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Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence

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"An elegant, impassioned demand that America see gender-based violence as a cultural and structural problem that hurts everyone, not just victims and survivors... It's at times downright virtuosic in the threads it weaves together."--NPR From the woman who gave the landmark testimony against Clarence Thomas as a sexual menace, a new manifesto about the origins and cour "An elegant, impassioned demand that America see gender-based violence as a cultural and structural problem that hurts everyone, not just victims and survivors... It's at times downright virtuosic in the threads it weaves together."--NPR From the woman who gave the landmark testimony against Clarence Thomas as a sexual menace, a new manifesto about the origins and course of gender violence in our society; a combination of memoir, personal accounts, law, and social analysis, and a powerful call to arms from one of our most prominent and poised survivors. In 1991, Anita Hill began something that's still unfinished work. The issues of gender violence, touching on sex, race, age, and power, are as urgent today as they were when she first testified. Believing is a story of America's three decades long reckoning with gender violence, one that offers insights into its roots, and paths to creating dialogue and substantive change. It is a call to action that offers guidance based on what this brave, committed fighter has learned from a lifetime of advocacy and her search for solutions to a problem that is still tearing America apart. We once thought gender-based violence--from casual harassment to rape and murder--was an individual problem that affected a few; we now know it's cultural and endemic, and happens to our acquaintances, colleagues, friends and family members, and it can be physical, emotional and verbal. Women of color experience sexual harassment at higher rates than White women. Street harassment is ubiquitous and can escalate to violence. Transgender and nonbinary people are particularly vulnerable. Anita Hill draws on her years as a teacher, legal scholar, and advocate, and on the experiences of the thousands of individuals who have told her their stories, to trace the pipeline of behavior that follows individuals from place to place: from home to school to work and back home. In measured, clear, blunt terms, she demonstrates the impact it has on every aspect of our lives, including our physical and mental wellbeing, housing stability, political participation, economy and community safety, and how our descriptive language undermines progress toward solutions. And she is uncompromising in her demands that our laws and our leaders must address the issue concretely and immediately.


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"An elegant, impassioned demand that America see gender-based violence as a cultural and structural problem that hurts everyone, not just victims and survivors... It's at times downright virtuosic in the threads it weaves together."--NPR From the woman who gave the landmark testimony against Clarence Thomas as a sexual menace, a new manifesto about the origins and cour "An elegant, impassioned demand that America see gender-based violence as a cultural and structural problem that hurts everyone, not just victims and survivors... It's at times downright virtuosic in the threads it weaves together."--NPR From the woman who gave the landmark testimony against Clarence Thomas as a sexual menace, a new manifesto about the origins and course of gender violence in our society; a combination of memoir, personal accounts, law, and social analysis, and a powerful call to arms from one of our most prominent and poised survivors. In 1991, Anita Hill began something that's still unfinished work. The issues of gender violence, touching on sex, race, age, and power, are as urgent today as they were when she first testified. Believing is a story of America's three decades long reckoning with gender violence, one that offers insights into its roots, and paths to creating dialogue and substantive change. It is a call to action that offers guidance based on what this brave, committed fighter has learned from a lifetime of advocacy and her search for solutions to a problem that is still tearing America apart. We once thought gender-based violence--from casual harassment to rape and murder--was an individual problem that affected a few; we now know it's cultural and endemic, and happens to our acquaintances, colleagues, friends and family members, and it can be physical, emotional and verbal. Women of color experience sexual harassment at higher rates than White women. Street harassment is ubiquitous and can escalate to violence. Transgender and nonbinary people are particularly vulnerable. Anita Hill draws on her years as a teacher, legal scholar, and advocate, and on the experiences of the thousands of individuals who have told her their stories, to trace the pipeline of behavior that follows individuals from place to place: from home to school to work and back home. In measured, clear, blunt terms, she demonstrates the impact it has on every aspect of our lives, including our physical and mental wellbeing, housing stability, political participation, economy and community safety, and how our descriptive language undermines progress toward solutions. And she is uncompromising in her demands that our laws and our leaders must address the issue concretely and immediately.

30 review for Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence

  1. 5 out of 5

    Roxane

    Beyond Anita Hill's work as an accomplished legal scholar, she has spent the past three decades relentlessly fighting to change our cultural attitudes toward gender-based violence. In her latest book, Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender-Based Violence, Hill offers a deeply researched, elegantly precise, fiercely intelligent examination of the intersections of gender, violence, identity, culture, and justice. Blending memoir, analysis, and trenchant advocacy, Hill has crafted a tower Beyond Anita Hill's work as an accomplished legal scholar, she has spent the past three decades relentlessly fighting to change our cultural attitudes toward gender-based violence. In her latest book, Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender-Based Violence, Hill offers a deeply researched, elegantly precise, fiercely intelligent examination of the intersections of gender, violence, identity, culture, and justice. Blending memoir, analysis, and trenchant advocacy, Hill has crafted a towering and necessary work that reminds us of the work we must all do to create a safer, more equitable world where we are all free from gender-based violence.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Annette

    This was a hard read, because of how much things have not changed in 30 years. Thank goodness for for brave women who never give up, no matter how hard the patriarchy tries to squash them. I hope someday, these stories will just be a sad page in history instead of an ongoing daily reality.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    I recently attended a library conference, and Anita Hill was announced as one of the speakers. The Clarence Thomas hearings seem so long ago, and I thought she must be elderly by now, but nope – she is only a few years older than me. She was 35 when she testified about the sexual harassment she dealt with from Thomas. Hill was a powerful speaker at the conference, and I looked forward to reading her new book Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence. Although the book is certainl I recently attended a library conference, and Anita Hill was announced as one of the speakers. The Clarence Thomas hearings seem so long ago, and I thought she must be elderly by now, but nope – she is only a few years older than me. She was 35 when she testified about the sexual harassment she dealt with from Thomas. Hill was a powerful speaker at the conference, and I looked forward to reading her new book Believing: Our Thirty-Year Journey to End Gender Violence. Although the book is certainly one of power and importance, I did not find it as effective as her speech. The book comes across as a series of essays or speeches intended for different audiences on different occasions. It is at times unfocused and repetitive. (For example, I did not need to read more than once about the annual march through campus of Yale frat boys chanting “No means yes” or of the increased use of mandatory arbitration in employment contracts.) Occasionally assumptions are made that the reader is already familiar with something that is mentioned. Hill is clearly an expert on the topic of gender violence and discrimination, and she uses a nice mix of statistics and anecdotes to make her case for change. She is a strong woman who put up with a lot of abuse over her testimony in 1991, although she also tells stories of people who supported her. Despite the wordiness and repetition, I still recommend Believing for people who want to know more about the topic. From chapter 10: “[G]ender-based violence imperils our country’s health, safety, economic security, housing, transportation, and educational opportunities. It puts at risk our national security, as well as our social and political standing within this country and around the globe, and it reduces out ability to credibly advocate for human rights and gender equality.” (p. 232 of the advance reader copy) I read an advance reader copy of Believing from Netgalley. It will be published in late September.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    If we want meaningful change in gender-based violence, awareness of facts is critical. This book delivers lots of those facts, the most infuriating of which is that NOTHING has changed in the last 30 years since the author testified about her harassment experience. Well-written, well-researched, motivating.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I was very young when Anita Hill testified against Clarence Thomas and didn't understand (at the time) the sheer courage it would have required. As I listened to Believing, I was so impressed with Ms. Hill's recounting of the hearings, as well as her perspective on the recent Kavanaugh hearings. Turns out, so was Christine Blasey Ford ( https://padailypost.com/2019/11/03/ch... ) I'd love to see Believing added to college curricula. This is an enlightening book that depicts where we are now and ho I was very young when Anita Hill testified against Clarence Thomas and didn't understand (at the time) the sheer courage it would have required. As I listened to Believing, I was so impressed with Ms. Hill's recounting of the hearings, as well as her perspective on the recent Kavanaugh hearings. Turns out, so was Christine Blasey Ford ( https://padailypost.com/2019/11/03/ch... ) I'd love to see Believing added to college curricula. This is an enlightening book that depicts where we are now and how far we still have to go.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    It took me a while to finish this book (through no fault of Hill's - life just got in the way). It should be a must-read for everyone, no matter your gender or race or identity. As Hill so eloquently and succinctly puts it: Gender violence damages us all. Hill lays out the centuries-old problem of gender inequality and puts forth a treatise urging us to find our way through the thorny path to true equality. Her research is thorough and tinged with her personal story, though she turns her focus o It took me a while to finish this book (through no fault of Hill's - life just got in the way). It should be a must-read for everyone, no matter your gender or race or identity. As Hill so eloquently and succinctly puts it: Gender violence damages us all. Hill lays out the centuries-old problem of gender inequality and puts forth a treatise urging us to find our way through the thorny path to true equality. Her research is thorough and tinged with her personal story, though she turns her focus outward to the millions of victims from every gender and race. I cannot recommend this book enough.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Harte Reads

    3 1/2*

  8. 5 out of 5

    Diana

    What a powerful book. Definitely a must read for anyone with an interest in ending gender-based violence (ie. everyone).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jayme

    This is a powerful book with a lot of information. She shares a lot of stories of gender violence that I somehow never heard about before. It is maddening to hear about how little has changed in the last 49 years. I can only hope that we find someone to lead this charge from the White House as soon as possible. (This doesn’t mean I agree with everything she says, but I still think it’s important to consider her views.)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    I was a little too young to really comprehend Anita Hill's experiences but do somewhat recall seeing clips of her testimony, even if I didn't really understand the what and the why. I was curious to know what she might have to say in the light of the Me Too movement, the stories and grappling with gender and sexual violence, the stories of some of the most powerful (often men but women can be predators and/or accomplices) people. Did not know what to expect but wanted to know what she might have I was a little too young to really comprehend Anita Hill's experiences but do somewhat recall seeing clips of her testimony, even if I didn't really understand the what and the why. I was curious to know what she might have to say in the light of the Me Too movement, the stories and grappling with gender and sexual violence, the stories of some of the most powerful (often men but women can be predators and/or accomplices) people. Did not know what to expect but wanted to know what she might have to say. The book is really a bunch of essays discussion all of these things: gender violence, sexual violence, discrimination and more. It's a mix of personal anecdotes, history, commentary, statistics, etc. It is clear she has done a lot of work and research in these areas and unfortunately Hill also makes it clear that there is still, sadly, a lot of work to do be done here, no matter how far we've come (or not). Agree that the book was rather dull. I thought it might be Hill's story but it's really about an overview via essays/speeches, etc. adapted for the book. I can appreciate that (I'm not sure I'd really want to delve into the details and respect that's not the purpose of this book) but I'm also not really sure what else it really adds to the conversation that isn't already a part the work done by Hill or others. That is not to say that this doesn't have value. Just that this might not be a format that works for everyone, but your mileage may vary. As mentioned, there are a lot of tough topics covered that might be difficult for some to read and it's not really possible to avoid, given the purpose of the book and who the author is. Would recommend it as a library borrow and wouldn't be surprised if it showed up on class syllabi on gender relations, women's studies, etc.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Judie

    Anita Hill gained public attention when she testified against the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1991. Her comments about his sexual harassment was not believed by the male senators on the committee and he was sworn in soon afterwards. Many things have changed since then, particularly the MeToo movement. Workplaces, schools, and the military have taken action to define and reduce the number of incidents but the results have not been consistent. BELIEVING addresses d Anita Hill gained public attention when she testified against the nomination of Clarence Thomas to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1991. Her comments about his sexual harassment was not believed by the male senators on the committee and he was sworn in soon afterwards. Many things have changed since then, particularly the MeToo movement. Workplaces, schools, and the military have taken action to define and reduce the number of incidents but the results have not been consistent. BELIEVING addresses denial, workplaces, institutions, politics, victim shaming, politics, backlash. It points out problems with it like the sexual harassment rules not covering businesses with fewer than 15 employees which especially affects women in small towns. Also, lawsuits are costly and the short statute of limitations (180-300 days depending on the jurisdiction). There are some chilling examples: e.g., a female highschool student who was being pressured by a male student who kept trying to get her to meet him in a bathroom. She told a counselor. The counselor said they should set a trap and catch him in the act. She followed the instructions. She went into a restroom with him. By the time the counselor got there, she had been raped. Hill does a thorough job explaining the state of sexual harassment experiences and laws to protect women (and men, at times). Unfortunately it lumps different types of acts together. She equates Bill Clinton’s sexual affair with a 21-year-old intern who came on to him with Donald Trump’s bragging about assaulting women with Brett Kavanaugh’s rape of a college student with Joe Biden getting close to a woman and making her uncomfortable and putting his hand on her shoulder. The book is well-researched, documented, and, sadly, timely.

  12. 5 out of 5

    M

    I really appreciated that this book wasn’t a memoir but a dense, engaging, rigorously researched and practical book that is grounded in action and solutions to gender-based violence. Hill managed to give historical context to the web of systemic abuse rampant over the world but also provide modern and current statistics and information that made this feel completely of the moment. We must, as she argues, realize gender based violence is systemic and deeply embedded into every facet of society. A I really appreciated that this book wasn’t a memoir but a dense, engaging, rigorously researched and practical book that is grounded in action and solutions to gender-based violence. Hill managed to give historical context to the web of systemic abuse rampant over the world but also provide modern and current statistics and information that made this feel completely of the moment. We must, as she argues, realize gender based violence is systemic and deeply embedded into every facet of society. Anger alone won’t eradicate it. We need a full systemic cultural and political reckoning with concrete laws and actions if we are to ever to end this violence. I learned a ton of new things, including that Massachusetts is one of the states that doesn’t include violence motivated by gender or sex as a category of hate crimes; it lists gender identity as a factor in determining whether a crime is motivated by bias or hate, but did not list gender (211). I mean… wow. Finally, I thought her discussion of the parallels with Dr. Christine Blasey Ford was fascinating, riveting and quite sad. It seems we have made little progress over the last 30 years Hill has been fighting but I appreciate the candor Hill had about the failure to galvanize around Me Too to actually create lasting change over the last few decades. This is the call to arms we needed to actually do something and recognize this is, as she calls it, a “public crisis.”

  13. 4 out of 5

    Erin Matson

    Anita Hill is one of the pre-eminent thinkers and advocates working to end gender-based violence. Practical, uncompromising, and radical in all the right places, Believing offers chewy approaches to combat the full range of gender-based violence. She thoroughly dismisses the idea that we should count on younger people to fix it because they have more accepting and liberal attitudes about identity-based inequality. Hill argues forcefully that it’s a dereliction of duty on the part of the elders t Anita Hill is one of the pre-eminent thinkers and advocates working to end gender-based violence. Practical, uncompromising, and radical in all the right places, Believing offers chewy approaches to combat the full range of gender-based violence. She thoroughly dismisses the idea that we should count on younger people to fix it because they have more accepting and liberal attitudes about identity-based inequality. Hill argues forcefully that it’s a dereliction of duty on the part of the elders to leave this mess to young people. Sadly, the most promising organizing structure that appeared to exist to address these issues, Times Up, recently imploded among revelations its leadership advised Governor Andrew Cuomo on the credible sexual harassment and assault allegations against him. With the leadership already gone, in the past week nearly all staff have been laid off. This matters because we need structures to fight this problem. As advocates look to pick up those pieces, we’d be wise to read the systemic approach advocated by Professor Hill. As she avows, gender-based violence is one of the most serious issues in the country. It’s time to treat it that way.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kyra Alexandria

    This book is especially outside of my wheelhouse—I avoid reading non-fiction in my free time, but my book club chose this book and I was eager to join the discussion. This was my first time reading Hill, and I think she’s an accessible writer—she made the data and content easy to understand and seemed to invite the reader into dialogue with her by differentiating her personal opinions from general political interpretations. I also appreciated her candid retelling of her famous congressional test This book is especially outside of my wheelhouse—I avoid reading non-fiction in my free time, but my book club chose this book and I was eager to join the discussion. This was my first time reading Hill, and I think she’s an accessible writer—she made the data and content easy to understand and seemed to invite the reader into dialogue with her by differentiating her personal opinions from general political interpretations. I also appreciated her candid retelling of her famous congressional testimony, as I can’t imagine anyone picking up this book and not being interested in hearing her opinions of the experience and aftermath. Despite these boons, I found her argument unconvincing based on the evidence she presented. This wasn’t a terribly bad read, it also just wasn’t a terribly good one. For more short, spoiler-free reviews of books & films, visit my blog: kyrasimmortallongings.wordpress.com

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joyce Thomas

    “Gender based violence” is an intentional phase used throughout this book. It covers no only women but nonbinary people as well as men and includes a wide range of behaviors that are violent: rape, intimate partner violence, stalking, harassment, victim shaming, etc. This book is extensive and only Anita Hill could have written it. It is not a book about the Supreme Court nomination of Clarence Thomas though she does use examples from that hearing as they apply to the concepts she writes about. “Gender based violence” is an intentional phase used throughout this book. It covers no only women but nonbinary people as well as men and includes a wide range of behaviors that are violent: rape, intimate partner violence, stalking, harassment, victim shaming, etc. This book is extensive and only Anita Hill could have written it. It is not a book about the Supreme Court nomination of Clarence Thomas though she does use examples from that hearing as they apply to the concepts she writes about. It convincingly makes the case that gender-based violence is ubiquitous and tied to other areas of discrimination and oppression. She makes a powerful argument that, if we apply ourselves, we can end gender violence.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Irving

    I stayed up late last night to finish the remnants of this book. Anita Hill eloquently writes about the ubiquitous human rights issue of gender-based violence. Her writing is intelligent, visceral, and poignant. Hill wrote about the problem of gender-based violence from a panoramic view in that she highlights its perpetual existence in every sphere of our lives. Sexual harassment does not discriminate against anyone, which means any woman, regardless of her social status, race, age, etc., can be I stayed up late last night to finish the remnants of this book. Anita Hill eloquently writes about the ubiquitous human rights issue of gender-based violence. Her writing is intelligent, visceral, and poignant. Hill wrote about the problem of gender-based violence from a panoramic view in that she highlights its perpetual existence in every sphere of our lives. Sexual harassment does not discriminate against anyone, which means any woman, regardless of her social status, race, age, etc., can be a victim of it. I find it very objectionable that it continues to occur in the workplace, schools, and the upper echelons of the political system.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Susan Waller

    Dismal and depressing, this book is a compendium of injustice and violence against women over the last 30 years. The point of the book is not to provide a solution, but to shine a light on the problem, and how far reaching it is. Anita Hill connects the dots between misogyny and harassment/violence/rape/murder showing how they are all connected. She acknowledges that addressing the problem is like trying to "boil the ocean"; we will never solve the problem of violence against women until we can Dismal and depressing, this book is a compendium of injustice and violence against women over the last 30 years. The point of the book is not to provide a solution, but to shine a light on the problem, and how far reaching it is. Anita Hill connects the dots between misogyny and harassment/violence/rape/murder showing how they are all connected. She acknowledges that addressing the problem is like trying to "boil the ocean"; we will never solve the problem of violence against women until we can create a society that values women.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Penny Adrian

    An amazing, well researched, and compassionate book by a National Treasure. Dr. Hill's voice is - as always - a voice of courage so necessary in our time. She makes it very clear that no anti-racist movement is complete without an equally powerful anti-misogyny movement (half of all Black people are women, after all). Women hold up half the sky, and the sexual and domestic terrorism committed against us must not be accepted or ignored if we are ever to live in a world of justice and equality. WOMEN' An amazing, well researched, and compassionate book by a National Treasure. Dr. Hill's voice is - as always - a voice of courage so necessary in our time. She makes it very clear that no anti-racist movement is complete without an equally powerful anti-misogyny movement (half of all Black people are women, after all). Women hold up half the sky, and the sexual and domestic terrorism committed against us must not be accepted or ignored if we are ever to live in a world of justice and equality. WOMEN'S LIVES MATTER!!!! Anita Hill is a hero of historic proportions.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Burstrem

    Prof. Hill reminds us how much work we have yet to do and how central and critical that work is to everything else. A lot of this book is painful and upsetting to read, but she does have excellent proposed approaches to solving these problems once you get to the end of the book. It gave me some insight into my own life that I managed to overlook for all these years. It is not a gripping read, nor is it always easily intelligible writing, but it is crucial and timely.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Martha Phillips

    My takeaway quote: "The number of women in U.S. jails has increased fourteenfold since 1970 ... at the heart of this stunning development are trauma, sexual violence, and mental health issues that are largely untreated and, in some cases, undetected or unacknowledged. Women in jail, the majority of whom are women of color, experience trauma at extraordinarily high rates both before and during their incarceration: 86 percent report having experienced sexual violence in their lifetimes." My takeaway quote: "The number of women in U.S. jails has increased fourteenfold since 1970 ... at the heart of this stunning development are trauma, sexual violence, and mental health issues that are largely untreated and, in some cases, undetected or unacknowledged. Women in jail, the majority of whom are women of color, experience trauma at extraordinarily high rates both before and during their incarceration: 86 percent report having experienced sexual violence in their lifetimes."

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bruin Mccon

    I can’t write a review that will do this book justice. Anita Hill’s perspective is broad, her knowledge deep and her vision for a future inspiring. This book is about ending gender violence and reframing it to do so. I got to a certain part of the book that reminded me of Unbound, which I read a few weeks ago. The two books go together in a horrible stew made of generations of trauma and the drive to finally make the world end it.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Blk Book Swap

    The fact that this doesn’t have 5 stars from every review is shocking — and sad. This is an essential must read from one the three most daring advocates against sexual harassment, assault & r*pe for literally the last 30 years. You will learn, you will cry and you will be angry. But this is 5 star work and a 5 star read.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    Very hard to read at times, but that just proves how vital this topic is. Very enlightening, informative, and meaningful. I just wish we'd have come a bit farther, or just a millimeter farther since 1991. A must read for ALL, NOT JUST WOMEN! Alas, most reviewers here are women... sigh! sob! grrrr! Very hard to read at times, but that just proves how vital this topic is. Very enlightening, informative, and meaningful. I just wish we'd have come a bit farther, or just a millimeter farther since 1991. A must read for ALL, NOT JUST WOMEN! Alas, most reviewers here are women... sigh! sob! grrrr!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    I learned a lot but found myself wanting to read less lecturing & opinions and more solutions. Her perspective was from a biased viewpoint and the finger pointing got tiring. But I agree with the author's premise- more attention needs to be paid to gender violence and harassment. We need to teach respect for every person. I learned a lot but found myself wanting to read less lecturing & opinions and more solutions. Her perspective was from a biased viewpoint and the finger pointing got tiring. But I agree with the author's premise- more attention needs to be paid to gender violence and harassment. We need to teach respect for every person.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

    While I did learn a little about different hallmark cases which influence gender rights in the US, I felt that most of the book was heavily focused on examples of gender violence. This is important to add context, of course, but the number of examples overwhelmed the history of progress and needed actions for further progress on the issue.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shari Suarez

    Anita Hill has spent her years after testifying to the sexual harassment she endured due to Clarence Thomas advocating against gender violence. In this book, she discusses the problems, outcomes and possible solutions to our epidemic of gender violence in this country. Touching, empowering and heartbreaking all at once.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    This is basically a summary of many cases and circumstances. I was looking forward to her own insights of her own life. I read almost all of the books referred to and knew of these cases so it was a lot of repeat information for me. Not a memoir.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jodi

    This was a fierce, searing, and smart book that made me sick to my stomach and bummed me the hell out. Hill handles the topic with grace, intelligence, and, surprisingly, lots of optimism.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey M

    This book was really well done and well researched by Anita Hill. She shows such strength in going over her experience and how she has been a support system for Christine Blasey Ford.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tyanna

    Well written and well researched.

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