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Sapiens: A Graphic History, Volume 2 - The Pillars of Civilization

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This second volume of Sapiens: A Graphic History, the full-color graphic adaptation of Yuval Noah Harari’s #1 New York Times bestseller, focuses on the Agricultural Revolution—when humans fell into a trap we’ve yet to escape: working harder and harder with diminishing returns. What if humanity’s major woes—war, plague, famine and inequality—originated 12,000 years ago, when This second volume of Sapiens: A Graphic History, the full-color graphic adaptation of Yuval Noah Harari’s #1 New York Times bestseller, focuses on the Agricultural Revolution—when humans fell into a trap we’ve yet to escape: working harder and harder with diminishing returns. What if humanity’s major woes—war, plague, famine and inequality—originated 12,000 years ago, when Homo sapiens converted from nomads to settlers, in pursuit of the fantasy of productivity and efficiency? What if by seeking to control plants and animals, humans ended up being controlled by kings, priests, and Kafkaesque bureaucracy? Volume 2 of Sapiens: A Graphic History – The Pillars of Civilization explores a crucial chapter in human development: the Agricultural Revolution. This is the story of how wheat took over the world; how an unlikely marriage between a god and a bureaucrat created the first empires; and how war, plague, famine, and inequality became an intractable feature of the human condition. But it’s not all doom and gloom with this book’s cast of entertaining characters and colorful humorous scenes. Yuval, Zoe, Prof. Saraswati, Cindy and Bill (now farmers), Detective Lopez, and Dr. Fiction, all introduced in Volume 1, once again travel the length and breadth of human history, this time investigating the impact the Agricultural Revolution has had on our species. The cunning Mephisto shows them how to ensnare humans, King Hammurabi lays down the law, and Confucius explains harmonious society. The origins of modern farming are introduced through Elizabethan tragedy; the changing fortunes of domesticated plants and animals are tracked in the columns of the Daily Business News; the story of urbanization is portrayed as a travel brochure, offering discount journeys to ancient Babylon and China; and the history of inequality unfolds in a superhero detective story; with guest appearances by historical and cultural personalities throughout such as Thomas Jefferson, Scarlett O'Hara, Margaret Thatcher, and John Lennon. Sapiens: A Graphic History, Volume 2 is a radical, witty and colorful retelling of the story of humankind for adults and young adults, and can be read on its own or in sequence with Volume I.


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This second volume of Sapiens: A Graphic History, the full-color graphic adaptation of Yuval Noah Harari’s #1 New York Times bestseller, focuses on the Agricultural Revolution—when humans fell into a trap we’ve yet to escape: working harder and harder with diminishing returns. What if humanity’s major woes—war, plague, famine and inequality—originated 12,000 years ago, when This second volume of Sapiens: A Graphic History, the full-color graphic adaptation of Yuval Noah Harari’s #1 New York Times bestseller, focuses on the Agricultural Revolution—when humans fell into a trap we’ve yet to escape: working harder and harder with diminishing returns. What if humanity’s major woes—war, plague, famine and inequality—originated 12,000 years ago, when Homo sapiens converted from nomads to settlers, in pursuit of the fantasy of productivity and efficiency? What if by seeking to control plants and animals, humans ended up being controlled by kings, priests, and Kafkaesque bureaucracy? Volume 2 of Sapiens: A Graphic History – The Pillars of Civilization explores a crucial chapter in human development: the Agricultural Revolution. This is the story of how wheat took over the world; how an unlikely marriage between a god and a bureaucrat created the first empires; and how war, plague, famine, and inequality became an intractable feature of the human condition. But it’s not all doom and gloom with this book’s cast of entertaining characters and colorful humorous scenes. Yuval, Zoe, Prof. Saraswati, Cindy and Bill (now farmers), Detective Lopez, and Dr. Fiction, all introduced in Volume 1, once again travel the length and breadth of human history, this time investigating the impact the Agricultural Revolution has had on our species. The cunning Mephisto shows them how to ensnare humans, King Hammurabi lays down the law, and Confucius explains harmonious society. The origins of modern farming are introduced through Elizabethan tragedy; the changing fortunes of domesticated plants and animals are tracked in the columns of the Daily Business News; the story of urbanization is portrayed as a travel brochure, offering discount journeys to ancient Babylon and China; and the history of inequality unfolds in a superhero detective story; with guest appearances by historical and cultural personalities throughout such as Thomas Jefferson, Scarlett O'Hara, Margaret Thatcher, and John Lennon. Sapiens: A Graphic History, Volume 2 is a radical, witty and colorful retelling of the story of humankind for adults and young adults, and can be read on its own or in sequence with Volume I.

30 review for Sapiens: A Graphic History, Volume 2 - The Pillars of Civilization

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    The Agricultural Revolution really kicks humanity down the slippery slope to tangled bureaucracy, hegemony of the elites, classism, racism, and sexism. Wheat is the ultimate big bad! Harari and his collaborators really dig deep into the fictions upon which our history and our present social order is constructed, ripping away the pseudoscience and myths to get at what the science really supports. Not as mind-blowing as the first volume -- which motivated me to read the big book from which this seri The Agricultural Revolution really kicks humanity down the slippery slope to tangled bureaucracy, hegemony of the elites, classism, racism, and sexism. Wheat is the ultimate big bad! Harari and his collaborators really dig deep into the fictions upon which our history and our present social order is constructed, ripping away the pseudoscience and myths to get at what the science really supports. Not as mind-blowing as the first volume -- which motivated me to read the big book from which this series is adapted -- but still very good even if the lessons seem a little more repetitive and simplified. A lot of time is spent on the Hindu caste system and U.S. slavery, making me a little curious how the Israeli author would apply some of his reasoning and deconstruction to the current state of his nation.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Erikka

    I feel like this one was a bit less history and a bit more sociology and cultural theories. I didn't care for it quite as much. I did appreciate the part about how human society is organized by a slew of complex fictions. That was an incredible window into society and how it operates and I think it's changed how I view societal rules and orders. I'm excited about part three and hope it's more historical and anthropology based like volume one. I feel like this one was a bit less history and a bit more sociology and cultural theories. I didn't care for it quite as much. I did appreciate the part about how human society is organized by a slew of complex fictions. That was an incredible window into society and how it operates and I think it's changed how I view societal rules and orders. I'm excited about part three and hope it's more historical and anthropology based like volume one.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Sapiens: A Graphic History, Volume 2 - The Pillars of Civilization is a fascinating exploration of human social organisation, from the transition from nomadic to agricultural societies through to the struggle for gender and racial equality in the twenty-first century. Author Yuval Noah Harari explores themes including: - The "paradox of plenty": the way that the transition from nomadic to primary agricultural societies created a vicious cycle whereby humans had more children, so had to produce eve Sapiens: A Graphic History, Volume 2 - The Pillars of Civilization is a fascinating exploration of human social organisation, from the transition from nomadic to agricultural societies through to the struggle for gender and racial equality in the twenty-first century. Author Yuval Noah Harari explores themes including: - The "paradox of plenty": the way that the transition from nomadic to primary agricultural societies created a vicious cycle whereby humans had more children, so had to produce ever more food, requiring more workers and so on. - How early societies tended to measure "success" in terms of quantitative output, rather than qualitative experience, which has clear parallels in modern economics. "The discrepancy between evolutionary "success" and individual suffering may well be the most important lesson we can learn from the agricultural revolution." (p.61)- The "luxury trap": the phenomenon whereby achieving goals and sufficiency often doesn't produce happiness and satisfaction, but instead an expectation and want for more. - The concept of "imagined order", including drawing a comparison between the Babylonian Code of Hammurabi (c.1750-5BCE) and the US Declaration of Independence (1776), both intended as documents creating a social order, and both based upon particular belief systems. Both could be viewed as examples of an "imagined order", under which the violent enforcement of social order may be justified. - The related concept of "intersubjective reality", which exists in the shared imagination of millions of people, and is the necessary basis for intangibles such as laws, human "rights", belief in deities, nations, corporations and money. - The importance of information, both its communication and effective storage, to human civilisation, including an exploration of the development of writing and numerical systems in different parts of the world. - The development of systemic discrimination on the basis of sex, race, age etc., based on imagined hierarchies and perpetuated by vested interests. David Vandermeulen and Daniel Casanave's adaptation of the original text (Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind) into an illustrated graphic novel format makes the subject matter accessible to a wider audience, in particular middle-grade and high-school aged students. I felt that this was mostly successful, although as an adult reader, I occasionally found the content a little contrived. I should add that I haven't read widely within the graphic fiction format, so am perhaps not the best judge. Overall, I found many of the concepts raised fascinating, and well-explained within a practical context. This book would provide a fantastic basis upon which to launch further study into human civilisations and the human impact of organisational systems and historical "advances".

  4. 5 out of 5

    Pratik Sarkar

    Just completed the second installment of the graphic adaptation of Sapiens. Being a sincere admirer of Harari's writing style, I was eagerly waiting for the book. Although based on the bestselling book, the graphic team took its creative freedom to make it even better. It should also be noted that while the first part was largely based on archeological & anthropological findings, this book is more rooted in sociology, philosophy and history. Around 12000 BCE, bands of Sapiens, settled in differe Just completed the second installment of the graphic adaptation of Sapiens. Being a sincere admirer of Harari's writing style, I was eagerly waiting for the book. Although based on the bestselling book, the graphic team took its creative freedom to make it even better. It should also be noted that while the first part was largely based on archeological & anthropological findings, this book is more rooted in sociology, philosophy and history. Around 12000 BCE, bands of Sapiens, settled in different part of the earth, independently discovered farming to achieve food security. This 'agricultural revolution' completely transformed the interaction between humans and nature, male and female and between pastoralist and agriculturists. The book is split into 4 parts Little crop of horrors Of myths and men Into the labyrinth The cabinet of Doctor Fiction This book also features several popular historical figures like Thomas Jefferson, Margaret Thatcher, Franz Kafka, John Lenon as characters. The main protagonists Dr Saraswati, Harari himself, Joey, Detective Lopez are also present from the first installment. They sometime switch timeline and interact with the historical figures. The caste inequality of India and the racial inequality of the USA are elaborately described and analyzed. Harari showed how religion and science were evoked to justify the discrimination. Harari's support for feminism and veganism is also reflected in this book. The book is hardbound, colorful, tad bit heavy and the quality of page is too good. Any lover of graphic novel and history would not want to miss this book.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Best takeaway in volume two of the series is that the Feminist Revolution changed the world without killing anybody.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Garrett Crouch

    birds descended from reptiles

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kirsti

    Harari considers himself a philosopher as well as a historian, and Volume 2 of this excellent series is mostly philosophy. The idea is that individual human lives became more miserable during and after the agricultural revolution, even as that revolution meant there were a lot more human lives brought into existence than hunter-gatherer societies could ever have supported. His logic leaves me unconvinced, but it's interesting to think about. Harari considers himself a philosopher as well as a historian, and Volume 2 of this excellent series is mostly philosophy. The idea is that individual human lives became more miserable during and after the agricultural revolution, even as that revolution meant there were a lot more human lives brought into existence than hunter-gatherer societies could ever have supported. His logic leaves me unconvinced, but it's interesting to think about.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jenn Adams

    So much information packed into graphic novel format. Would recommend going through this slowly to absorb everything. As with the first, makes me want to read/listen to the original text. 3.5 Thanks to NetGalley/Edelweiss and the publisher for this eARC in exchange for my honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    The Pillars of Civilization is a less satisfying follow-up to the first volume, though it still makes me want to read the prose version. The heavy hitter here is the reveal that the agricultural revolution was a bad thing. People getting more food and settling down? Awful! For pleasure, that is. Which I can get behind. I'd like more time for pleasure, sure. Besides that idea, the author returns to some old favorites from the first volume, namely that everything is fiction. He really hammers this The Pillars of Civilization is a less satisfying follow-up to the first volume, though it still makes me want to read the prose version. The heavy hitter here is the reveal that the agricultural revolution was a bad thing. People getting more food and settling down? Awful! For pleasure, that is. Which I can get behind. I'd like more time for pleasure, sure. Besides that idea, the author returns to some old favorites from the first volume, namely that everything is fiction. He really hammers this point home, moving to caste systems, racism, and sexism to prove his point. Or rather, to have the random police officer and "Doctor Fiction" superhero prove his point. I was even less enamored with the framing stories in this volume. Skip the weirdos and just give me the facts? I'm not a child, nor is this book for children. There's a real sense of repetition here that I'm not sure I felt with the first volume. Despite the big ideas, The Pillars of Civilization was kind of a dull read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Interesting overview, with emphasis on the word "overview." I would have liked an even deeper dive into his source material & the messy weeds of history. He pushes a narrative/ argument, for sure: humans make up fictions as a means to achieve desired hierarchies. It has the feel of pop anthropology, leaving me to wonder how many actual scientists/social scientists are reading and agreeing with Harari's work. The final chapters — astute, but not novel — were my favorite: a discussion of the impact Interesting overview, with emphasis on the word "overview." I would have liked an even deeper dive into his source material & the messy weeds of history. He pushes a narrative/ argument, for sure: humans make up fictions as a means to achieve desired hierarchies. It has the feel of pop anthropology, leaving me to wonder how many actual scientists/social scientists are reading and agreeing with Harari's work. The final chapters — astute, but not novel — were my favorite: a discussion of the impacts of our cognitive development of time, capitalism, happiness, and the future of humans.

  11. 4 out of 5

    hiaa123

    Volume 2 of Sapiens wasn't as engaging as the first for me. The first half of this graphic novel felt way too heavy-handed in its negative portrayal of the agricultural revolution. I got the point but it was getting too repetitive. I liked the second half of the novel much better when it dives into culture and the myths/fictions of society that result in inequalities and hierarchies. I'll probably still pick up Volume 3 and read until the end. Overall, it was a quick, easy read. Can't say that I Volume 2 of Sapiens wasn't as engaging as the first for me. The first half of this graphic novel felt way too heavy-handed in its negative portrayal of the agricultural revolution. I got the point but it was getting too repetitive. I liked the second half of the novel much better when it dives into culture and the myths/fictions of society that result in inequalities and hierarchies. I'll probably still pick up Volume 3 and read until the end. Overall, it was a quick, easy read. Can't say that I learned anything new exactly but it was a nice reminder about societal constructs. The agricultural revolution stuff was interesting but I was getting tired of being told how bad it was for humanity.

  12. 5 out of 5

    R.J. Sorrento

    Informative graphic novel but not quite as strong as Volume 1. I also felt this book was more opinion-based than scientific. Overall, this graphic nonfiction series offers food for thought and poses many ideas and questions worth pondering and considering. Thank you to Harper Perennial for the gifted copy. This is my honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dramapuppy

    Effectively expands on concepts introduced in the first volume, even if it isn’t quite as engaging. I really enjoyed the first book, but I didn’t agree with the significance it assigned to fictions, and I was confused by the way the author was using the term. This book delved much deeper into the concept of fictions and successfully convinced me of their importance. I feel like I have a much better understanding of the concept than I did after the first book, which introduced the concept as somet Effectively expands on concepts introduced in the first volume, even if it isn’t quite as engaging. I really enjoyed the first book, but I didn’t agree with the significance it assigned to fictions, and I was confused by the way the author was using the term. This book delved much deeper into the concept of fictions and successfully convinced me of their importance. I feel like I have a much better understanding of the concept than I did after the first book, which introduced the concept as something important without really explaining why. I thought about giving this book an extra star because of that, but I gave it the same rating I did the first because the first one kept my attention better. I’m not sure if the characters and framing devices were less interesting in this one or if I’m just less interested in the period of history it covers. Regardless, I continue to enjoy the series. I love it when nonfiction is approachable like this.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Noe

    Volume 1 covered a lot more "hard" history, while this one begins to get into the weeds a bit - and its success is hit or miss. Volume 1 covered a lot more "hard" history, while this one begins to get into the weeds a bit - and its success is hit or miss.

  15. 4 out of 5

    DRugh

    This second volume is as good as the first. A lot of information packed into a well presented package.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Đức Nhật

    21/07/2021: Hello Volume 2. Here go fucking go

  17. 5 out of 5

    LUCAS H. GOLDING

    Sapiens: A Graphic History vol 2 is lighter on the history aspect and definitely delves more into theory. So for those wanting the history this may not be the book for you. However, those of you that are fascinated by theory, this book has that. Mainly the story’s that humans tell other humans to get massive groups of people to believe in one cause. Until the cognitive revolution (about 70 thousand years age) there really is very little evidence of such a crazy concept. But all one would have to Sapiens: A Graphic History vol 2 is lighter on the history aspect and definitely delves more into theory. So for those wanting the history this may not be the book for you. However, those of you that are fascinated by theory, this book has that. Mainly the story’s that humans tell other humans to get massive groups of people to believe in one cause. Until the cognitive revolution (about 70 thousand years age) there really is very little evidence of such a crazy concept. But all one would have to do to see massive cooperation today is look around. Fictions are all around us. Literally, our entire economic structure is based on a human made fiction called Capitalism. Capitalism is not real, in the sense of it being biologically programmed into humans, it’s a fiction that we made up and millions of people believe in. It’s useful because we can use that fiction to buy and sell goods and services that we need and want from other human beings that also believe in Capitalism. It’s interesting to note that it’s not just Capitalism that a lot of people believe in, religion, sportsmanship, human rights, justice and politics are just a few radical ideas that have only come about recently in human history. These are all fictions as well. Some are productive, some are not so much. This book does a great job of exploring the idea of fictions and the stories that we humans are so good at telling and probably is one of the reasons that we became the dominant species of this planet.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Crippen

    Mostly about the Agricultural Revolution, with a whole lot of current social commentary. It is odd to read such serious material in cartoon speech balloons, but fun!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alejandro Cuba

    This second volume of our illustrated story as a species is twice as ambitious, complex, and fun to read. I can't wait to read the third release scheduled for the end of the year. This second volume of our illustrated story as a species is twice as ambitious, complex, and fun to read. I can't wait to read the third release scheduled for the end of the year.

  20. 4 out of 5

    David White

    In 2020, Yuval Noah Harari adapted his outstanding “Sapiens” into a unique graphic format, making key concepts even more accessible to both adults and young adults alike. Volume 1 told the story of “The Birth of Humankind”. Volume 2 - “The Pillars of Civilisation” is now available, and opens with the agricultural revolution. The author returns to a controversial point contained in the original “Sapiens” – the agricultural revolution actually made life more difficult for humans instead of easier. In 2020, Yuval Noah Harari adapted his outstanding “Sapiens” into a unique graphic format, making key concepts even more accessible to both adults and young adults alike. Volume 1 told the story of “The Birth of Humankind”. Volume 2 - “The Pillars of Civilisation” is now available, and opens with the agricultural revolution. The author returns to a controversial point contained in the original “Sapiens” – the agricultural revolution actually made life more difficult for humans instead of easier. The work involved tending to crops was far more challenging and difficult than the hunter gatherer lifestyle. The book suggests by extension the agricultural revolution brought famine (when crops failed and there were no alternatives) and chronic health issues. Rather than improved quality of life the agriculture revolution brought about a population explosion which meant there were more mouths to feed. Disease was more prevalent because farmers lived in crowded villages in close contact with lots of animals and waste products, so viruses could easily jump from a chicken to a person wipe out a whole village. The author is vegan, and he makes clear in the narration how brutal the raising of domesticated animals is for their meat and and dairy produce. Post the agricultural revolution despite all the black backbreaking work peasants hardly ever achieved the economic security they craved. Rulers and elites sprang up everywhere living after peasants surplus food and leaving them fairly enough to survive. History was made by very few people when everybody else ploughed fields and carries water buckets. The book later looks at how societies were able to become more complex - through use of “fictions”, myths and constructs. A fascinating look at how humans progressed from hunter-gathers to civilisation builders. I received a copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for an unbiased review.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Synoeca

    Harari, you fearless historian, how did you manage to grasp all these ideas and project them onto paper to come up with a work like «Sapiens»? This has shaken me, this has stunned me, this has filled me with awe! Where the first part focuses more on the history of how humankind came to be, the second part dives into the complex fabric and intertwined seams of the societies we live in. On the surface, there is nothing we haven’t read about—racism, the patriarchy, bureaucracy, discrimination and so Harari, you fearless historian, how did you manage to grasp all these ideas and project them onto paper to come up with a work like «Sapiens»? This has shaken me, this has stunned me, this has filled me with awe! Where the first part focuses more on the history of how humankind came to be, the second part dives into the complex fabric and intertwined seams of the societies we live in. On the surface, there is nothing we haven’t read about—racism, the patriarchy, bureaucracy, discrimination and so on—, but the vigor radiates from the way it’s depicted throughout this graphic novel; this story succeeds in clarifying difficult yet important subjects in such a nimble way! I admit that this wouldn’t be possible without leaving out details and certain parts of explanations, but it seems Harari does so very rarely, for historians tend to value the truth. The efficacy, the profoundness, the boldness—the concept in its whole—, it’s such a delight to read through! Through «Sapiens», the author proves himself to be a gallant knight of the Truth, undaunted to lay out the facts and fictions, some harsh realities of our social system and their—oh so important!—history; it’s only through understanding the history of things that one can improve the future (said someone probably at some time). I can only bring up admiration and awe for works like this, for masterpieces like Yuval Noah Harari’s «Sapiens».

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christianne

    Probably more like a 3.5. A little too simple at times, especially the sections on race in the U.S. But I think overall it would still be valuable for young people just starting out studying human history. I appreciated his thoughts on how evolutionary success should be expressed in terms of human joy and satisfaction instead of simply being a measurement of how many copies of our DNA exist. The notion of fictions and "imagined orders" gets explored in greater detail here. While fictions and langu Probably more like a 3.5. A little too simple at times, especially the sections on race in the U.S. But I think overall it would still be valuable for young people just starting out studying human history. I appreciated his thoughts on how evolutionary success should be expressed in terms of human joy and satisfaction instead of simply being a measurement of how many copies of our DNA exist. The notion of fictions and "imagined orders" gets explored in greater detail here. While fictions and language allow Sapiens to cooperate we haven't had time to evolve an instinct for mass cooperation. Our imagined orders can create more or less ordered societies and allow us to feed a lot of people, but they are built on anxieties and feature racist/bigoted/sexist hierarchies wherein few can achieve economic security and fulfillment. Our evolutionary success has not meant less overall human suffering. The good news is that we created these fictions/imagined orders and we can create different ones if we have the will. We have changed fictions over and over but it remains to be seen if we can create ones that are truly egalitarian and healthy for us, other animals and the planet.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ben Vore

    Volume 2 features the same conventions that made the first graphic installment engaging (recurring characters like Detective Lopez and Dr. Fiction; a meta narrative between Harari, Zoe, and Professor Saraswati; installments from the fictional newspaper the Daily Business News; etc.), and big ideas are rendered in easily accessible ways to a general audience. But the ideas in this volume seem more speculative. The appeal of Harari’s ideas may be their contrarianism, but is there any way to dispro Volume 2 features the same conventions that made the first graphic installment engaging (recurring characters like Detective Lopez and Dr. Fiction; a meta narrative between Harari, Zoe, and Professor Saraswati; installments from the fictional newspaper the Daily Business News; etc.), and big ideas are rendered in easily accessible ways to a general audience. But the ideas in this volume seem more speculative. The appeal of Harari’s ideas may be their contrarianism, but is there any way to disprove a thesis as broad as “the Agricultural Revolution was in fact a bad thing”? Harari suggests we would’ve been better off as hunter-gatherers, but his analysis relies on selective reasoning. (His argument against the Agricultural Revolution as a critique of capitalism, though? I’m all ears.) As a conversation starter, these volumes remain quite effective.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Wekoslav Stefanovski

    As expected, this volume went much deeper than the humble beginnings of humanity. The first part of the book is dedicated to the agricultural revolution - and Harari's theory that it might have not been the best idea ever. The second and third parts are much stronger, with a in depth analysis of fiction and the intersubjectivity of humanity. Some uncomfortable topics are analyzed - like racism, classism, patriarchy - but still, the book ends with a message of hope. As expected, this volume went much deeper than the humble beginnings of humanity. The first part of the book is dedicated to the agricultural revolution - and Harari's theory that it might have not been the best idea ever. The second and third parts are much stronger, with a in depth analysis of fiction and the intersubjectivity of humanity. Some uncomfortable topics are analyzed - like racism, classism, patriarchy - but still, the book ends with a message of hope.

  25. 4 out of 5

    sophia

    *5 stars Yuval Noah Harari keeps amazing me. His work is so beeautiful and life changing. He talks about history,philosophy,religion,race,feminism,sexuality in a way that’s so educational. Everybody should read these books, they make the world and society more interesting. Amazing, keep up with these amazing books Yuval!:)

  26. 4 out of 5

    emma ♖

    even more than the first book, 'the pillars of civilization' explained history by central themes and not strictly adhering to a chronically correct timeline which i thought to be quite fitting. it also conveys an important lesson about how our 'civilization' is a product of our collective imagination and we should never forget that. even more than the first book, 'the pillars of civilization' explained history by central themes and not strictly adhering to a chronically correct timeline which i thought to be quite fitting. it also conveys an important lesson about how our 'civilization' is a product of our collective imagination and we should never forget that.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    An interesting perspective on how societies developed especially through the use of agriculture. I always find it a bit odd he had his own characters compliment him on his own arguments in one segment in particular. I will be reading more of his work but do feel he cherry picks examples a bit too freely.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Fuller

    I liked how this volume shows the reader how the power of myth shapes society's power structures by using just so stories to justify them. Slavery in the American South was validated by the myth of Noah's son Ham and his descendants being the servants of servants based on Ham's mocking of his father. What I also was fascinated me was how agriculture's rise made these myths necessary for a the huge empires that agriculture made possible. This gave me food for thought. I liked how this volume shows the reader how the power of myth shapes society's power structures by using just so stories to justify them. Slavery in the American South was validated by the myth of Noah's son Ham and his descendants being the servants of servants based on Ham's mocking of his father. What I also was fascinated me was how agriculture's rise made these myths necessary for a the huge empires that agriculture made possible. This gave me food for thought.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kim Irmen

    “MOST HUMANS WOULD NEVER ACCEPT THAT THEiR LiVES ARE GOVERNED BY AN iMAGiNED ORDER. BUT LET'S GET THiS STRAiGHT: ALL HUMANS LiVE iNSiDE THE DREAMS OF DEAD PEOPLE. HUMANS ARE BORN iNTO A WORLD SHAPED BY THE MYTHS OF THEiR ANCESTORS… AND NONE OF THEM EVER REALLY BREAK FREE.” “MOST HUMANS WOULD NEVER ACCEPT THAT THEiR LiVES ARE GOVERNED BY AN iMAGiNED ORDER. BUT LET'S GET THiS STRAiGHT: ALL HUMANS LiVE iNSiDE THE DREAMS OF DEAD PEOPLE. HUMANS ARE BORN iNTO A WORLD SHAPED BY THE MYTHS OF THEiR ANCESTORS… AND NONE OF THEM EVER REALLY BREAK FREE.”

  30. 4 out of 5

    Siddhartha Jain

    Excellent continuation of part 1 graphic novel. The story continues on how humans evolved and moved to farming and then fictional stories that we have today. Recommended.

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