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Children of Demeter

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In 1973, a commune of almost twenty-five people—mostly women and children—disappeared overnight from the small town of West Burma, WI. What happened to the hippie Children of Demeter has remained a mystery until this day, which is what draws Sarah Bisset, a sociologist on sabbatical, to the place. With her personal life in ruins Sarah is more than happy to lose herself in t In 1973, a commune of almost twenty-five people—mostly women and children—disappeared overnight from the small town of West Burma, WI. What happened to the hippie Children of Demeter has remained a mystery until this day, which is what draws Sarah Bisset, a sociologist on sabbatical, to the place. With her personal life in ruins Sarah is more than happy to lose herself in the secrets of the isolated farmhouse, but soon those revelations have her questioning her own identity, and even her sanity. Is she prepared to navigate the labyrinth of lies and cover ups to expose the truth concealed inside Demeter House despite the consequences?


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In 1973, a commune of almost twenty-five people—mostly women and children—disappeared overnight from the small town of West Burma, WI. What happened to the hippie Children of Demeter has remained a mystery until this day, which is what draws Sarah Bisset, a sociologist on sabbatical, to the place. With her personal life in ruins Sarah is more than happy to lose herself in t In 1973, a commune of almost twenty-five people—mostly women and children—disappeared overnight from the small town of West Burma, WI. What happened to the hippie Children of Demeter has remained a mystery until this day, which is what draws Sarah Bisset, a sociologist on sabbatical, to the place. With her personal life in ruins Sarah is more than happy to lose herself in the secrets of the isolated farmhouse, but soon those revelations have her questioning her own identity, and even her sanity. Is she prepared to navigate the labyrinth of lies and cover ups to expose the truth concealed inside Demeter House despite the consequences?

30 review for Children of Demeter

  1. 4 out of 5

    Char

    CHILDREN OF DEMETER had me ensnared right from the get-go. I generally love stories about cults and this one was a doozy! Being pressed for time right now, I thought I should make a brief review of this compelling story while it is still fresh in my mind. A woman reels from the death of her husband, which is revealed to her along with the knowledge of his infidelity and his hospitalized mistress. With his insurance money, she up and moves to a new house, a house shunned by the community and by na CHILDREN OF DEMETER had me ensnared right from the get-go. I generally love stories about cults and this one was a doozy! Being pressed for time right now, I thought I should make a brief review of this compelling story while it is still fresh in my mind. A woman reels from the death of her husband, which is revealed to her along with the knowledge of his infidelity and his hospitalized mistress. With his insurance money, she up and moves to a new house, a house shunned by the community and by nature itself. What will she discover there? You'll have to read this to find out! I loved the vivid characters here and was therefore even more emotionally stressed when bad things started to happen to them. I was also surprised at several changes that took place which completely altered the picture as far as this reader was concerned. I love when that happens. I cannot finish this review without mentioning the awesome cover of this book which called out to me the minute I gazed upon its awesomeness. Look at it! Just look at it! This is my first E. V. Knight book, but it shall not be my last. She took the "evil in a small town" trope, mashed it up with some mysterious cult activity, sprinkled in some mythology and sprayed some creature-feature rich whipped cream on the top. To all of which, I say: "Hell Yeah!" *Thanks to the publisher, the author and Erin Al-Mehairi for the e-ARC in exchange for my honest feedback. This is it!*

  2. 5 out of 5

    Laurie

    Children of Demeter is the third work I’ve read by author E.V. Knight. Dead Eyes was fast-paced and fun and full of eyeballs, The Fourth Whore was an epic and brutal rage-filled tale of Lillith, while Children of Demeter tackles cults, strange goings-on, and a house full of secrets. They’re all unflinching reads with strong female characters and if this is your idea of a good reading time (and how couldn’t it be?!) you’re going to love her writing. Sarah’s running from her life which imploded whe Children of Demeter is the third work I’ve read by author E.V. Knight. Dead Eyes was fast-paced and fun and full of eyeballs, The Fourth Whore was an epic and brutal rage-filled tale of Lillith, while Children of Demeter tackles cults, strange goings-on, and a house full of secrets. They’re all unflinching reads with strong female characters and if this is your idea of a good reading time (and how couldn’t it be?!) you’re going to love her writing. Sarah’s running from her life which imploded when her wayward husband died in an auto accident leaving her reeling with both grief and betrayal. She’s taking a much-deserved sabbatical and buys a home sight unseen with the insurance money. A home rumored to have once housed a cult of women and children who mysteriously disappeared in the ’70s. They were once bountiful farmers with a lush and fruitful harvest but when they disappeared so did any signs of life on the property. The house is in sad shape because no one has been able to live there for very long without fleeing for the hills and the grounds are completely barren of all life because it’s supposedly been cursed by the cult but Sarah doesn’t care. She feels an instant kinship with the run-down house. “She could only offer it co-misery as she was also bereft of life “ Yikes, that all sounds a little depressing, doesn’t it? But don’t you worry, before long it takes a turn over to creepy-strangeville and never looks back. There’s no time here for dwelling on the sad-making thoughts because there are secrets that need revealing. Sarah’s planning on researching the cult and starts to poke around and the locals are not happy about it. A few lively side characters show up and before long it feels like everyone in this town is keeping secrets. And I LOVE me a secret-filled book so this was the book for me! I also love me a character who isn’t afraid to do some aggressive snooping like Sarah here. She is my kind of nosy as hell heroine. She doesn’t let strange circumstances, naysayers, party-poopers, and grumpy old men shut her down. Loved it. These secrets aren’t the milquetoast lame ones that fill so many books either so prepare thyself. The Children of Demeter is unsettling, weird and mysterious and wild and all those great things that'll keep you reading and it’s just the right amount of disorientating. Do yourself a kindness and forget this messed up world for a few hours by spending some time with this book! CW: (view spoiler)[miscarriage, a dead-ass cheating husband who deserved what he got, if you ask me 😈 (hide spoiler)] Thank you Erin Al-Mehairi & RDS Press for sharing this copy with me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♡⚔♡ [howling libraries]

    I love a good cult story, but I don't find many cult-based horror books that actually feel like horror. A lot of the ones I've read seemed to tread more along the thriller line — which is perfectly acceptable, don't get me wrong... but sometimes, I want more, and I can safely say that Children of Demeter delivered. Children of Demeter follows a woman who's grieving her husband, though not in the way you might think: his death led to the reveal of his infidelity, and thus, Sarah is left grieving h I love a good cult story, but I don't find many cult-based horror books that actually feel like horror. A lot of the ones I've read seemed to tread more along the thriller line — which is perfectly acceptable, don't get me wrong... but sometimes, I want more, and I can safely say that Children of Demeter delivered. Children of Demeter follows a woman who's grieving her husband, though not in the way you might think: his death led to the reveal of his infidelity, and thus, Sarah is left grieving her marriage on multiple levels. Desperate to get away, she buys an old house without visiting it first, and finds out that it was the site of a bizarre, hippie-esque cult in the 70s. Things seem innocent at first, but Sarah quickly learns that this home has a way of getting inside her mind, and shit hits the fan pretty quickly after that. First of all, I really enjoyed Sarah immensely as a protagonist. She's incredibly head-strong, constantly putting her nose where it doesn't belong and determined not to let anyone stop her from finding out the truth. Not only that, but the setting is so atmospheric and the reveals are perfectly paced to make this a quick, engaging read that never gets stale. I enjoyed Children of Demeter very much and I finally experienced for myself how incredible E.V. Knight's writing talent is. I can't wait to read more from this author in the future! Thank you so much to Erin Al-Mehairi & the publisher for providing me with this review copy in exchange for an honest review! ——— twitter | booktok | bookstagram | blog

  4. 4 out of 5

    Steve Stred

    ** Edited as review is now live on Kendall Reviews! ** Huge thanks to Erin Al-Mehairi for sending me ‘Children of Demeter’ to check out. I’d honestly not seen much about this book until she sent it my way. I was very intrigued to see how this would unfold, with the commune of people seemingly packing up and disappearing overnight, leaving the lands dead from that day forth. Cult-based stories have always been something I’ve loved reading, so I was excited to dive in. What I liked: The story follows ** Edited as review is now live on Kendall Reviews! ** Huge thanks to Erin Al-Mehairi for sending me ‘Children of Demeter’ to check out. I’d honestly not seen much about this book until she sent it my way. I was very intrigued to see how this would unfold, with the commune of people seemingly packing up and disappearing overnight, leaving the lands dead from that day forth. Cult-based stories have always been something I’ve loved reading, so I was excited to dive in. What I liked: The story follows Sara, a sociologist, recently widowed, who has moved to the site of the former commune to investigate the group as she researches her next book. On sabbatical from her position at the University, this was a prime time for her to come up and see what really happened. Knight lets us know almost immediately that not only is Sara not welcome up in the house that the small town believes is cursed or haunted, but also many of the citizens would prefer she not be there at all and bring any more attention to the group. Knight kept the tension levels high throughout. You always know something is about to happen, and you can’t wait to see just what exactly is going on. The layers of how the commune has seeped out throughout the surrounding area and people was fascinating and learning how the cult came to be and what ultimately happened was also great. What I didn’t like: It was an odd thing, but even though I absolutely wanted to know what was going to happen, every ‘twist’ or ‘unexpected turn’ was telegraphed far in advance. Saying that Knight had created such an intriguing narrative that I had to know if what I expected to happen did. Why you should buy this: If you like cult stuff, this will easily fill that itch. The Children of Demeter is an intriguing group and the way Knight infuses the past with the present was well done. This was a really fun read, one that kept me wanting to read on, pulling me along with each turn of the page.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Janelle Janson

    YOU HAD ME AT CULTS. Review to come.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    **Review coming soon**

  7. 5 out of 5

    Well Read Beard

    Excellent cult novel. It has a ton of stuff going for it, and honestly the first 100 pages were going to be 4 stars for me. I liked the 2nd half of the book a bit less, just a personal taste thing, but it's still a wonderful book. The gist, a cult disappeared over night 30 years ago and the land on their property just died. Nothing grows here anymore. Our main character is at the edge of something and she comes to the house to investigate from an academic side of things. There's so much, the hou Excellent cult novel. It has a ton of stuff going for it, and honestly the first 100 pages were going to be 4 stars for me. I liked the 2nd half of the book a bit less, just a personal taste thing, but it's still a wonderful book. The gist, a cult disappeared over night 30 years ago and the land on their property just died. Nothing grows here anymore. Our main character is at the edge of something and she comes to the house to investigate from an academic side of things. There's so much, the house, the caves, the lake, the painted over mural, the townspeople, the goddess, the sex.. yeah, there's some sex... It's definitely worth your time. The first paragraph in this one is great, very reminiscent for me of Eleanor gazing on Hill House for the first time. All my thoughts here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tNX0...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Yolanda Sfetsos

    Thanks to Erin Sweet Al-Mehairi and Raw Dog Screaming Press, I was lucky enough to receive this book before the release date. And I couldn't wait to get stuck into it because the cover is so psychedelic and the story sounded intriguing. I mean, it mentions Demeter and I'm a Greek mythology fan. And it deals with a hippie cult from the 60s, which sounded fascinating. And groovy. Sara is a sociologist running from the aftermath of her husband's death and the negative effects the accident took on her Thanks to Erin Sweet Al-Mehairi and Raw Dog Screaming Press, I was lucky enough to receive this book before the release date. And I couldn't wait to get stuck into it because the cover is so psychedelic and the story sounded intriguing. I mean, it mentions Demeter and I'm a Greek mythology fan. And it deals with a hippie cult from the 60s, which sounded fascinating. And groovy. Sara is a sociologist running from the aftermath of her husband's death and the negative effects the accident took on her life. She's on a sabbatical and has decided to write a book about the farmhouse she's just bought and moved into. A house that used to belong to a cult called Children of Demeter, and now holds many secrets within its walls... Wow. What an awesome horror book this turned out to be. Loved it! I was hooked from the very beginning because I found Sara's voice so addictive, I just had to follow her quest until the end. As soon as she arrives and steps into Demeter House, the eerie air of creepy mystery begins to haunt her life and it never lets go. This town is also packed with interesting characters of all ages who obviously have secrets and motivations of their own. So, the interactions as Sara attempts to solve the mystery of what happened to the Demeter clan were all fascinating. Every new piece added to the overall puzzle and deepened Sara's involvement in a place she feels strangely connected to. One of my favourite things about this story is how everything seems to move at the perfect slow-burn pace, but at the same time, the nightmarish reality of what's happening to this poor woman sneaks up on you pretty fast. Things get strange early on and the worm of dread never leaves. I enjoyed the ride. A lot! Demeter House is such a vividly imagined place and this house, as well as the surroundings, all feel so real the land becomes a character in its own right. And I absolutely love when that happens in a haunted house story. Children of Demeter is a really dark story that blends a lot of my favourite things together and delivers them in the one perfect package of horror delusion. The cult angle is super creepy, the mythology angle fits perfectly with what's going on, and the horror is satisfying. I also loved how well the whole psychedelic vibes of the 60s is very much alive through the whole thing. Not just because of the commune and the freaky mural or the house they abandoned, but also in the storytelling. A lot of ambiguity, bordering on a bad trip, is squeezed into the narrative. There's a LOT to love about this book, and I suspect Sara's story will stay with me for a long time. This is a fantastic book and you should definitely check it out!

  9. 4 out of 5

    The World According To J!

    Video Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N91T2... We have an interesting story of a commune. A Hippie Commune in a small town in Wisconsin. And, just like that it disappeared. In 1973, this commune of 25 people, mostly women and children, just vanished overnight. The commune was named “Children of Demeter.” And for years and years it remained a mystery, until a sociologist on sabbatical, named Sarah decides to do a little investigating. She buys the farmhouse on the land the commune once occup Video Review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N91T2... We have an interesting story of a commune. A Hippie Commune in a small town in Wisconsin. And, just like that it disappeared. In 1973, this commune of 25 people, mostly women and children, just vanished overnight. The commune was named “Children of Demeter.” And for years and years it remained a mystery, until a sociologist on sabbatical, named Sarah decides to do a little investigating. She buys the farmhouse on the land the commune once occupied. She wants to be a part of this place, to feel the vibes it gives off. All of this is research for her new book. Despite the advice of the townspeople, including her neighbor, she decides to go all in, live in this farmhouse, and try to experience life. The whole story concept was interesting to me. We have this Hippie Commune that is basically a cult, full of women and children, possibly brainwashed because that is what happens with cults, and it just disappears. What exactly is the connection to the land, the water, the mural on the wall of the farmhouse? How is all of this connected? There is just something about cult stories that really grabs our attention. It could be just us wondering how people can become so brainwashed, and wondering what happens within these cults. So much damage is done to a person’s life. There are definitely parts that are a little trippy, and a little hair raising at times. The book does a good job building up some of the scenes giving us a few shocking moments. It also does a good job making you question what exactly is happening, and what did happen, where did these people go? It gets dark a few times, and the story as a whole has a cast of interesting people that are in this town. All of them you just get the feeling they know a whole lot more than what they are letting on. So the story idea, the concept, I enjoyed. Unfortunately the thing that sort of soured this book for me was the writing. And look, I am no one to point out someone else’s writing. EV Knight is a Bram Stoker Award Winner. I just read and review books. But then again it’s my opinion. I just felt the writing was very thin throughout. It started off strong. The first few chapters I didn’t have any issues. I noticed the narrative getting thinner and thinner as we went along. There were several spots where I felt the dialogue was forced, and a bit cringey at times. Some of the dialogue did not seem like how people actually talked. Now maybe the writer intended to make the younger people in the story sound the way they did, but to me it came off like a bad script in a B movie. For example, the door to the basement is finally unlocked the Sarah is having the younger adults go down. One turns to the other and asks “You carrying?” And the other raises his shirt exposing his gun and just nods. That whole sequence felt very stereotypical to me. And the odd dialogues continued during the podcast segments of the book. I understand, yes, some young adults sound like that, but it really felt stereotypical, and written by someone way out of their comfort zone. So I’m at a 3 overall. The storyline about the cult and the mystery of how it disappeared and the connection to the mural is definitely the saving grace in my opinion for this one. The writing just didn’t work for me at all. It’s still an interesting book I would recommend you give it a chance. What doesn’t work for me may very well work for you. And it does have a few eerie moments sprinkled in. Thank you to Raw Dog Screaming Press for a copy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    E.F.

    A hippy commune disappears overnight, leaving their land and connections behind. The town swirls with rumors and suspicions, and the visiting sociologist (Sara) finds some folks are still reluctant to talk about the past... except for raving about the luscious harvests they used to sell at the farmer's markets. Picking up themes like the line between cult and commune, insider and outsider, Knight's blend of past and present day conflicts builds layers of suspense throughout. Complex characters, A hippy commune disappears overnight, leaving their land and connections behind. The town swirls with rumors and suspicions, and the visiting sociologist (Sara) finds some folks are still reluctant to talk about the past... except for raving about the luscious harvests they used to sell at the farmer's markets. Picking up themes like the line between cult and commune, insider and outsider, Knight's blend of past and present day conflicts builds layers of suspense throughout. Complex characters, vivid settings, and strange surprises await all guests to the old farm!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Sociologist Sarah Bisset needs her sabbatical not just for an academic recharge, but to find herself again following tragedy and betrayal. Her husband has died in a car accident, and with him in the vehicle was the mistress she didn’t know he had. She uses the insurance money to buy an infamous property in rural Wisconsin, a destination for her sabbatical research, but moreover an escape from her routine life and a home soured with memories of her duplicitous husband. The purchased farmhouse and Sociologist Sarah Bisset needs her sabbatical not just for an academic recharge, but to find herself again following tragedy and betrayal. Her husband has died in a car accident, and with him in the vehicle was the mistress she didn’t know he had. She uses the insurance money to buy an infamous property in rural Wisconsin, a destination for her sabbatical research, but moreover an escape from her routine life and a home soured with memories of her duplicitous husband. The purchased farmhouse and its lands are the former homestead of the Children of Demeter, a mysterious counterculture commune that led a seemingly peaceful hippie existence within the small community before disappearing overnight without trace or explanation in 1973. Partnering with a podcast that features stories of the unexplained (that is run by the son of her longtime friend) Sarah sets out to investigate the history of the agrarian hippie group and its enigmatic leader, interviewing longtime residents of the town and scope out the property, its lake, and the adjacent caves. Each bit of an answer they find only brings more questions. Already confused by a personal relationship clouded in deception, Sarah begins to notice oddities around the house that begin to lead her to further question her identity, and her sanity. The secrets of the property and the twenty-five mostly women and children who once called it home come coupled with inexplicable oddities: signs of someone – or something – living in the basement, barren land where nothing will grow, a psychedelic mural depicting a strange creature coming from the lake, and a hostile neighbor who appears to want a dark past kept hidden. I previously read and reviewed E.V. Knight’s The Fourth Whore from Raw Dog Screaming Press, a title that impressed me in its feminist themes and vibrant writing despite not being the genre of story that I’m particularly partial to. The plot of that novel necessitated a harsh, almost vitriolic tone and style, making a novel that while thought provoking and high quality, wasn’t ‘fun’ to read, or bewitching in that pleasurable way that some horror can do for me. Horror like a gothic ghost story. When I read the plot synopsis of Children of Demeter I knew this would probably be something I’d adore, a beloved sub-genre in the hands of an author who writes engagingly and who can place powerful feminist themes in an interesting light. Children of Demeter didn’t disappoint that expectation. The mysteries of a possible haunting, the secrets of an old property and the uncertain nature of this cult of fertility and harvest make for a classically captivating gothic horror. Knight puts an interesting spin on this by tying it in with psychedelic hippie culture. At heart of the novel is not something of ghosts, monsters, or the true story of the cult’s past. It’s the nature of Sarah, her identity as a person, as a woman. It’s a psychological, or perhaps even a social, horror story, though those other paranormal elements do get their due, secrets become revealed. The journey toward that is just coupled to Sarah’s rocky path to self-rediscovery, both literal and metaphorical. The only aspect of the novel that didn’t really work for me was the podcast angle. As a concept of the plot it works fine, the issue becomes Knight’s incorporation of the podcast dialogue into the novel. There is a cheesiness to the podcast presentation that takes away from the tone of the novel and Sarah’s point of view. It also ends up serving as a way to reveal information about the past quickly in the form of interviews. But, that doesn’t have as satisfying an effect on the reader than if these details were divulged in another format than a verbatim oral transcript. Aside from these moments, the creepy slow build up and the ultimate climax of the novel play out pitch perfectly in a successful combination of mythology, classic horror, and modern themes. Knight has won the Bram Stoker award already for horror, but after reading this I feel as though she’d also have great things to contribute to the mystery/suspense genre. Children of Demeter could almost classify in that realm over horror. If mythology, mysterious cults and gothic tones are among your cherished elements of fiction, check this one out.

  12. 5 out of 5

    VICKI HERBERT

    Far Out Man and not so Groovy... No spoilers. 3 stars. In 1966 Esmond Light founded a hippie commune and gathered followers, mostly women... The locals believed that the cult was up to witchcraft with their animal sacrifices and naked orgies resulting in many pregnant women... They called themselves The Children of Demeter... At the town's farmers market the cult was known for its jams, honey, meads and produce which was exceptionally good... But... The townsfolk were concerned about the welfare of th Far Out Man and not so Groovy... No spoilers. 3 stars. In 1966 Esmond Light founded a hippie commune and gathered followers, mostly women... The locals believed that the cult was up to witchcraft with their animal sacrifices and naked orgies resulting in many pregnant women... They called themselves The Children of Demeter... At the town's farmers market the cult was known for its jams, honey, meads and produce which was exceptionally good... But... The townsfolk were concerned about the welfare of their children especially the twins... Then on September 26, 1973, the entire commune disappeared overnight... Fast forward to current-day... Sara Bissett, recovering from the sudden death of her cheating husband, is using her funds to buy the old Demeter house on the hill to research the cult... Far out man, but not so groovy... I detect shades of the Charles Manson hippie cult... I generously bumped this rating from 2.5 to 3 stars but frankly this story seemed like a hodgepodge of 60s and 70s Manson-style hippie info dump to me. The plot is full of holes and loose ends and at times is boring and trite. I would liken this story to a psychedelic HARVEST HOME, a novel by Thomas Tryon. It tries half-heartedly to pull one into the past without much effort.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    Children of Demeter was the first novel I read by EV Knight, and what a great introduction to this talented writer! In a year where I have struggled to finish reading various books, this one drew me in from the first page and kept me reading until I finished. Sociology professor, Sara Bissett, buys a house that was inhabited by a commune (or cult) that disappeared in the 1960s. The house offers a chance to further her research on cults and to escape the aftermath of her husband’s death. Needless Children of Demeter was the first novel I read by EV Knight, and what a great introduction to this talented writer! In a year where I have struggled to finish reading various books, this one drew me in from the first page and kept me reading until I finished. Sociology professor, Sara Bissett, buys a house that was inhabited by a commune (or cult) that disappeared in the 1960s. The house offers a chance to further her research on cults and to escape the aftermath of her husband’s death. Needless to say, things don’t exactly go as planned as she explores the past and all of the secrets a small town can harbor. This book was an engaging ride through Sara’s ups and downs, twists and turns. Highly recommended.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Miranda

    3.5 stars, rounding up to 4. This book lost me for a bit in the middle, but the last 50 pages or so had me on the edge of my seat. Early on I thought I had some of the mysteries figured out, but I definitely couldn’t have predicted some of these twists! I’ll definitely be seeking out more of this author’s work.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Joel Lindenberg

    meh Really wanted to like this but the characters. story and tension never really came together. A lot of the plot and especially decision making by key characters was totally unbelievable and the ending left a ton of lose ends. Interesting idea but the execution just wasn’t there. I’d give this one pass….

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elle

    I feel like there should have been a lot more here in order to have the story hit the emotional notes it was going for. It wasn't bad but it felt sparse, which made it hard for me to care about the characters/plot I feel like there should have been a lot more here in order to have the story hit the emotional notes it was going for. It wasn't bad but it felt sparse, which made it hard for me to care about the characters/plot

  17. 4 out of 5

    Corinne

    Second half of the book lost something for me. Liked a lot of this very much though, and I’ll read more EV Knight publishes.

  18. 4 out of 5

    MCWow

    Engrossing, mysterious horror. Lots of dread & suspense. Stands on its own even though epilogue indicates the conflict continues.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Johannes Rytter

    Wayyy too scary for me!!!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  21. 4 out of 5

    Laura MacBride-Gandia

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kristen

  23. 4 out of 5

    Clay

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jon Vermilye

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Del Duca

  26. 4 out of 5

    jim_c

  27. 4 out of 5

    Annette Murray

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  29. 5 out of 5

    John Lawson

  30. 5 out of 5

    Angel Dey

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