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Deep Beyond, Vol. 1

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In an underpopulated future Earth, devastated by the dire consequences of the millennium bug, the survival of mankind--and, maybe, of the planet itself--is handled by a small number of people. These are talented scientists who, despite the adverse situation and the stupid feuds that continue to divide the small number of people still alive, try to understand and study what In an underpopulated future Earth, devastated by the dire consequences of the millennium bug, the survival of mankind--and, maybe, of the planet itself--is handled by a small number of people. These are talented scientists who, despite the adverse situation and the stupid feuds that continue to divide the small number of people still alive, try to understand and study what is hidden in the depths of the abyss--something mysterious and dangerous, which could eventually cause an even worse and more destructive catastrophe! The 100 meets LOW, with a hint of Death Stranding in the brand-new sci-fi thriller series from acclaimed creator MIRKA ANDOLFO (UNNATURAL, MERCY, SWEET PAPRIKA), teaming up with writer DAVID GOY, rising-star artist ANDREA BROCCARDO (Star Wars: Doctor Aphra, Empyre: X-Men), and colorist BARBARA NOSENZO (The Ballad of Halo Jones). Collects DEEP BEYOND #1-6


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In an underpopulated future Earth, devastated by the dire consequences of the millennium bug, the survival of mankind--and, maybe, of the planet itself--is handled by a small number of people. These are talented scientists who, despite the adverse situation and the stupid feuds that continue to divide the small number of people still alive, try to understand and study what In an underpopulated future Earth, devastated by the dire consequences of the millennium bug, the survival of mankind--and, maybe, of the planet itself--is handled by a small number of people. These are talented scientists who, despite the adverse situation and the stupid feuds that continue to divide the small number of people still alive, try to understand and study what is hidden in the depths of the abyss--something mysterious and dangerous, which could eventually cause an even worse and more destructive catastrophe! The 100 meets LOW, with a hint of Death Stranding in the brand-new sci-fi thriller series from acclaimed creator MIRKA ANDOLFO (UNNATURAL, MERCY, SWEET PAPRIKA), teaming up with writer DAVID GOY, rising-star artist ANDREA BROCCARDO (Star Wars: Doctor Aphra, Empyre: X-Men), and colorist BARBARA NOSENZO (The Ballad of Halo Jones). Collects DEEP BEYOND #1-6

44 review for Deep Beyond, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    I've been thinking a lot about dialogue in comics, again. I think a good rule of thumb could be, keep plot-related dialogue to a minimum (which means cut! cut! cut!), and keep longer dialogue for character-related stuff. Even though Deep Beyond has characters (quite a lot of them), they spend a lot of oxygen babbling endlessly about the uninteresting plot. It's one of those books where you see all the speech bubbles on the page, and the size of them, and the only thing you can do is sigh. Oodles a I've been thinking a lot about dialogue in comics, again. I think a good rule of thumb could be, keep plot-related dialogue to a minimum (which means cut! cut! cut!), and keep longer dialogue for character-related stuff. Even though Deep Beyond has characters (quite a lot of them), they spend a lot of oxygen babbling endlessly about the uninteresting plot. It's one of those books where you see all the speech bubbles on the page, and the size of them, and the only thing you can do is sigh. Oodles and oodles of plot, never very thrilling or interesting. There are some nice ideas in the later, more sci-fi-y parts, but they're ideas full of plot holes. There are some half-hearted attempts at character development, but they're very forced, and they're made confusing by characters looking and sounding like eachother. The art is practical, but the designs of monsters and technology are cliched. Not great. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    I had hope for this. I love a good underwater adventure or horror story, but that's not even what this is. Yes they do go to an underwater base in a submarine but that's not the main focus. I couldn't even begin to tell you the wold building in this. There's about a half dozen dystopian future ideas thrown out here, none of which mesh together or make any kind of sense. Then there's some odd part of this book where aliens came here in the 1700's. I could hear the record scratch go off in my head I had hope for this. I love a good underwater adventure or horror story, but that's not even what this is. Yes they do go to an underwater base in a submarine but that's not the main focus. I couldn't even begin to tell you the wold building in this. There's about a half dozen dystopian future ideas thrown out here, none of which mesh together or make any kind of sense. Then there's some odd part of this book where aliens came here in the 1700's. I could hear the record scratch go off in my head. I thought it was a typo. Just when you think Andolfo has already given us enough half baked ideas, an even crazier one emerges. By the way, if you are expecting some nice Mirka Andolfo art in this, it's only on the alternate covers. She only co-wrote this, Andrea Broccardo is the artist. It's serviceable. Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Always a moment for trepidation when an artist, having turned writer-artist, then moves to just writer. Not invariably a disaster (that Alan Moore guy seems to have done OK), but more often than not you lose a memorable artist and gain only a so-so writer (just look at anything Dave Gibbons scripted but didn't pencil). And Mirka Andolfo isn't even the sole writer here, but collaborating with David Goy. Of whom I've never heard, likewise art team Andrea Broccardo and Barbara Nosenzo – though one Always a moment for trepidation when an artist, having turned writer-artist, then moves to just writer. Not invariably a disaster (that Alan Moore guy seems to have done OK), but more often than not you lose a memorable artist and gain only a so-so writer (just look at anything Dave Gibbons scripted but didn't pencil). And Mirka Andolfo isn't even the sole writer here, but collaborating with David Goy. Of whom I've never heard, likewise art team Andrea Broccardo and Barbara Nosenzo – though one point of interest here is that it's the first time I recall seeing a colourist get in on the 'created by' credit. So if you're here after the decadent, fleshy, intermittently sinister quality which has distinguished Andolfo's previous work, most notably Unnatural...well, you're pretty much out of luck, though she does contribute some lovely back covers. There is a sense of biological danger, granted, from the contaminations and mutant monstrosities running rampant outside the sealed colonies in which what's left of humanity hides itself from a horrifically inhospitable late 21st century Earth. But they're very much not sexy. Even the way in which one of the leads gets kidnapped by his ex's sister Jolene doesn't play out quite the way that name would suggest – despite which, it still feels way too on-the-nose given her role and context. I was already being bugged by little details like that, or the way the lifeboat numbers in the art and the dialogue don't match, and then it became clear that this wasn't even a cautionary tale about the future we're storing up for ourselves, because the ruined, murderous Earth here wasn't the result of our ongoing fuckery but...the Millennium Bug? Somehow? Possibly there's an angle here that I'm missing, but for me that was the point where this flipped from an unremarkable and derivative post-apocalyptic rampage to an outright stupid one. Still, I'm perversely glad I persevered, because there was worse to come! I'm more forgiving of ancient aliens crap in fiction than when it poses as fact, simply because it's already baked in to too many of my favourite fictional worlds to entirely unpick. But I'm still not sure the tally needs further additions, and if you do, you really have to be careful how you play it. This one, though, has them bestowing some of their lesser technologies on primitive Earthlings in...1712. "Think! Did we monkeys really have any chance of inventing alternating current of flight on our own?" Well, given Newton had already done most of his important work, and he was just one particularly abrasive component of a burgeoning scientific revolution, as exhaustively explored in the likes of Neal Stephenson's Baroque Cycle, then...yes, actually? Since reading that, I've been struggling to think of a dafter time to have aliens supposedly uplift us, and the only one I've been able to come up with that's more ridiculous is to have them get in touch in 1993 because "Think! Did we monkeys really have any chance of inventing the Segway and blue LEDs on our own?" (Edelweiss ARC)

  4. 4 out of 5

    Elyse

    Edelweiss ARC. 2.5 stars. (generously rounded to 3) The artwork was cool but the story did not hold up. Which is too bad. It had a couple of things going for it but the execution of the storyline was pretty abysmal. So disappointing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    This started with an interesting idea - humans live in a dystopian future in atmospheric globes because the air causes a deadly disease. There's an underwater anomaly that may or may not be causing these problems. Then... A whole bunch of crazy stuff goes down in the first issue, and then somehow gets crazier. The author has waaay too many ideas to be coherent. There are rebels who might be terrorists, a scientist that's been in cryo sleep for 100 years, apparently aliens that have been around si This started with an interesting idea - humans live in a dystopian future in atmospheric globes because the air causes a deadly disease. There's an underwater anomaly that may or may not be causing these problems. Then... A whole bunch of crazy stuff goes down in the first issue, and then somehow gets crazier. The author has waaay too many ideas to be coherent. There are rebels who might be terrorists, a scientist that's been in cryo sleep for 100 years, apparently aliens that have been around since the 1700s, alternate history with a catastrophic Y2K (seriously), and then alternate dimensions and weird amphibian people. It's just way 👏 too 👏 much 👏.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    So-so adventure comic, with something about the end of the world and missing submariner explorers and underwater bases, and the whole kit and caboodle under threat from Cthulhu-lite monsters and nasty germs. It's OK, but that's the limit, for it's very wordy, not happy with giving its readers an easy start or likeable characters, and a bit plodding – the difference between the first 'the story so far' page here and the last is remarkably small. This volume is the first fifty per cent of the full So-so adventure comic, with something about the end of the world and missing submariner explorers and underwater bases, and the whole kit and caboodle under threat from Cthulhu-lite monsters and nasty germs. It's OK, but that's the limit, for it's very wordy, not happy with giving its readers an easy start or likeable characters, and a bit plodding – the difference between the first 'the story so far' page here and the last is remarkably small. This volume is the first fifty per cent of the full twelve-parter, and if I ever clap eyes on the second book it'll be because I downloaded it in error.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Adriana

    I'm afraid that this book ended up being just a run-of-the-mill science fiction story. In the same vein as all great B movies, it's somewhat enjoyable while you're reading it but relies so heavily on classic tropes that it's pretty forgettable once you're done. Attempts made to make the characters more than one-dimensional fall short due to what seems like a directive to continually show the most impressive spreads and visual concepts possible. Some panels are phenomenal, but all they do is make I'm afraid that this book ended up being just a run-of-the-mill science fiction story. In the same vein as all great B movies, it's somewhat enjoyable while you're reading it but relies so heavily on classic tropes that it's pretty forgettable once you're done. Attempts made to make the characters more than one-dimensional fall short due to what seems like a directive to continually show the most impressive spreads and visual concepts possible. Some panels are phenomenal, but all they do is make the story even less of the focal point and easier to forget. Overall, I wish they'd dedicated more page space to the characters and the story and less to the visual awe.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Vijaya

    Gives me Kaiju vibes and I like it. Anyone know when Volume 2 will be out?

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kylie

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sheri

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Religioso

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karin

  13. 4 out of 5

    Travis Chesser

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matthijs van Soest

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Khan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dillon

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

  18. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Martin

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

  20. 4 out of 5

    D

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nowenen

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jack Coyne

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  24. 4 out of 5

    Charles Benson

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anyeliz

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mori

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ben Brown

  28. 5 out of 5

    sleepytroll

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

  30. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

  31. 5 out of 5

    Django

  32. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Paletta

  33. 4 out of 5

    Monica

  34. 4 out of 5

    Ananya

  35. 5 out of 5

    Sam

  36. 4 out of 5

    Kori Watson

  37. 5 out of 5

    Iain

  38. 5 out of 5

    Paul Porry

  39. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  40. 5 out of 5

    Kees Kees

  41. 5 out of 5

    Bárbara

  42. 4 out of 5

    Mithun Gangopadhyay

  43. 5 out of 5

    R

  44. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

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