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Nightwing, Vol. 1: Leaping into the Light

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The New York Times bestselling Injustice team of Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo take on Nightwing! Nightwing is back—and his drive to keep Blüdhaven safe has never been stronger! But his adoptive city has elected a new mayor with the last name Zucco. When Nightwing enlists Batgirl’s help in investigating the politician bearing the same name as the man who murdered his parents The New York Times bestselling Injustice team of Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo take on Nightwing! Nightwing is back—and his drive to keep Blüdhaven safe has never been stronger! But his adoptive city has elected a new mayor with the last name Zucco. When Nightwing enlists Batgirl’s help in investigating the politician bearing the same name as the man who murdered his parents, she unearths details that will shock and fundamentally change the hero. Dick Grayson’s big heart has protected those persecuted by bullies in his youth, combated evil alongside Batman as Robin, and pledged his newly inherited wealth to enriching Blüdhaven as Nightwing. His kindness and generosity have always guided his life. But now a new villain stalks the back alleys, removing the hearts of the city’s most vulnerable. Who is this terrifying new menace named Heartless, and will he be able to resist plucking out the biggest heart in all of Blüdhaven? Collected in this Infinite Frontier Nightwing evolution are issues #78-83.


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The New York Times bestselling Injustice team of Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo take on Nightwing! Nightwing is back—and his drive to keep Blüdhaven safe has never been stronger! But his adoptive city has elected a new mayor with the last name Zucco. When Nightwing enlists Batgirl’s help in investigating the politician bearing the same name as the man who murdered his parents The New York Times bestselling Injustice team of Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo take on Nightwing! Nightwing is back—and his drive to keep Blüdhaven safe has never been stronger! But his adoptive city has elected a new mayor with the last name Zucco. When Nightwing enlists Batgirl’s help in investigating the politician bearing the same name as the man who murdered his parents, she unearths details that will shock and fundamentally change the hero. Dick Grayson’s big heart has protected those persecuted by bullies in his youth, combated evil alongside Batman as Robin, and pledged his newly inherited wealth to enriching Blüdhaven as Nightwing. His kindness and generosity have always guided his life. But now a new villain stalks the back alleys, removing the hearts of the city’s most vulnerable. Who is this terrifying new menace named Heartless, and will he be able to resist plucking out the biggest heart in all of Blüdhaven? Collected in this Infinite Frontier Nightwing evolution are issues #78-83.

30 review for Nightwing, Vol. 1: Leaping into the Light

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Alfred was a billionaire - whodathunkit? And, following his demise, he left everything to Dick Grayson. Newly rich Dick decides to help his adopted city of Bludhaven, first by feeding and housing the homeless. But shenanigans are afoot in city hall as Blockbuster, the boss of Bludhaven’s underworld, is busy installing a new mayor - Melinda Zucco, the daughter of Tony Zucco, aka the man who killed Dick’s parents - and a new serial killer called Heartless is stalking the streets, murdering the hom Alfred was a billionaire - whodathunkit? And, following his demise, he left everything to Dick Grayson. Newly rich Dick decides to help his adopted city of Bludhaven, first by feeding and housing the homeless. But shenanigans are afoot in city hall as Blockbuster, the boss of Bludhaven’s underworld, is busy installing a new mayor - Melinda Zucco, the daughter of Tony Zucco, aka the man who killed Dick’s parents - and a new serial killer called Heartless is stalking the streets, murdering the homeless. And if there’s one thing Dick hates, it’s dicks! Time for Dick to get a firm handle on things and start rubbing out these problems… (Alright, I’ll put the dick puns back in the pants - for now!) Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo, the creative team behind Suicide Squad: Bad Blood, reunite to produce a surprisingly decent Nightwing book with Volume 1: Leaping into the Light. I haven’t read Nightwing in years - apparently he recently suffered head trauma and thought he was someone else for a spell? That sounds stoopid and I’m glad I missed it - but this isn’t a huge stumbling block and the book is easily accessible on the whole. It’s not an amazing story. Dick doesn’t have any great nemeses like Joker or Penguin so he gets Batman’s rogues gallery castoffs like Blockbuster who’s basically DC’s Kingpin. Heartless is an unremarkable new villain too. He’s wearing half of Anarky’s mask for some reason and his MO is to remove the victim’s heart and put it in a jar - literally making them less of a heart. Hmm. Melinda Zucco seems more promising although that storyline ends up playing out in a soap opera-y way. It was nice to see Babs Gordon and Tim Drake show up for the ride - Dick and Babs’ never-ending on/off romance is back on, sorta - and Taylor’s light, playful tone fits the series like a glove. It’s not a badly-written book, it’s just mostly very easy to put down because nothing that gripping is happening - until that final chapter, which has a great scene where Dick escapes Blockbuster and takes down an attack copter. And, if you’ve read Taylor’s Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man, you’ll know he can really bring the emotion when he wants, and he leans HARD on the feels for that closing chapter, in a way that even I was gagging from all the moving Dick moments had a lump in my throat. Other aspects though are transparently sentimental like when Dick gets a new pet puppy (kinda like Jonathan the actual wolverine in All-New Wolverine). Bruno Redondo’s art is fantastic - it’s very slick, very appealing. Nightwing looks great, the splash pages are outstanding, and I love how Dick’s movements as he soars through Bludhaven reflect his trapeze artist beginnings, so he moves like an acrobat. I especially like how Redondo often zooms out during a scene so you know the area the characters are moving around in exactly - it shows he’s really thought about the setting. Rick Leonardi and Neil Edwards draw the handful of pages that make up the flashback sequence, which aren’t bad but aren’t that special either, and I wasn’t that impressed with Heartless’ character design. Overall though, no real complaints about the art in this one - it’s tip-top. I don’t think I’ve come across any truly great Nightwing books. The best ones seem to be just ok - which is where Leaping into the Light sits for me. The lack of a strong or memorable story lets it down a bit but it also has great art throughout with some sweet moments here and there. Overall, Nightwing, Volume 1: Leaping into the Light is a decent beginning/leaping on point/soft relaunch of this title and I hope it becomes even better as it goes on.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John Wiswell

    This is it. This is every reason I have ever liked Robin, Dick Grayson, and Nightwing, all rolled into one. Firstly, it foregrounds Dick’s relationships. He loves the Teen Titans and remains in contact with them. The other Robins are “my brothers,” and his night going on patrol with Tim Drake warmed my heart. His complicated relationship with Barbara Gordon has all the turns and jabs you’d crave. Even Superman’s influence on who he wants to be is clear. Plus without spoiling them, those few momen This is it. This is every reason I have ever liked Robin, Dick Grayson, and Nightwing, all rolled into one. Firstly, it foregrounds Dick’s relationships. He loves the Teen Titans and remains in contact with them. The other Robins are “my brothers,” and his night going on patrol with Tim Drake warmed my heart. His complicated relationship with Barbara Gordon has all the turns and jabs you’d crave. Even Superman’s influence on who he wants to be is clear. Plus without spoiling them, those few moments where Batman actually shows up are terrific and speak to the strain on the love between them. Now, this book isn’t quite a story. Like the recent X-Men House of X/Powers of X launch, it’s really a long setup for a new status quo. Dick is rich now, and figuring out what to do both with his heroic career and his influence. His sympathy for the homeless and powerless is great. Gone are the days of beating up pickpockets; now we’re asking why this rich city has so many people starving for cash. This book promises an attempt to address the root causes of street crime, and to render villainous the powerful people who benefit from chaos. This could be a special book for mainstream superhero stories. Oh, but there are still villains. There’s literally a bad guy stealing people’s hearts. So don’t worry: flashy combat in spandex is still on the menu. Also you can’t read this book without being floored by Bruno Redono’s art. His fight scenes are slick, and his quiet moments are packed with emotion. A glance, a kiss, and a concussion all hit perfectly. It also has hilarious details like that Dick hangs around his apartment in a Black Canary concert t-shirt. The look of this series is simply most of the most appealing any superhero comic has. So we’ve got this great ensemble that reflects upon the best elements of a classic character, and we’re putting him at a new angle for crimefighting, while not deleting his history. And this story is drawn gorgeously. I’m excited for what’s next.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    A great book. This is a great jumping on point for the Nightwing. A great story and lots of setup for things for later as well. Nightwing/Dick Grayson is back to his old self. He is back in Bludhaven. The trouble is Bludhaven is no longer in the gangsters back pocket they see officially are the city. The police and every official answers to them. On top of that the serial killer is stalking the streets taking from people who have nothing to lose. A great story of Nightwing setting up his new life A great book. This is a great jumping on point for the Nightwing. A great story and lots of setup for things for later as well. Nightwing/Dick Grayson is back to his old self. He is back in Bludhaven. The trouble is Bludhaven is no longer in the gangsters back pocket they see officially are the city. The police and every official answers to them. On top of that the serial killer is stalking the streets taking from people who have nothing to lose. A great story of Nightwing setting up his new life and plans. Guess staring Barbara Gordon,Tim Drake, and cameos or mention of the whole Bat family and a couple of others. Good artwork, great story and perfect jump on point.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    One of the best Nightwing books I have ever read! Tom Taylor has done it again as he has always done wonders with Elseworld stories like Dceased and Injustice down to then doing one of the best Suicide Squad runs in a long while. Now he's doing what is quickly becoming my favorite Nightwing run! Dick Grayson has had a lot of changes over the last few years, as he was a secret agent at one point, to then being shot in the head and becoming Rick, which is a run I'd like to forget ever happened. Wh One of the best Nightwing books I have ever read! Tom Taylor has done it again as he has always done wonders with Elseworld stories like Dceased and Injustice down to then doing one of the best Suicide Squad runs in a long while. Now he's doing what is quickly becoming my favorite Nightwing run! Dick Grayson has had a lot of changes over the last few years, as he was a secret agent at one point, to then being shot in the head and becoming Rick, which is a run I'd like to forget ever happened. What interested me in this new run, was them going back to basics, with Dick being back in Bludhaven, Blockbuster has taken over city hall and runs everything behind the scenes. Meanwhile, Dick inherits all of the money Alfred had saved up over the years as Bruce's butler, and now he's a billionaire who can actually exact change. The strongest part of this series is by far Tom Taylor's writing, as he nails the character of Dick so well, and also does a good job of writing the bat family. It's a very wholesome, yet still fun superhero comic with tons of action and thrills. Bruno Redondo's art is also spectacular and he gets really creative with some of the panels! I overall just really loved this volume, and this series is by far my favorite book on the shelf as of right now! Highly recommend it!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kadi P

    As usual, everything Tom Taylor touches is gold. Armed with quippy dialogue, creative panel layouts, and new Batfam lore galore, this was a breath of fresh air and a complete win for the DC community who have long since been waiting for the return of a Nightwing we could get behind. This being an introductory volume for Tom Taylor’s run meant that the focus here was more on the setup of the overall storyline and that was well done. All the character cameos and references to the DC world beyond Ni As usual, everything Tom Taylor touches is gold. Armed with quippy dialogue, creative panel layouts, and new Batfam lore galore, this was a breath of fresh air and a complete win for the DC community who have long since been waiting for the return of a Nightwing we could get behind. This being an introductory volume for Tom Taylor’s run meant that the focus here was more on the setup of the overall storyline and that was well done. All the character cameos and references to the DC world beyond Nightwing was something I relished and something the writer included liberally. They were what made the story fun and a pleasure to read. And as if that wasn’t enough, there were more than a few surprises nestled into this one like an unknown backstory, and the introduction of both a possible new ally and a new villain. Bruno Redondo’s art was very expressive and Adriano Lucas’ colours were not overly rendered yet remained effective and atmospheric. The use of warm tones really added to the emotional and down-to-Earth feel of this volume and Nightwing’s character as a whole. I don’t usually touch on editors in my reviews, but in this volume Jessica Chen’s input and notes were noticeable from the outset, something which I thought was great to see and very helpful for new and old readers alike.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emma Anais Doyle

    Okay, the essence of Dick Grayson as a person and Nightwing as his vigilante alias has never felt so perfectly captured. The art is freaking gorgeous. I want to frame some of these panels on my wall. This has to be one of my favourites. And I can’t believe I have to wait, like, SIX MONTHS for volume 2. CRIMINAL.

  7. 5 out of 5

    TJ

    An excellent book! Tom Taylor continues to blow me away. Can’t recommend enough. And the art is stunning! 5/5 stars and a new favorite graphic novel.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    When it comes to Robin, Batman’s sidekick, Dick Grayson is the first and most iconic to take on the mantle, even though he hasn’t been the Boy Wonder for a long time. I have not read any Nightwing solo comics – though the Grant Morrison/Scott Snyder-penned comics when Grayson was temporarily Batman is worth reading – but after reading Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo’s eleven-issue maxiseries Suicide Squad: Bad Blood, I was excited to see what they were going to do with the former Boy Wonder. Followi When it comes to Robin, Batman’s sidekick, Dick Grayson is the first and most iconic to take on the mantle, even though he hasn’t been the Boy Wonder for a long time. I have not read any Nightwing solo comics – though the Grant Morrison/Scott Snyder-penned comics when Grayson was temporarily Batman is worth reading – but after reading Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo’s eleven-issue maxiseries Suicide Squad: Bad Blood, I was excited to see what they were going to do with the former Boy Wonder. Following the "Joker War" storyline, Dick Grayson returns to fight in the streets of Blüdhaven as Nightwing, starting with a couple of adult bullies picking on a three-legged dog. After taking the dog home to his apartment, Dick is reunited with his old flame Barbara Gordon, who hands him a letter from the late Alfred Pennyworth. As part of his will, Alfred, who was secretly a billionaire, would give his fortune to Dick following his death. Suddenly now the richest man in Blüdhaven, Dick is hoping to do more than just being Nightwing, but other forces have sinister plans for the city. Given what has happened to the character in recent years, this run is a perfect jumping-off point of getting into Grayson’s solo adventures for newcomers and long-time readers. Writer Tom Taylor does a great job in establishing his backstory in only a few pages throughout this volume, whilst finding new wrinkles that play a huge part in this storyline. Although they could’ve easily made Batman a main player here, Taylor is very conscious of telling a story of Dick, who is looking back on his history, which includes reacquainting with the current Robin, Tim Drake, and more importantly, a possible romantic rekindling with Barbara Gordon. No doubt that the creators were inspired by Matt Fraction and David Aja’s run on Hawkeye, which was more about showing the domesticity of its hero than actually showing the spandex-wearing heroics. Also, if the cute dog that is eventually named Bitewing isn’t the first sign of that influence, then I don’t know what is. A lot of the best stuff in the comic is Dick’s interactions with the few members of the Bat-Family, especially with Babs as their banter has been delightful. However, as much as Alfred is no longer around, the few scenes that evoke the late butler play as an emotional tribute to him, from his letter to Dick, to Batman’s only line. Taylor always seems to know how to pull the heart strings. Although this comic isn’t as bloody as their Suicide Squad run – despite the mysterious new villain Heartless, who is literally pulling hearts out of his victims – Bruno Redondo maintains a lot of that kinetic energy. Along with Adriano Lucas’s vibrant colouring, Redondo brings a fluidity to his action with his panel layouts, as well as the double page spreads that uses intricately detailed collage work that show off Nightwing’s acrobatics. A special shoutout to Redondo’s front covers for single issues that more than simple superhero poses, such as one featuring Nightwing chilling with Robin, as well one that is a deliberate nod to Batman ‘66. Considering the darkness that we usually expect in Batman comics, but once you step outside of that world and show someone else from the Bat-Family living his/her life, you get a different perspective and the first volume of Taylor and Redondo’s Nightwing delivers one that is hopeful and optimistic. Depending on how long this storyline is going to be, so far this is a perfect jump-in for anyone wanting to read the solo adventures of Dick Grayson.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    Okay, look, Tom Taylor is NOT subtle. The man's got his heart in the right place and his sense of humor is pretty great but if he wants to make a point or a political statement, he makes it so the back rows can see it. And those watching from outside the stadium can see it. And those in a neighboring city can see it. My point is, this book is very, very blunt in what it's trying to say, over and over again. Even as someone who agrees with it, that can be a detriment. But Taylor is also, luckily, Okay, look, Tom Taylor is NOT subtle. The man's got his heart in the right place and his sense of humor is pretty great but if he wants to make a point or a political statement, he makes it so the back rows can see it. And those watching from outside the stadium can see it. And those in a neighboring city can see it. My point is, this book is very, very blunt in what it's trying to say, over and over again. Even as someone who agrees with it, that can be a detriment. But Taylor is also, luckily, self-aware enough to wrap this bluntness in candy-colored art from Bruno Redondo and tons of action, which is breezy and fast-paced, so that you almost don't see the heaping portions of moralization thrown at you. Call me a fanboy but I liked this, a lot.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Clint

    I mostly loved this, minus one unfortunate but pervasive detail I’ll mention later. First and foremost this is a strikingly pretty comic series. There’s vibrant colors and clean lines in a realistic style that reminds me of Janin’s Batman, but this also borrows some of the best visual ideas for portraying action from some modern Marvel classics. Aja’s Hawkeye lends its abstracted instructional pamphlet iconography to several sequences, and I also enjoyed the repeat use of a single huge panel show I mostly loved this, minus one unfortunate but pervasive detail I’ll mention later. First and foremost this is a strikingly pretty comic series. There’s vibrant colors and clean lines in a realistic style that reminds me of Janin’s Batman, but this also borrows some of the best visual ideas for portraying action from some modern Marvel classics. Aja’s Hawkeye lends its abstracted instructional pamphlet iconography to several sequences, and I also enjoyed the repeat use of a single huge panel showing multiple copies of the same characters at different points in time, reminding me of McKelvie’s Young Avengers. Redondo’s art doesn’t feel derivative, but just inspired by some of the best. I’m familiar with the BatFamily in general, but less so with Nightwing’s specific rogues and his Bludhaven setting, so I appreciated that novelty. And speaking of the BatFamily, there’s a ton of playful interaction between them that I loved. The dialogue is generally punchy and witty in a way that can be difficult to pull off but I thought worked more than not here. There’s also lots of fun easter eggs like all the rescue boats being named after other recent-ish Nightwing writers or Oracle wearing a shirt with the old “Batman slapping Robin” image on it. What kept this from being rated higher for me was how flimsy and eye-rolling its core premise is. It seems to think its politically progressive (which I’d be a fan of), and even runs down a specific list of progressive social programs near the end, but then betrays all of that with its deeply conservative insistence that the government is corrupt and unable to solve problems, which must instead be solved by the personal charity of virtuous billionaires. Unsurprisingly, law enforcement is the only part of the government exempt from general skepticism (lol, maybe that’s a “thin blue line” on Nightwing’s chest?) This leads to the terribly bootlicking line “Not a lot of good, decent people have a large FBI file” to which MLK Jr is the obvious counterexample, but definitely not the exception. These sections of the plot also briefly shift the tone from witty fun to back-patting and smarmy. Anyway, it’s not enough to ruin an otherwise fantastic series, but it’s persistent enough to drag it down a bit.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Everything Tom Taylor touches turns to gold lately, and Nightwing is no exception. Fresh off of the Joker War and firmly back in blue, Dick Grayson heads back to Bludhaven to try and solve every problem in the city at once - even if that means palling up with its new mayor, or running around tent cities searching for a murderer. Taylor's story is heartfelt, and pitched perfectly for the period of life that Dick currently finds himself in. He's tried to save Bludhaven before, but has only ever rea Everything Tom Taylor touches turns to gold lately, and Nightwing is no exception. Fresh off of the Joker War and firmly back in blue, Dick Grayson heads back to Bludhaven to try and solve every problem in the city at once - even if that means palling up with its new mayor, or running around tent cities searching for a murderer. Taylor's story is heartfelt, and pitched perfectly for the period of life that Dick currently finds himself in. He's tried to save Bludhaven before, but has only ever really scratched the surface - now, he's really trying to enact systemic change, in the best way he knows how; acrobatics and hitting people. There are a few neat revelations here that would have landed poorly under lesser writers, but Taylor nails the landing with a perfect Nightwing flourish, and the way he writes Dick's relationships with the other members of the Bat Family is just *chef's kiss*. Oh, and long live Bitewing! Of course, Taylor's partner in crime Bruno Redondo is heaven sent as well. You want innovative panel layouts? You got 'em. You want beautifully rendered visuals in every single panel? Have that too. You want Dick looking the most like a snack since Travis Moore drew him? Sure, why not, have that too. This is a beautiful book from front to back cover. Tom Taylor is getting to be synonomous with good quality, and his Nightwing run is yet another shining example of why. A great story well written and well illustrated. There's a reason everyone's raving about this one.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Connie

    I own this comic. Admittedly, I have never read a main world DC story before. I've only ever read DCeased. And somebody told me I would like Nightwing. They weren't wrong. Holy crap this book was good. Nightwing is Dick Grayson, one of the first Robin's under Batman and the Wayne family, and he has grown up to become his own superhero now. Nightwing protects Bludhaven, a town that could give Gotham a run for it's money on crime and when it's new mayor bares the last name of the man who killed I own this comic. Admittedly, I have never read a main world DC story before. I've only ever read DCeased. And somebody told me I would like Nightwing. They weren't wrong. Holy crap this book was good. Nightwing is Dick Grayson, one of the first Robin's under Batman and the Wayne family, and he has grown up to become his own superhero now. Nightwing protects Bludhaven, a town that could give Gotham a run for it's money on crime and when it's new mayor bares the last name of the man who killed his parents, Dick enlists Batgirl and Robin's help to investigate what is going on. Who is the man without a heart who haunts the city's homeless? What do the Zucco's want with Bludhaven? Now that Dick is rich, what does he do with his money? I loved this book. The characters were amazing, the art was 10/10 and I am so happy I decided to make this my first step into the DC world. I will 100% be picking up volume 2 when it's released.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam Williams

    I was really wowed by Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo's first volume on Nightwing. I don't know my DC continuity or characters well, but this one got me invested in them. This shares a bit of DNA with Matt Fraction and David Aja's all-time great run on Hawkeye: the hero grappling what it means to be a hero and how to do good; the hero wanting to live up to his chosen family; beautiful and kinetic artistic layouts; an amazing dog (I would die for Bitewing). I don't know Bruno Redondo's other work si I was really wowed by Tom Taylor and Bruno Redondo's first volume on Nightwing. I don't know my DC continuity or characters well, but this one got me invested in them. This shares a bit of DNA with Matt Fraction and David Aja's all-time great run on Hawkeye: the hero grappling what it means to be a hero and how to do good; the hero wanting to live up to his chosen family; beautiful and kinetic artistic layouts; an amazing dog (I would die for Bitewing). I don't know Bruno Redondo's other work since I'm not generally a DC reader, but boy have I been missing out. This art is gorgeous. Again, the layouts are dynamic and beautiful, and I don't understand how a cartoon man on paper can be so hot.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bornfirst

    Is DC pitching a Nightwing CW show with this run? Because this has all the ingredients: a sexy superhero, a corrupt city to protect, a support team, and a mysterious supervillain with an agenda. This is superhero comics perfection in many ways. But I also found it to be just a tad predictable and safe. Nevertheless, this was fun to read and the art is stellar. The subtitle "Leaping into the light" suggests Nightwing coming into his own in this run. I hope he does because I like the character, an Is DC pitching a Nightwing CW show with this run? Because this has all the ingredients: a sexy superhero, a corrupt city to protect, a support team, and a mysterious supervillain with an agenda. This is superhero comics perfection in many ways. But I also found it to be just a tad predictable and safe. Nevertheless, this was fun to read and the art is stellar. The subtitle "Leaping into the light" suggests Nightwing coming into his own in this run. I hope he does because I like the character, and I'm excited to find out what Tom Taylor's plans are. But this hasn't eclipsed Tom King's run yet for me. Story 4/5, Art 5/5

  15. 5 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    Tom Taylor brought me into this with his story...Bruno Redondo made me stay with that incredible art. I didn't even really care about Nightwing that much, but this book sure as chips changed all that. Fantastic stuff. This volume is the secret sauce, the magic recipe, one of those special ones that 'changes everything for me.' Tom Taylor brought me into this with his story...Bruno Redondo made me stay with that incredible art. I didn't even really care about Nightwing that much, but this book sure as chips changed all that. Fantastic stuff. This volume is the secret sauce, the magic recipe, one of those special ones that 'changes everything for me.'

  16. 4 out of 5

    André Habet

    A little corny in what its doing politically. Reminded me of the black panther movie coda in terms of how wealthy philanthropists being the keys to social injustice. Besides that, its a really a great romp delivering really well choreographed action that emphasizes both dick's physique and prowess in often fun ways. I like how much it also works to establish a distinct tone from the brooding of Batman through the theme of community and mutual aid. A little cheesy but lovely to see. Redondo is am A little corny in what its doing politically. Reminded me of the black panther movie coda in terms of how wealthy philanthropists being the keys to social injustice. Besides that, its a really a great romp delivering really well choreographed action that emphasizes both dick's physique and prowess in often fun ways. I like how much it also works to establish a distinct tone from the brooding of Batman through the theme of community and mutual aid. A little cheesy but lovely to see. Redondo is amazing on this book and I want him to do a more straight up action comedy. Give him a textless issue to go slapstick crazy on with a suddenly endearing end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rylan

    This is one of the best DC series that I have read in a long time. Nightwing has had a rough couple of years with Ric so it was beyond nice to see him finally get a good run if not one of the best runs he’s had in a long time. Taylor really understands the character and builds a great story around him and utilizes his supporting cast. This is honestly going to be a modern classic I highly recommend reading it because it will blow your mind.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Dick Grayson is the bestest dude ever he is so ethical and unproblematic. Look at all these problems that might be complicated but because Dick Grayson is such a pure good boy he doesn't have problem he just does the right thing like a nice kiddo. He gets money? The money is ethical and goes to charity. He sees homeless people? He buys them pizza! His parents have a dark secret? The dark secret is that they are really nice people! And Nightwing? He doesn't like people shooting dogs in the face. Dick Grayson is the bestest dude ever he is so ethical and unproblematic. Look at all these problems that might be complicated but because Dick Grayson is such a pure good boy he doesn't have problem he just does the right thing like a nice kiddo. He gets money? The money is ethical and goes to charity. He sees homeless people? He buys them pizza! His parents have a dark secret? The dark secret is that they are really nice people! And Nightwing? He doesn't like people shooting dogs in the face. We need a superhero like this. Most superheroes would let others shoot dogs in the face, or even shoot the dogs themselves, but not Nightwing. He is perfect, and saves doggos and pupperinos. Tom Taylor writes books for fans of superheroes who want their superheroes to be squeaky clean goodie goodies who are purehearted and good. He writes the books that fans like, because they want to like their superhero. No one wants their favourite superhero to have flaws, unless that flaw is being too kind. No one wants their favourite superhero to cause trouble, unless the ones in trouble are the villains. At least Bruno Redondo has some good artwork! Not all the art is good, but he gets some changes to show off his best David Aja and Annie Wu impression as the book steals whole-heartedly from their Hawkeye run with Matt Fraction. Yes, the writing steals a lot from that book too, down to Nightwing owning an apartment block and trying to be a regular old tired dude and a superhero, but the art is really aping something. And what it's aping is maybe the most influential superhero comic of the last decade, so every superhero book is already aping it. This is just taking it, making it pretty, and not adding anything else new to the table. But it does, usually, look pretty. You know, this isn't a book for Nightwing fans. It's a book for Nightwing stans. It's a book that will likely have zero influence over the character after it ends, but people will always point to specific pages and go "look how great this run was, we need more runs like this!" It happened with Friendly Neighborhood Spider-Man. It will happen with this. But because it's not "Ric", everyone is going to celebrate it all the same. When the biggest compliment your book gets is "it's better than the awful one before it", I don't think your book has all too many compliments. HOW is it better than Ric? Oh, because it has good art! But the art wasn't the problem people had with Ric. Tom Taylor spends this whole book introducing problems and scrambling to prove they're not actual problems to the point where I don't even know what the book is about. Actually, I know what the book is about. Every few weeks you go on Twitter and see someone complaining about how Batman is so much more useless than Bruce Wayne and oh if only Bruce Wayne used his money to help people instead of punching people in the face. And... that's literally what Dick Grayson says here. He says being Batman, and being Nightwing, is wrong. And that he doesn't like punching people in the face. And he wants to be ethical with his money and fund social programs. He's inviting in all this real world criticism of the problems of capitalism and social programs, but he's trying to tie it all up in this big superhero/supervillain plot against a villain who is called The Man With No Heart. It's grand-standing about social justice and change without changing anything because it's all through the lens of superhero capeshit nonsense that doesn't matter. Nightwing is a boring nothing of a book with a sugar gum coating on it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jibug

    My heart!!! MY HEART!!!! I have such a soft spot for Alfred and the love that Dick Grayson has for him and honoring his memory in the way that he did warmed my heart so much. 😭 THE ART… my gosh from Redondo is sooooo memorable. I have so many favorites. I loved seeing the spread that had the backdrop of the aerial netting with images of all those he loves across the page both past and present. Seeing that art and understanding the significance where Grayson is becoming that someone who catches t My heart!!! MY HEART!!!! I have such a soft spot for Alfred and the love that Dick Grayson has for him and honoring his memory in the way that he did warmed my heart so much. 😭 THE ART… my gosh from Redondo is sooooo memorable. I have so many favorites. I loved seeing the spread that had the backdrop of the aerial netting with images of all those he loves across the page both past and present. Seeing that art and understanding the significance where Grayson is becoming that someone who catches those who falls is beautiful. My description doesn’t do the art justice. There is a fantastic scene where you see Dick walking down the stairs changing out of his costume into regular clothing. There is an aerial shot of his apartment layout as you see Dick and Babs conversing through one end of the unit to the other. Mundane moments that are enhanced because of the art. The story in this volume is just the beginning and I’m really really looking forward to reading more! Also, I loved Bitewing!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yas (whatifitsbooks)

    I really enjoyed seeing Dick be back to normal. The interactions with the Batfam were brilliant and the art style is MAGNIFICENT in this one.

  21. 5 out of 5

    z e e

    One of the best comics I've read in a while and the art is GORGEOUS One of the best comics I've read in a while and the art is GORGEOUS

  22. 5 out of 5

    Mikah

    This comic bears more than a slight resemblance to Fraction and Aja’s iconic Hawkeye run, but there are worse things to resemble, and himbo Dick Grayson is a perpetual delight. This is a great read for people who find recent Batman adaptations too dour. Dick + Babs forever and ever

  23. 4 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    Tom Taylor just gets it, man. He understands what makes superheroes special: it's not about being super powerful but being a hero. And when you pair Taylor's unbridled optimism with art as wonderful and vivid and expressive as what Redondo and Lucas deliver? Well, that leads to one helluva comic. It's not hard to tell how invested I am in the Batman Mythos™️, so a lot of emotion I felt from this stems from how intimately Taylor highlights the depths of the relationships and history shared between Tom Taylor just gets it, man. He understands what makes superheroes special: it's not about being super powerful but being a hero. And when you pair Taylor's unbridled optimism with art as wonderful and vivid and expressive as what Redondo and Lucas deliver? Well, that leads to one helluva comic. It's not hard to tell how invested I am in the Batman Mythos™️, so a lot of emotion I felt from this stems from how intimately Taylor highlights the depths of the relationships and history shared between Dick and his family. Granted, Taylor overplays the emotions a few too many times and strays into the saccharine territories, but it's all done with such earnestness that it's hard to complain. And the payoff in the final issue of the volume is stellar--had me swallowing my emotions, that's for sure. However, as fun, hopeful, and clever as Taylor's scripts are, it's Redondo's art and Lucas' colors that propel this to the heights it reaches. Redondo's layouts are exceptional and burst with creativity and fluidity that function as an extension of Dick's character in the best of ways. Like Taylor, Redondo understands these characters so well that every movement and pose feels incredibly intentional and tailored to the characteristics of each hero. Lucas' colors are something else entirely, too, as his rich, vibrant colors bring a fantastical quality to the story that makes it a dream to look at. Some of the spreads here are downright breathtaking. I do wish the villain had more of a presence, though. The story takes its time (rightfully so) developing Dick's motivations and thought processes, but in doing so, it sidelines the villains so much that they don't feel threatening at all. I'm obviously interested in learning more, but at this point, the book almost feels like it's shoehorning in a villain out of obligation, which is honestly distracting from all the good the rest of the story is doing. Still, this is a terrific debut volume, and Taylor's promises that he and Redondo are committed to the series for the long haul have me so, so excited. I can easily see this becoming a landmark run for Nightwing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    andrés

    What can I say? 10/10 art, 10/10 colors, 10/10 sexy hero with a heart of gold, 10/10 choosing to be against wealth accumulation/disparity, helping people through mutual aid and attacking corrupt governments and systems of power! In a way, not a lot happened, but it's still one of the best superhero comics I have read. What can I say? 10/10 art, 10/10 colors, 10/10 sexy hero with a heart of gold, 10/10 choosing to be against wealth accumulation/disparity, helping people through mutual aid and attacking corrupt governments and systems of power! In a way, not a lot happened, but it's still one of the best superhero comics I have read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

    4.5/5 stars This made me remember how much I love reading comics!!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Emond

    I've never read a Nightwing book - not for any particular reason but there hasn't been a run that anyone recommended before this one. But this one was on a lot of fans' top ten lists so I thought I would take the plunge. And I am glad I did. Great character, great supporting cast, nice story (although a few complaints) and amazing art. Bruno Redondo has a beautiful style and is a wonderful story teller. Those two don't always go hand in hand but I love it when they do. So I am all on board with I've never read a Nightwing book - not for any particular reason but there hasn't been a run that anyone recommended before this one. But this one was on a lot of fans' top ten lists so I thought I would take the plunge. And I am glad I did. Great character, great supporting cast, nice story (although a few complaints) and amazing art. Bruno Redondo has a beautiful style and is a wonderful story teller. Those two don't always go hand in hand but I love it when they do. So I am all on board with this. Now I do want to nit pick a little because I am OCD after I read something. First - this was obviously inspired by Hawkeye and Matt Fraction and David Aja's run. We get the cute dog inserted into the story ala Pizza Dog. We get the cute little cartoon "how to" cutaways. We get the "hero trying to connect with the people in his city". I am okay with all of that and the dog was used effectively in the story but I had to point it out. There was the "you have a family member you never knew about AND they are going to coincidentally play a huge role in your life". I don't know if this character needed to be related to Dick for the character to work but I guess it increased the emotional stakes. I also think the big payoff fell flat for me in the sense it was obvious. Dick inherits Alfred's billions (a) Alfred is dead?!?! b) he was a billionaire?!?!) and agonizes what to do with it. We have a montage of him talking to people like Superman (as well as other people) which is sweet but...he didn't really need Superman's (or the other people) advice and we all knew what he was going to do with it - help out the city. So, I liked the scenes but in terms of driving the story forward it was gratuitous. My biggest nitpick is it leaves us in the middle of a story arc. I know this is commonplace in modern comics but I look back fondly when a story arc could be finished in 6 issues (or 2 or 1) and I didn't feel like picking up a series meant I needed to invest 60 issues of reading something to get a conclusion. Okay - I am done with my nitpicking, I guess I would say it isn't perfect but it was a lot of fun (drama without getting too dark and kept the humour up) so I strongly recommend it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Langston Lardi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is my first Nightwing book, I’ve kept up with his evolving story (such as the infamous Rick Grayson), but this is the first story I’m officially reading myself and I’m impressed. The first Robin has always been my favorite for just how different he always ways, the charisma, the spunk, the acrobatics, the way he brought out a different side in Batman, so when he became Nightwing I always considered the character one of my favs despite not reading a proper run of him. This book definitely pa This is my first Nightwing book, I’ve kept up with his evolving story (such as the infamous Rick Grayson), but this is the first story I’m officially reading myself and I’m impressed. The first Robin has always been my favorite for just how different he always ways, the charisma, the spunk, the acrobatics, the way he brought out a different side in Batman, so when he became Nightwing I always considered the character one of my favs despite not reading a proper run of him. This book definitely paints a good picture in that respective, seeing Alfred pass on his wealth to Grayson and him inner monologging on how to use the wealth for good, to help those who needed it seems like such a Grayson thing and was a nice touch. But hands down my favorite aspect of this story is not only seeing Grayson being his normal witty, backflipping self, but the cast of support characters. Seeing his support system and those he loves help out when he needs it. Those like his brother Tim, the love interest with Babs (always felt right), his best friends in the Titans, and most importantly his father figures, and just how many of those he had/has. This story revolves around that concept, our fathers and how they help shape us. It was touching seeing Grayson defend a child being bullied, being afraid Bruce would be upset, only to see Alfred approve of the person Dick is outside of the costume. Then Dick meeting up with Superman, that man can always give quotes of hope for days, never gets old. Grayson adopting his new dog Haley. Bruce thanking Dick for the Alfred Foundation was a warming touch as well. Overall this book is a feel good book and that’s what I love about it most. It’s a return to form and I can see why it is so highly praised. Loved the art work as well. Though the binding of the book itself became a hassle at times.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Drake Zappa

    Nightwing is back... And he's better than ever! 💙🦹🏻 This is a beautiful book. This is not only one of the greatest Nightwing books in a long time but one of the best comic books in recent years. The writing and the art is incredible and the portrayal of Dick Grayson is perfect. Seeing his interactions with the bat-family and the characters around him is really cool and the Heartless is an interesting design for a villain. The book is as action packed as it is a slice of life superhero tale and is Nightwing is back... And he's better than ever! 💙🦹🏻 This is a beautiful book. This is not only one of the greatest Nightwing books in a long time but one of the best comic books in recent years. The writing and the art is incredible and the portrayal of Dick Grayson is perfect. Seeing his interactions with the bat-family and the characters around him is really cool and the Heartless is an interesting design for a villain. The book is as action packed as it is a slice of life superhero tale and is balanced very well. I'm truly impressed with Tom Taylors writing as of late specifically on this book and think i may have found an artist to look out for in Bruno Redondo, his style is really cool and I love the way he plays with panels and setup/structure, some of the splash pages and double pages in here could make a grown man cry! I could continue gushing about how amazing this book is but please go read it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    I stopped reading Nightwing after the ridiculous amnesia plot, but thought I'd give this new direction a try since I have always loved the character. It turns out Alfred has posthumously made him a billionaire ( kinda curious what Pennyworth made working for Bruce) and he struggles to figure out what to do with it. He and Baby are finally seeming to start a relationship, and we are introduced to an important familial character which actually did not come off as contrived or ridiculous. The art i I stopped reading Nightwing after the ridiculous amnesia plot, but thought I'd give this new direction a try since I have always loved the character. It turns out Alfred has posthumously made him a billionaire ( kinda curious what Pennyworth made working for Bruce) and he struggles to figure out what to do with it. He and Baby are finally seeming to start a relationship, and we are introduced to an important familial character which actually did not come off as contrived or ridiculous. The art is gorgeous, and they include a variant cover gallery. As far as superhero books go, this was top notch. My only complaint is that some of Mister Grayson's philanthropic goal seem just a liiiiittle bit communist-ish. I can overlook that though, and highly recommend this book to Dick Grayson fans who think the title went a little off the rails.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

    Really, really good. Probably the most emotionally mature take on the Batman world since Year One, if not ever. My personal issues with the Batman stuff is that he doesn’t use his money to help people in a real-world way, that there’s a lack of humanity in the character, he beats up poor and mentally ill people and that he heals too quickly and unrealistically from injury. Tom Taylor has Dick Grayson as Nightwing address all of these things in a way that a new generation does when looking at tho Really, really good. Probably the most emotionally mature take on the Batman world since Year One, if not ever. My personal issues with the Batman stuff is that he doesn’t use his money to help people in a real-world way, that there’s a lack of humanity in the character, he beats up poor and mentally ill people and that he heals too quickly and unrealistically from injury. Tom Taylor has Dick Grayson as Nightwing address all of these things in a way that a new generation does when looking at those who preceded them. Bruno Redondo brings all of this to life in a gorgeous way and establishes himself as an artist of note to stay on the radar. Really, really good.

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