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Cooking at Home: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying About Recipes (And Love My Microwave)

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The chef of Momofuku cooks at home . . . and that means breaking the rules that chefs, magazines, and everyone else tell you about, so you can get a great dinner done fast. Being a chef can make you the worst kind of home cook. Either you’re too fussy when dinner just needs to be on the table or, as Momofuku chef Dave Chang will tell you about his early years in the indust The chef of Momofuku cooks at home . . . and that means breaking the rules that chefs, magazines, and everyone else tell you about, so you can get a great dinner done fast. Being a chef can make you the worst kind of home cook. Either you’re too fussy when dinner just needs to be on the table or, as Momofuku chef Dave Chang will tell you about his early years in the industry, you just . . . never cook at home. But now, with a family to feed, Dave faces the same challenges as any home cook: how to make something as delicious as possible, in the least amount of time possible, with as little mess as possible. It’s no time for meticulous searing or searching for the perfect medium rare. This is his guide to the culinary dark arts of substituting, adapting, shortcutting, and sandbagging, like par-cooking chicken in the microwave before showing you seven ways to blast it with flavor in a four-minute stir-fry or a ten-minute stew, because he is as tired as you are of doing things the hard way


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The chef of Momofuku cooks at home . . . and that means breaking the rules that chefs, magazines, and everyone else tell you about, so you can get a great dinner done fast. Being a chef can make you the worst kind of home cook. Either you’re too fussy when dinner just needs to be on the table or, as Momofuku chef Dave Chang will tell you about his early years in the indust The chef of Momofuku cooks at home . . . and that means breaking the rules that chefs, magazines, and everyone else tell you about, so you can get a great dinner done fast. Being a chef can make you the worst kind of home cook. Either you’re too fussy when dinner just needs to be on the table or, as Momofuku chef Dave Chang will tell you about his early years in the industry, you just . . . never cook at home. But now, with a family to feed, Dave faces the same challenges as any home cook: how to make something as delicious as possible, in the least amount of time possible, with as little mess as possible. It’s no time for meticulous searing or searching for the perfect medium rare. This is his guide to the culinary dark arts of substituting, adapting, shortcutting, and sandbagging, like par-cooking chicken in the microwave before showing you seven ways to blast it with flavor in a four-minute stir-fry or a ten-minute stew, because he is as tired as you are of doing things the hard way

30 review for Cooking at Home: Or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying About Recipes (And Love My Microwave)

  1. 4 out of 5

    emily

    An easy 5. Greatest advocate(s) of improv cooking. I'm all for it. I cook everyday; and for anyone who does the same, well, you lot know that there's just no room/luxury for precise recipes/measurements. I adore this book. Chang's other book, Eat a Peach is one of my favourite memoirs . An easy 5. Greatest advocate(s) of improv cooking. I'm all for it. I cook everyday; and for anyone who does the same, well, you lot know that there's just no room/luxury for precise recipes/measurements. I adore this book. Chang's other book, Eat a Peach is one of my favourite memoirs .

  2. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    Originally posted on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Cooking at Home is a well written guide by David Chang and Priya Krishna on making the most of readers' cooking skill in the home kitchen. Due out 26th Oct 2021 from Penguin Random House on their Clarkson Potter imprint, it's 304 pages and will be available in hardcover and ebook formats. I can't even count the number of times I've stood in front of the refrigerator trying to find inspiration and figure out what to cook for dinner. This is a book b Originally posted on my blog: Nonstop Reader. Cooking at Home is a well written guide by David Chang and Priya Krishna on making the most of readers' cooking skill in the home kitchen. Due out 26th Oct 2021 from Penguin Random House on their Clarkson Potter imprint, it's 304 pages and will be available in hardcover and ebook formats. I can't even count the number of times I've stood in front of the refrigerator trying to find inspiration and figure out what to cook for dinner. This is a book by two food professionals which doesn't contain actual precisely measured recipes (really). Instead, they've taken the route of showing (and not telling) readers how to follow guidelines which they've provided and find their own dishes and seasoning profiles. This is much more theory than slavish recipe following. I found it intriguing. Both Chang and Krishna have an active voice in the text and their interactions are labeled with their initials to keep them distinct. Honestly, their voices are so different from one another, it's not difficult to keep them straight when reading. The tone throughout is light and full of warmth and humor. I enjoyed listening to what they had to say and their different perspectives (Chang is quite brash sometimes, Krishna more thoughtful). The book is graphically very bold and colorful. It's full of bright *popping* sidebars and simple illustrations. There are numerous photographs, of the authors cooking, process cooking photos, and some finished dishes. The book's emphasis is on ingredients and how to utilize them to make different dishes, as well as different appliances and cooking methods. Famous chefs and professional foodies might be famous, but they still have to eat. This book helps the rest of us as well. I'm not sure how much I'll use this book, but it's an enlightening and engaging read. Five stars. It would be a good selection for public library acquisition, and for cooks who enjoy deeper food theory and want to learn to develop their own techniques and recipes. Disclosure: I received an ARC at no cost from the author/publisher for review purposes.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Leith Devine

    This is a great book for someone who wants some cooking basics, regardless of experience. This isn’t a cookbook overflowing with recipes, it’s more about technique with a few recipes and variations. There’s a lot of helpful reference information. I love the pictures and graphics, they make a chart look fascinating! I’ve already tried the chicken and a few of the variations, they were delicious. I highly recommend this book, 5 stars. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley I received a complimentary This is a great book for someone who wants some cooking basics, regardless of experience. This isn’t a cookbook overflowing with recipes, it’s more about technique with a few recipes and variations. There’s a lot of helpful reference information. I love the pictures and graphics, they make a chart look fascinating! I’ve already tried the chicken and a few of the variations, they were delicious. I highly recommend this book, 5 stars. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley I received a complimentary copy of this book. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I loved the visuals of this book just as much as I loved the content. It's the kind of book that we should all have on our shelves as a reference book, but it is just as much fun to simply leaf through it for ideas and commentary. There's no doubt that the authors know their stuff and readers benefit from what they've learned through their own hours in the kitchen. I ended up feeling actual gratitude towards them for this wonderful attempt to have us all eating well without too much fuss. This is I loved the visuals of this book just as much as I loved the content. It's the kind of book that we should all have on our shelves as a reference book, but it is just as much fun to simply leaf through it for ideas and commentary. There's no doubt that the authors know their stuff and readers benefit from what they've learned through their own hours in the kitchen. I ended up feeling actual gratitude towards them for this wonderful attempt to have us all eating well without too much fuss. This is a book both for the experienced cook and the novice. Highly recommended! Thank you to NetGalley for a chance to view and read this book pre-publication.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Amy Naidoo

    This may be the best cookbook I've read in a long time, and I own a lot of cookbooks. One fun thing about getting into this book is that both authors have a great online video presence, so when you're reading you can pretty much hear it in their voices. I love that they share how different their perspectives on taste and cooking are, it makes cooking so much more personal and low pressure. Personally their method of instinctual cooking is how my mom cooks and how I now cook, so this made a lot o This may be the best cookbook I've read in a long time, and I own a lot of cookbooks. One fun thing about getting into this book is that both authors have a great online video presence, so when you're reading you can pretty much hear it in their voices. I love that they share how different their perspectives on taste and cooking are, it makes cooking so much more personal and low pressure. Personally their method of instinctual cooking is how my mom cooks and how I now cook, so this made a lot of sense to me and made other types of cuisine seem much easier to cook too. I love all the information they provide about ingredients and why they like those particular ones, it really helps understanding different flavour profiles and if it is something you would like investing in and adding to your pantries. Dave provides an excellent guide as to how to layer flavours and I'm excited to really try this method when I'm cooking now. When I am cooking my own cuisine I instinctually know how to layer the flavours to achieve balance, but this guide makes me more confident to experiment with layering flavours for different cuisines like Thai or Korean without following a strict recipe. The recipes in this book do not have and measurements, and I'm so keen to jump in a start cooking and building my confidence with flavours and instincts. *This review was from an Advanced Reader Copy I received, however, the review is entirely my own.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alissa Avilov

    This book is honestly fantastic - it pairs the hot takes and no nonsense attitude you expect from David Chang with Priya’s thoughtful interpretations and, at times, conflicting perspective. This book is incredibly real, starting with the photos and ending with the essays. This book is more of an education and a guide rather than a book with recipes. I did still find it really useful, and I learned a lot! I especially enjoyed the essays from scientists who shared the intersection of science and f This book is honestly fantastic - it pairs the hot takes and no nonsense attitude you expect from David Chang with Priya’s thoughtful interpretations and, at times, conflicting perspective. This book is incredibly real, starting with the photos and ending with the essays. This book is more of an education and a guide rather than a book with recipes. I did still find it really useful, and I learned a lot! I especially enjoyed the essays from scientists who shared the intersection of science and food around topics like frozen food. The general sections included in this book are as follows: - cooking meat -cooking in the microwave (this section really inspired me) -fish (titled Who actually has a local fishmonger? Not me! A realistic approach to cooking fish) -cooking vegetables (especially less than ideal produce) -if I’m not eating rice I’m probably eating noodles -a flatbread recipe -condiments -a few other recipes they love After reading through I am excited to play around with tuna pasta salad, choose your own adventure beans, cooking iceberg lettuce (?!), and cooking corn in corn. I think this is a must for anybody who loves to cook or wants to learn more. The guidance offered in this book is valuable to anyone with a kitchen.

  7. 4 out of 5

    =^.^= Janet

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Date reviewed/posted: July 23, 2021 Publication date: October 26, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you have personally decided to basically continue on #maskingup and #lockingdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #thirdwave ( #fourthwave #fifthwave?) is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. Plus it is hot as all heck and nothing is more appealing than sitting in front of a fan Date reviewed/posted: July 23, 2021 Publication date: October 26, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you have personally decided to basically continue on #maskingup and #lockingdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #thirdwave ( #fourthwave #fifthwave?) is upon us, superspeed readers like me can read 300+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. Plus it is hot as all heck and nothing is more appealing than sitting in front of a fan with a kindle! I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. The chef of Momofuku cooks at home . . . and that means breaking the rules that chefs, magazines, and everyone else tell you about, so you can get a great dinner done fast. Being a chef can make you the worst kind of home cook. Either you’re too fussy when dinner just needs to be on the table or, as Momofuku chef Dave Chang will tell you about his early years in the industry, you just . . . never cook at home. But now, with a family to feed, Dave faces the same challenges as any home cook: how to make something as delicious as possible, in the least amount of time possible, with as little mess as possible. It’s no time for meticulous searing or searching for the perfect medium-rare. This is his guide to the culinary dark arts of substituting, adapting, shortcutting, and sandbagging, like par-cooking chicken in the microwave before showing you seven ways to blast it with flavour in a four-minute stir-fry or a ten-minute stew, because he is as tired as you are of doing things the hard way. I love David Chang's cookbooks (Lucky Peach .... I have a cat named Peaches!) and his autobiography "Eat a Peach" and I like that he admits to using a microwave when cooking at home. Most chef's egos would not let them admit that....ever. I can see using this book, personally, over and over again - I have already pre-ordered a copy for myself! The recipes are well written and understandable by cooks of all levels and the photos make the food very appealing to myself and other lovers of food out there. I especially love the book because it uses mostly whole ingredients instead of pre-prepared and packaged foods. I do draw the line at making my own cheese beyond a quickly-made mozzarella, and canning tomatoes but the more "ingredients" you use the better. My one nephew says that I never have any food in my house, only ingredients --- that is why I cook so much. I also refuse to eat or cook with Frankenfoods such as "chick'n" and its 88 ingredients vs. 🐔chicken🐔 having one and cheese that does not come from an animal is udder nonsense!) I will recommend this book to friends, family, patrons, book clubs, and people reading books in the park as we do … I have had some of my best conversations about books and food down by the Thames! As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I simply adore emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/snowflakes / literally-like-overusers etc. ") on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🍑🍑🍑🍑🍑

  8. 4 out of 5

    sara

    I love that this cookbook is written for real people, that it honors the microwave, and respects short cuts. The book itself is visually beautiful and wonderfully organized. My only issue is that it doesn’t feel co-written, it feels like Priya was ghost-writing for Dave. Other than that: a modern classic. (Thanks to Netgalley for the ARC.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Flora

    I don't think I have ever read a cookbook this closely before. There is a lot, A LOT of good info here. I suspect I am going to be pretty influenced by David Chang and his style of cooking. For instance, he has convinced me to give MSG a try again! And not long after finishing the book, I actually went and gave my microwave a good clean! Cook veggies in the microwave? He has convinced me to try it. I made a lot of notes, and even texted my daughter back and forth about some of the kitchen equipme I don't think I have ever read a cookbook this closely before. There is a lot, A LOT of good info here. I suspect I am going to be pretty influenced by David Chang and his style of cooking. For instance, he has convinced me to give MSG a try again! And not long after finishing the book, I actually went and gave my microwave a good clean! Cook veggies in the microwave? He has convinced me to try it. I made a lot of notes, and even texted my daughter back and forth about some of the kitchen equipment he recommended, I appreciated that the book has more meat dishes than anything else. If I remember correctly, there's only one dessert recipe! I'm not sure I like the way the "recipes" are written. I like them easy to refer to. Even though he says he doesn't think people should use recipes, he does have recipes except that they are not formatted the conventional way and some of the ingredients (mostly seasonings) are not given exact measurements. Perhaps not for absolute beginners but for someone who has had a little bit of experience in the kitchen (if disasters are to be avoided.) Some of the 90 odd recipes are interesting and I hope to try them out soon. I like that he goes for the fast and easy and simple but still aiming for delicious. If this book had been a hard copy one, it would be dog-earred and covered with highlights and notes.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jason Frasca

    Overall I did appreciate this book and its concept. I love the idea of presenting more of a 'roadmap' with concepts and themes, rather than specific directions and instructions. I learned a new appreciation for several methods I've never used, such as boiling meat, and refocusing on cuts of meat I often overlook, like chuck beef. I appreciate the tidbits from food scientists that that authors have added as well. I do recommend to most readers has it will add to your fundamental toolbox of cookin Overall I did appreciate this book and its concept. I love the idea of presenting more of a 'roadmap' with concepts and themes, rather than specific directions and instructions. I learned a new appreciation for several methods I've never used, such as boiling meat, and refocusing on cuts of meat I often overlook, like chuck beef. I appreciate the tidbits from food scientists that that authors have added as well. I do recommend to most readers has it will add to your fundamental toolbox of cooking methods. My main criticisms, though, are as follows: -The organization confuses me. It seems to break into subsections based off protein, then cooking method, but still seems disorganized overall to me. -There is a lot of cursing throughout. A bit here and there I can deal with, especially seeing as the whole goal of this book is to focus on ways to cook efficiently at home. However, from a professionalism stand point, I highly recommend re-wording multiple sections. -The back and forth from the authors leaves me confused at times. Why don't the authors combine forces as just one unified narrative voice? -Multiple pictures of cooked meals on display throughout are burnt, and the authors even comment as such. Now, from the cooking at home standpoint, I can see how having these throughout can show how home meals are often imperfect, yet still delicious. As a big reader and lover of cookbooks, I'm left wondering, why weren't these remade to look more attractive for print? I did read this on the NetGalley app, which seemed to have some issues with the exact words and layout - perhaps they will look better in print. Because of the comments above, I have chosen 3 stars, as overall, I think the content is great. Thank you NetGalley for my free copy. The comments above are mine without influence.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jennyfer

    I LOVE this book. It's a budget-friendly, no-frills guide to trusting your instincts.and learning to cook the foods you like. There are lists of pantry staples favoured by the authors, and recommended gadgets and utensils that would be idea for someone starting their cooking journey, sections on food safety and the science on why flavours work together. There are pages dedicated to how to eyeball the foods to know when it's right, and the microwave is acknowledged for being an essential part of a I LOVE this book. It's a budget-friendly, no-frills guide to trusting your instincts.and learning to cook the foods you like. There are lists of pantry staples favoured by the authors, and recommended gadgets and utensils that would be idea for someone starting their cooking journey, sections on food safety and the science on why flavours work together. There are pages dedicated to how to eyeball the foods to know when it's right, and the microwave is acknowledged for being an essential part of a home kitchen. The authors encourage the use of the much maligned microwave, as well as frozen vegetables, because they're all about making great tasting food in a short amount of time. The recipes are more like guides -or the sort of instructions you'd get if you were cooking alongside someone. You get a vague ingredient list and a rough method, but you're encouraged to make it your own, It's written in a very conversational tone, which adds to the feel of cooking alongside the authors, and there is some banter between the two within the pages, which is refreshing to see in a cookbook. The recipes have a strong global influence, and any recipe based on a traditional one has a reference back to the culture where it originated. It's a fabulous cookbook, refreshing to read, and I look forward to trying out some of these recipes! ~Many thanks to NetGalley and Clarkson Potter/Ten Speed Press for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review~

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amy Naidoo

    This may be the best cookbook I've read in a long time, and I own a lot of cookbooks. One fun thing about getting into this book is that both authors have a great online video presence, so when you're reading you can pretty much hear it in their voices. I love that they share how different their perspectives on taste and cooking are, it makes cooking so much more personal and low pressure. Personally their method of instinctual cooking is how my mom cooks and how I now cook, so this made a lot o This may be the best cookbook I've read in a long time, and I own a lot of cookbooks. One fun thing about getting into this book is that both authors have a great online video presence, so when you're reading you can pretty much hear it in their voices. I love that they share how different their perspectives on taste and cooking are, it makes cooking so much more personal and low pressure. Personally their method of instinctual cooking is how my mom cooks and how I now cook, so this made a lot of sense to me and made other types of cuisine seem much easier to cook too. I love all the information they provide about ingredients and why they like those particular ones, it really helps understanding different flavour profiles and if it is something you would like investing in and adding to your pantries. Dave provides an excellent guide as to how to layer flavours and I'm excited to really try this method when I'm cooking now. When I am cooking my own cuisine I instinctually know how to layer the flavours to achieve balance, but this guide makes me more confident to experiment with layering flavours for different cuisines like Thai or Korean without following a strict recipe. The recipes in this book do not have and measurements, and I'm so keen to jump in a start cooking and building my confidence with flavours and instincts. *This review was from an Advanced Reader Copy I received, however, the review is entirely my own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    Cooking at Home by David Chang & Priya Krishna is a free NetGalley ebook that I read into late October. It's creatively designed as a mix between a mod color scheme and the font choices & text placement of a late 1980s slim, hardcover, yet progressive cookbook that’s titled something like “Microwave and Toaster Ovens: Easy, Wholesome Recipes for the Modern Cook.” In somewhat related news, the chapters are centered around a simplifying cooking instrument and/or a food group that someone may find t Cooking at Home by David Chang & Priya Krishna is a free NetGalley ebook that I read into late October. It's creatively designed as a mix between a mod color scheme and the font choices & text placement of a late 1980s slim, hardcover, yet progressive cookbook that’s titled something like “Microwave and Toaster Ovens: Easy, Wholesome Recipes for the Modern Cook.” In somewhat related news, the chapters are centered around a simplifying cooking instrument and/or a food group that someone may find too complex or that they feel too uncomfortable winging it on their own. Chang & Krishna encourage readers/cooks to learn with a recipe, instead of from it, and to use their own intuition and innovation, like riffing with a map or playing along with a jazz chart. They also address concerns with Q&A interviews and comprehensive lists or things to keep in mind. Honestly, the concept of this book having no written recipes was more of a relief to me than a panic, like ‘FINALLY! This is what I do all the time without necessarily meaning to,’ in the sense that I take a picture of an ingredient list from an online recipe, loosely memorize the oven temperature and timing, then go into my kitchen and work out the rest.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Do you have a friend that's a whirlwind of chaos, who's amazing at playing it by ear? If yes, this is the perfect book for them! If you like making lists and having concrete lists of ingredients, this book might not be for you. 😂 There are lot of things I like behind the principles of this book - learning techniques so that you can be flexible and adapt with what you have and in making recipes you love. Chang teaches techniques of cooking different meats and foods to help you explore and experim Do you have a friend that's a whirlwind of chaos, who's amazing at playing it by ear? If yes, this is the perfect book for them! If you like making lists and having concrete lists of ingredients, this book might not be for you. 😂 There are lot of things I like behind the principles of this book - learning techniques so that you can be flexible and adapt with what you have and in making recipes you love. Chang teaches techniques of cooking different meats and foods to help you explore and experiment with seasoning, flavors, and more. It's less a book of recipes and more a book of concepts, starters, suggestions, and tips. You might also love this book if you're practicing your cooking and want to develop more of these intuitive skills. The design of the book is really beautiful with pictures, colorful pages, and lots of tips and ideas for cooking and changing your approach to cooking and experimentation.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Huberfeld

    Thank you to NetGalley, David Chang and Priya Krishna for providing this free copy in exchange for an honest review. I am a longtime fan of both Chang and Krishna. I’m a semi regular listener to The David Chang Show and Recipe Club so I was curious what a Chang/Krishna cookbook would look like given the personalities on the show. The answer is exactly like this, and that made reading this book such a joy. While most people think about cookbooks as a collection of recipes, this book provides you wi Thank you to NetGalley, David Chang and Priya Krishna for providing this free copy in exchange for an honest review. I am a longtime fan of both Chang and Krishna. I’m a semi regular listener to The David Chang Show and Recipe Club so I was curious what a Chang/Krishna cookbook would look like given the personalities on the show. The answer is exactly like this, and that made reading this book such a joy. While most people think about cookbooks as a collection of recipes, this book provides you with an approach for thinking about how to cook and some very practical cooking advice including temperatures for meat and poultry, food storage issues and how to actually learn how to season something to taste. This is truly a 4.5/5 because it definitely feels like Priya was a helpmate of the Dave Chang Show that is this cookbook but that’s a little nitpicky. Truly I loved it and will return to it again and again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Glennis

    This isn’t set up like most cookbooks course or even some by season. This is set up taking an item and then showing what a few changes to it can make several different meals based on different cultures. There is a lot of back and forth from both writer in the book and there is also reference titles they give of you want to learn more in-depth about certain dishes and other dishes from that culture. This is much more of a cook at home book and a discussion of home cooking than “Let’s do recipes f This isn’t set up like most cookbooks course or even some by season. This is set up taking an item and then showing what a few changes to it can make several different meals based on different cultures. There is a lot of back and forth from both writer in the book and there is also reference titles they give of you want to learn more in-depth about certain dishes and other dishes from that culture. This is much more of a cook at home book and a discussion of home cooking than “Let’s do recipes from my restaurant”. I was reviewing a digital copy of the book but I do want to look at the final version because I think some stuff will be different. This book feels like it is geared to someone who wants to be more adventurous in the kitchen but is a bit hesitant about playing with flavors. It feels more like an intermediate book, something for someone that is used to cooking a few things but is ready to take the next step in the kitchen. Digital review copy provided by the publisher through Edelwiess

  17. 4 out of 5

    MookNana

    The use case for this book is not quite obvious. It's a useful tome on food science and recipe development, and I appreciate its advocacy for free-form, intuitive cooking (don't get bogged down in measurements/recipes, if it tastes good, eat it. etc.), but it' s not really a quick reference guide for harried home cooks. It takes some dedicated time to read through all of the theory presented here. It's good information and will help build a foundation of knowledge, but I'm not sure someone looki The use case for this book is not quite obvious. It's a useful tome on food science and recipe development, and I appreciate its advocacy for free-form, intuitive cooking (don't get bogged down in measurements/recipes, if it tastes good, eat it. etc.), but it' s not really a quick reference guide for harried home cooks. It takes some dedicated time to read through all of the theory presented here. It's good information and will help build a foundation of knowledge, but I'm not sure someone looking for easy cook-at-home solutions is going to have the time/inclination to parse this text. It might be a good introductory book for young adults to help them master basic principles of cooking as they're starting out. Many thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for the opportunity to read and review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    joyce w. laudon

    David Chang became very well known when Momofuku overtook Manhattan. His food was good and his restaurants were popular. Now, in this book, the well known chef addresses the home cook. He notes that he learned to cook in the classic way but believes that the best food comes without slavishly following recipes. His goal, and one that he successfully achieves, is to show how to cook without panic. He is even a fan of the microwave. This is not a traditional cookbook with precise measurements. This David Chang became very well known when Momofuku overtook Manhattan. His food was good and his restaurants were popular. Now, in this book, the well known chef addresses the home cook. He notes that he learned to cook in the classic way but believes that the best food comes without slavishly following recipes. His goal, and one that he successfully achieves, is to show how to cook without panic. He is even a fan of the microwave. This is not a traditional cookbook with precise measurements. This is deliberate. Both Chang and his co-author Priya Krishna comes to life in these pages. Take a chance and try this different kind of book about cooking. Maybe it will work for you! Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher. All opinions are my own.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    Stop everything and go pre-order this book now. Cooking at Home is perfect for the home cook, like me, who really hates eating the same thing day after day or trying to find the exact ingredients for a recipe (things quite honestly you'll only use once and then forget about in the back of your cupboard). Priya and David walk you through how to forget most of what you've learned about cooking and actually enjoy the process. 5/5 Stars Thank you to NetGalley and Clarkson Potter/Ten Speed Press, Clar Stop everything and go pre-order this book now. Cooking at Home is perfect for the home cook, like me, who really hates eating the same thing day after day or trying to find the exact ingredients for a recipe (things quite honestly you'll only use once and then forget about in the back of your cupboard). Priya and David walk you through how to forget most of what you've learned about cooking and actually enjoy the process. 5/5 Stars Thank you to NetGalley and Clarkson Potter/Ten Speed Press, Clarkson Potter for providing me with an e-arc of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Thank you Netgalley and Clarkson Potter/Ten Speed Press, Clarkson Potter for this arc. This is my kind of cookbook. I never follow recipes (which is way I don't bake), but read a recipe, get the of what goes in it and how it is put together, then substitute with what I have/like and add more spice. If you're looking for a step-by-step guide to a dish, this probably isn't the book for you. If you want handy tips and hints and insights this would be perfect. The writing is engaging and easy to rea Thank you Netgalley and Clarkson Potter/Ten Speed Press, Clarkson Potter for this arc. This is my kind of cookbook. I never follow recipes (which is way I don't bake), but read a recipe, get the of what goes in it and how it is put together, then substitute with what I have/like and add more spice. If you're looking for a step-by-step guide to a dish, this probably isn't the book for you. If you want handy tips and hints and insights this would be perfect. The writing is engaging and easy to read. It's also beautiful and colorful.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    If you ever asked your parent/grandparent how much of an ingredient they put in and they shrug and say "enough", this book is how you become that person. This is NOT your typical cookbook where you have exact amounts of different ingredients, times to do tasks etc. This is learning how to cook by feel and by taste. It's perfect, especially for new cooks or those who just want to cook by feel. There are great tips in here and some really interesting food essays by food scientists. I will use this If you ever asked your parent/grandparent how much of an ingredient they put in and they shrug and say "enough", this book is how you become that person. This is NOT your typical cookbook where you have exact amounts of different ingredients, times to do tasks etc. This is learning how to cook by feel and by taste. It's perfect, especially for new cooks or those who just want to cook by feel. There are great tips in here and some really interesting food essays by food scientists. I will use this for years to come.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carla Galland

    My husband bought this book who is perfectly capable of cooking and following a recipe but finds it tedious at the best of times. This book is literally how I cook, for the most part. Recipes are guidlines (unless you are baking). Cook with what you have and with flavors you enjoy. Yes this book skews Asian but the real gold is in the principals of this book. My husband recently made one effortless meal based out of the book and said it was the first meal he cooked in a long time that he enjoyed My husband bought this book who is perfectly capable of cooking and following a recipe but finds it tedious at the best of times. This book is literally how I cook, for the most part. Recipes are guidlines (unless you are baking). Cook with what you have and with flavors you enjoy. Yes this book skews Asian but the real gold is in the principals of this book. My husband recently made one effortless meal based out of the book and said it was the first meal he cooked in a long time that he enjoyed both making and eating.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Teagan

    I wanted to like this book more than I did, but I just didn’t find it that useful. A few reasons: -emphasis on cooking meat, especially beef and pork, in large quantities -emphasis on cooking large portions in general -confusing organization Things I liked about it: -the concept of cooking without measuring -interviews with food scientists and general commentary between the authors -some of the vegetable and condiment guides were interesting, especially because I usually don’t use recipes for those -pr I wanted to like this book more than I did, but I just didn’t find it that useful. A few reasons: -emphasis on cooking meat, especially beef and pork, in large quantities -emphasis on cooking large portions in general -confusing organization Things I liked about it: -the concept of cooking without measuring -interviews with food scientists and general commentary between the authors -some of the vegetable and condiment guides were interesting, especially because I usually don’t use recipes for those -pretty graphics

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tanya

    Great and informative book about how to cook and what to cook. Loved the bright colours and pictures throughout the book as well. I could see me recommending this to students as they move out of home and have to prep food for themselves for the first time. The titles of the various chapters were funny and made me chuckle a few times. :)

  25. 5 out of 5

    sara

    I love that this cookbook is written for real people, that it honors the microwave, and respects short cuts. The book itself is visually beautiful and wonderfully organized. My only issue is that it doesn’t feel co-written, it feels like Priya was ghost-writing for Dave. Other than that: a modern classic.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    This book was too chaotic for me. I am a person who loves her recipes to be exact, and this book, while probably helpful to some, was just not helpful to me. I could not get into it. Thanks to NetGalley for an advanced copy in exchange for my honest opinion.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Virginia

    An interesting book but not for me. This reminds of the Sam Sifton from NYT cooking and his no recipe recipes. I want recipes. It’s a very building block kind of cooking and would probably be great for someone just learning to cook.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra

    Some good tips and recipes. Could get some information out of this, but is not my type of book - can be for others. Well sectioned and set up.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Declan

    Such a joy to read, and one of the best looking books on food I've come across. Such a joy to read, and one of the best looking books on food I've come across.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lucas

    i think its a good book for me to learn

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