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Scattered Seed

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Three sisters navigate the horrors of the Middle Passage in a powerful historical novel about family, honor, and the will to live by the author of The Daughter of Union County. Timbuktu, western Africa, 1706. Folashade, the fourteen-year-old daughter of a professor of linguistics, is sent south with her older sisters, Bibi and Adaeze, to endure the painful ceremony that a g Three sisters navigate the horrors of the Middle Passage in a powerful historical novel about family, honor, and the will to live by the author of The Daughter of Union County. Timbuktu, western Africa, 1706. Folashade, the fourteen-year-old daughter of a professor of linguistics, is sent south with her older sisters, Bibi and Adaeze, to endure the painful ceremony that a girl on the cusp of womanhood is expected to. In Djenné, on the banks of the Niger, the sisters’ fate and that of their fellow Bambara is changed forever when they’re kidnapped, marched toward grueling indignities on Gorée Island, and eventually hauled aboard an English slaver bound for the Americas. Before they are inevitably separated, Folashade, Bibi, and Adaeze plot to keep their memories alive. Drawing from her ancestry, Francine Thomas Howard gives an authentic voice to the horrors of the Middle Passage―and an empowered one to a girl who is determined to survive, to honor her father and Timbuktu, and to ensure that her and her sisters’ names will never be forgotten.


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Three sisters navigate the horrors of the Middle Passage in a powerful historical novel about family, honor, and the will to live by the author of The Daughter of Union County. Timbuktu, western Africa, 1706. Folashade, the fourteen-year-old daughter of a professor of linguistics, is sent south with her older sisters, Bibi and Adaeze, to endure the painful ceremony that a g Three sisters navigate the horrors of the Middle Passage in a powerful historical novel about family, honor, and the will to live by the author of The Daughter of Union County. Timbuktu, western Africa, 1706. Folashade, the fourteen-year-old daughter of a professor of linguistics, is sent south with her older sisters, Bibi and Adaeze, to endure the painful ceremony that a girl on the cusp of womanhood is expected to. In Djenné, on the banks of the Niger, the sisters’ fate and that of their fellow Bambara is changed forever when they’re kidnapped, marched toward grueling indignities on Gorée Island, and eventually hauled aboard an English slaver bound for the Americas. Before they are inevitably separated, Folashade, Bibi, and Adaeze plot to keep their memories alive. Drawing from her ancestry, Francine Thomas Howard gives an authentic voice to the horrors of the Middle Passage―and an empowered one to a girl who is determined to survive, to honor her father and Timbuktu, and to ensure that her and her sisters’ names will never be forgotten.

59 review for Scattered Seed

  1. 4 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ⚡ϟ⚡⛈⚡☁ ❇️❤❣

    I think I'll give this one full marks. Well, of course, me wouldn't be me if I had no axes to grind on minute details and trifles and plot dev and all kinds of stuff that sounded off... but again, I'm a total sucker for family history tidbits and extended genealogy and weird familial ties that some of us (all? some? all?) have and love learning about. Here's a piece of totally heartbreaking family history that's totally horrible. Dreadful. Heartrending. And dreadful some more. Yet... as this boo I think I'll give this one full marks. Well, of course, me wouldn't be me if I had no axes to grind on minute details and trifles and plot dev and all kinds of stuff that sounded off... but again, I'm a total sucker for family history tidbits and extended genealogy and weird familial ties that some of us (all? some? all?) have and love learning about. Here's a piece of totally heartbreaking family history that's totally horrible. Dreadful. Heartrending. And dreadful some more. Yet... as this book goes to show, even the darkest of times can be expected to give way to proper light. Let's hope that this book, as it is, gave some extra comfort to those brave and naive women (and men) (and women some more: they had it worst of all!) who lived once upon a time. And whose struggle brought on such illuminating books as this one. Cheers and may many more wonderful books come our way from the same author. Amen.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mocha Drop

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My interest in Scattered Seed by Francine Thomas Howard was piqued when the book blurb cited the story was drawn from her ancestry. The premise seemed to add it would delve into some aspects of history, as well. While I find her scholarship and dedication to the African Diaspora admirable, I found this offering underwhelming. Perhaps others who are not familiar with the First and Middle passages may glean cursory knowledge from reading this novel; I doubt anyone with a notion of familiarity woul My interest in Scattered Seed by Francine Thomas Howard was piqued when the book blurb cited the story was drawn from her ancestry. The premise seemed to add it would delve into some aspects of history, as well. While I find her scholarship and dedication to the African Diaspora admirable, I found this offering underwhelming. Perhaps others who are not familiar with the First and Middle passages may glean cursory knowledge from reading this novel; I doubt anyone with a notion of familiarity would learn anything significant or insightful. The story opens with 14-year-old Folashade, the youngest of three sisters of Mali “royalty” (their lineage is unnecessarily repeated throughout the story), attempting to thwart an unwanted bethrotal and inevitable female circumcision procedure that must occur prior to marriage. Her father, having married off the two older sisters, has delayed as long as he could with Folashade, his favorite; after all the procedure should have been done four years prior. He is adamant that both must be done despite a promise to his deceased wife who died from complications of such a procedure. While vacationing, the sisters are kidnapped along with servants while awaiting a rendezvous with their husband’s families. The First Passage is detailed vividly as they traverse for a few months over land to Goree Island in Dakar, Senegal. The two eldest sisters endure humiliation and rape; one coping with an escape into madness, the other attempts cunning and defiance as a balm. Folashade seemingly falls away as a backdrop. The transatlantic Middle Passage to the Americas is again marked by even more graphic scenes of rape, acts of depravity and sexual torture by sadistic and vile captors before their fates are sealed on the auction block in Louisiana – not without some unrealistic (almost to the point of absurdity) plot twists and turns. While it solidly contributes to the horrors, inhumanity, and brutality of the slave trade, this book chooses to focus on three descendants who spend most of the book hoping for rescue and naively attempting to reason with their captors for their freedom and safe return to Timbuktu. In principle, it’s understandable and plausible; however, in execution it fails. Granted, this is a work of fiction and the author has every right to use their creative licenses as they see fit; but there were many instances in which I had to suspend belief just to get through the story, skim passages which were pages of repetitive bickering, and struggle to maintain interests with the lead protagonists who were not endearing in the least. Sure, they are “princesses” - but their haughtiness, attitudes of entitlement, condescending demeanor, and belief that they’d be rescued were sustained too long considering the mental, physical, and emotional damage they endured – after months of hardship, the realities of horror, death, violence, and starvation and sexual subjugation experienced along the journey - I would think they would be humbled – the arrogance would be bumped down a few notches; but instead, it persisted. Another nit is the uneveness of delivery - for example, author spends quite a bit of time on the subject of female circumcision: the differing options of what parts can be removed, why their culture demands it should be done, implied depictions regarding the damage in sexual function, physical scarification and the repulsion European men felt toward women who had endured the procedure. Another issue is the convenient epiphany at the rather rushed ending, where a character who spent most of the novel in a fugue state suddenly comes to her senses (literally) during the last minutes to offer uncharacteristically sage advice in the proverbial “eleventh hour.” The novel then ends abruptly on a cliffhanger as the women depart with their “owners,” men of different cultures, ethnicities, and professions (a Latin/Hispanic planter, a French furrier, and a Native American) implying the separation of the sisters forever. Thus upon their arrival in America after a hellacious capture and journey; their final fates are unknown to the reader. I suppose I expected a bit more closure; but respect the author’s decision to end the novel as she chooses. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for an opportunity to review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Winter

    I feel that something would be morally wrong to say that this book was good. I think the proper term to use here would be “Educational”? Then again, I am not sure if that could be considered proper. Let us just go with “Uncategorizable” Thomas Howard gives us one of the most disturbing books I have read to date. Do not get me wrong in any way, there is rape, speaking of rape, but down to graphic details? That is way beyond my comfort level, when it comes to children. Anybody for that matter. Hones I feel that something would be morally wrong to say that this book was good. I think the proper term to use here would be “Educational”? Then again, I am not sure if that could be considered proper. Let us just go with “Uncategorizable” Thomas Howard gives us one of the most disturbing books I have read to date. Do not get me wrong in any way, there is rape, speaking of rape, but down to graphic details? That is way beyond my comfort level, when it comes to children. Anybody for that matter. Honestly! I was ready to call it quits. I have a daughter and of the thought of anyone kidnapping my baby. Dear GOD! Let me not even let my mind take me there again. So! The story is set in 1706 Timbuktu, West Africa. 3 Sisters, 14-year-old Folashade is being sent with her 2 older sisters Bibi and Adaeze, for the painful female circumcision. Which they call a ceremony, which happens there when they are on the cusp of womanhood. However! In Dejenne, the banks of Niger, the 3 sisters and their fellow Bambara are kidnapped. Taken to Goree Island where they are Assaulted, Repeatedly Raped and Tortured. This all happens prior to them being put on a slavers ship headed to America. Falashade, Bibi and Adaeze plot to do whatever they can, to make sure their memories are kept alive. They have to do this before they are inevitably separated forever. To know this story is about the authors family is absolutely heartbreaking. However, hard, and hurtful that must have been, I am sure she is grateful to be able to trace that piece of heritage. So many of us cannot trace our family line because they were not recorded, or they were made to vanish. Poof! They cannot claim something that did not exist. Thank you NetGalley/Francine Thomas Howard/Lake Union Publishing for this eARC in advance. My opinions are of my own volition.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Emily Holloway

    TW: sexual assault, rape, violence, mass killings There are very few books I find so raw and harrowing that I struggle to finish them. I had a physical reaction to Scattered Seed, and I highly recommend it to others for furthering your education of the true origins of slavery through the Middle Passage. Scattered Seeds follows three sisters of royalty living in Middle Passage era Timbuktu. The daughters of a linguistics professor, all three women possess distinct expertise that make their lives ea TW: sexual assault, rape, violence, mass killings There are very few books I find so raw and harrowing that I struggle to finish them. I had a physical reaction to Scattered Seed, and I highly recommend it to others for furthering your education of the true origins of slavery through the Middle Passage. Scattered Seeds follows three sisters of royalty living in Middle Passage era Timbuktu. The daughters of a linguistics professor, all three women possess distinct expertise that make their lives easier as wives and mothers. On the eve of the youngest sister's wedding, the women are captured and forced into the slave trade, where the sisters must ban together and use their unique talents to avoid the traumatic, often-fatal journey to the Americas. There were so many times I wanted to DNF this book, not because of the writing or the plot, but because the story is so graphic. What's harder to swallow is that it's authentic and unfiltered, historically accurate. These atrocities were committed on a grand scale, and violence against women, specifically black women is just as prevalent as ever. Then to learn this story is about Francine Thomas Howard's own family? And you realize that millions of families have evolved from these same exact origins? It's gut-wrenching, yet we all owe it to their memories to continue studying and sharing these stories, no matter how uncomfortable they are to read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Macknificent Reads

    Dnf @ 14% I did not enjoy what I read of this book at all. The sisters that the story is about are annoying, especially Folashade. She is supposed to be 14 but behaves like a 9 year old. The author tells us the sisters are close but there was no evidence of that before we were dropped into the brutal and dark portions of the book. It's strange that the author spent a whole chapter talking about how learned the people of Timbuktu were, but the main characters act like they have never seen or heard Dnf @ 14% I did not enjoy what I read of this book at all. The sisters that the story is about are annoying, especially Folashade. She is supposed to be 14 but behaves like a 9 year old. The author tells us the sisters are close but there was no evidence of that before we were dropped into the brutal and dark portions of the book. It's strange that the author spent a whole chapter talking about how learned the people of Timbuktu were, but the main characters act like they have never seen or heard of white people before. They literally bring up Spain and how Moors are no longer accepted there so...what is going on? The narrative voice was not compelling, I already know about the horrors of the Middle Passage, and the main characters irked me. I feel good about not finishing this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jazzie077

    Scattered Seed by Francine Thomas Howard. Pub Date: August 2, 2o22. Rating: 3 stars. In a harrowing story, this book delves into the origins of slavery through the Middle Passage. Focused around three sisters, this is the story of a time in history that is painful, heartbreaking and traumatic. The three sisters who come from affluence are captured and entered into the slave trade with ultimate sacrifices to be made. This story is not for the faint of heart and has many gruesome scenes with trigg Scattered Seed by Francine Thomas Howard. Pub Date: August 2, 2o22. Rating: 3 stars. In a harrowing story, this book delves into the origins of slavery through the Middle Passage. Focused around three sisters, this is the story of a time in history that is painful, heartbreaking and traumatic. The three sisters who come from affluence are captured and entered into the slave trade with ultimate sacrifices to be made. This story is not for the faint of heart and has many gruesome scenes with trigger warnings of rape, sexual assault and violence. I think this book is educational in the fact that it is based off of the author's family history with emphasis on telling the pure truth of the time period no matter how difficult it is to read. Delicate subject matter, but important to shed light on to not forget history. Thanks to NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for this e-arc in exchange for my honest review. #scatteredseed #netgalley

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leanne Neale

    For me, Francine Thomas Howard’s Scattered Seed was a page-turner. Set in 18th century Africa, three royal sisters are kidnapped along with other members of their village to be sold abroad into slavery. Each sister experiences the personal horrors awaiting them at the hands of the slave traders all the while holding out in the vain hope of being rescued by their tribal king and his warriors. A very harrowing fictional account of the horror and injustice of losing one’s identity in the frenzy for For me, Francine Thomas Howard’s Scattered Seed was a page-turner. Set in 18th century Africa, three royal sisters are kidnapped along with other members of their village to be sold abroad into slavery. Each sister experiences the personal horrors awaiting them at the hands of the slave traders all the while holding out in the vain hope of being rescued by their tribal king and his warriors. A very harrowing fictional account of the horror and injustice of losing one’s identity in the frenzy for colonial imperialism and prosperity.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aria Harlow

    It feels wront to say that I enjoyed this book when it is about a harrowing and very real topic. The book is so well written with a heartwrenching and gripping storyline and well developed characters who I took to my heart, especially the three sisters. I went through a rollercoaster of emotions whilst reading this book and I know it will be one that stays with me for a long time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    This was not an easy read. Obviously, being set against Middle Passage era Africa, I had not expected it to be a light read by any means, but this was perhaps a tad more graphic than I'd have liked, showcasing the real horrors of FGM, rape, sexual assault and torture exactly as it must have been. This is not for the faint of heart, and while a good story and an education to those of us who are not quite as familiar with the slave trade happening in the Middle Passage era, you definitely need to This was not an easy read. Obviously, being set against Middle Passage era Africa, I had not expected it to be a light read by any means, but this was perhaps a tad more graphic than I'd have liked, showcasing the real horrors of FGM, rape, sexual assault and torture exactly as it must have been. This is not for the faint of heart, and while a good story and an education to those of us who are not quite as familiar with the slave trade happening in the Middle Passage era, you definitely need to be prepared for harrowing scenes and wanting to put the book away every now and again. That being said, the book tells the story of three sisters of a nobleman, who are kidnapped and forced into slavery as the youngest sister ( is getting ready to be married off. Each of the sisters has a unique point of view on their lives and the happening in the story. They also each possess a unique skill that will help them come to terms with their journey to the Americas and their fate away from their home in Mali. Persisting through the harrowing, yet incredibly believable and important scenes in the book, I found Scattered Seed to be an educational page-turner of a read. I learned a lot and am looking for additional books set in this timeframe. A big thank you to NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for providing me with an eARC in return for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mistress Maleficent

    Ok…I’m honestly unsure of how to feel about this book. Going into it I knew nothing, absolutely nothing, about the era/the middle passage etc… But the synopsis had that hook that drew me in. We follow sisters, young in age, that are kidnapped and used. There’s got to be a TW here as it focuses on rape, torture, FGM and so on. Unfortunately, this also takes up a lot of the story in the book, and it’s extremely graphic in nature. I totally understand that that sort of thing happened and frequently Ok…I’m honestly unsure of how to feel about this book. Going into it I knew nothing, absolutely nothing, about the era/the middle passage etc… But the synopsis had that hook that drew me in. We follow sisters, young in age, that are kidnapped and used. There’s got to be a TW here as it focuses on rape, torture, FGM and so on. Unfortunately, this also takes up a lot of the story in the book, and it’s extremely graphic in nature. I totally understand that that sort of thing happened and frequently. I understand that the stories need to be told and people now need to be made aware of it. But did it need to be this graphic? Did it need so much of it in the book? Honestly. I just don’t know. The story is well written, there’s no arguing that. The author has created a book that is extremely uncomfortable for the reader and it’s definitely not for everybody. It’s hard to say you “liked” a book like this, but….it’s a challenging read, with extreme graphic content, but really well written. Because of this, I feel like I can recommend it, but clearly it won’t be for everyone. Thank you to the author, the publisher and Netgalley for my arc.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karen Kennan

    I was really interested to start this book as I’ve never read a novel about the Middle Passage but have briefly studied it in the past. It features 14 year old Folashade and her two older sisters - all African princesses from Timbuktu in the early 1700s. They are travelling to Djenne for Folashade to endure FGM, which signifies her imminent womanhood. However, the three are kidnapped by slave traders, along with the rest of their company. The book goes on to detail their journey, and their attem I was really interested to start this book as I’ve never read a novel about the Middle Passage but have briefly studied it in the past. It features 14 year old Folashade and her two older sisters - all African princesses from Timbuktu in the early 1700s. They are travelling to Djenne for Folashade to endure FGM, which signifies her imminent womanhood. However, the three are kidnapped by slave traders, along with the rest of their company. The book goes on to detail their journey, and their attempts to escape to safely. Of course, due to the nature of the book, there are so many trigger warnings including rape, torture, violence, death. So it’s definitely not an easy read, and that’s something to think about before picking it up.It’s also based on the authors ancestors, which gives an extra dimension. I’m saying that, I wish I could say that it was a book that would stay with me but I just didn’t connect with the narrator at all. I’ll give this 3 stars but it’s more 2.5. I would definitely be interested in reading more about the era though.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Stark

    TW for sexual violence and more Scattered Seed explores the horrors of the middle passage through the eyes of three sisters from Timbuktu. I wanted to love this. I really did. After all, the author is an OT (like me!) who drew on her own ancestry and the topics are extremely important. Unfortunately the entirety of the book focuses on mutilation, rape, and abuse. I think it’s important to know the full story of what happened and a few scenes would have been understandable, but I really needed som TW for sexual violence and more Scattered Seed explores the horrors of the middle passage through the eyes of three sisters from Timbuktu. I wanted to love this. I really did. After all, the author is an OT (like me!) who drew on her own ancestry and the topics are extremely important. Unfortunately the entirety of the book focuses on mutilation, rape, and abuse. I think it’s important to know the full story of what happened and a few scenes would have been understandable, but I really needed some closed door moments. I ended up having to skim parts because I was utterly overwhelmed by constant graphic descriptions of violence interrupting what might have been a solid plot. I’d hoped to connect with the characters more but at the end of the day, I did learn something and I’m grateful for that.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Becky Dickerson

    Scattered Seed is a powerful book set in the 1700s as three sisters are kidnapped from Mali to be sold as slaves. I found that the book was primarily about sexual violence, with the opening chapters focusing on female circumcision and the rest of the book graphicly detailing the rapes and abuse against the sisters. There were times I wanted to put it down and not finish but I am glad I persevered. These are important and uncomfortable stories that need to be told and whilst it is hard to read, le Scattered Seed is a powerful book set in the 1700s as three sisters are kidnapped from Mali to be sold as slaves. I found that the book was primarily about sexual violence, with the opening chapters focusing on female circumcision and the rest of the book graphicly detailing the rapes and abuse against the sisters. There were times I wanted to put it down and not finish but I am glad I persevered. These are important and uncomfortable stories that need to be told and whilst it is hard to read, learning from history is necessary.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Atulya Kriday

    Scattered Seed is technically excellent and educational to those uninformed about the First, Middle, and Final passages of the Atlantic slave trade. It provides a harrowing account on the horrors of Middle Passage, but the continuous, episodic depiction of rape and sexual assault is honestly triggering and I couldn’t bring myself to read further. However, these are my personal gripes, as Scattered Seed is an otherwise excellent book, as pointed out by many other reviewers who read and enjoyed th Scattered Seed is technically excellent and educational to those uninformed about the First, Middle, and Final passages of the Atlantic slave trade. It provides a harrowing account on the horrors of Middle Passage, but the continuous, episodic depiction of rape and sexual assault is honestly triggering and I couldn’t bring myself to read further. However, these are my personal gripes, as Scattered Seed is an otherwise excellent book, as pointed out by many other reviewers who read and enjoyed the book. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher Lake Union Publishing for an ARC.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Louise

    I had a very hard time reading this book. Way too graphic and raw for me.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Amy Hietapelto

    There must be a sequel in the works!!!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mai

    A very interesting read! Rating: 3/5 Synopsis: Three sisters navigate the horrors of the Middle Passage in a powerful historical novel about family, honor, and the will to live, by the author of The Daughter of Union County. Timbuktu, western Africa, 1706. Folashade, the fourteen-year-old daughter of a professor of linguistics, is sent south with her older sisters, Bibi and Adaeze, to endure the painful ceremony that a girl on the cusp of womanhood is expected to. In Djenné, on the banks of the Niger A very interesting read! Rating: 3/5 Synopsis: Three sisters navigate the horrors of the Middle Passage in a powerful historical novel about family, honor, and the will to live, by the author of The Daughter of Union County. Timbuktu, western Africa, 1706. Folashade, the fourteen-year-old daughter of a professor of linguistics, is sent south with her older sisters, Bibi and Adaeze, to endure the painful ceremony that a girl on the cusp of womanhood is expected to. In Djenné, on the banks of the Niger, the sisters’ fate and that of their fellow Bambara are changed forever when they’re kidnapped, marched toward grueling indignities on Gorée Island, and eventually hauled aboard an English slaver bound for the Americas. Before they are inevitably separated, Folashade, Bibi, and Adaeze plot to keep their memories alive. Drawing from her ancestry, Francine Thomas Howard gives an authentic voice to the horrors of the Middle Passage—and an empowered one to a girl who is determined to survive, to honor her father and Timbuktu, and to ensure that her and her sisters’ names will never be forgotten. Thank you NetGalley for giving me an eARC!!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anika Todalen

    The concept of this book is beautiful and timeless — it follows three sisters trying to maintain their relationship and connection to their culture and homeland as they are kidnapped from Mali and taken on a journey to be sold into slavery in the new world. The beginning is fascinating, I learned a lot about Bambara culture and Islamic Mali in the 1700s. The relationship between the three sisters is well written and believable. The climax was also a page turner. Unfortunately, it drags on and on The concept of this book is beautiful and timeless — it follows three sisters trying to maintain their relationship and connection to their culture and homeland as they are kidnapped from Mali and taken on a journey to be sold into slavery in the new world. The beginning is fascinating, I learned a lot about Bambara culture and Islamic Mali in the 1700s. The relationship between the three sisters is well written and believable. The climax was also a page turner. Unfortunately, it drags on and on and I felt as long as this book was, not a lot really happened. What really drew me away from the book, and would have caused me to DNF if I wasn’t reading it as an ARC was the near constant sexual harassment, assault and rape. The treatment of the sisters may have been accurate, but it was constant and grotesque. I left feeling that I didn’t read a book about sisterhood amidst slavery, I read a book about rape that happened to have sisters in it. I have read other books in this genre that also follow women’s journey through the Middle Passage that discuss the sexual assault that occurred without being so graphic about it. Most of the book left me feeling sick to my stomach. I would give other pieces by this author a chance, I liked her writing style, I just wished that I knew just how triggering of a book I was getting into when I requested it. I was given this e-book as an ARC in exchange for my honest review. Thank you to NetGalley and Lake Union Publishing for this ARC.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Ann Knight

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hope Thompson

  21. 5 out of 5

    carole clowrey

  22. 5 out of 5

    ALice Hysell

  23. 5 out of 5

    wayne harbaugh

  24. 4 out of 5

    christina blackburn

  25. 5 out of 5

    Karen Kennan

  26. 5 out of 5

    kim mcconvile

  27. 5 out of 5

    Regina Stone

  28. 5 out of 5

    Frank Schmidt

  29. 5 out of 5

    Brenda hunter

  30. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Leah

  32. 5 out of 5

    Sue

  33. 4 out of 5

    Reggie

  34. 4 out of 5

    Laurie

  35. 4 out of 5

    Chelsey

  36. 4 out of 5

    Megnews

  37. 5 out of 5

    Savanna

  38. 4 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sami Melaragno

  40. 5 out of 5

    Megan

  41. 4 out of 5

    Addy

  42. 5 out of 5

    Shernell

  43. 5 out of 5

    Kara Lance

  44. 4 out of 5

    Sarah-Hope

  45. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  46. 4 out of 5

    Lianna

  47. 4 out of 5

    cate

  48. 4 out of 5

    Erika

  49. 4 out of 5

    Shelbey Monae

  50. 5 out of 5

    Ragnhild

  51. 5 out of 5

    Shana Zucker

  52. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  53. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Dyer

  54. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  55. 4 out of 5

    Afton Philbrick

  56. 5 out of 5

    Judy King

  57. 5 out of 5

    Ahmunet Jessica

  58. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Jernigan

  59. 5 out of 5

    Nina

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