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The Good Asian, Vol. 1

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Writer PORNSAK PICHETSHOTE's long-awaited follow-up to the critically acclaimed INFIDEL with stunning art by ALEXANDRE TEFENKGI (OUTPOST ZERO)! Following Edison Harki, a haunted, self-loathing Chinese-American detective on the trail of a killer in 1936 Chinatown, THE GOOD ASIAN is Chinatown noir starring the first generation of Americans to come of age under an immigration Writer PORNSAK PICHETSHOTE's long-awaited follow-up to the critically acclaimed INFIDEL with stunning art by ALEXANDRE TEFENKGI (OUTPOST ZERO)! Following Edison Harki, a haunted, self-loathing Chinese-American detective on the trail of a killer in 1936 Chinatown, THE GOOD ASIAN is Chinatown noir starring the first generation of Americans to come of age under an immigration ban, the Chinese, as they're besieged by rampant murders, abusive police, and a world that seemingly never changes. Collects THE GOOD ASIAN #1-4, plus covers by SANA TAKEDA, ANNIE WU, JEN BARTEL, DAVE JOHNSON, and more.


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Writer PORNSAK PICHETSHOTE's long-awaited follow-up to the critically acclaimed INFIDEL with stunning art by ALEXANDRE TEFENKGI (OUTPOST ZERO)! Following Edison Harki, a haunted, self-loathing Chinese-American detective on the trail of a killer in 1936 Chinatown, THE GOOD ASIAN is Chinatown noir starring the first generation of Americans to come of age under an immigration Writer PORNSAK PICHETSHOTE's long-awaited follow-up to the critically acclaimed INFIDEL with stunning art by ALEXANDRE TEFENKGI (OUTPOST ZERO)! Following Edison Harki, a haunted, self-loathing Chinese-American detective on the trail of a killer in 1936 Chinatown, THE GOOD ASIAN is Chinatown noir starring the first generation of Americans to come of age under an immigration ban, the Chinese, as they're besieged by rampant murders, abusive police, and a world that seemingly never changes. Collects THE GOOD ASIAN #1-4, plus covers by SANA TAKEDA, ANNIE WU, JEN BARTEL, DAVE JOHNSON, and more.

30 review for The Good Asian, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    The detective story gets lost in the need to tell of the racism and injustice Chinese immigrants went through in the 1930's. There's a lot of interesting historical tidbits about how the U.S. government passed laws specifically against those of Chinese ancestry and then the larger Asian population. The art and coloring very much added to the noirish setting. The detective story gets lost in the need to tell of the racism and injustice Chinese immigrants went through in the 1930's. There's a lot of interesting historical tidbits about how the U.S. government passed laws specifically against those of Chinese ancestry and then the larger Asian population. The art and coloring very much added to the noirish setting.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    A noir detective story set in 1930s San Francisco Chinatown, told from the perspective of an ethnically Chinese cop, it works better as historic fiction than it does as a mystery. The insights into the horribly racist laws invented to keep the new immigrants down, is very interesting, although it maybe is not as well integrated into the narrative as you'd want. The mystery is all over the place, with dead ends and sidesteps a-plenty, making the whole feel slowmoving and in the end unsatisfying, ev A noir detective story set in 1930s San Francisco Chinatown, told from the perspective of an ethnically Chinese cop, it works better as historic fiction than it does as a mystery. The insights into the horribly racist laws invented to keep the new immigrants down, is very interesting, although it maybe is not as well integrated into the narrative as you'd want. The mystery is all over the place, with dead ends and sidesteps a-plenty, making the whole feel slowmoving and in the end unsatisfying, even knowing it ends on a cliffhanger. I liked the art and especially the colouring, creating a lot of noir-ish atmosphere. I'm not so sure I'd read a second volume, to be honest. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    This series certainly earns its reputation in terms of relevancy and historical context. With all of the Noir tropes, this one feels unique by going into the post-Chinese immigration bans. I mean our main character doesn't even refer to himself by his birth name. That's despite the fact that he doesn't go by any name other than Edison because he settled into a lie he thrived in. But it's barely doing him or any other Chinese American any favors. The Chinese people see him as a race traitor, and h This series certainly earns its reputation in terms of relevancy and historical context. With all of the Noir tropes, this one feels unique by going into the post-Chinese immigration bans. I mean our main character doesn't even refer to himself by his birth name. That's despite the fact that he doesn't go by any name other than Edison because he settled into a lie he thrived in. But it's barely doing him or any other Chinese American any favors. The Chinese people see him as a race traitor, and his White American colleagues see him more as a pet with a special owner. In fact the look into how the bans, repeals, and the efforts to get people to America anyway; it paints a somber picture on trying to find a better life. Between all of the risks, there are times when keeping your head down feels smothering but necessary. But doesn't this just mean waiting for things to get better when bad things keep happening? Some people like Ed's more racist detective colleague practically thrives on the Chinese people he can dominate. Just look at the villain of this series, a clear Red Scare stand-in using superstition to his advantage.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    It's the 1930s, and Edison Hark is the only Chinese cop on the force policing San Francisco's Chinatown. Early on, when he busts an opium addict, he tells the man's family that if the Chinese want the authorities to stop treating them like dirt, they should stop giving them reasons to do so. Privately, he knows it's never that simple, as witness the endless aggro and slurs he has to face – and it's not just whites, but the Chinese community too, who are prone to assuming his badge must be fake. It's the 1930s, and Edison Hark is the only Chinese cop on the force policing San Francisco's Chinatown. Early on, when he busts an opium addict, he tells the man's family that if the Chinese want the authorities to stop treating them like dirt, they should stop giving them reasons to do so. Privately, he knows it's never that simple, as witness the endless aggro and slurs he has to face – and it's not just whites, but the Chinese community too, who are prone to assuming his badge must be fake. He's only in this privileged yet corrosive position thanks to his family association with the tycoon Carroway, whose own family emerged from an earlier generation of racism – "Father was Irish when that meant 'job-stealing trash'". But now old man Carroway is dead, and an already constricted accommodation is looking ever shakier. Every scene provides some new tangle of the doubled identity, whether it's Hark bridling when he meets someone else trying to play the well-assimilated part, or the addition of a female narrator to the mix, which brings a whole additional layer of complications as regards what it means to be a 'good Asian'. All of this wrapped around and threaded through a classic noir plot, with bodies dropping and bits chopped off, leading to rumours of the return of a legendary hatchet-man not seen since the police busted the Tongs years previously. The art catches the mean streets, the microexpressions, and the little details Hark notices, which a crime story needs to come off on the page; an appendix summarises the various hateful pieces of legislation which form the bedrock for this whole situation. Of these, the Chinese Exclusion Act looms largest, as America's first effort to essentially outlaw a whole race, yet somehow it's not even the most shocking among them; consider the double-edged Naturalization Act of 1870, taking away Chinese-Americans' citizenship even as it was opened to "aliens of African nativity and to persons of African descent", or the 1920 Cable Act whereby an American woman who married a Chinese man ceased legally to be an American woman. (Edelweiss ARC)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    Compelling artwork and a killer premise go a long way toward making this work as well as it does. The setting is rich and packed with nasty, complex undercurrents of racism, privilege, violence, male rage, and more, and Pichetshote is hellbent on mining it for all its worth. And for the most part, it works! I love how his protagonist is shady and often unpleasant, the kind of guy you don't like but can't help but follow around. Tefenkgi and Loughridge's art is striking, too, and captures the per Compelling artwork and a killer premise go a long way toward making this work as well as it does. The setting is rich and packed with nasty, complex undercurrents of racism, privilege, violence, male rage, and more, and Pichetshote is hellbent on mining it for all its worth. And for the most part, it works! I love how his protagonist is shady and often unpleasant, the kind of guy you don't like but can't help but follow around. Tefenkgi and Loughridge's art is striking, too, and captures the pervading griminess of the setting really well. I also love how murky the moralities at play in the comic are and how, despite the obvious examples of The Bad Guys™️, very few good people are given a spotlight. It makes for a complicated narrative I never knew what to expect from. That unpredictability is a double-edged sword, though, because as labyrinthine as the noir and mystery is, most of it feels disjointed. I'm sure Pichetshote has an endgame in mind, but there's an intentionality to the breadcrumb trail of clues that I felt was lacking. There's a good mystery being developed, but it gets lost in tangents and monologues that don't seem to be driving toward anything, which left me feeling a little confused, albeit never bored. I'm on board for at least another volume, especially considering how this one ends. But I hope the story is able to find a clearer sense of direction and alignment, as that will help its already strong foundations work even better.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    I think I'm due a Second Law of Graphic Novels. I mean, the first doesn't just apply to graphic novels, but it's where I see the truth of the Law the most – that books get translated with the urgency they deserve, the best rushed out to foreign markets, and things not appearing in translation for decades never worth the wait. My Second Law then is not just based on this volume at hand, but is certainly proved by this, its most extreme example. It states that my favourable reaction will be in inv I think I'm due a Second Law of Graphic Novels. I mean, the first doesn't just apply to graphic novels, but it's where I see the truth of the Law the most – that books get translated with the urgency they deserve, the best rushed out to foreign markets, and things not appearing in translation for decades never worth the wait. My Second Law then is not just based on this volume at hand, but is certainly proved by this, its most extreme example. It states that my favourable reaction will be in inverse to the quantity of puff quotes present. This one has THREE full pages of quotes before we've begun, and practically a full back cover, all stating that this noir, set between the wars in San Francisco's Chinatown, is the best thing since kung pao chicken. It's not. It's decidedly meh, despite my wanting it to show up America's racism. Who killed what and why, and what it means for the detective's past, present and future, and who's a goodie and who's not – it all just passed me by. I do wish I'd found more to engage me, beyond a lasting life lesson.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Allard

    Slightly confusing pulp noir comic series. Based in San Francisco in the 1930s, this series centers on a Chinese-American detective and the troubles in which he gets involved in the Chinese community at that time. There's murder, bloodshed and other nefarious activity and the 4 issues of this volume leave the end up in the air, no doubt with more to follow. The mainly monochrome artwork and the writing are not always clear and I found it a little confusing but got there in the end. It's quite goo Slightly confusing pulp noir comic series. Based in San Francisco in the 1930s, this series centers on a Chinese-American detective and the troubles in which he gets involved in the Chinese community at that time. There's murder, bloodshed and other nefarious activity and the 4 issues of this volume leave the end up in the air, no doubt with more to follow. The mainly monochrome artwork and the writing are not always clear and I found it a little confusing but got there in the end. It's quite good and worth a look. I got a copy in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Somewhat choppy, but a good first half for this noir detective story set in San Francisco’s Chinatown. The historical notes at the end of the volume add great context for the historical forces at play.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Joshua Lawson

    Comics: the best medium for historical fiction?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ana

  12. 4 out of 5

    Suren Raja

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel

  14. 4 out of 5

    Johannes

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rustie

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nowenen

  18. 5 out of 5

    Holly

  19. 4 out of 5

    Robert

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  21. 4 out of 5

    Drew Woodworth

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jan-Niklas Bersenkowitsch

  23. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Brown

  24. 4 out of 5

    mabuse cast

  25. 4 out of 5

    Francois Arsenault

  26. 5 out of 5

    R.E.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Dcf

  28. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joe Danzi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Peter

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