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The Old Guard: Tales Through Time, Vol. 1

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A STAR-STUDDED ANTHOLOGY EVENT! The bestselling, critically acclaimed THE OLD GUARD, now a hit Netflix movie starring Charlize Theron, returns with NEW stories by writers GREG RUCKA, LEANDRO FERNÁNDEZ, and an all-star lineup of guest creators, expanding the world of the immortal warriors in shocking ways! Meet the immortals' families, witness never-before-seen adventures, a A STAR-STUDDED ANTHOLOGY EVENT! The bestselling, critically acclaimed THE OLD GUARD, now a hit Netflix movie starring Charlize Theron, returns with NEW stories by writers GREG RUCKA, LEANDRO FERNÁNDEZ, and an all-star lineup of guest creators, expanding the world of the immortal warriors in shocking ways! Meet the immortals' families, witness never-before-seen adventures, and discover the first appearance of a major new character! Featuring writers BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS, KELLY SUE DeCONNICK, MATT FRACTION, VITA AYALA, JASON AARON, DAVID F. WALKER, and more, and artists VALENTINE DE LANDRO, NICOLA SCOTT, MICHAEL AVON OEMING, RAFAEL ALBUQUERQUE, MIKE HENDERSON, MATTHEW CLARK, KANO, and more! Collects THE OLD GUARD: TALES THROUGH TIME #1-6


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A STAR-STUDDED ANTHOLOGY EVENT! The bestselling, critically acclaimed THE OLD GUARD, now a hit Netflix movie starring Charlize Theron, returns with NEW stories by writers GREG RUCKA, LEANDRO FERNÁNDEZ, and an all-star lineup of guest creators, expanding the world of the immortal warriors in shocking ways! Meet the immortals' families, witness never-before-seen adventures, a A STAR-STUDDED ANTHOLOGY EVENT! The bestselling, critically acclaimed THE OLD GUARD, now a hit Netflix movie starring Charlize Theron, returns with NEW stories by writers GREG RUCKA, LEANDRO FERNÁNDEZ, and an all-star lineup of guest creators, expanding the world of the immortal warriors in shocking ways! Meet the immortals' families, witness never-before-seen adventures, and discover the first appearance of a major new character! Featuring writers BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS, KELLY SUE DeCONNICK, MATT FRACTION, VITA AYALA, JASON AARON, DAVID F. WALKER, and more, and artists VALENTINE DE LANDRO, NICOLA SCOTT, MICHAEL AVON OEMING, RAFAEL ALBUQUERQUE, MIKE HENDERSON, MATTHEW CLARK, KANO, and more! Collects THE OLD GUARD: TALES THROUGH TIME #1-6

30 review for The Old Guard: Tales Through Time, Vol. 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    I have a fundamental problem with this series - the fact that the main characters are immortal isn't interesting enough, and combining it with violence is the least interesting avenue to explore. Bending it towards loved ones aging out and dying, is better, but you can't keep repeating it. And so we come to this anthology of 12 short stories, 2 of them written by Rucka, the rest by a bevvy of writers. Two stories are drawn by the original artist, Leandro Fernandez, every other story by another ar I have a fundamental problem with this series - the fact that the main characters are immortal isn't interesting enough, and combining it with violence is the least interesting avenue to explore. Bending it towards loved ones aging out and dying, is better, but you can't keep repeating it. And so we come to this anthology of 12 short stories, 2 of them written by Rucka, the rest by a bevvy of writers. Two stories are drawn by the original artist, Leandro Fernandez, every other story by another artist. And most of the stories are really dull. They basically have one of the immortals show up somewhere, some time, baddies kill the immortal, immortal resurrects and takes down the baddies. And again. And again. I did like two stories, one by Brian Michael Bendis, the other by Vita Ayala. They did something interesting with this set up, something not directly related to violence. The fact that ten stories are drawn by different artists throws up a different problem - it became a puzzle to figure out which immortal was featured, looking quite different in each version. Overall, it's a bit of a mess. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Greg Rucka and Leandro Fernández invite twenty-one other writers and artists to play with the toys in their Old Guard sandbox, and everyone does a pretty good job of it. I think the better stories were in the front half of the book, but there were no awful ones. My only complaints might be that there is too much Booker and too little Nicky and Joe. And there is little effort to introduce the characters, so anyone who hasn't read the other two graphic novels or at least seen the movie will probab Greg Rucka and Leandro Fernández invite twenty-one other writers and artists to play with the toys in their Old Guard sandbox, and everyone does a pretty good job of it. I think the better stories were in the front half of the book, but there were no awful ones. My only complaints might be that there is too much Booker and too little Nicky and Joe. And there is little effort to introduce the characters, so anyone who hasn't read the other two graphic novels or at least seen the movie will probably be pretty lost.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    I really enjoyed this book. It contains twelve medium to short stories. Every story is excellent. It complements the main books brilliantly. They add insights snd gives a look at each of the main characters. This is a must have for any fan of the Old Guard. Showing more of the main characters personalities, their pleasures and pain of imortality. The book finishes with a cover gallery of full page of all the issue covers and the one of each varient covers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Aldi

    Ehhhhh. I'm basically happy to throw money at the franchise because I love the movie, can't wait for the second one, and want to support the creator of the original medium but. Most of these are deeply blah and phoned in. Most of the guest art isn't any better than the (no good, bad, terrible, cliched, frequently offensive) original art by Fernandez (which still features in two of these). There were only two artists whose work I liked (Jacopo Camgani in the Zanzibar story and NIcola Scott's in M Ehhhhh. I'm basically happy to throw money at the franchise because I love the movie, can't wait for the second one, and want to support the creator of the original medium but. Most of these are deeply blah and phoned in. Most of the guest art isn't any better than the (no good, bad, terrible, cliched, frequently offensive) original art by Fernandez (which still features in two of these). There were only two artists whose work I liked (Jacopo Camgani in the Zanzibar story and NIcola Scott's in Many Happy Returns); some were so bad that I wasn't sure which character it was meant to be (like, I'm pretty sure it ought to be somewhat clear whether I'm looking at Booker, Nicky, or some complete rando). It doesn't help that the stories themselves are pretty mediocre, bend characterisation to fit plot, and are puzzlingly unvaried in their themes. Basically, if you want actual good plots and actual depth of characterisation for these characters, head to AO3.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Let's btranslate the blurb, shall we? an all-star lineup of guest creators, expanding the world of the immortal warriors in shocking ways! Meet the immortals' families, witness never-before-seen adventures, and discover the first appearance of a major new character! an all-star lineup of guest creators - "I couldn't be bothered to write any more stories myself" expanding the world of the immortal warriors - That's what new book should ALWAYS do, right? in shocking ways! - No shocks to be found. Meet Let's btranslate the blurb, shall we? an all-star lineup of guest creators, expanding the world of the immortal warriors in shocking ways! Meet the immortals' families, witness never-before-seen adventures, and discover the first appearance of a major new character! an all-star lineup of guest creators - "I couldn't be bothered to write any more stories myself" expanding the world of the immortal warriors - That's what new book should ALWAYS do, right? in shocking ways! - No shocks to be found. Meet the immortals' families - Any family seer is mere plot fuel and not a developed character. witness never-before-seen adventures - Kind hard to do a clip-issue with less than 20 on the shelf. discover the first appearance of a major new character! - Since the whole run is short one-offs, there is no telling who this might be, and none of the newbs seen are interesting enough to warrant being a 'major new character'.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Devann

    actual rating: 3.5 I agree with some other reviewers that there is in fact nothing 'shocking' here but I did think it was a pretty enjoyable read and overall a very standard anthology volume. Obviously this book is not really going to be moving the current storyline forward since it's a series of flashback stories but if you like the characters and their interactions I think there is plenty of enjoyable new content here. If you're just a die-hard 'every single piece of this story has to concretel actual rating: 3.5 I agree with some other reviewers that there is in fact nothing 'shocking' here but I did think it was a pretty enjoyable read and overall a very standard anthology volume. Obviously this book is not really going to be moving the current storyline forward since it's a series of flashback stories but if you like the characters and their interactions I think there is plenty of enjoyable new content here. If you're just a die-hard 'every single piece of this story has to concretely move the plot forward' kind of person then probably skip this but if you just want some random interesting stories then I'd say it's a good time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    The characters of the hit series (and Netflix show) The Old Guard return in The Old Guard: Tales Through Time Vol. 1. If short stories and vignettes are your thing, then you're absolutely going to love this collection. Here's the backstory necessary to appreciate these tales: the characters in the Old Guard don't die. Technically, there may come a day where they stop getting back up, but the simple truth is that they never know when that moment might happen. They walk the earth for centuries, d The characters of the hit series (and Netflix show) The Old Guard return in The Old Guard: Tales Through Time Vol. 1. If short stories and vignettes are your thing, then you're absolutely going to love this collection. Here's the backstory necessary to appreciate these tales: the characters in the Old Guard don't die. Technically, there may come a day where they stop getting back up, but the simple truth is that they never know when that moment might happen. They walk the earth for centuries, doing what they can to leave their mark on the world (for good or for ill, that's up to you to decide). Obviously, immortal characters have seen and been through a lot. Not all of them have pasts that they are proud of. Andy is the oldest of the group, several thousand years old (no exaggeration there), while Nile is the youngest, only twenty-seven. My Mother's Axe The first story in this anthology is My Mother's Axe, by Greg Rucka and Leandro Fernandez. Given that this is the original team behind the series, it probably is no surprise to hear that this is one of the best stories. It's the tale of Andy's axe – and the transformation it has withstood over the centuries. There's something so beautiful and poignant about the discussion that arises in this issue. It's essentially The Old Guard's version of the Ship of Theseus, with some solid emotional attachments thrown into the mix for good measure. Zanzibar and Other Horrors Next up is Zanzibar and Other Horrors by Andrew Wheeler and Jacopo Camagni. Camgagni is an artist I fell in love with throughout Nomen Omen, so I was delighted to see that name pop up here! This tale focuses on Nicky and Joe (those would be their modern names, of course, not the names they were born with) and is set in Berlin, 1932. There's a lot to unpack from this story, as there's a lot of commentary (both historical and modern) woven into the narrative. Daniela Miwa was the colorist for both of the above stories, and Jodie Wynne was the letterer. Bonsai Shokunin Bonsai Shokunin, by Kelly Thompson, Valentine De Landro, Rebecca McConnell, and Jodi Wynne, is the third story in this collection. This story felt...weighted. You can really feel the weight an unwilling soldier carries through life, even at the end of his days. It also feels like there's a message woven into the story here, and it resonates with something Andy has said. Blood begets blood. Strong Medicine There's something about Strong Medicine that is stuck in my brain. It's been a minute since I read this graphic novel, and it's still bouncing around inside my head. Eric Trautmann, Mike Henderson, Daniela Miwa, and Jodie Wynne are the ones behind this tale, and I love them for it. The year is 1870, in Colorado. What happens to a small town when there's no real sense of law, and one man is letting his grief tear apart the town? (Quite literally, as the case may be). Well, in the world of The Old Guard, somebody shows up to handle things. Passchendaele Passchendaele is a story that offers a look at Andy through a wholly different lens. It's easy to see Andy as a warrior – the woman who will always get up and fight. It may be harder to picture her taking a role other than the hero (or killer) in somebody's life. Yet that is what happened here, as at least once, Andy was unable to walk away from an orphan she found many years ago. Thanks to Brian Michael Bendis, Michael Avon Oeming, Taki Soma, and Jodi Wynne for offering this perspective. Lacus Solitudinis Booker and Nicky are on a mission to confront a careless (and homophobic) officer in Lacus Solitudinis. Created by Robert Mackenzie, Dave Walker, Justin Greenwood, Daniela Miwa, and Jodie Wynne, this story, in particular, felt very relevant. There's a bit more jumping around in this tale than in the others, as they're trying to show us multiple perspectives to help us understand everything going on – and what it costs the characters involved. How to Make a Ghost Town There are no two ways about it, How to Make a Ghost Town is a heavy-hitting story. Created by Matt Fraction, Steve Lieber, Daniela Miwa, and Jodi Wynne, this one isn't afraid to hit readers right where it hurts. In other words, it hits us in Andy's past. It's a more recent story and one that readers of the main series will be familiar with. I think that's what makes it hurt so much. Well, that and the guilt and Anger Andy must have felt. Love Letters Next, we have Love Letters, created by David F. Walker, Matthew Clark, Rebecca McConnell, and Jodi Wynne. Set in Pennsylvania, 1863 – it's pretty easy to figure out what all the fighting is about. Though with The Old Guard, naturally, there's a bit of a twist. It's pretty fascinating to get a glimpse into how the team felt about this particular moment in time – I feel like this was a necessary story for that very reason. An Old Soul An Old Soul is the second to last story in this collection, created by Jason Aaron (love him), Rafael Alburquerque, Daniela Miwa, and Jodi Wynne. This one actually gets a bit...weird? Yeah, strange is a good description for it. It does a great job of showing what can happen to our spirits and minds after long enough. It's a subject that has come up time and time again in the series. The biggest difference this time is the character we're focusing on...and his choice of handling things. Never Gets Old Last but certainly not least, there's Never Gets Old by Alejandro Arbona, Kano, Daniela Miwa, and Jodi Wynne. There's a lot of interesting commentary in here, much of it understated. Maybe it's just me, but I felt a lingering sense of dread when reading this story. We can all picture how badly it would go when one of The Old Guard told their family the truth – thus; I kept waiting for that hat to drop. I'm sure it did, but I'm happy that we didn't see it (to the extent that I feared) here. Thanks to Image Comics and #Edelweiss for making this book available for review. All opinions expressed are my own. Read more at Quirky Cat's Comics

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kogiopsis

    All anthologies are destined to be mixed bags, and I think there are some very valid criticisms of this one, especially the fact that a lot of the stories repeated the same plotline with the same 'twist' - the Old Guard don't die! shock! - but overall it was interesting and enjoyable. Standouts: - "Many Happy Returns" was a refreshingly nonviolent and genuinely sweet little adventure. - "How to Make a Ghost Town" hit on notable themes and is an interesting insight into Andy's character. - "The Bear" All anthologies are destined to be mixed bags, and I think there are some very valid criticisms of this one, especially the fact that a lot of the stories repeated the same plotline with the same 'twist' - the Old Guard don't die! shock! - but overall it was interesting and enjoyable. Standouts: - "Many Happy Returns" was a refreshingly nonviolent and genuinely sweet little adventure. - "How to Make a Ghost Town" hit on notable themes and is an interesting insight into Andy's character. - "The Bear" featured Joe doing what I imagine I'd want to do sometimes to if I was an immortal: fucking off into the wilderness of Alaska for some peace and quiet! There was more Booker than I expected; I don't really think of him as one of the more interesting characters, and he's not always, but some of his appearances did pay off - especially "Many Happy Returns" and "Never Gets Old" lined up back to back. Many of Joe and Nicky's appearances were... basically about homophobia, which was fine the first time but felt a little old. Nicky gets away from it in "Love Letters", but I spent the whole book hoping Joe would get some prime pagetime to himself and "The Bear" is the closest we got. The most interesting element here was how many of these stories focused on individual members of the cast flying solo. There are obvious storytelling reasons for that, but I also find it adds nuance to their group dynamic to think of them - even Joe and Nicky - spending years or decades apart. It is frustrating how indistinct the character designs are, which is made abundantly clear in the varied art styles of this collection. Some of that is because of the different time periods portrayed, and that's an unavoidable challenge, but I feel like the failure to meet that challenge is indicative of weak original designs. I spent a good portion of this book wishing I could see these stories with the movie cast instead, because then I'd know who I was looking at. Overall, interesting, but mostly made me want to watch the movie again.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Twelve pieces of nothing. I mean, I've never seen a page of the two graphic novels this collection of shorts spins off from, but I can clearly see from this evidence why people cry foul at the bad idea of making immortal warriors so damned immortal, and so damned, well, boring. Not even the N-bomb and some nuns' tits can wake this lot up. Twelve pieces of nothing. I mean, I've never seen a page of the two graphic novels this collection of shorts spins off from, but I can clearly see from this evidence why people cry foul at the bad idea of making immortal warriors so damned immortal, and so damned, well, boring. Not even the N-bomb and some nuns' tits can wake this lot up.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    As the preamble to each issue points out, between them these immortal-ish soldiers have 10,000 years of history, so why not invite in various creative teams to offer vignettes from those vast and violent pasts? Series creators Rucka and Fernandez kick it off with a story about Andy's instantly recognisable axe. Which...well, neither of them is British, so I guess maybe they still think of this paradox as the respectable, mythic Ship of Theseus. Whereas to a UK reader, the inevitable response is As the preamble to each issue points out, between them these immortal-ish soldiers have 10,000 years of history, so why not invite in various creative teams to offer vignettes from those vast and violent pasts? Series creators Rucka and Fernandez kick it off with a story about Andy's instantly recognisable axe. Which...well, neither of them is British, so I guess maybe they still think of this paradox as the respectable, mythic Ship of Theseus. Whereas to a UK reader, the inevitable response is 'You're doing an anthology series about ancient warriors, and you opened with Trigger's broom?' Still, I did empathise with this exchange: "That's tempered steel and spot-welded and shit, Andy. You're telling me you had advanced metallurgy in the Stone Age?" "Copper Age, thank you. I mean, I'm old, I'm not *that* old." Still, you can't say it doesn't take full advantage of the range the set-up affords. Wild West, feudal Japan, Weimar Germany... Contributors include the Bitch Planet team, the Powers boys, and the pair behind that wonderful recent Jimmy Olsen series (though this last CV is less of a guide to the content here than the other two). Thoughtfully, they're mostly paired such that each issue includes one story from big names, and one from newer creators, thereby discouraging singles readers from skipping the less famous names. Given the film was definitely enough of a hit to get sequels, it would be lovely if they drew on some of this variety; given those sequels will all be coming from Netflix, I won't be holding my breath. (Edelweiss ARC)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    This is a collection of shorts, and as with any compilation, the quality varies. There are a couple very good ones - Jason Aaron & Rafael Albequerque's story manages to be pretty funny and fun, while "Zanzibar and Other Harbors" pushes the LGBTQ perspective very effectively, with a memorable story. None of the stories are weak, and a couple do add some dimension to the characters - 'My Mother's Axe' and 'How to Make a Ghost Town' both give Andy lots to do, for example. The art is good to great, This is a collection of shorts, and as with any compilation, the quality varies. There are a couple very good ones - Jason Aaron & Rafael Albequerque's story manages to be pretty funny and fun, while "Zanzibar and Other Harbors" pushes the LGBTQ perspective very effectively, with a memorable story. None of the stories are weak, and a couple do add some dimension to the characters - 'My Mother's Axe' and 'How to Make a Ghost Town' both give Andy lots to do, for example. The art is good to great, with some unique approaches that work to a greater or lesser level for the stories (some make it very hard to recognize the characters). But overall, it's a nice addition to the world with plenty of bite-size stories that aren't integral by any means, but are definitely enjoyable.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jay

    The Old Guard: Tales Through Time collection features a series of stories that expand upon series creator Greg Rucka's universe. The list of writers and artists on the individual stories is impressive. The stories range all over the characters long lifetimes so that you learn more about each of them and what they were up to at any given time. I found both the stories and artwork to be top notch. While I might've liked some stories more than others, they were all pretty darn good. The opportunity to The Old Guard: Tales Through Time collection features a series of stories that expand upon series creator Greg Rucka's universe. The list of writers and artists on the individual stories is impressive. The stories range all over the characters long lifetimes so that you learn more about each of them and what they were up to at any given time. I found both the stories and artwork to be top notch. While I might've liked some stories more than others, they were all pretty darn good. The opportunity to read more stories featuring The Old Guard is always welcome and it is nice to see all the various creators getting to dabble in the universe as well.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    The writing, artwork, and canon felt a little hodge-podge here but I appreciated one or two of the smaller and more personal stories. (e-galley from Edelweiss)

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mik Cope

    On the whole, pretty boring, really.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    This six-issue graphic novel collects twelve standalone short stories from “The Old Guard” universe. For those who’ve neither read the comic nor watched the Netflix movie, it imagines that a few immortals walk among us, or – if not immortals – at least extremely long-lived people. The oldest known among them, Andromache the Scythian (a.k.a. Andy,) is somewhere between six and seven thousand years old. (She appears in about half the stories in some capacity or another, ranging from cameo mention This six-issue graphic novel collects twelve standalone short stories from “The Old Guard” universe. For those who’ve neither read the comic nor watched the Netflix movie, it imagines that a few immortals walk among us, or – if not immortals – at least extremely long-lived people. The oldest known among them, Andromache the Scythian (a.k.a. Andy,) is somewhere between six and seven thousand years old. (She appears in about half the stories in some capacity or another, ranging from cameo mention to main character.) As the subtitle suggests, the dozen stories jump through time offering vignettes from the lives of the various immortals. The locales also vary, though primarily involving places that are known for their belligerency, intrigue, or noir ambiance -- e.g. the wild west, samurai era Japan, 197o’s New York City, Berlin in 1932, etc. Some of the tales, e.g. “How to Make a Ghost Town,” “Zanzibar and Other Harbors,” and “Lacus Solitudinus,” are story-driven. Other pieces are more conceptual, focusing on an intriguing idea that comes with immortality. For example, “My Mother’s Axe” explores the Theseus’s ship idea of what it means for a thing to be itself when it’s replaced piece by piece over time. I enjoyed this collection a great deal. The artistic styles vary to be apropos to the time and place in question, and the storytelling approach also shifts, owing not only to the different settings but also to the numerous authors involved. If you’re attached to having extended story arcs told over several issues, this might not be for you. The storytelling is necessarily terse and / or truncated, owing to space constraints. But if you go in expecting the two story-per-issue flash fiction format, you’ll likely find it compelling.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lucsbooks

    Omg, omg, omg, I loved the movie so much that I was afraid of reading the comics but this was awesome! I may be biased, but this book felt like a gift for the fans above all: little plot, just seeing the characters we know and love with their families and lovers through the centuries. Each tale focus on a different character (including some I had never met before), so no matter who's your favourite, you'll see them and if there's someone you don't care as much about, this will give you a one on on Omg, omg, omg, I loved the movie so much that I was afraid of reading the comics but this was awesome! I may be biased, but this book felt like a gift for the fans above all: little plot, just seeing the characters we know and love with their families and lovers through the centuries. Each tale focus on a different character (including some I had never met before), so no matter who's your favourite, you'll see them and if there's someone you don't care as much about, this will give you a one on one chance to get to know them better. The art was so beautiful, I loved seeing the hairstyles and clothes change across the centuries and how these characters referenced something that happened a millennium ago as if it was yesterday. At the same time, the fact that they forgot a lot also made them more human. The biggest surprise for me was Andy and how much I loved this version of her. Don't get me wrong, I pray at the altar of Charlize Theron but I loved Andy's look so much more here, plus seeing her lovers and friends across the centuries. Conclusion This delivered everything I dreamed of and more, mixing the way these characters loved each other and the world with times and people that held no love for those that looked or were like them. I want, no, I NEED more. Thank you to Edelweiss and Image Comics for this DRC. Rating:5/5

  17. 4 out of 5

    Liberty

    Anyone who knows me personally, or who has watched me read these comics originally, knows that I love everything The Old Guard related. I originally started with the Netflix movie because the comics were back ordered. I read the first two volumes of the comics and loved them when I finally got my hands on them. And now we’re getting more of our beloved immortals. Tales Through Time are stories told between moments we already know about the characters from the other comics. There’s a comic of Nil Anyone who knows me personally, or who has watched me read these comics originally, knows that I love everything The Old Guard related. I originally started with the Netflix movie because the comics were back ordered. I read the first two volumes of the comics and loved them when I finally got my hands on them. And now we’re getting more of our beloved immortals. Tales Through Time are stories told between moments we already know about the characters from the other comics. There’s a comic of Nile training with Andy between the end of Opening Fire and the beginning of Force Multiplied. We see a few stories of Booker and his life with his family in France. We see Nicky and Joe being their lovely and loving selves in times that weren’t always so welcoming to gay men. I think these stories are great to give depth to the characters that I’ve come to know and love. My only real complaint is that the art styles vary between stories because this is such a huge and collaborative project (I want to say 10 people or more worked on this). My only not-a-real-complaint-but-I-am-who-I-am compliant is that this coming out between Force Multiplied and the next volume in the Old Guard series means I have to wait even longer. But I will wait because I love these characters.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alexa

    Some of the stories I liked a lot, others that I forgot about as I was reading them. I did like how they were all bite-sized stories; more glimpses into the characters' histories rather than larger narratives. However, some of those bites didn't examine particularly interesting concepts to begin with. I think a risk of having all these guest writers is that it reduces the opportunity for meaningful character backstory and/or development to occur because it may contradict canon characterisation o Some of the stories I liked a lot, others that I forgot about as I was reading them. I did like how they were all bite-sized stories; more glimpses into the characters' histories rather than larger narratives. However, some of those bites didn't examine particularly interesting concepts to begin with. I think a risk of having all these guest writers is that it reduces the opportunity for meaningful character backstory and/or development to occur because it may contradict canon characterisation or continuity.

  19. 4 out of 5

    thedailyflannel

    Honestly, I loved it. I've seen a lot of people say that this addition is sort of a 'take it or leave it' situation, but I think that it added flavor and backstory to the cast. Would I have loved to see more Joe and Nicky? Yes. One hundred percent. Did I love seeing Andy's son and partner? Yes. Absolutely. The Merrick peek was fun, the Booker museum piece was heartwarming, and seeing Noriko was exciting. I loved it for the most part, other than Isaac's story feeling somewhat out of the blue. (Ma Honestly, I loved it. I've seen a lot of people say that this addition is sort of a 'take it or leave it' situation, but I think that it added flavor and backstory to the cast. Would I have loved to see more Joe and Nicky? Yes. One hundred percent. Did I love seeing Andy's son and partner? Yes. Absolutely. The Merrick peek was fun, the Booker museum piece was heartwarming, and seeing Noriko was exciting. I loved it for the most part, other than Isaac's story feeling somewhat out of the blue. (Maybe I forgot him? Or is he actually a new character? I can't remember.)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    Pretty good spin-off just to show what these immortals do in their off time. Plus the way Books was portrayed really looks like a story all to itself. He seems to have started out as a nice enough guy with the people he was closest too until each major historical conflict got even worse. Seeing him go down the bottle makes him look like an authentic war soldier. Plus it was really good to see the other immortals looking out for another and show the need for connection even spiritually.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stephen Ede-Borrett

    For any fan of Rucka's characters or simply the first (I understand that there is another in development) Netflix movie this book provides an excellent background with wonderful stories. There are twelve stories, of varying lengths, from twelve authors and twelve plus artists. A wonderful book to gently browse through reading one at a time to make stretch the experience out. Unreservedly recommended to any and all. For any fan of Rucka's characters or simply the first (I understand that there is another in development) Netflix movie this book provides an excellent background with wonderful stories. There are twelve stories, of varying lengths, from twelve authors and twelve plus artists. A wonderful book to gently browse through reading one at a time to make stretch the experience out. Unreservedly recommended to any and all.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    I enjoy this series, but I don’t see the point of this short story collection. It adds nothing of value to The Old Guard universe. It also doesn’t add much depth to the characters, particularly because the different artists makes it difficult to tell which of the male characters we are seeing (the two females, being different races, are much easier, but they don’t show up in very many stories).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    The old guard is great. I hope they keep going with this though I've heard the author say only a three arc series. So 1 more volume I guess. So this is like a nice bonus volume. Still though not at all required for the main series as far as I can tell. The old guard is great. I hope they keep going with this though I've heard the author say only a three arc series. So 1 more volume I guess. So this is like a nice bonus volume. Still though not at all required for the main series as far as I can tell.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Warren

    A collection of short stories - solid tales through the lens of the immortality and reluctant heroism of the old guard. Justice? Revenge? Necessity? Even a solid take on the ship of theseus story ha!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I trust Rucka, and this does not disappoint. Meet more of the immortals and get to know them a bit more intimately. There are different tales, at different times, and I love this almost as much as I love the original. Job well done.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Really enjoy the series, but this anthology didn’t do it for me. Mostly violence and each story was short with no real story line that engaged me. Three were memorable - the rest I doubt I will remember for long.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jelena Milašinović

    A wonderful addition to the series. Tales Through Time offers short, but meaningful glimpses into the past of the Old Guard. My personal favourite from this volume is Zanzibar and Other Harbours

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shana

    So amazing. All six issues are fantastic. The last one had me bawling.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erica McGillivray

    Some of these stories didn't quite do it for me, but they had kernels of truth for the characters. The couple I very much enjoyed made me tip from 3 to 4. Some of these stories didn't quite do it for me, but they had kernels of truth for the characters. The couple I very much enjoyed made me tip from 3 to 4.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Not great, but good to get a peak at some more humanity behind these immortals.

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