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The King of Progressive Rock, a curator of talent and the reason behind Porcupine Tree's rise and fall, the enormous scope and depth of Steven Wilson's career has spanned over 30 years. This is his untold story. Part memoir, part meditation, part roadmap, part confection box of loose threads, lyrics, stories, pictures and ideas, A Limited Edition of One is a book presented The King of Progressive Rock, a curator of talent and the reason behind Porcupine Tree's rise and fall, the enormous scope and depth of Steven Wilson's career has spanned over 30 years. This is his untold story. Part memoir, part meditation, part roadmap, part confection box of loose threads, lyrics, stories, pictures and ideas, A Limited Edition of One is a book presented as a journey, one that takes an unconventional route through the life and work of Steven Wilson, following the years up to the final Porcupine Tree show and revealing the aftermath of his decision to disband the group just when they were poised for superstardom. This is Steven Wilson, as he has never been understood or glimpsed or presupposed before.


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The King of Progressive Rock, a curator of talent and the reason behind Porcupine Tree's rise and fall, the enormous scope and depth of Steven Wilson's career has spanned over 30 years. This is his untold story. Part memoir, part meditation, part roadmap, part confection box of loose threads, lyrics, stories, pictures and ideas, A Limited Edition of One is a book presented The King of Progressive Rock, a curator of talent and the reason behind Porcupine Tree's rise and fall, the enormous scope and depth of Steven Wilson's career has spanned over 30 years. This is his untold story. Part memoir, part meditation, part roadmap, part confection box of loose threads, lyrics, stories, pictures and ideas, A Limited Edition of One is a book presented as a journey, one that takes an unconventional route through the life and work of Steven Wilson, following the years up to the final Porcupine Tree show and revealing the aftermath of his decision to disband the group just when they were poised for superstardom. This is Steven Wilson, as he has never been understood or glimpsed or presupposed before.

30 review for Limited Edition of One

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    A couple of years ago, The Telegraph described Steven Wilson as “probably the most successful British artist you’ve never heard of“. Despite spanning well over thirty years, which included the rise and fall of a silly solo-project-turned-legendary-cult-band, his professional career has, in Wilson’s own words, been an accidental one, so you’d be hard-pressed to find anything in Limited Edition of One that follows the conventions of a rock star autobiography. "I lie a lot in interviews. (...) Ev A couple of years ago, The Telegraph described Steven Wilson as “probably the most successful British artist you’ve never heard of“. Despite spanning well over thirty years, which included the rise and fall of a silly solo-project-turned-legendary-cult-band, his professional career has, in Wilson’s own words, been an accidental one, so you’d be hard-pressed to find anything in Limited Edition of One that follows the conventions of a rock star autobiography. "I lie a lot in interviews. (...) Even the untruths tell you a lot about the subject. Which lies did I tell? There will probably be some in this book, too. Some of them will be accidental untruths, things I even believe myself, because memory plays strange tricks on you, plus I've been telling them for so long. Maybe this is a lie too, and everything that follows is completely true, but I want you to doubt it just enough." Limited Edition of One, written with the help of Mick Wall, who has in turn been described as “the world’s leading rock and metal writer“, is an intriguing collage, somewhere between memoir, music journalism, and interview, and even includes a pretty good piece of short fiction, The Harmony Codex, which is supposedly also going to be the title of Wilson’s next solo album, set for release in 2023. This book is for the fans, or rather, I think that being one is a prerequisite to get anything out of it—there’s nothing in here, despite the authors attempts, that will appeal or transcend to a wider audience who isn’t already familiar with or interested in Steven Wilson and what he has to say. And, as anyone who’s ever seen/heard/read a Steven Wilson interview or listened to his podcast with Tim Bowness, his partner in the distinctive but hard to categorize No-Man, will be aware of, he has a lot to say; Steven lives and breathes music, has the most eclectic taste imaginable, and definitely knows his stuff. My best friend first introduced me to Porcupine Tree’s In Absentia sometime in the late aughts, but I didn’t dive into their discography properly until many years later, after getting into Steven Wilson’s solo stuff and discovering his myriad of other projects in my own time. I saw him live all over Europe, had tickets for several shows on the cancelled The Future Bites tour, and will be seeing the reunited Porcupine T(h)ree twice later this year, so I still consider myself a big fan… and yet, I feel compelled to preface this review by saying that I was so profoundly disappointed by some of his political comments in the past year (which culminated in a spectacularly tone-deaf social media post in support of Israel in which he used the phrase “All Lives Matter”), that I haven’t been keeping up with him too much, even removing myself from many of the fan-spaces I used to be quite active in. All this to say that despite having been looking forward to this book since he first teased it some years back, I approached it a little warily. Thankfully, while his love for Israel shines through on several occasions, it stops well before stepping into Zionism, and I enjoyed Limited Edition of One a lot more than I had dared to hope: It was an all-around fascinating romp through his formative years, career, and musings on the music industry and more or less obscure artists from every genre imaginable. I really liked how the book was tackled, even the cheesier chapters that broke the fourth wall, and how it unfolded—just about every chapter contained a revelation, and was often prefaced by snippets of lyrics from many years prior, showing an odd sort of prescience for how his life and the world would end up going. He can occasionally come off as a bit snobby, and I felt that this was amplified in writing, but I appreciated that he didn’t try to paint himself in a better light, especially concerning how difficult he can be to work with and what caused Porcupine Tree to go on hiatus, as well as his romantic relationships. He may have started with a caveat lector about him being a liar, but I felt this was quite genuine, authentic, and brutally honest in parts—surely he would’ve otherwise sugarcoated certain things? If you’re a fan hoping for verifiable hard facts about the history of Porcupine Tree, I’d suggest picking up Rich Wilson’s unofficial biography Time Flies instead, but if you’re interested in the thoughts and unusual experiences of a music fan making and enjoying music, this is a worthwhile, fascinating, uncompromising, and rather illuminating contemplation of today’s “music biz”. I’ll revisit this in audio book format soon, which I suspect might even be the better suited medium.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Vlad Pîrvu

    Pink Floyd este trupa care a reușit să mă transpună pe niște coordonate de existența cărora nici nu bănuiam. Odată cu muzica și versurile lui Gilmour și Waters, am făcut cunoștință cu un nou univers și am crezut că, „gata, asta a fost, de aici nu mai am unde să mă duc”. Dar, nu cu mult timp după acel moment, mi-a intrat pe radar Steven Wilson (Porcupine Tree, No Man, Blackfield), care a luat noul univers floydian și mi l-a spart în milioane și milioane de galaxii, fiecare cu identitatea și perso Pink Floyd este trupa care a reușit să mă transpună pe niște coordonate de existența cărora nici nu bănuiam. Odată cu muzica și versurile lui Gilmour și Waters, am făcut cunoștință cu un nou univers și am crezut că, „gata, asta a fost, de aici nu mai am unde să mă duc”. Dar, nu cu mult timp după acel moment, mi-a intrat pe radar Steven Wilson (Porcupine Tree, No Man, Blackfield), care a luat noul univers floydian și mi l-a spart în milioane și milioane de galaxii, fiecare cu identitatea și personalitatea ei. Și mi-a pus capac. Steven Wilson e genul de artist care vorbește cel puțin la fel de bine precum compune. Vine din rândul acelor filosofi ai artelor, care reușesc să pătrundă atât de adânc în vintrele ocupației lor, că te poți trezi ascultându-i zeci de ore pe YouTube cum vorbesc despre muzică, teatru, film și viață. Fără să te plictisești, doar hrănindu-te. Din acest punct de vedere, îl așez lângă Sergiu Celibidache, Andrei Șerban, David Lynch sau Frank Zappa, oameni fascinanți care mi-au modelat personalitatea și mi-au schimbat viața în bine, oricât de cheesy ar suna asta. „Limited Edition of One” nu este deloc o carte pretențioasă (ba chiar e foarte accesibilă) și, deși nu se ridică la nivelul muzicii pe care o compune Wilson (dar puține lucruri o fac), este bine scrisă, onestă și, în dese rânduri, captivantă. Reușește să spună povestea de succes (sau…?) a unui englez tocilar și încăpățânat, pe care nimic nu îl recomandă pentru a fi un mega star rock. Mă rog, nimic în afara talentului. Oferă detalii picante din cariera artistului, pe care fanii precum sunt eu le vor devora pe nemestecate. Are umor, autoironie și nu se ia foarte tare în serios. Chiar dacă sunt mai mult decât subiectiv, sunt sigur că această autobiografie îi va încânta până peste cap pe fanii lui Steven Wilson. Asta în vreme ce nici celorlalți nu văd să le facă o impresie proastă, deși ei ar putea fi ceva mai rezervați.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Alison Mcauliffe

    I will confess to being a diehard Steven Wilson fan since I first saw him perform with Porcupine Tree back in 2007, so I may be slightly biased. I picked this book up today and finished it in one sitting. I love the way it’s not strictly autobiographical nor when it does stray into autobiographical territory the timeline is not linear. Much of it is really about the way Steven ticks. Fascinating insights into his early influences, views on music today, fans and even an intriguing short story. A I will confess to being a diehard Steven Wilson fan since I first saw him perform with Porcupine Tree back in 2007, so I may be slightly biased. I picked this book up today and finished it in one sitting. I love the way it’s not strictly autobiographical nor when it does stray into autobiographical territory the timeline is not linear. Much of it is really about the way Steven ticks. Fascinating insights into his early influences, views on music today, fans and even an intriguing short story. A must read for any fan.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michæl Barker

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. As I read Chapter Twenty-Five, interestingly titled The Harmony Codex - A Story, I listen to Porcupine Tree’s 2000 album Lightbulb Sun. The soundtrack to this short story was not so much of a conscious decision as an intuitive one; having flicked through my record collection, something in the back of my head urged me to pick this one, even over In Absentia and Fear of a Blank Planet - it could be that I wanted to see the clear vinyl (to my horror it turned out that my copy was sealed, revealing As I read Chapter Twenty-Five, interestingly titled The Harmony Codex - A Story, I listen to Porcupine Tree’s 2000 album Lightbulb Sun. The soundtrack to this short story was not so much of a conscious decision as an intuitive one; having flicked through my record collection, something in the back of my head urged me to pick this one, even over In Absentia and Fear of a Blank Planet - it could be that I wanted to see the clear vinyl (to my horror it turned out that my copy was sealed, revealing that I never took the time to even look at it after I bought it - insert some kind of The Future Bites-style consumerist statement here). Anyway, I digress. This short story was mentioned as being included a few chapters earlier, and I’ve been looking forward to reading it. Now, an unexpected catastrophe begins as our point-of-perspective characters ride up in an elevator (in a skyscraper which includes the offices of the hilariously named Globatronic Solutions) and I am simultaneously warned about the effects of human ways, human behaviour, human ignorance and human misinformation during the track Last Chance to Evacuate Planet Earth Before it is Recycled. I include this to outline an important detail of this story. It is so Steven Wilson. A short fiction story may seem like something new for him, but it fits so neatly into his canon of works that a record picked almost at random from his back catalogue can provide the perfect soundtrack, despite sharing little in the way of narrative. I wonder if I’d have picked To the Bone or Deadwing, would I have the same sense of things clicking into place? Probably. The ending of the short story, naturally, was frustrating. Perfectly so. And frustratingly perfect - leaving more to question as many great short stories do. The Harmony Codex - A Story would have fit in perfectly in one of those collections curated by someone like Chuck Palahniuk, where you have no expectations from each story, but still you’re left a little dumbfounded. I’ll also briefly acknowledge the fact that in Chapter Seventeen of the book, Lists #4, Steven has included The Harmony Codex (2023) as number 11 on a list of his 10 favourite albums of his own. Speculate away. Coincidentally, the following and final chapter Arriving... begins with a lyrics from another Lightbulb Sun song, Where We Would Be. Many of the chapters begin similarly; foreworded by a younger Wilson in the form of his own lyrics; while some begin with the autobiography classic of a nostalgic photograph, to set the tone and theme of the forthcoming pages. The bulk of the book up until this point has been a collage of autobiography and musical journalism. Anybody who has listened to Steven’s podcast with Tim Bowness, The Album Years, will be unable to contest that he knows his stuff (disregarding the hilarious errata sections of each episode). I’ll admit to having read through SW’s wiki page a fair few times over the years, as well the individual pages for each album... band... single etc. I also follow him on Instagram, though that mostly provides me with pictures of his dog, Bowie. With this in mind, there was still a lot more to learn about the life of this man who has, in his words, an accidental career. Insight into his early years, his relationships with family members, mostly his parents and his brother. Some of the most interesting chapters are where he and Mick Wall, who has earned himself a with credit for his input, are in conversation and bouncing off of each other like old friends. Two people with decades of experience of the music industry talking over Zoom about where the book is going, perhaps not realising at the time that the transcript itself would be provocative enough to make the book. My personal highlights: • Any mention of Mikael Åkerfeldt (my friend, Mikael, from the Swedish band Opeth / The singer from Opeth, my friend Mikael Åkerfeldt / my friend from Opeth (the Swedish metal band), Mikael.) • Reading about the inventions and contraptions that Steven’s father had built for him when he was younger (the sequencer with nine steps - as his father had no idea about common time signatures). • Anything that hinted toward the future of his musical output (not that I consider it to be reliable information. Steven himself warns of his tendency to lie, this book being no exception.) My personal lowlight: • Disappointed to discover that Steven Wilson's dad is not Richard Wilson. I don't believe it. In short; if you’re a fan of Steven Wilson in any of his numerous guises, this book is definitely worth a read. Simple as that.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Yevgeny Tarabanov

    A wonderful treat for die hard fans. This is a rare autobiography that goes beyond the information you can usually find online. The book truly feels like a peek into the life and thoughts of Steven Wilson in a way that previous interviews and behind the scenes footage never captured before. Sure, he can sound like a bit of a snob sometimes and he’s also brutally honest in certain places in the book. But that’s part of the magic! He is what he is - as uncompromising as ever. And that’s some of the A wonderful treat for die hard fans. This is a rare autobiography that goes beyond the information you can usually find online. The book truly feels like a peek into the life and thoughts of Steven Wilson in a way that previous interviews and behind the scenes footage never captured before. Sure, he can sound like a bit of a snob sometimes and he’s also brutally honest in certain places in the book. But that’s part of the magic! He is what he is - as uncompromising as ever. And that’s some of the best qualities of his art and this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Fraser

    I really enjoyed this. Then I knew I would. I love the music, pretty much all of it. From what I’ve seen/heard of Steven Wilson in interview - and on stage live - nothing changes that. I have questions, quite a few, as no book can quite answer my own unique perspective on the music, the lyrics and outlook. There is a parallel track here of a music fan making music and a music fan enjoying music - and that’s where my questions lie in that strange nexus of ‘overlap’. I like how this book was tackle I really enjoyed this. Then I knew I would. I love the music, pretty much all of it. From what I’ve seen/heard of Steven Wilson in interview - and on stage live - nothing changes that. I have questions, quite a few, as no book can quite answer my own unique perspective on the music, the lyrics and outlook. There is a parallel track here of a music fan making music and a music fan enjoying music - and that’s where my questions lie in that strange nexus of ‘overlap’. I like how this book was tackled, I enjoy being given a different way of looking at someone’s life, their experience, attitude etc. I knew this was unlikely to be a conventional ‘here is my life story’ sort of thing and I’m glad it was so. The signs were there at the outset but reaffirmed as the chapters slowly unfolded. Fascinating way to reveal oneself, and in some ways not laying bare everything. Steven admits to lying in interviews, but we’re not quite sure where when and what. But keeping us slightly off balance is his way - as with his music and the twists and turns of what he might do, or not, next. It’s perhaps what keeps many of us coming back.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rod Sedgwick

    Everything I could’ve hoped for and more. A very thoughtful and illuminating read about one of my most treasured artists and their thoughts, musings and experiences of a life well-lived.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gallifrey

    Full disclosure: Steven Wilson is my favourite musician of all time, and probably the only "celebrity" I even come close to idolising, although I try to stop short of that. Take from that what you will - I felt a lot of things reading this. Steven has been a bit of an enigma for most of his career, and he is right when he describes it in this book as being reasonably unique - whilst most artists burn bright and fade out, he steadily got better over a span of 30 odd years, before releasing arguably Full disclosure: Steven Wilson is my favourite musician of all time, and probably the only "celebrity" I even come close to idolising, although I try to stop short of that. Take from that what you will - I felt a lot of things reading this. Steven has been a bit of an enigma for most of his career, and he is right when he describes it in this book as being reasonably unique - whilst most artists burn bright and fade out, he steadily got better over a span of 30 odd years, before releasing arguably his best works at the age of 45. His recognition as a generational artist was even slower than this. So he has quite a unique perspective. Never inside the mainstream, but always close to it. Worshipped by thousands but a complete unknown to the vast populace. And in true style, this is a fairly non-standard book. He does do brief passages of the personal history routine (and I personally wished he did more, as these were quite interesting), but a lot of this book is dedicated to general musings about art and culture, some of which are a bit old man yells at cloud, but some are quite illuminating, especially given that he is one of the very few of his generation that has actually tried to stay in touch with modern music. But I have to say that a lot of my emotions in regards to this book are incredibly subjective, and probably not that useful to anyone but me. I have a lot in common with Mr Wilson, and this is something I learned even after I became a huge listener of his music. There's a spiritual connection I have to so many parts of this book, to the point where it's like reading my own diary. I'm going to give a copy to my mother. Not because she'd like him or his story, but because she doesn't really understand me. There is so much of what I'm trying to achieve written out from the perspective of someone who has achieved it, and even if I don't get 1% as far as he did, I still think it's a path worth leading. I learned a lot about myself from reading this, which is something I can't say about any other book. I've made life choices inspired by what I read here, after taking a chance to reevaluate where I'm at. I don't feel that's particularly relevant to anyone else. But yeah, it's got some cool bits about music in it too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tim Hughes

    If you don’t know Steven Wilson but he is the creative force behind a progressive rock band called, Porcupine Tree. He even admits it’s a wired name, but there again it was all made up. The records were all created in his bedroom. He has come along way since then, even called “the king of Prog”. This is not your usual boring rock autobiography of drink and drugs in fact Steven admits he pretty boring. But he and Mick Wall (the ghost writer*) know that the modern reader needs to be engaged with mo If you don’t know Steven Wilson but he is the creative force behind a progressive rock band called, Porcupine Tree. He even admits it’s a wired name, but there again it was all made up. The records were all created in his bedroom. He has come along way since then, even called “the king of Prog”. This is not your usual boring rock autobiography of drink and drugs in fact Steven admits he pretty boring. But he and Mick Wall (the ghost writer*) know that the modern reader needs to be engaged with more than just words. So while you get an autobiographical story there are also lists of Steven’s favourite songs of all time, plus musings about various stages in his career, which keeps the book interesting, I read the limited deluxe version which features a second volume of some “contextual” zoom conversations between Steven and Mick, some of Steven’s short stories as well as the detail behind the additional CD. The CD has tracks from Steven’s career, from school bands through to his work in the advertising industry. As well as Blazing Apostles, God, No man is an island and of course, Porcupine Tree. A great dive into Steven’s actual musical journey. *I had a conversation with Mick Wall on Instagram and he said it was a collaboration with Steven, rather than ghost written. Mick went onto to say that Steve is a good writer.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tiff

    Other reviewers have given excellent synopses, so will share only my list(!) of key takeaways from this excellent memoir (I use the term loosely as this man has much left to do in this lifetime): 1. I put together a playlist of Steven's top 100 songs of all time (well, 98 because one was in a foreign language that I couldn't figure out how to spell from the audiobook and one was apparently just that obscure for the artist, not OCD friendly), a mixtape for the modern day (but promise to try to fin Other reviewers have given excellent synopses, so will share only my list(!) of key takeaways from this excellent memoir (I use the term loosely as this man has much left to do in this lifetime): 1. I put together a playlist of Steven's top 100 songs of all time (well, 98 because one was in a foreign language that I couldn't figure out how to spell from the audiobook and one was apparently just that obscure for the artist, not OCD friendly), a mixtape for the modern day (but promise to try to find some on vinyl!) 2. I took his suggestion to watch Bad News and it's one of the funniest things I've seen in eons 3. Our Mr. Wilson may have a budding career in nonfiction writing if this "music thing" doesn't pan out 4. I'm definitely stealing some of his well-articulated rationale for going vegan and hope he does decide to make the full switch and be a bit more vocal about it. The movement sure could use it as we are on the brink of a paradigm shift, hopefully 5. I'm making it my life's mission to get that Disney World sad Steven parade gif from the Insurgentes film to go viral. It's the least I can do. Well worth your time, especially for audiophiles looking to commiserate with a fellow music nerd. Highly recommend the self-narrated audiobook format. Looking forward to seeing P/T for the first (last?) time later this year finally.

  11. 4 out of 5

    George Cutter

    I don't read a lot of biographies, but sometimes there comes along a book that grabs my attention. I've been a fan of Steven Wilson since stumbling across his third solo album, The Raven That Refused to Sing, in 2013. So naturally, I had to pick this up. This isn't quite your standard autobiography: some chapters are memoir based, others are recorded conversations (that are endlessly fascinating) and others are lists of his favourite songs, records, films, books, ect... This was a great read and I don't read a lot of biographies, but sometimes there comes along a book that grabs my attention. I've been a fan of Steven Wilson since stumbling across his third solo album, The Raven That Refused to Sing, in 2013. So naturally, I had to pick this up. This isn't quite your standard autobiography: some chapters are memoir based, others are recorded conversations (that are endlessly fascinating) and others are lists of his favourite songs, records, films, books, ect... This was a great read and worth picking up if you're a fan of his music. It's a crime that his music isn't more well known, because for my money he's one of the best in the business. Limited Edition of One is a thoroughly enjoyable read that is insightful, witty, and always interesting. I was lucky enough to acquire my copy at a book signing where I got to chat with him for around thirty seconds or so (one must always be conscious not to hold up the line for too long). Having now read his book, my anticipation for the eleventh Porcupine Tree record (and his sneakily announced seventh solo album for 2023) has heightened tremendously.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Clark

    An excellent insight into the life of the best musician you've never heard of. Stevens book is not like your ordinary rock star biography. There's no wild parties, no excessive drug use, no near death experiences. It reads as a musician, after years creating a huge back catalogue, producing, mixing, remixing artists like Black Sabbath and Tears For Fears, even selling out the prestigious Royal Albert Hall, he's still really not broken the mainstream which is a travesty. This biographical story te An excellent insight into the life of the best musician you've never heard of. Stevens book is not like your ordinary rock star biography. There's no wild parties, no excessive drug use, no near death experiences. It reads as a musician, after years creating a huge back catalogue, producing, mixing, remixing artists like Black Sabbath and Tears For Fears, even selling out the prestigious Royal Albert Hall, he's still really not broken the mainstream which is a travesty. This biographical story tells the struggles, the inspiration and his incredible journey to where he is now. It's an easy, quick read too. Amazing page turner, that after 3 and a half fascinating hours, I was ready to read again. Highly recommended. Discover Steven Wilson... then discover his music. You won't be disappointed.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Allan Heron

    What an excellent book by Steven Wilson. Part-autobiography and part-anaylsis of where artists like Steven could operate in the present day music business when it's changed out of all recognition from when they started out. All that plus lots of lists which let you know the kind of things that make up Steven. What an excellent book by Steven Wilson. Part-autobiography and part-anaylsis of where artists like Steven could operate in the present day music business when it's changed out of all recognition from when they started out. All that plus lots of lists which let you know the kind of things that make up Steven.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Glyn Gasson

    Not your traditional rock biography, this isn't chronological, and a lot of it is the thoughts of Steven Wilson, not his history. Along with many lists. Because of this it's thoroughly enjoyable and highly recommended. Not your traditional rock biography, this isn't chronological, and a lot of it is the thoughts of Steven Wilson, not his history. Along with many lists. Because of this it's thoroughly enjoyable and highly recommended.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hannu Sinisalo

    Huippukiinnostavan muusikon huippukiinnostava omaelämäkerta. Ei pelkkää kronologiaa ja bändimuisteluita, itse asiassa aika vähän mitään sellaista. Tästä saa hyvän kuvan siitä, millainen Steven Wilson oikeasti itse on.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rodrigo

    Reading this book I noticed that I love lists. It's a very interesting book for Steven Wilson fans and has a very Wilson humor. Reading this book I noticed that I love lists. It's a very interesting book for Steven Wilson fans and has a very Wilson humor.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paul Keen

    A good listen, slightly let down by the short story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nika Chomakhidze

  19. 5 out of 5

    Bill Flanagan

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tiki

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jonas Sjöberg

  23. 5 out of 5

    Martin

  24. 5 out of 5

    Niall

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mary Harrison

  26. 4 out of 5

    Tim Hidskes

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gareth Hughes

  28. 5 out of 5

    Max Janotka

  29. 4 out of 5

    Conor McSheffery

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tuuso

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