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Batman: Reptilian

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¿Qué infunde miedo en los corazones de aquellos que aterrorizan a Gotham? Solía ser Batman... Pero ahora, algo mucho más aterrador que un simple hombre acecha en las sombras, y va tras los villanos de la ciudad. ¿Qué tan salvaje debe ser un monstruo para estar en las pesadillas de los monstruos? Batman sale a la calle en busca de la criatura que aterroriza al bajo mundo de ¿Qué infunde miedo en los corazones de aquellos que aterrorizan a Gotham? Solía ser Batman... Pero ahora, algo mucho más aterrador que un simple hombre acecha en las sombras, y va tras los villanos de la ciudad. ¿Qué tan salvaje debe ser un monstruo para estar en las pesadillas de los monstruos? Batman sale a la calle en busca de la criatura que aterroriza al bajo mundo de Gotham y los golpea con fuerza. La búsqueda de pistas del Caballero Oscuro lo llevará por toda su galería de villanos, pero… ¿será capaz de llegar a ellos a tiempo? Contiene: Batman: Reptilian #1-6 (2021)


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¿Qué infunde miedo en los corazones de aquellos que aterrorizan a Gotham? Solía ser Batman... Pero ahora, algo mucho más aterrador que un simple hombre acecha en las sombras, y va tras los villanos de la ciudad. ¿Qué tan salvaje debe ser un monstruo para estar en las pesadillas de los monstruos? Batman sale a la calle en busca de la criatura que aterroriza al bajo mundo de ¿Qué infunde miedo en los corazones de aquellos que aterrorizan a Gotham? Solía ser Batman... Pero ahora, algo mucho más aterrador que un simple hombre acecha en las sombras, y va tras los villanos de la ciudad. ¿Qué tan salvaje debe ser un monstruo para estar en las pesadillas de los monstruos? Batman sale a la calle en busca de la criatura que aterroriza al bajo mundo de Gotham y los golpea con fuerza. La búsqueda de pistas del Caballero Oscuro lo llevará por toda su galería de villanos, pero… ¿será capaz de llegar a ellos a tiempo? Contiene: Batman: Reptilian #1-6 (2021)

30 review for Batman: Reptilian

  1. 4 out of 5

    A.J. Anders

    “Joker? Whatever’s in there with you—it isn’t me.” Oh Batman Reptilian, how my heart sings for thee. What a great fucking read. This may be the funniest Batman book I have ever read, as well as one of my favorite Batman comics in recent memory. The hardcover also thankfully brightens up the art on a bunch of the pages, which is great since it could be a little hard to see some of it in the singles. I literally ran to my LCS first thing this morning to grab this hardcover, and I planned on reading “Joker? Whatever’s in there with you—it isn’t me.” Oh Batman Reptilian, how my heart sings for thee. What a great fucking read. This may be the funniest Batman book I have ever read, as well as one of my favorite Batman comics in recent memory. The hardcover also thankfully brightens up the art on a bunch of the pages, which is great since it could be a little hard to see some of it in the singles. I literally ran to my LCS first thing this morning to grab this hardcover, and I planned on reading it until I had to go to class, but I ended up finishing the whole thing before then. Loved this even more on reread, and I can totally see myself coming back to this book a bunch of times in the future. Ennis and Sharp have to work together again eventually because this has just about everything I love in my comics. I usually just do one or the other, but this was totally worth buying in both singles and a collected edition. For anyone interested in the print edition of this, in the back of the hardcover is a variant cover gallery, Ennis’ original pitch for the series that he wrote back in 2016, and Liam Sharp’s initial concept art for the book. All a bunch of neat little extras, and Sharp’s concepts show he was going to initially draw this in a different style, which just confirmed to me that the style he ended up going with in the final product was the perfect choice for it. Recommended for Garth Ennis fans or anyone who likes absurd capeshit comics. DISCLAIMER: This spiel above was written after having read the series again in the newly released hardcover. Original Review can be found below: Batman Reptilian is a book you will either absolutely love or absolutely hate. I, for one, fall into the former category, as Ennis weaves a surprisingly hilarious Batman story, with artwork by Liam Sharp that is utterly jaw-dropping on every level. This is one of those stories that starts with a pretty okay first issue but just gets better and more absurd by the end. The gist is some weird, new creature is rampaging through Batman’s rogue's gallery, and Batman has to figure out what it is, and what exactly it wants. The conception behind the book is almost as interesting as the story at hand here. Back in 2016, the Preacher show was just about to launch on AMC, and around that same time, Steve Dillon, co-creator and penciler of Preacher, was very ill and hadn’t been drawing very much as of late. Garth Ennis, other co-creator and the writer of Preacher, wanted to get Dillon a gig that would make a big splash for him in the industry, and get him back to work. So he did something he probably never would have done otherwise: he pitched a Batman story. At the time, this would’ve been in continuity in the Legends of the Dark Knight anthology series, with the main draw being the creative team behind Preacher was doing a Batman book around the same time the Preacher show was premiering, which would have meant easy publicity and let’s be honest, Batman books sell. The pitch was accepted, but sadly, before any work could begin on the art, Steven Dillon passed away. Ennis, mostly doing this as a favor to get a friend back into the swing of things after he had been sick, just forgot about the script. Years later, an editor at DC, Marie Javins, pitched to Ennis to finish his script and have Liam Sharp, who had just wrapped on Green Lantern with Morrison, do the art. Instead of being published under Legends of the Dark Knight, which is in continuity, this revamped Reptilian would now be under Black Label, giving the creators more freedom now that it’s out of continuity, and the rest is history. Liam Sharp also has a note at the beginning, saying he would draw this book in completely his own style, as Dillon would have wanted him to. It’s a bittersweet story behind an absurd book. Now onto the actual story. I attended a con recently and Ennis talked about how this was one of the only superhero books that he genuinely enjoyed writing, and it shines through in the script. Little moments from Mr. Freeze getting his broken helmet fixed with “Bat-tape”, to Alfred dusting the dinosaur that’s in the Batcave, thankfully add a lot of levity to a pretty dark story. The rogues in the story are mostly played for laughs or shocks, but those moments mainly work for me because of how dry the humor is during the interactions. I also want to give Ennis praise for keeping Batman heroic here. There is a scene in this book I was just not expecting after seeing how Batman was written in Hitman. Ennis manages to keep his heroic nature, while also keeping him a mean-spirited bully in a hilarious way. I don’t like when Batman is a jackass to his allies like Robin & Alfred, but cracking a joke to Joker after he’s been skinned alive? Yeah, that’s objectively pretty hilarious. Well to me at least. Batman in this book is worth discussing further, as Ennis’ Batman is unlike most other versions of the character, which may annoy some, but brings me much joy. Ennis writes him as this 6 foot plus, 250 pound monster, who is just a living weapon posing as a man and dressing as a giant bat to scare the shit out of anyone who crosses him. He uses his no-kill rule as a weapon, threatening others with the fear of pain to get the information he needs. It’s great to see the different ideas and tropes of the Batman mythos used in hilarious ways. Ennis also sees Batman’s rogues in an interesting manner as well, viewing most of the lot as outclassed, multi-colored twerps, who couldn’t actually come close to touching the efficient machine of a man that is Batman on their best day. He also finds Joker to be the single most annoying character in all of comic books, which is an unfathombly based take. This all can be seen pretty clearly once you read the story, but it’s always interesting to me to see how people who didn’t grow up with superheroes write them and view them later in life. The context behind this book honestly adds so much more to the story for me, and it does help you to understand what Ennis is going for with this story. Liam Sharp’s art is also the best it’s ever been here. I loved his Green Lantern stuff with Morrison recently, and his new digital style, while controversial with some people, just works so well for this story. He brings a moody, atmospheric look to the city that shows just how grotesque and dreary this Gotham is. I honestly think this may be my single favorite rendition of Gotham City ever. Gotham is supposed to be the city of monsters, with Batman being the worst monster of them all—well until the Reptilian of course, but that’s literally perfect since the art now plays into this story Ennis has set up and really helps sell you from the start on just what kind of Batman book this will be. A lot of influence from artists like Simon Bisley & Dave McKean can be seen in the art, and Sharp makes it all feel fresh and interesting, showing off his own distinct style he has managed to develop over the years. If you end up reading the book, really take the time to study all of Sharp’s pages, especially the panels that show the cityscape. He does a lot of amazing things visually that have stuck with me since I read the first issue a while back, inking and coloring his work as well, which is great since I always love it when artists ink and color their own work. I just feel like it looks more cohesive and how they truly intend the work to look. I also adored how all the rogues are drawn almost like caricatures of their normal selves since that’s exactly how Ennis sees them all. Just love everything about the art in this, and it literally matches the script perfectly. The only complaint I have with this book is I think it should’ve been a three-issue series, in those magazine-sized black label books, instead of something like Superman Vs Lobo, that ended up getting them. The art could’ve benefited from it, and the story would’ve worked a lot better broken into three issues instead of six. A minor complaint considering the final product we got in the end though. The other thing that is obviously on my mind is what would this book have looked like if Dillon got to draw it? Even though I adore Sharp’s work, I will always wonder what Dillon’s rendition of the story would have looked like. At the end of the day, I think this is my favorite Black Label book along with Spurrier’s Hellblazer, Peacemaker, and Harleen. I enjoyed the 90’s-ish Batman that Ennis & Sharp were going for, and will double dip and pick this up in hardcover whenever it gets collected. If you don’t take Batman or your capeshit stories in general too seriously, you’ll probably like this, and if you are just a Garth Ennis fan or his take on capeshit like I am, you’ll probably love this. If you are anyone else, well I’m sorry you wasted your time with this. One of my favorite Batman stories ever, even if it’s not for everyone.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Someone - or something - is systematically mutilating Gotham’s supervillains. But who - and why? Garth Ennis usually only tangentially writes about superheroes in his comics, and often subversively, like in The Boys, The Punisher, Kev, etc. - they’re never the main feature. And, aside from a short run on Ghost Rider, I don’t think he’s ever written a mainstream superhero comic and has only written Batman as a side-character in books like Hitman and Section Eight. Not that I think it’s from a lac Someone - or something - is systematically mutilating Gotham’s supervillains. But who - and why? Garth Ennis usually only tangentially writes about superheroes in his comics, and often subversively, like in The Boys, The Punisher, Kev, etc. - they’re never the main feature. And, aside from a short run on Ghost Rider, I don’t think he’s ever written a mainstream superhero comic and has only written Batman as a side-character in books like Hitman and Section Eight. Not that I think it’s from a lack of opportunity - I’m sure he’s been offered every superhero title under the sun by Marvel and DC over the decades he’s been writing comics - but, if we assume the things expressed by characters like Frank Castle and Billy Butcher are similar to his perspective, it’s safe to say that Ennis doesn’t think much of superheroes in general. So it’s surprising to see Ennis finally write a Batman book, and also very disappointing, as both a fan of Ennis and Batman, to discover that Reptilian was so bad! The only amazing thing about the book is how little story there is to this six-issue miniseries. Batman tracks down a monster, fights it, the end. That’s really all there is to it. It’s so unimaginative and insubstantial! Ennis tries for goofy humour with regards Killer Croc and a caricature of an idiotic gangster called Volkov, neither of which land, while his Batman is the chattiest I’ve read in some time, spouting a lot of bitterly smarmy dialogue. It turns out the idea for Reptilian has been floating around for some time as Steve Dillon was originally meant to draw this until his death in 2016 scuppered plans. Liam Sharp is the artist on this book instead and, if you’ve seen his work on other DC titles like Wonder Woman Rebirth, Green Lantern and The Brave and the Bold like I have, you’ll be surprised to see how different his artwork is in this book. Reptilian is all painted artwork and extremely dark - literally - throughout, so that it’s often hard to discern what’s going on amidst the murkiness. Some of the character designs are oddly cartoonish too, particularly Joker and Penguin, and a lot of Croc’s expressions. Like Ennis mixing in corny jokes into his violent story, the cartoonishness doesn’t sit well amongst all the darkness. The painted style is an odd choice and wasn’t to my taste, though, even if it had looked like Sharp’s usual artwork, it wouldn’t have improved the book. Despite its top tier talent, Batman: Reptilian is a really boring, underwhelming, and instantly forgettable comic - a very poor (lack of) effort from Garth Ennis.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Garth Ennis writes one of his loud, obnoxious, gross, and cruel takes on superheroes, giving Killer Croc an origin story and pushing the character in a new direction with some goofy shock value developments. It's almost okay but crosses the line a few too many times with a gleefully sadistic Batman, gratuitous fat shaming, and the mutilation and maiming of Batman's entire rogue's gallery in ways that either make this an Elseworlds tale or a canon story that will be quickly ignored or retconned. Garth Ennis writes one of his loud, obnoxious, gross, and cruel takes on superheroes, giving Killer Croc an origin story and pushing the character in a new direction with some goofy shock value developments. It's almost okay but crosses the line a few too many times with a gleefully sadistic Batman, gratuitous fat shaming, and the mutilation and maiming of Batman's entire rogue's gallery in ways that either make this an Elseworlds tale or a canon story that will be quickly ignored or retconned. (This latter ambiguity is an issue with most of the Black Label books.) What really sunk the book for me though was Liam Sharp abandoning his usual style for a murky and ugly Arkham Asylum morass that looks like Bill Sienkiewicz painting over Sam Kieth. Ugh. The initial concept sketches included in the back of the book looked so much better.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kadi P

    (Recommended by A.J. Anders) (Recommended by A.J. Anders)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Roman

    Це було весело, сподіваюсь, що Еннісу дадуть ще щось написати про Бетса.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Frédéric

    Actually rather fun despite its pregnant gory atmosphere. Monolithic and tongue-in-cheek, Batman is that close to being hilarious. The humour is tipically Ennis- hence tipically british- so it sometimes sounds a bit odd in Bats’ mouth but it’s fun either way. Alfred’s a riot too despite his few lines. Did the story deserve to be a 6-parter though? Gosh, no! Half that, 4 tops, would have been enough. I don’t stick with Batman’s theory on Croc’s origins and if you go to the bottom of it the main ar Actually rather fun despite its pregnant gory atmosphere. Monolithic and tongue-in-cheek, Batman is that close to being hilarious. The humour is tipically Ennis- hence tipically british- so it sometimes sounds a bit odd in Bats’ mouth but it’s fun either way. Alfred’s a riot too despite his few lines. Did the story deserve to be a 6-parter though? Gosh, no! Half that, 4 tops, would have been enough. I don’t stick with Batman’s theory on Croc’s origins and if you go to the bottom of it the main argument is a bit far-fetched if not totally dumb. Not the Bat book of the year but totally readable/enjoyable Liam Sharp greatly surprised me, working in a Bisley/Sienkiewicz style quite far from what he usually does. It’s colorful to say the least, deformed and caricatural- Batman is like 7 feet tall/250 pounds- but it reminded me of the glorious years of experimentations with the medium of the mid 80’s-mid 90’s. He seemed to have greatly enjoyed drawing it and I’ve enjoyed seeing it even though some readers might be put off-balance.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Batman: Reptilian collects issues 1-6 of the DC Comics series written by Garth Ennis and art by Liam Sharp. There is a beast tearing through Gotham’s underground and leaving Batman’s greatest villains torn to pieces. Batman must find the creature and stop it before it starts attacking the public. Garth Ennis is extremely hit or miss with me and this was mostly a miss. There are some humorous parts sprinkled throughout but I felt Ennis’s unempathetic Batman who would strangely just start spitting Batman: Reptilian collects issues 1-6 of the DC Comics series written by Garth Ennis and art by Liam Sharp. There is a beast tearing through Gotham’s underground and leaving Batman’s greatest villains torn to pieces. Batman must find the creature and stop it before it starts attacking the public. Garth Ennis is extremely hit or miss with me and this was mostly a miss. There are some humorous parts sprinkled throughout but I felt Ennis’s unempathetic Batman who would strangely just start spitting out random trivia was utterly bizarre. The story itself gets… weird. Let’s just keep it at that. The art is at times both beautifully dark and indecipherable. There was one particular double page spread that I seriously stared at for a couple minutes trying to figure out exactly what was in the picture. I still don’t know what it was. Unless you read everything there is about Batman, I believe this is skippable.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    This was very...different. A mystery/horror, wherein Batman investigates a creature terrorizing Gotham. When you step back after reading it, it's a fairly basic Batman tale with the core idea of revamping the origin of Killer Croc. I'll leave the rest out since it's in spoiler territory, but while initially fascinating, it only muddles his history even more and possibly removes him from the playing field completely. Ennis' Batman has more of a sense of humor but it's a biting, insulting one. His This was very...different. A mystery/horror, wherein Batman investigates a creature terrorizing Gotham. When you step back after reading it, it's a fairly basic Batman tale with the core idea of revamping the origin of Killer Croc. I'll leave the rest out since it's in spoiler territory, but while initially fascinating, it only muddles his history even more and possibly removes him from the playing field completely. Ennis' Batman has more of a sense of humor but it's a biting, insulting one. His attitude towards criminals comes off the same as a rich person who is inconvenienced by someone less fortunate. I think most Batman fans have a definitive version in their mind and Ennis' is a jarring change that doesn't come off as very heroic. The artwork by Liam Sharp is something I've never seen from him. It isn't his normal straight pencils and inks it looks digitally painted, with inspiration possibly from Sienkiewicz, McKean and even Powell. It's intriguing and has it's own style but it is visually very dark, to where you can't always make out what is happening in the panel. There also isn't a lot of panel-panel storytelling, just snapshots of a person standing or a building; everything is very static. At a certain point it just becomes a hurdle to understand the story. I'm waffling whether to give it 1 or 2 stars, but it left a bad taste in my mouth, despite some sparks of creativity.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ondřej Halíř

    V Gothamu něco ve velkém vraždí všechny důležité Batmanovi záporáky a jejich kumpány. Batman samozřejmě je tímto ihned uhranut a snaží se to vyřešit, jen nečeká do čeho se to vlastně nachomítne. Batman: Reptilian je ve svém nitru bláznivá absurdní komedie přejetá špinavým, slizkým a cynickým filtrem. Garth Ennis tu naštěstí nikoho neznásilňuje do prdele (no i když pár úchylných podtónů tu je). No a nabízí nám tu více satirickou verzi Batmana, kdy tu máte na něj více cynický pohled ve kterém vám V Gothamu něco ve velkém vraždí všechny důležité Batmanovi záporáky a jejich kumpány. Batman samozřejmě je tímto ihned uhranut a snaží se to vyřešit, jen nečeká do čeho se to vlastně nachomítne. Batman: Reptilian je ve svém nitru bláznivá absurdní komedie přejetá špinavým, slizkým a cynickým filtrem. Garth Ennis tu naštěstí nikoho neznásilňuje do prdele (no i když pár úchylných podtónů tu je). No a nabízí nám tu více satirickou verzi Batmana, kdy tu máte na něj více cynický pohled ve kterém vám dojde že on vlastně není taková dobrá duše a že i jeho konání místy se dá srovnat s padouchi se kterými válčí. Co hlavně z Reptiliana dělá jeden z nejlepších ucelených Batmaních příběhů je nejen lehce jiný take na Batmana, ale naprosto nádherná a uhrančivá kresba, která i během celého volumě mění nálady a lehce i styl. Nemluvě i o právě skvělém absurdním příběhu který ve své hloubce dává vzpomenout na ujetější eskapády. Ono vlastně, to je i důvod proč tenhle komiks buď nesnášíte nebo milujete. Není to pro každýho, je to silně off-beat, je tu hromada naprosto absurdních zvratů a naprosto náhodných až bizarně komediálních scén, že tohle opravdu je pro úzkou skupinu lidí. Pokud chcete zažít Batmanův a Killer Crocův fever dream, směle do toho. Konečně si můžu u něčeho od Ennise říct: MILUJU TO!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ondra Král

    Ennis u Batman... podle očekávání to nebylo dobrý. První tři sešity docela hezky budují atmosféru, ale pak to jde do sraček a Batman je místy děsně out of character (trochu se blíží k All-Star netopejrovi). Kresba je něco mezi Bisleym a McKeanem, pár panelů je naprosto skvělých, ale vlastně furt nevím, zda se mi líbí. Ztráta času

  11. 5 out of 5

    BIGnick BIGnick

    Illustrations are dark and creative but don’t pair very well with the tone Garth Ennis sets for the narrative. An interesting spin for hardcore Batman fans but a story that I don’t think will be greatly missed, if skipped over.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John Funderburg

    One of the weirdest Batman stories I've ever read. Honestly not sure what to make of it. Beautiful artwork by Liam Sharp. One of the weirdest Batman stories I've ever read. Honestly not sure what to make of it. Beautiful artwork by Liam Sharp.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jamil

    Good story, very funny and great batman characterization and gorgeous art by liam sharp

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Usually if I think of Garth Ennis writing Batman, it's as the butt of the joke in Hitman, so I was surprised when I saw he was contributing a Batman miniseries to DC's 'prestige, mature readers' (read: thick covers; slightly gorier) Black Label imprint. Which I shouldn't have been, because Black Label seem determined to put out even more Batman titles than core DC, so at this point they must be flinging absolute shedloads of cash at any big name who isn't entirely sworn of work for hire. But you Usually if I think of Garth Ennis writing Batman, it's as the butt of the joke in Hitman, so I was surprised when I saw he was contributing a Batman miniseries to DC's 'prestige, mature readers' (read: thick covers; slightly gorier) Black Label imprint. Which I shouldn't have been, because Black Label seem determined to put out even more Batman titles than core DC, so at this point they must be flinging absolute shedloads of cash at any big name who isn't entirely sworn of work for hire. But you know what? Turns out Ennis does write a good Batman. Yes, he's got form on giving good bastard, but here he manages to work within Bruce's ridiculous limitations so as to make someone who is widely known not to kill genuinely menacing all the same. And menace is the mood here, Liam Sharp's dark and doomy art recalling Dave McKean's phantasmagoric Arkham Asylum, such that I couldn't at all work out how it was originally meant to work with Steve Dillon drawing, all the light and space and raised eyebrows in his work. Except that – SPOILER, I guess, though I'll avoid details – then we get the bait and switch, and what started out as an Alien riff is revealed as a body horror sex comedy, starring Killer Croc. Yes, there were already hints – an Alfred so waspish that he was rapidly passing The Servant en route to 'Suits you, sir!' But I still properly fell for it. And although the ending falls apart a bit, with Batman's characterisation wobbling and a big explodey showdown that really doesn't sit right with the style Sharp is using here, I mostly enjoyed this one. Which said, I seem to have been in the minority there among people I know, and the price of it was properly taking the piss, so if you do fancy it, maybe wait for the library or the sales.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Freddie

    One of the dumbest and most ridiculous Batman stories I’ve ever read

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn Hogan

    In theory, DC's Black Label imprint is a great idea. More adult, contained stories that the reader doesn't need to know 50 years of comic history to enjoy. This is where DC shines anyway, with titles like Watchmen and Arkham Asylum. And some of the Black Label stuff has been really good, like the bonkers horror of Wonder Woman: Dead Earth and most of Joe Hill's Hill House comics. And then there's other stuff, like Batman: Damned, and this title, Batman: Reptilian. Listen, I don't want to yuck an In theory, DC's Black Label imprint is a great idea. More adult, contained stories that the reader doesn't need to know 50 years of comic history to enjoy. This is where DC shines anyway, with titles like Watchmen and Arkham Asylum. And some of the Black Label stuff has been really good, like the bonkers horror of Wonder Woman: Dead Earth and most of Joe Hill's Hill House comics. And then there's other stuff, like Batman: Damned, and this title, Batman: Reptilian. Listen, I don't want to yuck anyone's yum, but these books have no excuse for how half-assed they are. I honestly remember none of Batman: Damned's plot. The artwork by Bermejo is great, but the story isn't strong enough to hold it up. And with Reptilian we have a not-terrible Garth Ennis story, complete with Ennis's dark humor that is not served at all by Liam Sharp's art. Now, I don't want to come across like I'm bashing Sharp. I don't remember seeing his work before, but he's definitely a competent artist. In Reptilian, he mixes some of Bermejo's hyper-defined portraiture with scratchy, abstract backgrounds that remind me of Dave Mckean. (Side note- Does every horror comic geared toward adults have to have the same dark, abstract, scratchy scribble look? Off the top of my head, there's this, Department of Truth, and Killadelphia. You can do horror with clean lines and detailed panels, and I want more people to try. (I wish we'd have gotten this book done by Steve Dillon as it was originally intended. RIP.) I want to be able to follow where the characters are moving in the story, which is hard when they're all floating in scratchy color fields.) The design of the main monster is good and creepy, but none of Batman's rogues are drawn with much depth, and Batman is more of a dick than I prefer. I can't wholeheartedly recommend this, but it's not the worst comic ever.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Hunter

    I liked this one…I think. It was definitely a very unique story. The art was haunting, with a horrifying beauty. The story was interesting, and did not pan out how I thought it would, but definitely isn’t forgettable. Where it went with the characters was definitely atypical; the least spoilery one: Batman is a huge asshole the whole way through. He’s arrogant and cold and brutal, which I wouldn’t want for the normal character, but it makes for a fun one-off. I think the biggest downside of this I liked this one…I think. It was definitely a very unique story. The art was haunting, with a horrifying beauty. The story was interesting, and did not pan out how I thought it would, but definitely isn’t forgettable. Where it went with the characters was definitely atypical; the least spoilery one: Batman is a huge asshole the whole way through. He’s arrogant and cold and brutal, which I wouldn’t want for the normal character, but it makes for a fun one-off. I think the biggest downside of this one is that I read it as each issue came out, over the course of six months. It lost its impact, which wouldn’t have happened as much as if I’d read it all together. Maybe after a while I’ll come back and go through the whole thing again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robert Bussie

    This is a dark tale of the possible origin story of Killer Croc and his off spring. But what makes it more interesting is the unsympathetic and exhausted version of Batman. His dead pan delivery of one liners is funny at times and at other times shows how much tragedy and evil the man has seen trying to keep the streets of Gotham safe. In order to mentally survive what he has been through Batman would have to develop a sarcastic and somewhat uncaring attitude in order to not have a complete ment This is a dark tale of the possible origin story of Killer Croc and his off spring. But what makes it more interesting is the unsympathetic and exhausted version of Batman. His dead pan delivery of one liners is funny at times and at other times shows how much tragedy and evil the man has seen trying to keep the streets of Gotham safe. In order to mentally survive what he has been through Batman would have to develop a sarcastic and somewhat uncaring attitude in order to not have a complete mental and emotional break down. This is a more realistic version of the human side of the character. The art is excellent with gorgeous coloring that fits this story very well.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    (Strictly speaking, I read the individual issues but if this isn't a graphic novel yet, it will be.) The story was pretty "meh", especially for Garth Ennis. At first I didn't like the art work but it grew on me and, ultimately, was the best part. If you have a strong urge to read this (Ennis fan or Batman completist), I would recommend getting it from the library. (Strictly speaking, I read the individual issues but if this isn't a graphic novel yet, it will be.) The story was pretty "meh", especially for Garth Ennis. At first I didn't like the art work but it grew on me and, ultimately, was the best part. If you have a strong urge to read this (Ennis fan or Batman completist), I would recommend getting it from the library.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jack Bumby

    I really enjoyed this. Garth Ennis writes Batman as you'd imagine, and I'm willing to bet it would upset a few purists. But it fits the world of this story - one that is equal parts bizarre and haunting. Thanks mostly to Liam Sharp's painted artwork. Well worth checking out. I really enjoyed this. Garth Ennis writes Batman as you'd imagine, and I'm willing to bet it would upset a few purists. But it fits the world of this story - one that is equal parts bizarre and haunting. Thanks mostly to Liam Sharp's painted artwork. Well worth checking out.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    This is actually more like 3.5 stars. Stunning artwork, and the character take on Batman is unique in its own right, but little happens, the story is needlessly confusing at some points, and despite being six issues it actually feels over in a moment.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    One weird Batman tale.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Stewart

    As usual for me, Garth Ennis’ writing leaves me a bit cold, but even so this is worth reading for the gorgeous art from Liam Sharp alone.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Story was good but wasn't a huge fan of the art work Story was good but wasn't a huge fan of the art work

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rickey

    An interesting twist on Killer Croc. I like it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Keke

    Sam quixote, what the fuck do you know about good comics, you sjw idiot. Go read kibblesmith's new warriors or whatever that shit was. Sam quixote, what the fuck do you know about good comics, you sjw idiot. Go read kibblesmith's new warriors or whatever that shit was.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This was more fun than it should have been, considering how dumb it was.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nicolas Ferrer

    Pobre Waylon

  29. 4 out of 5

    Chalupa Batman

    Such a strange story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chris Richards

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I know Garth Ennis is a fairly big name for comics but I only realised that halfway through reading this. Full disclosure: this is my first ever Garth Ennis comic. Batman Reptilian is a Black Label out-of-continuity story. It’s a mystery that sees Batman’s rogues gallery hunted and maimed by a mysterious unseen creature. It didn’t go the way I expected as we find out Killer Croc has become a mummy. The what if of this book turns out to be what if Croc’s origins were actually that he’s an alien mu I know Garth Ennis is a fairly big name for comics but I only realised that halfway through reading this. Full disclosure: this is my first ever Garth Ennis comic. Batman Reptilian is a Black Label out-of-continuity story. It’s a mystery that sees Batman’s rogues gallery hunted and maimed by a mysterious unseen creature. It didn’t go the way I expected as we find out Killer Croc has become a mummy. The what if of this book turns out to be what if Croc’s origins were actually that he’s an alien mutant thing that can give birth. As plots go, it’s utterly ridiculous. But it’s done in the way that its the right kind of ridiculous that tickles rather than annoys you. Batman himself is quite a different figure to what I was used to. In continuity, I’d have issues. For this one off, I found him highly entertaining as Ennis’ Batman is a hilarious a$$hole to all his villains. There is still enough heroism though that this does still feel like a take on Batman. Sharp’s artwork is beautiful and a real treat. His rendering and redesigns for the rogues gallery are interesting, though hit and miss. The narrative of the book is thin at best, but Ennis finds some great moments to pull out of it. What elevates this though is Ennis’ dark humour that had me chuckling throughout. I really enjoyed it and recommend

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