cinema,  and 80s paperbacks story wise but its also very different in style then the first two and i salute that. The first one was really a meet and great with the character and a story about drug running, the secons one was about a cult, and alot darker,  this third one is Ed Brubaker's and Sean Phillip's third Reckless book is another winner. We follow Ethan Reckless again, a problem solver and sort of private eye, and also ex CIA, on a new case. This third one is still a love letter to noir cinema,  and 80s paperbacks story wise but its also very different in style then the first two and i salute that. The first one was really a meet and great with the character and a story about drug running, the secons one was about a cult, and alot darker,  this third one is about the shady world of real estate and crooked business man, the overall tone is the same but the pacing is very different and a bit slower, Ed Brubaker keeps evolving and he always keep it interesting while also keeping it topnotch quality wise. We also get to see more of his relationship with his assistent and just way more character development. We have all the classic Brubaker stuff but he keeps it fresh. The artwork is good as ever and i cant wait for the 4th one to come out next year already. ⭐⭐⭐⭐

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zedsdead

    Ethan is hired by an honest politician to ruin a corrupt politician. His relationship with Anna gets screen time and she finally comes to life as a character. An unsurprisingly great piece of pocket noir. It gets hard to come up with fresh good things to say about Brubaker-Phillips collaborations. They're so consistently excellent. Shrug. Ethan is hired by an honest politician to ruin a corrupt politician. His relationship with Anna gets screen time and she finally comes to life as a character. An unsurprisingly great piece of pocket noir. It gets hard to come up with fresh good things to say about Brubaker-Phillips collaborations. They're so consistently excellent. Shrug.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bruvydsb

    While I loved the previous two Reckless books, this one is definitely my favorite. Wish there was a 6th star. Brubaker/Phillips never disappoint.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Todd Glaeser

    My favorite of the series so far; and I’ve really liked the previous books.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dave Morris

    Brubaker and Phillips always deliver, but these books are only competent B-pictures in their noir output.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Well, this has been a rum series and no mistake. Volume One was unnecessary, to put it into one word, but the first sequel was commendable. This book pretty much follows that same pattern – the stodgy, overly-wordy first half building up to a second half where you are forced to care for the characters and not worry about how much this drifts away from being a crime book, or "about" things. Previously, we've had two looks at how deathly cults and the malaise of American life have soured lives and Well, this has been a rum series and no mistake. Volume One was unnecessary, to put it into one word, but the first sequel was commendable. This book pretty much follows that same pattern – the stodgy, overly-wordy first half building up to a second half where you are forced to care for the characters and not worry about how much this drifts away from being a crime book, or "about" things. Previously, we've had two looks at how deathly cults and the malaise of American life have soured lives and hopes and dreams. Here of course it's the stupidly-named Ethan Reckless (and I'll call him that however many books he turns up in) whose life and lack of hope and want for dreams that gets the bulk of the malaise, but as for the crime, it's a case that shows being rich to be a cult in itself. A coloured councillor is damned sure the man who stiffed his father over a property deal needs putting down, and employs ts-n ER to do it. Cue problems. I think this is by no means a fabulous, must-re-read book, but it is a good one. It's a continuation of the feel of the others – the pulpy verbosity, and the eighties shown up to be the least like Miami Vice as possible (yet still shown well, as the humongous mobile phone proves). And everything does happily accumulate – the cinema setting gets more welcome, the relationship between ts-n ER and his gal Friday gets much more interesting, and I suppose the political topics of the piece get that bit closer to home. I still can't find anything remarkable in these creators stepping so far away from their norm, which they certainly seem intent on doing this decade. It has left them very hit and miss, much like their hero. Thankfully this has the nous to swing towards the former, and it does end up being a book to approve of, almost to the extent of four stars.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Not as much action as previous stories, but this was still great. I recognized most of the movies they referenced but the one with the tiny ice cream trucks....! I know I saw that one not too long ago. A Walter Matthau crime caper maybe....

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tom

    Each book in the Reckless series is better than the last. Destroy All Monsters is fantastic. I really enjoyed the exploration of the friendship between Anna and Ethan. It was great to see Anna get more credit on this latest case.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    The best Reckless book yet, with a focus on Anna, and Ethan’s relationship with her. Ethan first encounters Anna when he realizes that she (at age 17), has been vandalizing his movie theater. And that she had a key and was letting herself in. That starts her relationship with Ethan as his friend and assistant in his private eye business. This story takes place mostly in the late eighties, when a rift develops in their relationship. At this time Ethan is in his late thirties and Anna is in her lat The best Reckless book yet, with a focus on Anna, and Ethan’s relationship with her. Ethan first encounters Anna when he realizes that she (at age 17), has been vandalizing his movie theater. And that she had a key and was letting herself in. That starts her relationship with Ethan as his friend and assistant in his private eye business. This story takes place mostly in the late eighties, when a rift develops in their relationship. At this time Ethan is in his late thirties and Anna is in her late twenties. You get the sense that, even though each forms outside relationships, there may be feelings between the two of them beyond friendship. But these are never acted upon, which gives the story a bittersweet quality. There is some foreshadowing at the end of what is to come, and I’m exciting to see how their story plays out.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Greg Trosclair

    This was my favorite of the Reckless books to date. Feels like Brubaker has found his groove with the slightly down on his luck PI Ethan Reckless. I enjoyed how much of this story revolves around his friendship/partnership with Anna, his assistant. The case involves a local politician and a crooked developer. There is a lot of talk about race and privilege but it does not detract from the overall story. Sean Phillips does a great job on the art and his son, Jacob does a fine job on the colors. T This was my favorite of the Reckless books to date. Feels like Brubaker has found his groove with the slightly down on his luck PI Ethan Reckless. I enjoyed how much of this story revolves around his friendship/partnership with Anna, his assistant. The case involves a local politician and a crooked developer. There is a lot of talk about race and privilege but it does not detract from the overall story. Sean Phillips does a great job on the art and his son, Jacob does a fine job on the colors. This team is top notch, maybe my favorite all of comics today. Great work. One thing that I do miss that has fit so well in Brubaker's past work is his end of book essays. I think that the Reckless books maybe more so than any of his past works rely on the past in literature and with regard to movies and would love a post story essay on his references and links to his current tale.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sean Kottke

    What a week, to get more Blacksad and Reckless in one drop. I can’t get enough of Brubaker and Phillips, and getting a 150 page infusion is worth the wait. The cinematic Easter eggs, from what’s being screened at the El Ricardo to chapter (and volume) names are rich. Some of the best L.A. noir tales involve shady real estate deals (evidence: Chinatown, Who Framed Roger Rabbit?), and this volume centers on the (un?)intended consequences of highway construction in the City of Angels, both in the m What a week, to get more Blacksad and Reckless in one drop. I can’t get enough of Brubaker and Phillips, and getting a 150 page infusion is worth the wait. The cinematic Easter eggs, from what’s being screened at the El Ricardo to chapter (and volume) names are rich. Some of the best L.A. noir tales involve shady real estate deals (evidence: Chinatown, Who Framed Roger Rabbit?), and this volume centers on the (un?)intended consequences of highway construction in the City of Angels, both in the main case and in the personal story between Ethan Reckless and Anna.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    Unlike the first two volumes/stories, this wild tale didn't have me ripping through the pages. The pacing's a bit slower and Ethan doesn't a lot more self-reflection than usual. It also reveals his age more so as he proves set, at times arguably selfish and stagnant, in his ways, though with a good heart. If it weren't for his younger sidekick, this wouldn't pop up so much, and there's something earnest about the way he comes to own it. Overall, it's still a good, radical '80s detective tale; ju Unlike the first two volumes/stories, this wild tale didn't have me ripping through the pages. The pacing's a bit slower and Ethan doesn't a lot more self-reflection than usual. It also reveals his age more so as he proves set, at times arguably selfish and stagnant, in his ways, though with a good heart. If it weren't for his younger sidekick, this wouldn't pop up so much, and there's something earnest about the way he comes to own it. Overall, it's still a good, radical '80s detective tale; just slower than usual in the series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Davide Pappalardo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Not the best installment in the series, but an enjoyable one nonetheless. Ethan is even moodier than usual and tired, the case itself is not the real focus of the story, that being the friendship with Anna and her history. So the plot sees less twists (you will find them at the end and are more of trivias than elements inherent to the progression of the story itself) and is more linear than in the previous books, with less action too, but we learn more about the aforementioned friendship between Not the best installment in the series, but an enjoyable one nonetheless. Ethan is even moodier than usual and tired, the case itself is not the real focus of the story, that being the friendship with Anna and her history. So the plot sees less twists (you will find them at the end and are more of trivias than elements inherent to the progression of the story itself) and is more linear than in the previous books, with less action too, but we learn more about the aforementioned friendship between the two main characters.

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