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God's Buried Children

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In an effort to increase Romania’s population, the communist dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu, authorized Decree 770 in 1967 that criminalized contraception and abortion. Abandoned and unwanted by their parents, thousands of children ended up in state orphanages where they were neglected and abused, and later became homeless on the streets of Bucharest. This book is drawn from In an effort to increase Romania’s population, the communist dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu, authorized Decree 770 in 1967 that criminalized contraception and abortion. Abandoned and unwanted by their parents, thousands of children ended up in state orphanages where they were neglected and abused, and later became homeless on the streets of Bucharest. This book is drawn from the journal entries of one of them. This book is the journal of a Romanian orphan who survived and escaped the street and the communist regime. This book is a healing book. Life itself wrote this book. All I can offer you is my reality, my simple truth. The book burst out of my journal with its own identity after twenty years of weekly confessions. What happened under the streets of Bucharest will sink into your mind and take you back into those dark communist times. This book is dedicated to the 3000 American Families that adopted Romanian orphans after the December 1989 Revolution.


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In an effort to increase Romania’s population, the communist dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu, authorized Decree 770 in 1967 that criminalized contraception and abortion. Abandoned and unwanted by their parents, thousands of children ended up in state orphanages where they were neglected and abused, and later became homeless on the streets of Bucharest. This book is drawn from In an effort to increase Romania’s population, the communist dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu, authorized Decree 770 in 1967 that criminalized contraception and abortion. Abandoned and unwanted by their parents, thousands of children ended up in state orphanages where they were neglected and abused, and later became homeless on the streets of Bucharest. This book is drawn from the journal entries of one of them. This book is the journal of a Romanian orphan who survived and escaped the street and the communist regime. This book is a healing book. Life itself wrote this book. All I can offer you is my reality, my simple truth. The book burst out of my journal with its own identity after twenty years of weekly confessions. What happened under the streets of Bucharest will sink into your mind and take you back into those dark communist times. This book is dedicated to the 3000 American Families that adopted Romanian orphans after the December 1989 Revolution.

48 review for God's Buried Children

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    This was powerful story about orphan life in communist Romania. Daniel was one of many orphans ignored and rejected by society. Him and his friends created an underground life for themselves to survive. They lived a life of hell but Daniel managed to hold hope for the possibility of a better future. He managed to escape Romania and make his dreams come true.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Definitely do not judge a book by it's cover in this one, it's an odd cover, but fabulous story. Rather fascinating and terribly sad. Interesting memoir of an event I knew nothing about, but terribly tragic. An orphan growing up in a terribly poor and difficult time, during a communist regime, along with children who also were brought to this orphanage, was absolutely tragic and not so shocking as to what had happened (rape, beatings, beyond sub-par living conditions), only to run away and hide Definitely do not judge a book by it's cover in this one, it's an odd cover, but fabulous story. Rather fascinating and terribly sad. Interesting memoir of an event I knew nothing about, but terribly tragic. An orphan growing up in a terribly poor and difficult time, during a communist regime, along with children who also were brought to this orphanage, was absolutely tragic and not so shocking as to what had happened (rape, beatings, beyond sub-par living conditions), only to run away and hide else where. It's good for mature young adults, not too graphic, just a bit jarring and not for those ready for certain themes. Definitely a read one should pick up. Received this from Goodreads as part of their giveaways, but this had no bearing on my review.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Wrage

    FYI: I won this book on Goodreads.com. I was a little hesitant to pick up this book as the illustrations put me off. They are "mind-bending." After I read the back cover I became intrigued. Once I started reading I couldn't stop. Heartbreaking and raw. Thoughtful and honest. A lot of food for thought. FYI: I won this book on Goodreads.com. I was a little hesitant to pick up this book as the illustrations put me off. They are "mind-bending." After I read the back cover I became intrigued. Once I started reading I couldn't stop. Heartbreaking and raw. Thoughtful and honest. A lot of food for thought.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachelle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is hard to review as it is based on an orphan’s journal. How much of the experiences are real and how much was added to move the story along from tragedy and struggle to freedom? I’m editing a book I wrote about a family’s escape from Bosnia during the fall of Yugoslavia, so I understand that PTSD and years of living with abuse and brutality can muddle the memory. It’s hard to imagine these children having deep analytical thoughts about their actions. It’s more likely the words of an adult This is hard to review as it is based on an orphan’s journal. How much of the experiences are real and how much was added to move the story along from tragedy and struggle to freedom? I’m editing a book I wrote about a family’s escape from Bosnia during the fall of Yugoslavia, so I understand that PTSD and years of living with abuse and brutality can muddle the memory. It’s hard to imagine these children having deep analytical thoughts about their actions. It’s more likely the words of an adult reflecting on the consequences of the abuse and neglect. It took me out of the scenes a bit as children would rarely possess that kind of insight into their behavior. Enough said. Put that aside. The story itself is a powerful portrayal of the horrifically abused and neglected children abandoned to tortuous prisons called orphanages. The dark dictatorship ruling Romania at the time makes circumstances worse and turns people against each other. From my western perspective, I’m always stunned at how inhuman humans can be toward each other. There is very little compassion or empathy given for these children who are in survival mode and form a bond with each other like a family. Most of them cling to hope and that’s what drives them. Characters are vivid and in spite of the violent actions some take, it’s understandable and I found myself hoping they’d get away with it. I grieved the loss of some and at the same time was grateful they were out of their misery. These children will break your heart and give you a window into their world. One gets out, the author? He is given another child’s journal to tell their story. I don’t want to spend time guessing who really wrote these memories and who added to them. If you suspend your questions about the source and the lack of editing, you will immerse yourself in a haunting story. The children don’t leave you and their experiences are still in my thoughts.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Naomi Wilson

    "Still, only the ones who lived through the reality of torture knows that sometimes the only way the mind can survive the pain is by physically killing the demon. Not just to quench the thirst for revenge, but for the redemption of knowing that the devil itself is never going to hurt you again. " - Dr. Daniel Farcas, God's Buried Children The story told about the short traumatic lives of these Romanian orphans is terrifying and heartbreaking. The book also contains a variety of dark, surreal dra "Still, only the ones who lived through the reality of torture knows that sometimes the only way the mind can survive the pain is by physically killing the demon. Not just to quench the thirst for revenge, but for the redemption of knowing that the devil itself is never going to hurt you again. " - Dr. Daniel Farcas, God's Buried Children The story told about the short traumatic lives of these Romanian orphans is terrifying and heartbreaking. The book also contains a variety of dark, surreal drawings that I found interesting. If this wasn't labeled as a memoir I would have thought I was reading a fictional horror story. It really was that scary at times. The story starts in a very mentally and physically abusive orphanage where these kids are raped, starved, beaten, and some end up deformed. They do escape and make somewhat of a home under the streets, but in a communist country during a time of political and civil rebellion life for them was extremely difficult. Degraded and continuously abused, they're forced to be criminals, some become murderers, and most of them die young, horrific deaths. Only one of them (the author) miraculously is able to escape to America. Overall it was an interesting read, but at times the writing style was jumpy and difficult to follow. 3.5 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    I enjoyed this book for the uncensored manner in which the author described the events as he recalled them taking place. The book is written with the diction of an adolescent, so it would be a good read for young readers albeit some vulgarities, so be advised (nothing too offensive in my opinion - just some language and adult themes). You are definitely put into the mindset of the author in his youth and how he feels during his experiences. While, personally, I would have liked a more adult vers I enjoyed this book for the uncensored manner in which the author described the events as he recalled them taking place. The book is written with the diction of an adolescent, so it would be a good read for young readers albeit some vulgarities, so be advised (nothing too offensive in my opinion - just some language and adult themes). You are definitely put into the mindset of the author in his youth and how he feels during his experiences. While, personally, I would have liked a more adult version of the political and historical aspect of the events that took place, this down-to-earth approach resonated well and I was able to relate to the characters and the author in the book. The ending has a more mature tone that I found very elegant and it makes me wish the author added commentary throughout the book or had written it in that style entirely, but again, that's just my personal preference. Honestly, it reads perfect the way it is. After reading this, I find myself engaged enough to learn more about that time period in that region on my own and I'm glad the author took the time to share his story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mariana Farcas

    Second Edition (New and Improved!)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebeckuh

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sally

  11. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Farcas

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Zizich

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alec

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jan

  16. 4 out of 5

    LeeAnna

  17. 4 out of 5

    Darian

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Jameson

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Farcaș

  20. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  21. 4 out of 5

    Leah Green

  22. 4 out of 5

    Edward

  23. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  24. 5 out of 5

    Aileen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sunnymay

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dayna

  27. 5 out of 5

    Shanon

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Heather Thompson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ahmed

  31. 5 out of 5

    Mary Luchsinger

  32. 4 out of 5

    Lo

  33. 5 out of 5

    Lianara Sepulveda

  34. 4 out of 5

    Christy Anderson

  35. 5 out of 5

    Christa Colangelo

  36. 5 out of 5

    Sonja

  37. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  38. 4 out of 5

    Reba Williams

  39. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Marcum

  40. 5 out of 5

    Liz Miller

  41. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  42. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  43. 4 out of 5

    Brenda Maki

  44. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  45. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

  46. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

  47. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Mcniece

  48. 5 out of 5

    Laurie Levarn arsenault

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