Hot Best Seller

Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be

Availability: Ready to download

The full and unbridled inside story of the last twenty years of country music through the lens of Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves—their peers and inspirations, their paths to stardom, and their battles against a deeply embedded boys’ club, as well as their efforts to transform the genre into a more inclusive place for all (and not just white men in trucker The full and unbridled inside story of the last twenty years of country music through the lens of Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves—their peers and inspirations, their paths to stardom, and their battles against a deeply embedded boys’ club, as well as their efforts to transform the genre into a more inclusive place for all (and not just white men in trucker hats), as told by award-winning Nashville journalist Marissa R. Moss. It was only two decades ago, but, for the women of country music, 1999 seems like an entirely different universe. With Shania Twain, country’s biggest award winner and star, and The Chicks topping every chart, country music was a woman’s world: specifically, country radio and Nashville’s Music Row. Cut to 2021, when women are only played on country radio 16% of the time, on a good day, and when only men have won Entertainer of the Year at the CMA Awards for a decade. To a world where artists like Kacey Musgraves sell out arenas but barely score a single second of airplay. But also to a world where these women are infinitely bigger live draws than most male counterparts, having massive pop crossover hits like Maren Morris’s “The Middle,” pushing the industry to confront its deeply embedded racial biases with Mickey Guyton’s “Black Like Me,” winning heaps of Grammy nominations, banding up in supergroups like The Highwomen and taking complete control of their own careers, on their own terms. When the rules stopped working for the women of country music, they threw them out and made their own: and changed the genre forever, and for better. Her Country is veteran Nashville journalist Marissa R. Moss’s story of how in the past two decades, country’s women fought back against systems designed to keep them down, armed with their art and never willing to just shut up and sing: how women like Kacey, Mickey, Maren, The Chicks, Miranda Lambert, Rissi Palmer, Brandy Clark, LeAnn Rimes, Brandi Carlile, Margo Price and many more have reinvented the rules to find their place in an industry stacked against them, how they’ve ruled the century when it comes to artistic output—and about how women can and do belong in the mainstream of country music, even if their voices aren’t being heard as loudly.


Compare

The full and unbridled inside story of the last twenty years of country music through the lens of Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves—their peers and inspirations, their paths to stardom, and their battles against a deeply embedded boys’ club, as well as their efforts to transform the genre into a more inclusive place for all (and not just white men in trucker The full and unbridled inside story of the last twenty years of country music through the lens of Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves—their peers and inspirations, their paths to stardom, and their battles against a deeply embedded boys’ club, as well as their efforts to transform the genre into a more inclusive place for all (and not just white men in trucker hats), as told by award-winning Nashville journalist Marissa R. Moss. It was only two decades ago, but, for the women of country music, 1999 seems like an entirely different universe. With Shania Twain, country’s biggest award winner and star, and The Chicks topping every chart, country music was a woman’s world: specifically, country radio and Nashville’s Music Row. Cut to 2021, when women are only played on country radio 16% of the time, on a good day, and when only men have won Entertainer of the Year at the CMA Awards for a decade. To a world where artists like Kacey Musgraves sell out arenas but barely score a single second of airplay. But also to a world where these women are infinitely bigger live draws than most male counterparts, having massive pop crossover hits like Maren Morris’s “The Middle,” pushing the industry to confront its deeply embedded racial biases with Mickey Guyton’s “Black Like Me,” winning heaps of Grammy nominations, banding up in supergroups like The Highwomen and taking complete control of their own careers, on their own terms. When the rules stopped working for the women of country music, they threw them out and made their own: and changed the genre forever, and for better. Her Country is veteran Nashville journalist Marissa R. Moss’s story of how in the past two decades, country’s women fought back against systems designed to keep them down, armed with their art and never willing to just shut up and sing: how women like Kacey, Mickey, Maren, The Chicks, Miranda Lambert, Rissi Palmer, Brandy Clark, LeAnn Rimes, Brandi Carlile, Margo Price and many more have reinvented the rules to find their place in an industry stacked against them, how they’ve ruled the century when it comes to artistic output—and about how women can and do belong in the mainstream of country music, even if their voices aren’t being heard as loudly.

30 review for Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nev

    I absolutely loved this book. I’m not really someone who likes country music, but I love reading about different genres and the music industry. So this book being focused on how women went from being some of the biggest stars in country music in the 90s to barely getting played on modern country radio was super fascinating. Her Country focuses on three women (Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton) and how they’re making music that is critically acclaimed yet still isn’t embraced by th I absolutely loved this book. I’m not really someone who likes country music, but I love reading about different genres and the music industry. So this book being focused on how women went from being some of the biggest stars in country music in the 90s to barely getting played on modern country radio was super fascinating. Her Country focuses on three women (Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton) and how they’re making music that is critically acclaimed yet still isn’t embraced by the powers that be in the country mainstream. I appreciated how this book pointed out different artists who fall outside of the white or straight mold that is most prevalent in country artists. Getting a history of different people and seeing artists who are coming out now during the midst of their careers was great to see. This is one of those books that will probably frustrate you because of the misogynistic practices it talks about. Like record companies being like “well we already have one girl, we don’t need another” or radio stations refusing to play music from women back to back. If this book sounds interesting to you then I definitely recommend checking it out. I was so engrossed by it that I ended up listening to the whole audiobook in one day. I think that even if you aren’t a fan of country music it’s a great read about sexism and racism in the music industry and artists who are trying to forge their own path outside of what was traditionally seen as the way to do things in the genre. Thank you to the publisher for providing an advance copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    raquel (taylor's version)

    Taylor Swift has the most awarded country album of all time, she changed the country industry and she's not even mentioned once? I'm suing Taylor Swift has the most awarded country album of all time, she changed the country industry and she's not even mentioned once? I'm suing

  3. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    GIRL POWER! I’ll admit right up front- I’ve long appreciated the attitudes of the three women featured in this book (Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves) without actually listening to their music. But now they, and many others mentioned, have their own playlist that’s getting frequent play in my car. Even though I wasn’t already familiar with much of the music discussed here, I was still fascinated by the inside look at Nashville and the machine that is the music business there. Moss GIRL POWER! I’ll admit right up front- I’ve long appreciated the attitudes of the three women featured in this book (Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves) without actually listening to their music. But now they, and many others mentioned, have their own playlist that’s getting frequent play in my car. Even though I wasn’t already familiar with much of the music discussed here, I was still fascinated by the inside look at Nashville and the machine that is the music business there. Moss deftly pulls back the curtain to show the everyday sexism and racism that is embedded into the fabric of the Nashville music business - and vividly portrays the young musicians who have helped begin to change it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    i was honestly surprised how much i enjoyed this. i've never been a huge fan of country music (i was raised by an "anything but country" mother lol), but sing along to the Iconic Tunes (i.e. Before He Cheats, Jolene, and Man! I Feel Like A Woman) and have enjoyed quite a few country artists over the past few years - particularly Kacey Musgraves, whose album Golden Hour has been one of my favorites for years and whose inclusion in this book was the initial draw for me. this book is incredibly wel i was honestly surprised how much i enjoyed this. i've never been a huge fan of country music (i was raised by an "anything but country" mother lol), but sing along to the Iconic Tunes (i.e. Before He Cheats, Jolene, and Man! I Feel Like A Woman) and have enjoyed quite a few country artists over the past few years - particularly Kacey Musgraves, whose album Golden Hour has been one of my favorites for years and whose inclusion in this book was the initial draw for me. this book is incredibly well-researched and well-interviewed, and provides an amazingly in-depth account of how country radio (and country music as a whole) has treated women since the 1990s. being so disconnected from country, i had only heard of the issues within country radio but hadn't looked into them much. and goodness do i know so much now!! this is a book that will leave you angry and frustrated at the injustices in country radio and how little the Powers That Be are willing to change, but also hopeful for the future with these powerful women paving their own paths forward. i was captivated throughout the book, fully invested in Kacey, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton's stories, and actually found some new tunes in the process! i checked out more music from all three women (and a few others mentioned in the book) and have had Maren's GIRL on repeat all week. regardless of your feelings on country music, i highly recommend this to anyone interested in the music industry or gender studies and broader issues of sexism, misogyny, racism, and homophobia. (also this was my first ever ARC and also my first ever giveaway win, so thank you to Henry Holt for sending me this copy!)

  5. 4 out of 5

    J Earl

    Her Country by Marissa R Moss is an engaging read that will satisfy readers ranging from fans of country music to those interested in women's studies and systemic sexism. The writing is very good and even the parts that most clearly illustrate the good ol' boys club stops short of being preachy and is more about the strength of these women who are, whether they want to or not, battling it and paving the way for those who will come after. I do not listen to country music as my preferred genre, tho Her Country by Marissa R Moss is an engaging read that will satisfy readers ranging from fans of country music to those interested in women's studies and systemic sexism. The writing is very good and even the parts that most clearly illustrate the good ol' boys club stops short of being preachy and is more about the strength of these women who are, whether they want to or not, battling it and paving the way for those who will come after. I do not listen to country music as my preferred genre, though the country music I like I tend to really like. So while I was looking forward to the music industry anecdotes that wasn't the main reason I came to the book. I was interested in an inside look at exactly how the industry exercises its own type of sexism, heterosexism, and racism. Not because I thought the country music industry was unusual in these things but each industry and field seems to have their own of making these things seem like they are right and rational. For the most part the stories of these performers is told in such a way that anyone simply wanting to read about them won't be disappointed. The obstacles they faced (and still face) and the things they did to circumvent them makes for an intriguing narrative. If you didn't know very much of this backstory you no doubt had a lot of respect for their music. This will shed new light on just how phenomenal these women are as human beings as well as artists. Highly recommended for fans of country as well as anyone with an interest in the obstacles that face women in not only country music but pretty much every industry. Reviewed from a copy made available by the publisher via NetGalley.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alissa Avilov

    Her Country by Marissa R. Moss is a phenomenal look into the "Good Ole' Boys Club" of the Nashville / Country music scene and how the women of today navigate it. The book focuses specifically on Maren Morris, Kacey Musgraves, and Mickey Guyton but includes their collaborators and friends along the way, too. Being a fan of these artists, and knowing the songs referenced throughout, really personalized the experience of this book for me but at the end of the day is not a pre-req to understanding t Her Country by Marissa R. Moss is a phenomenal look into the "Good Ole' Boys Club" of the Nashville / Country music scene and how the women of today navigate it. The book focuses specifically on Maren Morris, Kacey Musgraves, and Mickey Guyton but includes their collaborators and friends along the way, too. Being a fan of these artists, and knowing the songs referenced throughout, really personalized the experience of this book for me but at the end of the day is not a pre-req to understanding the key messages shared here. This book expertly navigates how stars like Kacey, Maren, and Mickey took the path less travelled - not because they wanted to but because Country Radio and the Music Industry wouldn't give them a chance otherwise. I have so much respect for these artists, and all artists in general, but to see the ways in which they, and the women who have come before them, have stuck it to the man and stood up for what they believe is right is really inspiring. I loved the inside peek into this industry and will now double down on my support for all of the female country artists that I love. The audio version of Her Country is performed by Kelli Tager and is a great way to take in this powerful story. Thank you to Netgalley and Macmillan Audio for the ARC - Her Country is out 5/10/22. Now I'm off to Listen to Merry Go 'Round on repeat!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura Dvorak

    A must-read for conflicted fans of country music like myself. This book charts the challenging rise of women in country music post-1990s. While focused on the careers of Kacey Musgraves, Mickey Guyton, and Maren Morris specifically, the author references many other artists who pushed the boundaries of country music both on and off stage. Lots of interesting behind the scenes stories and you'll leave with a new appreciation of all the artists profiled. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for A must-read for conflicted fans of country music like myself. This book charts the challenging rise of women in country music post-1990s. While focused on the careers of Kacey Musgraves, Mickey Guyton, and Maren Morris specifically, the author references many other artists who pushed the boundaries of country music both on and off stage. Lots of interesting behind the scenes stories and you'll leave with a new appreciation of all the artists profiled. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing an eARC in exchange for this review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    Inspiring and disheartening at the same time but the energy around these women is undeniable. And the music it will have you listening to is just the best.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    As a country music fan since basically birth I remember the women artists of the 1980s-1990s and as I grew up and got some disaffected I drifted to more rock and indie music. Returning to country music in my 30s was startling to see what it had became- bro country and hardly any ladies on the radio. Marissa Moss' book is a well researched (and interviewed!) book about the ways that country music has changed since the 1990s and includes interviews and overviews of the the careers of many female ar As a country music fan since basically birth I remember the women artists of the 1980s-1990s and as I grew up and got some disaffected I drifted to more rock and indie music. Returning to country music in my 30s was startling to see what it had became- bro country and hardly any ladies on the radio. Marissa Moss' book is a well researched (and interviewed!) book about the ways that country music has changed since the 1990s and includes interviews and overviews of the the careers of many female artists of late- including Kacey Musgraves and Maren Morris. I enjoyed reading the book and it also made me look up lots of other artists that might have slipped past me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rhode

    Excited about this coming out!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Erin | snappshelfbooks

    I grew up listening to only country music. It was the sound track to my whole childhood and I wrote many articles connecting that in various ways to new songs when I spent a period of time as a writer for a non-Nashville country music website for a fun little side gig. It was during that time when I learned about Marissa Moss and have followed her journalism ever since. I’ve been waiting for this book for years or however long Marissa has been tweeting about working on it and I devoured it in tw I grew up listening to only country music. It was the sound track to my whole childhood and I wrote many articles connecting that in various ways to new songs when I spent a period of time as a writer for a non-Nashville country music website for a fun little side gig. It was during that time when I learned about Marissa Moss and have followed her journalism ever since. I’ve been waiting for this book for years or however long Marissa has been tweeting about working on it and I devoured it in two days. This book has everything that the country music industry doesn’t want you to see but everyone knows is there: misogyny, racism, homophobia, and so much more. It was a fascinating journey through the careers of Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Mickey Guyton while weaving in all the other women and relevant people of the time. I found myself being reminded of so many things that I saw in real time I had forgotten. It’s honestly inspiring to truly see how women of country music have created their own paths to success while fighting every obstacle against them. I loved the chronological organization of the book, moving year to year through out these two decades. It did take me a little bit to get used to the writing style, there would be a relevant side tangent for a few paragraphs then back to the main point, which is exactly how my mind works. So once I picked up on that, it was super insightful and enriched the main point. I found myself wanting to pause to look up every name, every song, every album, etc. Thankfully there’s a playlist in the back of the book! I did notice that Kacey was not listed in the names of new interviews done for this book, nor was she thanked in the acknowledgments for her time in collaboration - Maren & Mickey were. No cause for concern. I think the research done is thorough and stands alone just fine. I’m just curious why she didn’t participate. Overall, I highly recommend this book. Not just to country music fans, but to fans of all music. Or fans of women beating the odds. Or those looking to understand more about the larger main stream systems of oppression and how straight white women may experience obstacles, but they can still find easier paths to success compared to Black artists, especially Black women and LGTBQIA+ artists. I hope in ten years there’s a sequel to this book that highlights the growth of Black women artists, non binary artists, queer artists, disabled artists, and all other artists that fall outside of the country music status quo. I look forward to watching that shift in real time.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Loved this! From Maren to Kacey to Mickey, this book does a really wonderful job of examining why it is that country music does such an atrocious job of uplifting female artists the same way they embrace and support white men. (It shouldn't come as a surprise that a lot of internalized misogyny and racism, coupled with white male radio execs pulling the strings on who gets radio play, is the formula at play here.) There are three main through lines in the book, which are the career trajectories o Loved this! From Maren to Kacey to Mickey, this book does a really wonderful job of examining why it is that country music does such an atrocious job of uplifting female artists the same way they embrace and support white men. (It shouldn't come as a surprise that a lot of internalized misogyny and racism, coupled with white male radio execs pulling the strings on who gets radio play, is the formula at play here.) There are three main through lines in the book, which are the career trajectories of Maren Morris, Kacey Musgraves, and Mickey Guyton. You learn about each of their individual upbringings, musical influences, introduction to country music and performing, and the entire history of each of their paths to achieving success in the country music world. Spoiler alert- for very different reasons, they each had their own struggles to defeat, and I loved reading about how they each overcame every obstacle thrown their way. Throughout the book, there are also countless references to iconic women in country through the years, and artists like Taylor Swift, The Chicks, Dolly Parton, Miranda Lambert, and Shania Twain are all given significant sections woven into the book as well. The author, Marissa R. Moss, did an impeccable job of researching and organizing the book structurally to include ALL women in country-- not just the popular ones or the ones you've heard of, but all women, including women of color and queer women in country, who have been historically left out of the conversation entirely, regardless of talent or ability. Mickey Guyton's story, for instance, is a perfect example of a woman playing all of the right cards and checking every single box-- but was, until recently, pushed aside and erased simply due to her being a Black woman. Fortunately, Mickey is finally beginning to get the recognition she deserves, and I hope more marginalized women in country are able to get their careers off the ground as well. A side note- I felt SO seen by the digs at Jason Aldean! Everything he does annoys me, and to have someone validate everything I feel about him in writing was truly *chef's kiss*. (In particular, the media's obsession and casting aside of LeAnn Rimes because of her affair, meanwhile, Jason did the exact same thing and suffered absolutely zero consequence because of it. This has always bothered me endlessly and I'm glad someone said it!)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sam Hughes

    First of all I wanted thank Henry Holt and Company and Marissa R. Moss for sending me this beautiful Hardcover Copy of Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be. I will forever showcase this on my coffee-table and continue to purchase for my sisters in yall-ternative music interests! Her Country tells the tale of how so difficult it is to be a woman, and especially in an industry such as Country music that is so entirely dominated by men... The First of all I wanted thank Henry Holt and Company and Marissa R. Moss for sending me this beautiful Hardcover Copy of Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be. I will forever showcase this on my coffee-table and continue to purchase for my sisters in yall-ternative music interests! Her Country tells the tale of how so difficult it is to be a woman, and especially in an industry such as Country music that is so entirely dominated by men... The greats like Johnny Cash, Hank Williams Jr., and even Willie Nelson have all sang about breaking the law, murder, and outlaw-ship, but god-forbid when The Chicks sing about combatting domestic violence with their radio-banned hit "Goodbye Earl" (which is still one of my favorites to this day and my husband jams along in the car with me when it comes on the radio!) But like seriously why is the Country Music Industry so sexist, but taking that further why are they so homophobic, racist, and so averse to progressive values??? Dolly Parton, Tammy Wynette, Patsy Cline, and so many other of my idols help to start the foundation of Women in Country, but its young, liberal women of today's country scene that have worked to access change and open up doors for those who don't identify as the industry's traditionalist artists. Kacey Musgraves, Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton and so many more fantastic women are standing up for social change and backing marginalized groups who need the support of women with a real platform. I feel so empowered after reading this beauty of a book and can't wait to tune into the playlist that's listed in the back of the book, starting off with Shania Twain's "Man, I Feel Like a Woman!"

  14. 4 out of 5

    christines-to-be___

    As a huge fan of what I call alternative country, meaning music that has a country sound but is not played on country radio, I was excited to hear that Marissa Moss was going to tackle this issue of the extreme lack of diversity on country radio which reinforces why I gave up on country radio a long time ago. This book is much needed, and I really hope that it changes a few (hundred or thousand or tens of thousand) minds about this stupid metaphor of women being the tomato in the country salad. U As a huge fan of what I call alternative country, meaning music that has a country sound but is not played on country radio, I was excited to hear that Marissa Moss was going to tackle this issue of the extreme lack of diversity on country radio which reinforces why I gave up on country radio a long time ago. This book is much needed, and I really hope that it changes a few (hundred or thousand or tens of thousand) minds about this stupid metaphor of women being the tomato in the country salad. UGH! My fear, though, is that the men (and women who sidle up to these men to get/maintain the smallest shred of power they have) who really need to read this won't. In fact, they will no doubt attack Marissa for being a "New York Jew who doesn't know real country:" a typical attack on anyone that dares question the status quo in Nashville. Don't get me started on the misogyny and racism that is rampant in a lot of entertainment genres, not just country music, but the focus here is the women of country and how their careers and lives are affected by the people at the top. Moss focuses on Maren Morris, Mickey Guyton, and Kacey Musgraves, but Miranda Lambert and others play a big role in this book. The timelines could get a bit jumbled, and some stories felt like they ended too soon, but overall this is an intriguing behind-the-scenes look at the women trying to share their "three chords and the truth" with the rest of us. Thank you to NetGalley and Henry Holt for the ARC. Now, excuse me while I go buy some music from Margo Price, Rissi Palmer, Brittney Spencer and SO MANY others!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    I loved this book so much. I grew up listening to country music and country radio with my mom, especially the Chicks. I felt like it wasn’t necessarily for me though as a young girl, who had started counting how many songs passed before they played one by a woman. Reading Her Country felt like someone was listening to the thoughts I’ve been having since middle school. Moss does an amazing job weaving the stories of all these talented artists together, from the shunning and eventual return of the I loved this book so much. I grew up listening to country music and country radio with my mom, especially the Chicks. I felt like it wasn’t necessarily for me though as a young girl, who had started counting how many songs passed before they played one by a woman. Reading Her Country felt like someone was listening to the thoughts I’ve been having since middle school. Moss does an amazing job weaving the stories of all these talented artists together, from the shunning and eventual return of the Chicks, to Maren and Kaceys fight to the top and Mickey’s long journey into the spotlight as well. She deftly weaves in pop culture and political moments, as well as amazing little gems of details. I loved the descriptions of the close knit community created by the “rebels” of Nashville, making their own space in a world that tends to reject them. I would recommend this book to anyone who cares about country music, about the entertainment industry, or about equality on a systemic level. I really appreciated the consistent reminder that of how much more challenging breaking into country music for Black women, queer women, or anyone else that falls outside what’s “acceptable” in the industry.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Schultz

    I grew up listening to 90s country, which was full of powerful women's voices: Reba McEntire, Shania Twain, The Dixie Chicks (now The Chicks), and many more. Although I no longer regularly listen to country music--other than attending some bluegrass concerts in my area--I was intrigued by this look at the major disparities and difficulties modern female country singers, especially those who are Black and/or LGBTQ+, face. Moss has a rich narrative writing style that immediately pulls you in as yo I grew up listening to 90s country, which was full of powerful women's voices: Reba McEntire, Shania Twain, The Dixie Chicks (now The Chicks), and many more. Although I no longer regularly listen to country music--other than attending some bluegrass concerts in my area--I was intrigued by this look at the major disparities and difficulties modern female country singers, especially those who are Black and/or LGBTQ+, face. Moss has a rich narrative writing style that immediately pulls you in as you follow these enormously talented and hardworking performers through ups and downs. Although country music fans who are concerned about the current state of mainstream country music are its primary audience, this will be enjoyed by anyone interested in books covering the entertainment industry. Many thanks to Henry Holt and NetGalley for a digital review copy in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Abra Kurt

    Extensively researched and with dozens upon dozens of personal interviews and firsthand accounts, Moss delivers a vividly drawn portrait of three iconic women breaking the rules of country music. While putting under a microscope the sexism and endless other forms of inherent bias that seek to marginalize progressive artists and sabotage promising careers, Her Country also explores the artifice of patriotism and common man-ness constructed by an industry that makes its living by unconsciously sto Extensively researched and with dozens upon dozens of personal interviews and firsthand accounts, Moss delivers a vividly drawn portrait of three iconic women breaking the rules of country music. While putting under a microscope the sexism and endless other forms of inherent bias that seek to marginalize progressive artists and sabotage promising careers, Her Country also explores the artifice of patriotism and common man-ness constructed by an industry that makes its living by unconsciously stoking the flames of division and "otherness." This would have been five stars for me if Moss had gone further to shine a light on the next generation of artists coming up in the wake of the trailblazers featured here - and maybe offered a something in the way of a call to action for readers. How can readers and country music fans help to change things? And, photos would have added another dimension. Moss's writing is solid and clever in unexpected ways, but there can be a bit of repetitiveness to some of her points and supporting evidence. Where I'd offer the most critique, however, is with the publisher's decision to go with such a binary title in a book that's so heavily focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion. Overall, this is an important read and lifts the veil for readers who may unfamiliar with how the music business - and specifically country music - operates and wields its power. I received a digital pre-publication copy of this book in exchange for an honest review, and I'll be including it in a TBR round-up for Women's History Month in March.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Having grown up listening to women like Reba McEntire, Dolly Parton, Trisha Yearwood, Martina McBride, The Dixie Chicks and more on the radio and in concert, I can appreciate the efforts of this younger generation making changes to the current country music environment. I still remember Reba reaching out to her fans for their opinions about her plan to cut her hair short before she'd do it. I found this book interesting in that I wasn't aware of all the behind the scenes inequality in the curren Having grown up listening to women like Reba McEntire, Dolly Parton, Trisha Yearwood, Martina McBride, The Dixie Chicks and more on the radio and in concert, I can appreciate the efforts of this younger generation making changes to the current country music environment. I still remember Reba reaching out to her fans for their opinions about her plan to cut her hair short before she'd do it. I found this book interesting in that I wasn't aware of all the behind the scenes inequality in the current atmosphere. While I haven't kept up with country music and wasn't super familiar with these women's music, I love that there are women strong enough to be themselves and bring about needed changes. As for the book itself, I found it to be a bit repetitive and I kept getting distracted while listening which only happens when I'm not really into a book. Thanks to Macmillan Audio and NetGalley for the ALC in exchange for my honest review.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This book looks at the country music industry and how except for a brief period in the 90s women have essentially been shut out, especially if they don't want to play by the rules that the men in charge have made for them. It mostly focuses on Kacey Musgraves, Mickey Guyton, and Maren Morris and how they have created careers for themselves by not playing by the rules. For Musgraves and Guyton that has mostly meant living on the outside of the traditional country music machine while Morris has ma This book looks at the country music industry and how except for a brief period in the 90s women have essentially been shut out, especially if they don't want to play by the rules that the men in charge have made for them. It mostly focuses on Kacey Musgraves, Mickey Guyton, and Maren Morris and how they have created careers for themselves by not playing by the rules. For Musgraves and Guyton that has mostly meant living on the outside of the traditional country music machine while Morris has managed to be one of the few women to break in despite trying to do her own thing. I don't know that I learned a whole lot from the book other than stuff about their early lives, but it was a really well written and engaging book that shines yet another spotlight on how messed up the country music industry is. As someone who grew up and fell in love with country music during the hey day of women's country, I sincerely hope things can get back there one day.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Thanks to the publisher, via Edelweiss, for an advance e-galley for honest review. I grew up as one of the "anything but country" snobs Moss mentions early in the book, and it was singers like Kacey, Maren, and Mickey, the three women who serve as the main focuses of the book, that brought me into the genre. Tracing the rise of these women alongside what has happened in country music over the last 25 years or so, this is a fascinating look at a complicated genre that reflects a lot of the politic Thanks to the publisher, via Edelweiss, for an advance e-galley for honest review. I grew up as one of the "anything but country" snobs Moss mentions early in the book, and it was singers like Kacey, Maren, and Mickey, the three women who serve as the main focuses of the book, that brought me into the genre. Tracing the rise of these women alongside what has happened in country music over the last 25 years or so, this is a fascinating look at a complicated genre that reflects a lot of the politics and cultural divisions in the US in ways both lyrical and in the ways it interacts with women, people of color, and anyone else who doesn't reflect white maleness. Marissa Moss clearly has a deep depth of knowledge about the genre and the industry, and the book comes through as well researched while still being an entirely absorbing narrative.

  21. 5 out of 5

    David

    Marissa Moss' Her Country is a timely, well reported history of the recent movement of women (primarily Miranda Lambert, Maren Moss, Mickey Guyton and Kacey Musgraves but dozens more artists make appearances) to make it in a country radio format yet segregated by gender and race--and then, also and instead, to create a space of their own and on their own terms. I know this territory well and still learned something new on nearly every page. Marissa Moss' Her Country is a timely, well reported history of the recent movement of women (primarily Miranda Lambert, Maren Moss, Mickey Guyton and Kacey Musgraves but dozens more artists make appearances) to make it in a country radio format yet segregated by gender and race--and then, also and instead, to create a space of their own and on their own terms. I know this territory well and still learned something new on nearly every page.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lovely Loveday

    Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be by Marissa R. Moss is well-written and well-researched. I enjoyed reading the book, and it also made me look up lots of other artists that might have slipped past me or ones I am not familiar with. If you didn't know very much about this backstory, you undoubtedly had a lot of respect for their music. I highly recommend it to fans of country music. Her Country: How the Women of Country Music Became the Success They Were Never Supposed to Be by Marissa R. Moss is well-written and well-researched. I enjoyed reading the book, and it also made me look up lots of other artists that might have slipped past me or ones I am not familiar with. If you didn't know very much about this backstory, you undoubtedly had a lot of respect for their music. I highly recommend it to fans of country music.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    Interesting and well researched look into the lives and struggles of those in the country music industry who do not fit the stereotypical mold. Overall I enjoyed what this book had to say but did find it to be somewhat repetitive and contains side tangents that I felt removed my attention from the primary story. Received an ARC in a Goodreads giveaway.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ben Gnute

    I read through the playlist in the back of the book. Maybe I'm blind but I didn't see Lucinda Williams. Should I even bother reading this? I read through the playlist in the back of the book. Maybe I'm blind but I didn't see Lucinda Williams. Should I even bother reading this?

  25. 4 out of 5

    Madonna

    Not what I was expecting it to be...... Good, but not interesting enough for me to be able to concentrate on reading it.... More of a complaint book than a story of country music.

  26. 5 out of 5

    RF

    I'm receiving a copy of this book to donate to the Women's Prison Book Project. I am sure the readers will appreciate it. Thanks for getting me a copy! I'm receiving a copy of this book to donate to the Women's Prison Book Project. I am sure the readers will appreciate it. Thanks for getting me a copy!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Reviewed for Booklist

  28. 5 out of 5

    John Schorg

    What's the best part of this book? It makes you want to listen to the music made by the women who populate it... What's the best part of this book? It makes you want to listen to the music made by the women who populate it...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Carissa Lindsey

    HER COUNTRY Marissa R. Moss Kelli Tager Biographies & Memoirs This book takes on the ups and downs of being a woman in country music. Focusing mostly on four artists. Some up and comers and The Chicks and what a struggle it is to compete with the men of country music. I have to say this book surprised me a bit. I figured it would be more about the genres pioneers of the music. Such as Dolly Parton and Reba MacEntire. Instead it really made me think of the way music genres are laid out. It especially HER COUNTRY Marissa R. Moss Kelli Tager Biographies & Memoirs This book takes on the ups and downs of being a woman in country music. Focusing mostly on four artists. Some up and comers and The Chicks and what a struggle it is to compete with the men of country music. I have to say this book surprised me a bit. I figured it would be more about the genres pioneers of the music. Such as Dolly Parton and Reba MacEntire. Instead it really made me think of the way music genres are laid out. It especially showed the me the difference about what women are supposed to sing and men can sing about. This is definitely a 5 star read for me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...