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The Silver Coin, Vol. 1

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The story starts with a failing rock band whose fortune changes overnight when they find the mysterious silver coin. Next, it helps handle some mean girls at sleep-away camp. Follow the curious token as it changes hands over centuries―from Puritan New England to the scavenged junklands of 2467―and discover how much pain a cursed coin can purchase. Eisner-winning artist MICH The story starts with a failing rock band whose fortune changes overnight when they find the mysterious silver coin. Next, it helps handle some mean girls at sleep-away camp. Follow the curious token as it changes hands over centuries―from Puritan New England to the scavenged junklands of 2467―and discover how much pain a cursed coin can purchase. Eisner-winning artist MICHAEL WALSH (Star Wars, Black Hammer/Justice League) teams with all-star collaborators―CHIP ZDARSKY (STILLWATER), KELLY THOMPSON (Sabrina the Teenage Witch), ED BRISSON (Old Man Logan), and JEFF LEMIRE (GIDEON FALLS)―on this new ongoing horror anthology series for mature readers. Collects THE SILVER COIN #1-5


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The story starts with a failing rock band whose fortune changes overnight when they find the mysterious silver coin. Next, it helps handle some mean girls at sleep-away camp. Follow the curious token as it changes hands over centuries―from Puritan New England to the scavenged junklands of 2467―and discover how much pain a cursed coin can purchase. Eisner-winning artist MICH The story starts with a failing rock band whose fortune changes overnight when they find the mysterious silver coin. Next, it helps handle some mean girls at sleep-away camp. Follow the curious token as it changes hands over centuries―from Puritan New England to the scavenged junklands of 2467―and discover how much pain a cursed coin can purchase. Eisner-winning artist MICHAEL WALSH (Star Wars, Black Hammer/Justice League) teams with all-star collaborators―CHIP ZDARSKY (STILLWATER), KELLY THOMPSON (Sabrina the Teenage Witch), ED BRISSON (Old Man Logan), and JEFF LEMIRE (GIDEON FALLS)―on this new ongoing horror anthology series for mature readers. Collects THE SILVER COIN #1-5

30 review for The Silver Coin, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The Silver Coin is a horror anthology series all about a cursed coin and the bad things what happen to people who come across it. A guitarist, a teen camper, a burglar, some futuristic person, and belt buckle-hat people. It’s also completely pants! Michael Walsh draws the entire comic, as well as writes the terrible final part, and is joined by Chip Zdarsky, Kelly Thompson, Ed Brisson, and Jeff Lemire - a who’s who of the worst writers currently in mainstream comics. None of the parts were any g The Silver Coin is a horror anthology series all about a cursed coin and the bad things what happen to people who come across it. A guitarist, a teen camper, a burglar, some futuristic person, and belt buckle-hat people. It’s also completely pants! Michael Walsh draws the entire comic, as well as writes the terrible final part, and is joined by Chip Zdarsky, Kelly Thompson, Ed Brisson, and Jeff Lemire - a who’s who of the worst writers currently in mainstream comics. None of the parts were any good - they were all utterly rubbish. How does a rock guitarist suddenly make it in a disco band? It doesn’t make sense. Also, music in comics never comes across, so Zdarsky’s story completely failed to convince. And the ending was just arbitrary nonsense. Which also applies to Ed Brisson’s story where a burglar just happens to have the coin and is able to get the drop on coppers for no reason. Kelly Thompson’s story of a bullied teen camper getting her revenge on her tormentors was so one-dimensional and unimaginative, which is also the case with Walsh’s story - essentially a weak derivation of Robert Eggers’ 2017 movie, The Witch. Ooo, you mean the cursed coin was cursed by a witch - a witch’s curse? Who could possibly have thought that up?! Jeff Lemire’s story was probably the worst, which is saying something considering the low quality throughout. He can’t write good sci-fi but he keeps plugging away at the medium anyway. His story was total gibberish - something about someone running from someone else and a virus. Ugh. Whatever. Apparently enough people bought this crap so there’s gonna be a second volume but I’m drawing the line after this garbage first book. The Silver Coin, Volume 1 is one helluva crummy horror anthology.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This was crap. People in different time periods randomly find a cursed coin, get possessed and kill people. That's the story. Michael Walsh draws, colors, and letters each issue while a guest writer pens each issue. The first issue or two were hand lettered and it showed. They were difficult to read as I guess Walsh doesn't know how to use a ruler. Walsh writes the origin which is a complete ripoff of the movie, The Witch. I expect better from Chip Zdarsky, Kelly Thompson, Ed Brisson and Jeff Le This was crap. People in different time periods randomly find a cursed coin, get possessed and kill people. That's the story. Michael Walsh draws, colors, and letters each issue while a guest writer pens each issue. The first issue or two were hand lettered and it showed. They were difficult to read as I guess Walsh doesn't know how to use a ruler. Walsh writes the origin which is a complete ripoff of the movie, The Witch. I expect better from Chip Zdarsky, Kelly Thompson, Ed Brisson and Jeff Lemire than this drivel.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    A horror anthology that has a cursed coin as its premise, but only two stories really make use of the coin as an object, in the others it's grafted on to the story and could've literally been any other object. Only the first story really works, the others have no point to them - coin makes people go mad and kill other people. That's it. There's no twist, no surprise. Really disappointing. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss) A horror anthology that has a cursed coin as its premise, but only two stories really make use of the coin as an object, in the others it's grafted on to the story and could've literally been any other object. Only the first story really works, the others have no point to them - coin makes people go mad and kill other people. That's it. There's no twist, no surprise. Really disappointing. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  4. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    As with all Anthology series, you get some good you get some bad. The first two stories are the best in the volume. The first dealing with a Rocker who will do ANYTHING for fame. It's pretty brutal ending to a tale of greed. Second is about a girl who watches to many slasher films and when she goes to sleep away camp things go very bad for her. Those are the two best. The following two are the weakest, dealing with a bunch of people who steal and murder and you find out what really happens when As with all Anthology series, you get some good you get some bad. The first two stories are the best in the volume. The first dealing with a Rocker who will do ANYTHING for fame. It's pretty brutal ending to a tale of greed. Second is about a girl who watches to many slasher films and when she goes to sleep away camp things go very bad for her. Those are the two best. The following two are the weakest, dealing with a bunch of people who steal and murder and you find out what really happens when they rely on a special coin like the rest of the people to get things. Jeff Lemire comes in with a tale of the future that's more confusing than good. Luckily last story is better and shows the origin of the Silver Coin. Overall fun book for spooky tales, but not amazing. A 3 out of 5.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    Are horror anthologies the only kind to be even a little memorable? I see a lot of them, few of them try to tie them all together like this, even if it is rather loose. Which does present them all with great display and anticipate what comes next. I see a lot of writers attached to this like Lemire and Zdarsky and the quality I've come to respect is top notch. I mean there's a cyberpunk story from Lemire that's unlike anything I've ever seen from him. It feels like people are coming in to experim Are horror anthologies the only kind to be even a little memorable? I see a lot of them, few of them try to tie them all together like this, even if it is rather loose. Which does present them all with great display and anticipate what comes next. I see a lot of writers attached to this like Lemire and Zdarsky and the quality I've come to respect is top notch. I mean there's a cyberpunk story from Lemire that's unlike anything I've ever seen from him. It feels like people are coming in to experiment with themes and genres they don't usually go into. Hence why some issues stood out a few more than others. The opening Zdarksy story did that for me with the classic rock n roll Faustian tale with a little more emotional context than normal. It feels like the lead guitarist wants more out of his life by connecting in some way to his mother. I can only imagine what the titular Silver Coin did for and to her. Then there's that Cyberpunk story by Lemire that was very similar in structure to Thompson's story; but for my bias his was better. There's a genuine moral ambiguity that's common in the best cyberpunk stories. And how people in this kind of world have already commodified their souls so what's a curse other than another augmentation to them? All of which leaves you wondering on what comes next. Gotta say though, the origin of the MacGuffin is a familiar one. But that's the same with the other stories; the emotional context brings out the best in the familiar.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    A musician who goes down the tired road of selling his soul to the devil, when he kind-of inherits a token of ancient hoodoo, is our introduction to the silver coin of this book's title. It's a very decent start to the anthology, however much the plot toys with cliche. Next, more cliches, with the girl camp killer getting inspired by the coin, which is by now embedded in a hatchet. We also realise there is a crow with a two-lettered warning "No" in common with both stories. Part three of the five A musician who goes down the tired road of selling his soul to the devil, when he kind-of inherits a token of ancient hoodoo, is our introduction to the silver coin of this book's title. It's a very decent start to the anthology, however much the plot toys with cliche. Next, more cliches, with the girl camp killer getting inspired by the coin, which is by now embedded in a hatchet. We also realise there is a crow with a two-lettered warning "No" in common with both stories. Part three of the five we get here, however, is a dud. Token girl with token guys who end up in the token-burglary-attempt-but-the-victim-dies-on-them goes vampire zombie – but still comes out of it a lot worse than anyone deserves, in a story with very little in the way of actual, you know, narrative cause and effect. Also, the crow seeming to act on the coin's behalf really doesn't make sense in the light of the first two one-shots. Dud number two is from Jeff Lemire, which is certainly not the norm I recognise. Future-thief-woman absorbs the power of the coin, which her nanotech thingy calls a virus, and all it really is is an excuse for the artist (the same one we've had throughout) to draw worms coming out of living people's eye-sockets. Nom. I will try and say the least about the end, origins episode – it just felt simple, pat, and not really a surprise. All told, I was honestly forced to revisit the earlier two issues, and see why I liked them so. I mean, they were never perfect, by a long chalk, and yes, they certainly riffed on the tried and tested. Seen individually they seemed fine as individual slices of horror comic. But with all five of them together you really can see a hefty amount of recycling going on, and not a lot that is original or clever at all. And the whole story, of this accursed coin, is a bit doolally – these are snapshots from its existence, so who sits around with a lethal, bedevilled coin and carves a slot for it in a hatchet in the first place, when other people have their comeuppance within moments? Clever and bravura is the pitch saying "we have fifty stories to cover this coin's whole life from Year X to now, and you're going to love them all and print them all." The pitch of this seems to have been more "well, there's a baddy coin, and we're going to dabble about in its history willy-nilly, and just pick and choose, and contradict ourselves whenever the heck we like, and make no sense when we want." Read this by all means, for the limited fun it provides, but by the finish if you haven't realised there is a much, much better version of this title in an alternative universe, you better check your pocket change.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Matty Dub

    When I subbed to this, it was a five issue mini. Now with issue #5 closing the arc out I find out it’s been upgraded to an ongoing with the upcoming second arc featuring a whole new host of amazing writers. I. Could. Not. Be. Happier!!!! The gist is this cursed coin causes all sorts of fuckery to whomever holds it and this book chronicles that jumping along the timeline to show you chapters in the coin’s history and the havoc its evil unleashed upon its bearers. This arc had chapters written Zdars When I subbed to this, it was a five issue mini. Now with issue #5 closing the arc out I find out it’s been upgraded to an ongoing with the upcoming second arc featuring a whole new host of amazing writers. I. Could. Not. Be. Happier!!!! The gist is this cursed coin causes all sorts of fuckery to whomever holds it and this book chronicles that jumping along the timeline to show you chapters in the coin’s history and the havoc its evil unleashed upon its bearers. This arc had chapters written Zdarsky, Brisson, K. Thompson and Lemire with the finale (and best issue) being written by the series’ artist and creator Michael Walsh. With those names attached there was some hype to this book and the hype was real, this surpassed my expectation by a country mile, I will be rereading these issues many times… it’s a great concept and story! It’s creepy and scary and awesome! Next arc will feature chapters by Vita Ayala, Matthew Rosenberg, Joshua Williamson, I assume Walsh and my current favorite scribe, Ram V!!!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Valéria.

    Silver Coin vám nedá poriadne nič originálne, v každom príbehu si nájdete niečo, čo už niekde bolo. To však nič nemení na tom, že sú tie jednotlivé príbehy dobre a zaujímavo napísané, element spájajúci ich je veľmi dobre použitý a Walshova kresba ako ďalšia konzistentnia vo všetkých len pridáva na kvalite. Nečakala som, že príbeh z budúcnosti od Jeffa Lemira ma bude baviť najmenej, ale stalo. Napriek tomu, fakt som z prvých 5 zošitov takmer nadšená a teším sa, že pokračovanie dostalo zelenú so z Silver Coin vám nedá poriadne nič originálne, v každom príbehu si nájdete niečo, čo už niekde bolo. To však nič nemení na tom, že sú tie jednotlivé príbehy dobre a zaujímavo napísané, element spájajúci ich je veľmi dobre použitý a Walshova kresba ako ďalšia konzistentnia vo všetkých len pridáva na kvalite. Nečakala som, že príbeh z budúcnosti od Jeffa Lemira ma bude baviť najmenej, ale stalo. Napriek tomu, fakt som z prvých 5 zošitov takmer nadšená a teším sa, že pokračovanie dostalo zelenú so zaujímavými menami ako Joshua Williamson či Ram V. 4,5/5

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Read the single issues of this one. Excellent collection of horror comics about a cursed coin. Every issue brought something new to the overarching story of the coin while being completely unique stories. Very excited this is going to have a second volume.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Gomes

    After reading the graphic novel I was content. It wasn’t great and it truly didn’t seem as bad as other folks described. I found the premise of a silver coin chaining the stories together an interesting one- but maybe because each issue was a contained story you were limited by the page numbers and the stories couldn’t breathe. I did like how the first story the coin is found by a fire fighter and then in the burglary issue it was gotten at the retired fire fighters home. Most of the stories res After reading the graphic novel I was content. It wasn’t great and it truly didn’t seem as bad as other folks described. I found the premise of a silver coin chaining the stories together an interesting one- but maybe because each issue was a contained story you were limited by the page numbers and the stories couldn’t breathe. I did like how the first story the coin is found by a fire fighter and then in the burglary issue it was gotten at the retired fire fighters home. Most of the stories result in the coin immediately causing issues- but it looks like that guy had it for a while. I guess it boils down to the fact it could have benefited from some rules. Like using it as a guitar pic- it didn’t possess him to murder people- it just started a fire. But in two of the stories it possesses. Like I said- nothing extremely cohesive or awe inspiring, but I was entertained and appreciated what they were trying to do. Let’s hope they tighten it up a bit for the next arc.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    Eh, this was fine. I like a lot of the creators involved and definitely vibed with the overall tone of the anthology. There's plenty of potential here, but not a lot is done with it, which is a bummer because Walsh is obviously passionate about the project, and his artwork is consistently strong. Some of the characters and facial expressions are a bit smudgy, but the coloring is steeped in pervasive shades of blue that set a consistent, unsettling mood, which I liked a lot. All the stories are p Eh, this was fine. I like a lot of the creators involved and definitely vibed with the overall tone of the anthology. There's plenty of potential here, but not a lot is done with it, which is a bummer because Walsh is obviously passionate about the project, and his artwork is consistently strong. Some of the characters and facial expressions are a bit smudgy, but the coloring is steeped in pervasive shades of blue that set a consistent, unsettling mood, which I liked a lot. All the stories are pretty standard horror fare, though, with only moments from a few of them actually leaving any impact on me. There are interesting settings and narrative wrinkles, but the stories range from "fine" to "boring," sometimes within the same issue. Zdarsky's story was creepy; Thompson's was cathartic but predictable; Brisson's had some of the best moments but a totally forgettable story; Lemire's was downright bad, and Walsh's "origin" story at the end was pretty unremarkable. It's apparent the writers love the horror genre, but instead of doing anything exciting with it, they retread tired tropes and never iterate on them. This isn't a bad read, and I might pick up the second volume on sale at some point, but this gets a big "meh" from me. I'm giving it a 2.5, but I will round up to 3 because there are some very scary moments sprinkled in here that will stick with me, even if everything around them doesn't.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Five stories of Faustian bargains occasioned when blood is shed on a cursed coin. Normally an anthology series will either have entirely different creative teams each time, or one writer and rotating artists, but this flips that model; Michael Walsh draws everything, with an issue each scripted by Chip Zdarsky, Kelly Thompson, Ed Brisson, and Jeff Lemire, before Walsh wraps up solo. Which makes a kind of sense, when you think about it: the world looks like the world, but the events which happen Five stories of Faustian bargains occasioned when blood is shed on a cursed coin. Normally an anthology series will either have entirely different creative teams each time, or one writer and rotating artists, but this flips that model; Michael Walsh draws everything, with an issue each scripted by Chip Zdarsky, Kelly Thompson, Ed Brisson, and Jeff Lemire, before Walsh wraps up solo. Which makes a kind of sense, when you think about it: the world looks like the world, but the events which happen within it are more than could plausibly have been invented within a single head. I'm not convinced any of the stories are that remarkable in their own right; the first three take in such mainstays as the band whose guitarist thinks they deserve better, the trip to summer camp, and the burglary gone wrong. We're further afield when it comes to a dystopian future in Lemire's issue, but it still feels a lot like deleted scenes from Gideon Falls spiced with a little Judge Dredd; Walsh's origin story is so recent as to limit the future possibilities, while drawing well within the lines of another horror subgenre. Plus, I'm too big a Marguerite Yourcenar fan to have a vacancy for a favourite series of stories linked by a single coin. But the art does make it work on the page as nice little doses of creepiness. (Edelweiss ARC)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    When it comes to horror comics, no matter what scary ideas that writers can come up with, the key to getting the chills when reading horror through sequential art is the art itself. Horror, in many forms, should be defined by imagery that should stick with you, even if you’re trying to sleep. Comics like Infidel and Blue in Green, both of which published by Image, have art styles that lean into abstract imagery, taking situations we are familiar with and leading them to a horrific, surreal concl When it comes to horror comics, no matter what scary ideas that writers can come up with, the key to getting the chills when reading horror through sequential art is the art itself. Horror, in many forms, should be defined by imagery that should stick with you, even if you’re trying to sleep. Comics like Infidel and Blue in Green, both of which published by Image, have art styles that lean into abstract imagery, taking situations we are familiar with and leading them to a horrific, surreal conclusion. That’s what’s at the core of The Silver Coin, a horror anthology that is entirely drawn by Michael Walsh. With a different writer tackling each of the five issues, we see the eponymous cursed coin travel over the ages and how its influence plagued the lives of numerous people. Please click here for my full review.

  14. 5 out of 5

    FrontalNerdaty

    An anthology of tales centred around a cursed coin. What I liked - Seeing the tales told throughout the ages and the power coin has is a fun way to show the longevity of a curse. All the writers bring their own voice to the tales and it’s a quick and easy read. What I disliked - As with most anthologies some of the stories are good and some others less so. The changing in times and places both helps and hinders the overall narrative I found. It works in that it gives power and credence to the co An anthology of tales centred around a cursed coin. What I liked - Seeing the tales told throughout the ages and the power coin has is a fun way to show the longevity of a curse. All the writers bring their own voice to the tales and it’s a quick and easy read. What I disliked - As with most anthologies some of the stories are good and some others less so. The changing in times and places both helps and hinders the overall narrative I found. It works in that it gives power and credence to the coin and the curse but telling the events out of sequence also cuts some tension. The first two issues are the best at showing the abilities the coin has and what it does to those affected but it seems to lose a bit of steam as it goes on. 3/5.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Horror story comic series, nothing very new but still good. It’s difficult to be original with horror stories in comics and the writers here have succeeded to some extent. All center around the silver coin of the title and we have different writers and artists to thank for the variety and the success of some of the 5 stories. It’s quite good and I can recommend it to lovers of horror. I received a copy of this in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Thom

    A cursed coin drives a series of seemingly unrelated tales. It reminds me of great premises from Black Mirror, 30 Monedas, and The VVitch and while sometimes adding a pulpy flare. The potential for this series to grow and continue into something even greater is extremely high with the talented writers already onboard and it only requiring loose links between stories. I will definitely read Vol 2.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Overall I enjoyed the premise and the art, although (as with many short story collections) there were some stronger stories than others. It would have been good to have a little more to tie each story together cohesively but it was still pretty dark, weird and worth a read!

  18. 5 out of 5

    The Lost Dreamer

    As mentioned by so many reviewers before, two of these five stories are pretty amusing. The other three lack most interest. The idea behind this anthology series is attractive, but the executive is uneven, at best. I'm not sure I'll keep reading more issues. Nothing is outstanding in any way. As mentioned by so many reviewers before, two of these five stories are pretty amusing. The other three lack most interest. The idea behind this anthology series is attractive, but the executive is uneven, at best. I'm not sure I'll keep reading more issues. Nothing is outstanding in any way.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Luke Costin

    A wonderful collection of one-shot horror tales that are more connected than they first appear... The artwork is a particular highlight, all done by Michael Walsh which keeps the consistency across the stories. Very pleased to hear this will now be an ongoing series.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tyler

    It's ok. Very anthology feeling to this where there's just a sort of pointless feel to it but still worth a read. It's ok. Very anthology feeling to this where there's just a sort of pointless feel to it but still worth a read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gizmo

    Un poco irregular como toda obras con tantas voces pero buen terror.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jamil

    Good stuff

  23. 4 out of 5

    Neon

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Stewart

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nick Zambrano

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kabuki

  27. 4 out of 5

    Suren Raja

  28. 5 out of 5

    Earl Foster

  29. 5 out of 5

    Vidal

  30. 5 out of 5

    Atit Patel

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