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The Great Stewardess Rebellion: How Women Launched a Workplace Revolution at 30,000 Feet

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The empowering true story of a group of spirited stewardesses who "stood up to huge corporations and won, creating momentous change for all working women." (Gloria Steinem, co-founder of Ms. magazine) It was the Golden Age of Travel, and everyone wanted in. As flying boomed in the 1960s, women from across the United States applied for jobs as stewardesses. They were dra The empowering true story of a group of spirited stewardesses who "stood up to huge corporations and won, creating momentous change for all working women." (Gloria Steinem, co-founder of Ms. magazine) It was the Golden Age of Travel, and everyone wanted in. As flying boomed in the 1960s, women from across the United States applied for jobs as stewardesses. They were drawn to the promise of glamorous jet-setting, the chance to see the world, and an alternative to traditional occupations like homemaking, nursing, and teaching. But as the number of "stews" grew, so did their suspicion that the job was not as picture-perfect as the ads would have them believe. "Sky girls" had to adhere to strict weight limits at all times; gain a few extra pounds and they'd be suspended from work. They couldn't marry or have children; their makeup, hair, and teeth had to be just so. Girdles were mandatory while stewardesses were on the clock. And, most important, stewardesses had to resign at 32. Eventually the stewardesses began to push back and it's thanks to their trailblazing efforts in part that working women have gotten closer to workplace equality today. Nell McShane Wulfhart crafts a rousing narrative of female empowerment, the paradigm-shifting '60s and '70s, the labor movement, and the cadre of gutsy women who fought for their rights--and won.


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The empowering true story of a group of spirited stewardesses who "stood up to huge corporations and won, creating momentous change for all working women." (Gloria Steinem, co-founder of Ms. magazine) It was the Golden Age of Travel, and everyone wanted in. As flying boomed in the 1960s, women from across the United States applied for jobs as stewardesses. They were dra The empowering true story of a group of spirited stewardesses who "stood up to huge corporations and won, creating momentous change for all working women." (Gloria Steinem, co-founder of Ms. magazine) It was the Golden Age of Travel, and everyone wanted in. As flying boomed in the 1960s, women from across the United States applied for jobs as stewardesses. They were drawn to the promise of glamorous jet-setting, the chance to see the world, and an alternative to traditional occupations like homemaking, nursing, and teaching. But as the number of "stews" grew, so did their suspicion that the job was not as picture-perfect as the ads would have them believe. "Sky girls" had to adhere to strict weight limits at all times; gain a few extra pounds and they'd be suspended from work. They couldn't marry or have children; their makeup, hair, and teeth had to be just so. Girdles were mandatory while stewardesses were on the clock. And, most important, stewardesses had to resign at 32. Eventually the stewardesses began to push back and it's thanks to their trailblazing efforts in part that working women have gotten closer to workplace equality today. Nell McShane Wulfhart crafts a rousing narrative of female empowerment, the paradigm-shifting '60s and '70s, the labor movement, and the cadre of gutsy women who fought for their rights--and won.

30 review for The Great Stewardess Rebellion: How Women Launched a Workplace Revolution at 30,000 Feet

  1. 5 out of 5

    Pooja Peravali

    Though the post of flight attendant was long touted as a glamorous and enviable one, it was also incredibly tough during the Jet Set age. Called stewardesses then, the women had to put up with low pay, sexualized stereotyping, and age and weight restrictions that had nothing to do with their suitability for the job and everything to do with being eye candy. In this book, the reader is taken through how flight attendants fought for workers' rights, often going to war over things that depressingly Though the post of flight attendant was long touted as a glamorous and enviable one, it was also incredibly tough during the Jet Set age. Called stewardesses then, the women had to put up with low pay, sexualized stereotyping, and age and weight restrictions that had nothing to do with their suitability for the job and everything to do with being eye candy. In this book, the reader is taken through how flight attendants fought for workers' rights, often going to war over things that depressingly should never have existed, such as restrictions stating women had to be unmarried and under the age of 35 to keep working. I liked that the author told this story through the efforts of specific women but made sure to demonstrate how it was a group effort still. It was interesting to contrast this with Fly Girl: A Memoir, as Hood enjoyed many of the rights won by flight attendants of the generation discussed here. In the first half of the book, Wulfhart goes over how the passage of Title VII changed many of the regulations around flight attendants, though battling sex discrimination cases was still an uphill battle when prosecutors did not find such cases worthy of attention. I was interested to learn that flight attendants were on the forefront of the implementation of  this act, setting precedents in sex discrimination cases for generations to come. In the second half of the book, the author focuses on unions and the organization Stewardesses for Womens' Rights, battling sexist messaging about flight attendants and trying to gain the privileges that their male counterparts, in this role and otherwise, held.. The book ends with the story of how flight attendants broke away from the Transport Worker's Union to form their own union, advancing the tale into the present day. I found this a really informative read about a subject I knew little about, and appreciated how information was relayed in an easily digestible way. However, I wished that we could have learned more about how women of color fit into 'the Great Stewardess Rebellion,' which was touched upon but not really elaborated. Disclaimer: I received an ARC of this book from NetGalley. This is my honest and voluntary review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linden

    Surprising and disturbing, this well-researched history of the flight attendant profession starts out in the 1950's and early 1960's--the stewardesses were young women selected for their appearance and cheerful personalities. Their training facility, nicknamed the "charm farm," covered hair, makeup and the social graces. They were weighed weekly (and fired if they were over the limit). They could not marry, were dismissed from the job at age 32, and were subject to random inspections by supervis Surprising and disturbing, this well-researched history of the flight attendant profession starts out in the 1950's and early 1960's--the stewardesses were young women selected for their appearance and cheerful personalities. Their training facility, nicknamed the "charm farm," covered hair, makeup and the social graces. They were weighed weekly (and fired if they were over the limit). They could not marry, were dismissed from the job at age 32, and were subject to random inspections by supervisors to ensure that each was wearing a bra, girdle, and slip at all times. Their union, the TWU, was happy to collect their dues, but marginalized the stewardesses and dismissed their concerns. They endured harassment from many of the passengers and pilots, and the airlines' advertisements, replete with sexual innuendos, just made things worse. Recommended for anyone interested in history, particularly women's history. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for the ARC.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ed

    This enjoyable nonfiction book is a sympathetic, well-written account of the airline "stewardesses" struggle to gain workplace rights (the same treatment as their men colleagues) during the 1960s. The first flight I ever took was on a Braniff airliner in 1973, so I don't remember much of the stuff covered, but I do recall seeing the airlines' sexist ads in magazines and on TV. The rules were stupid and arbitrary (the weight requirements, for instance), but the airlines had an economic incentive This enjoyable nonfiction book is a sympathetic, well-written account of the airline "stewardesses" struggle to gain workplace rights (the same treatment as their men colleagues) during the 1960s. The first flight I ever took was on a Braniff airliner in 1973, so I don't remember much of the stuff covered, but I do recall seeing the airlines' sexist ads in magazines and on TV. The rules were stupid and arbitrary (the weight requirements, for instance), but the airlines had an economic incentive to keep the payroll low for their flight attendants who still unionized. I like reading stories about underdogs who succeed in their struggles and win the fight.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I enjoyed reading and learning about the rebellion. I loved the different point of views and really learning about what happened during that time. I loved learning about Patti . Tommie and the many others that helped give them rights. I enjoyed seeing the ads about flying and learning about flight/charm school. Loved learning this book .

  5. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This ARC was provided to me via Kindle, Doubleday Books and by #NetGalley. Opinions expressed are completely my own. Fascinating tale of the women who were the trailblazers. The ones who set the stage for the future. The rebels. The ones who stood up for their rights and won.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Online Eccentric Librarian

    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ This is a very well researched and well written story about gender inequality and the fight for equal rights in the 1960s and 1970s. The author uses 4-5 women's stories to give a picture of the struggles at the time and how sexist and elitist the airline industry especially operated. The author doesn't just cover women but also focuses on racism and even the problems men encountered trying to be flight attendants. Wha More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ This is a very well researched and well written story about gender inequality and the fight for equal rights in the 1960s and 1970s. The author uses 4-5 women's stories to give a picture of the struggles at the time and how sexist and elitist the airline industry especially operated. The author doesn't just cover women but also focuses on racism and even the problems men encountered trying to be flight attendants. What makes the book so successful is the tone and pace: the book never bogs down and the author does an excellent job of making the facts entertaining and informative. The book is chronological and focuses on the women who made the changes in the airline industry in the 1960s and 1970s. Nearly all started out as stewardesses but some would move on to union jobs and try to affect change there. At its heart, the story is about the huge gender inequality issues: from pay differences to gender-specific job requirements. It is inconceivable today that a flight attendant would have to quit or be fired if she: was over 30, was over 125 lbs, got married, had a child, did not wear a girdle or false eyelashes, or did not style her her in a certain way. All for 3/4 less pay than a male counterpart who had no restrictions at all. Although the women were to be admired, the author had a great way of making each one extremely likable (despite the unlikelihood of them being very unlikeable in real life). The women had very strong personalities, were driven, and even had differing ideals at some points (e.g., whether to use the power of existing unions or to create a new one for flight attendants only). I found every single woman's story engrossing and appreciated that we got more than just their job info but also stories about their personal life. A good writer can really elevate the subject and Wulfhart does that here. This is a highly entertaining read that brings great insight into how bad things were at the airline industry (and for women) at the time. The women were candid about their mistakes and about their successes and the era of the 1960s and 1970s is well realized throughout. I honestly could not come up with any criticisms of the presentation, research, or subject matter. Especially for those who recently watched the TV series Mrs. America, you will recognize a lot of the names in here when the book reaches the 1970s. In all, highly recommended. And a great testament to the women who managed a lasting change against so much resistance. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bookoholiccafe

    It took me sometimes (more than a month) to write this review. I don’t even know how to write my feelings about it now. I have worked for big corporations, and this was a very relatable story for me. Being a stewardess is a dream job for so many people, everything is glamorous from the outside, and they travel the world and enjoy their life. This wasn’t the case in the 1960s when flying thrived and women across the nation were applying to become a stewardess. This book is a true story of a group It took me sometimes (more than a month) to write this review. I don’t even know how to write my feelings about it now. I have worked for big corporations, and this was a very relatable story for me. Being a stewardess is a dream job for so many people, everything is glamorous from the outside, and they travel the world and enjoy their life. This wasn’t the case in the 1960s when flying thrived and women across the nation were applying to become a stewardess. This book is a true story of a group of these brave stewardesses who stood up to big corporations for their strict rule, as they had to always maintain a certain weight, they were not able to marry or have children and they all had to follow the rules regarding their hair and makeup. On top of all these, they could only work as a stewardess till the age of 32. The first half focuses on regulations (Title VII) that changed everything and started discrimination. And then later in the book, we read about unions and organizations that started to fight for women's rights and ask for the same freedom and opportunities that their male counterparts had. This book is beautifully written, it is from different points of view and is very informative. But I have to say this five-star story was rather disturbing for me. because I have experienced this situation firsthand. I wish I could see more of this book on Bookstagram and Goodreads.

  8. 4 out of 5

    chels marieantoinette

    I remember when I went to flight attendant training in 2015, I had to dye my hair all one color and buy makeup because I didn’t even own the lipstick we were required to wear. I had friends and family who thought this was insane and sexist, but I didn’t really mind. I knew I wanted to be a flight attendant, so I attended “image” class to ensure I was properly groomed and wore my uniform as expected (though it’s kind of a joke in the industry that once you leave the training center- often called I remember when I went to flight attendant training in 2015, I had to dye my hair all one color and buy makeup because I didn’t even own the lipstick we were required to wear. I had friends and family who thought this was insane and sexist, but I didn’t really mind. I knew I wanted to be a flight attendant, so I attended “image” class to ensure I was properly groomed and wore my uniform as expected (though it’s kind of a joke in the industry that once you leave the training center- often called the “Charm Farm” by more senior flight attendants- that imagine standards are no longer necessarily adhered to). That being said, the industry has obviously changed drastically and I’m very grateful for the flight attendants before me who fought for all this leniency. I personally still take pride in how I present myself on the job and I want to represent my company well, but since I’m now married, on the verge of “aging out” according to the old standards, and can’t imagine feeling comfortable being referred to as a “C.R. honeybun,” I’m so happy I’m not forced to say goodbye to my incredible career. This book is very interesting and educational while also ensuring an entertainment quality that is necessary when reading historical accounts. There’s a focus on the union which is good knowledge to obtain about the industry in general and, while some of the employee treatment & expectations may be somewhat shocking to those outside the airlines, it’s a quick read and I’m glad I was able to review it. I’d highly recommend it to anyone interested in the aviation industry and any current or former flight attendants as well as feminists and general history buffs. (Also all the photos were SO fun to see.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura Solar

    As a flight attendant myself, this book was deeply personal for me, and it really brought to my attention how hard the stews that came before me worked to give me all the benefits and workers’ rights I have today. While I did know about a lot of the darkest parts of the industry already, I couldn’t believe just how scrutinized these women were and the things they were forced to endure from the company and passengers alike. The book itself is incredibly well researched and written in a really str As a flight attendant myself, this book was deeply personal for me, and it really brought to my attention how hard the stews that came before me worked to give me all the benefits and workers’ rights I have today. While I did know about a lot of the darkest parts of the industry already, I couldn’t believe just how scrutinized these women were and the things they were forced to endure from the company and passengers alike. The book itself is incredibly well researched and written in a really straightforward way, without sacrificing the truly human part of the story. If you have an interest in feminist history or labor movements, this is a book you’ll definitely want to read, and I’m forever grateful to the incredible women in this book for allowing me to have the career I do today!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Colin

    4.5 rounded up. Fascinating and inspiring story of these women who had to not only fight against the companies they worked for but also push back against their own union representing them for not taking them and their concerns/wishes seriously. Book may have gotten slightly repetitive at times and also a lot to take in terms of info but such a interesting story about these women who were apart of a movement that not only helped workers in a vacuum but also were instrumental in changing the cultur 4.5 rounded up. Fascinating and inspiring story of these women who had to not only fight against the companies they worked for but also push back against their own union representing them for not taking them and their concerns/wishes seriously. Book may have gotten slightly repetitive at times and also a lot to take in terms of info but such a interesting story about these women who were apart of a movement that not only helped workers in a vacuum but also were instrumental in changing the culture on what women could be, that I look forward to reading it again.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    In 1961 American Airlines had an add in the newspaper. The American Airlines made the stewardess job look like a magical wonderful job. In the morning the stewardess would be in New York and then that evening have dinner in New York. When nineteen year old left the farm wanted a job as a supervisor stewardess. Patt would lead a workers rebellion. Others did the same thing thr out the United States. Airlines had these rules that she be slim-hipped, smiling, perfectedly coiffed, strict weight leve In 1961 American Airlines had an add in the newspaper. The American Airlines made the stewardess job look like a magical wonderful job. In the morning the stewardess would be in New York and then that evening have dinner in New York. When nineteen year old left the farm wanted a job as a supervisor stewardess. Patt would lead a workers rebellion. Others did the same thing thr out the United States. Airlines had these rules that she be slim-hipped, smiling, perfectedly coiffed, strict weight levels, wear girdles, have perfect complexions, perfect eyesight and teeth, no scars and be white. They also could not be married. If they got pregnant, they would be fired immediately. The airlines kept these requirements. They would be checked to see if they were following the rules. They even fought for each stewardess to have their own bedroom rather than being doubled up in a bedroom. The stewardesses wanted their own bedroom. These women did so much to forward women’s rights. This is an amazing story to read. The author brings to this book a treasure trove of vintage commercials and related stories to this book. I realized how much their work/labor rebellions affected the future of the present working women today for the better working conditions. The writing is excellent. This is a combination of culture and feminist history information that quite readable. Disclaimer: I received an arc of this book from the author/publisher from Netgalley. I wasn’t obligated to write a favorable review or any review at all. The opinions expressed are strictly my own.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    3.5 stars. An interesting, well-written book about how stewardesses (and a few stewards), primarily in the 1960s through 1980s, dealt with rampant sexism and ridiculous (and often unsafe and compromising) work rules by organizing as part of national and independent unions. Not only did they have to fight the company management to get better pay, working conditions, and the right to continue working while married, pregnant, or over the age of 35, they were constantly battling the male leadership 3.5 stars. An interesting, well-written book about how stewardesses (and a few stewards), primarily in the 1960s through 1980s, dealt with rampant sexism and ridiculous (and often unsafe and compromising) work rules by organizing as part of national and independent unions. Not only did they have to fight the company management to get better pay, working conditions, and the right to continue working while married, pregnant, or over the age of 35, they were constantly battling the male leadership of the larger unions to which their union belonged who were always bargaining away stewardesses rights to better support male union members such as mechanics and baggage handlers. The book also discusses how belittled and disrespected stewardesses were by both male passengers and pilots, among other groups. The airline ads in the 1970s were sexist and offensive...objectifying the stewardesses into sex objects or wife substitutes. The book gives good background on the larger situation, and focuses in specifically on some of the most powerful stewardess union organizers of those critical decades. Oh, and BTW, the battles continue. Did you know that most flight attendants only get paid from the time the plane starts moving until the time it lands? Yep, that's right: most don't get paid for the time they spend prepping for the flight, or the time spent boarding and unboarding passengers. Crazy, right? Always more work to be done.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Here's another bit of history I either didn't really think about or didn't know at all. This book chronicles the battles flight attendants fought for DECADES to get workers' rights. Between the sexism, ageism, and just not wanting to pay fairly, the reader will close this book seething at the audacity of U.S. airlines. And the thing is, flight attendants are STILL fighting to get paid fairly for their time at work. There are times when I felt the book got a little slow or maybe that I had already Here's another bit of history I either didn't really think about or didn't know at all. This book chronicles the battles flight attendants fought for DECADES to get workers' rights. Between the sexism, ageism, and just not wanting to pay fairly, the reader will close this book seething at the audacity of U.S. airlines. And the thing is, flight attendants are STILL fighting to get paid fairly for their time at work. There are times when I felt the book got a little slow or maybe that I had already read that information a little earlier in the book. When it felt slow, I thought, "if I think this is slow, how about waiting 30 years to get back pay?" And when it felt repetitive, it was because the same things had to be fought for over and over again, just with different airlines, or over slightly different points. If I got frustrated, imagine what the flight attendants felt. I hope that people will read this book and realize how hard people fought and how far we still have to go in so many industries to get equity and fair wages for all workers. My thanks to Doubleday Books and NetGalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Virginia Schott

    Whenever I see memoirs, I need to listen to them via Audiobook. They are normally too dry for me to sit down and just read right through them. This particular novel caught my eye on the Kindle store and I decided to give it a try. I've always been fascinated with the early flying stories, Pan Am, etc. Also, how dusty is my car screen and how much do I need to clean it?! It's important people read this book because how flight attendants started and where we are today are two very very different pl Whenever I see memoirs, I need to listen to them via Audiobook. They are normally too dry for me to sit down and just read right through them. This particular novel caught my eye on the Kindle store and I decided to give it a try. I've always been fascinated with the early flying stories, Pan Am, etc. Also, how dusty is my car screen and how much do I need to clean it?! It's important people read this book because how flight attendants started and where we are today are two very very different places. I can't believe some of the restrictions that started with weight, pregnancy, dress, etc. It's insane and crazy that was even allowed to happen. I'm glad they had an epilogue to see where they are today. It got a little slow for me at the end and hard to follow, so I fast forwarded to that to see the conclusion of the book. I wish they would have gone into the actual personal story of more flight attendants and their story, but I understand that's not what the book was about. All and all an important read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    If you thought that the American film industry in the last half of the last century was sexist slavery, the airline industry, specifically stewardesses, has it beat by furlongs. Think Stepford without the marriage part. The pay was marginal and the clothing and other costs came out of it, think Company Store. The issues are feminist but are rooted in some basic human rights. Some parts read like a PhD thesis but clearly get the points across. This union was not only born of an honest need to bre If you thought that the American film industry in the last half of the last century was sexist slavery, the airline industry, specifically stewardesses, has it beat by furlongs. Think Stepford without the marriage part. The pay was marginal and the clothing and other costs came out of it, think Company Store. The issues are feminist but are rooted in some basic human rights. Some parts read like a PhD thesis but clearly get the points across. This union was not only born of an honest need to break the pattern of what was clearly employee abuse but with the future clearly in sight. Many detailed personal experiences are included and only magnify the need for the action taken. Needs to be included in college curricula and appreciated by those who travel by air. I requested and received a free temporary e-book from Doubleday Books via NetGalley.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mary Juno

    Fascinating story about the history of the job of being a flight attendant, beginning in the 1960's. Tells the true life story of the women who worked so hard to change the incredibly sexist policies of the airlines and how they dehumanized stewardesses with advertising like "Fly Me" campaign, the age and marriage limitations, nothing to say of the rules of appearance and weight and incredibly low pay. It also gives a good history of the ramifications of Title 7 and also how their work and subse Fascinating story about the history of the job of being a flight attendant, beginning in the 1960's. Tells the true life story of the women who worked so hard to change the incredibly sexist policies of the airlines and how they dehumanized stewardesses with advertising like "Fly Me" campaign, the age and marriage limitations, nothing to say of the rules of appearance and weight and incredibly low pay. It also gives a good history of the ramifications of Title 7 and also how their work and subsequent court cases affected equality for women in the workplace in other industries. Unbelievable that even in the 1990's the airlines were getting away with the insane weight requirements.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Biblio Files (takingadayoff)

    The Great Stewardess Rebellion combines social history with labor history to tell the story of how stewardesses (soon to become flight attendants) fought for recognition as vital members of flight crews. Long exploited as eye candy for male passengers, they battled against repressive weight and appearance regulations, rules against getting married or pregnant, and the mandatory retirement age of thirty-two. Important and fascinating! Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for a digital review cop The Great Stewardess Rebellion combines social history with labor history to tell the story of how stewardesses (soon to become flight attendants) fought for recognition as vital members of flight crews. Long exploited as eye candy for male passengers, they battled against repressive weight and appearance regulations, rules against getting married or pregnant, and the mandatory retirement age of thirty-two. Important and fascinating! Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for a digital review copy.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    As a frequent international flyer, I've always wondered how US based flight attendants seem to have more rights and job security than those based in other countries. This book was excellent for telling the story of how those rights came to be and really included a lot of rediculousness that made me embarrassed just to hear about (esp. the racoon skin hats and other uniform misses). There are photos of the adds that were run so you can see how they really walked the line sometimes between professi As a frequent international flyer, I've always wondered how US based flight attendants seem to have more rights and job security than those based in other countries. This book was excellent for telling the story of how those rights came to be and really included a lot of rediculousness that made me embarrassed just to hear about (esp. the racoon skin hats and other uniform misses). There are photos of the adds that were run so you can see how they really walked the line sometimes between professional and racy. Overall, fascinating to see and read about.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bruin Mccon

    I’m not sure if this book is for everyone but I found the intersection of worker’s rights, women’s rights, LGBTQ+ rights and BIPOC rights to be fascinating. The story is a long one and exceedingly well researched. The book kicks off discussing what life was like way back in the day: stewardess training, onerous weight and appearance restrictions, and bans in marriage or kids, and aging, ruled the day. Then you go through all the changes since then. Also enjoyed the inside-baseball union structur I’m not sure if this book is for everyone but I found the intersection of worker’s rights, women’s rights, LGBTQ+ rights and BIPOC rights to be fascinating. The story is a long one and exceedingly well researched. The book kicks off discussing what life was like way back in the day: stewardess training, onerous weight and appearance restrictions, and bans in marriage or kids, and aging, ruled the day. Then you go through all the changes since then. Also enjoyed the inside-baseball union structure elements.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I really enjoyed reading "The Great Stewardess Rebellion" by Wulfhart. I had no idea how many of the gains in women's rights were pioneered by stewardesses/flight attendants. The book was well-woven with personal stories and a linear narrative as to make it interesting to read as well as informative. I would recommend highly as a book club pick! I really enjoyed reading "The Great Stewardess Rebellion" by Wulfhart. I had no idea how many of the gains in women's rights were pioneered by stewardesses/flight attendants. The book was well-woven with personal stories and a linear narrative as to make it interesting to read as well as informative. I would recommend highly as a book club pick!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Primarily focused on the unionization efforts at American Airlines, Naomi McShane Wulfhart describes the battle flight attendants to gain respect and the rights they deserve and continue to fight for to this day. It’s an interesting read and will make you think about the efforts of your flight attendants on your next flight. An enjoyable read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Georgann

    Growing up in the 60’s, stewardess was still a glamour career option. If I knew then what I know now… Bravo for a finely written history of this often seen and little understood field. The anecdotes make the labor struggle instantly accessible. With the current climate of passenger misbehavior in the face of safety mandates, this background is especially relevant.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    A very interesting, well told history. Sobering to realize how many of the rights we now take for granted, as basic as they are, are the results of years of fighting, and how recent they actually are (legally being fired for being pregnant was the norm less than just 40 years ago, for example). Rage inducing as we seem to be heading straight backwards, day by day.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    This was a fantastic read. I basically didn't put it down. It was inspiring, it included humorous details, and I learned history of labor movements, feminist movements, and individual women that I'd known nothing about before picking this up on a whim. This was a fantastic read. I basically didn't put it down. It was inspiring, it included humorous details, and I learned history of labor movements, feminist movements, and individual women that I'd known nothing about before picking this up on a whim.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    I won a copy of this book in the Goodreads giveaway. I thought that the life of a stewardess was a glamorous job and never knew the discrimination that existed or all the rules that they were expected to follow

  26. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This was very well done and I got through it faster than expected because it was so interesting. It's incredible how much sexism and objectification was tolerated in the very recent past and still, as we all know, there are 40,000 miles to go. This was very well done and I got through it faster than expected because it was so interesting. It's incredible how much sexism and objectification was tolerated in the very recent past and still, as we all know, there are 40,000 miles to go.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Pattie

    Very interesting history of how the profession of stewardess evolved.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    The timeline jumped around a little bit but it wasn’t too detrimental to the continuity. Overall, really informative and a great read pulling from stories of the women who founded the union.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pat Borg

    As a former stewardess for American, I found many discrepancies in the book.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Peter Swanson

    I liked this book well enough, but I stopped reading when I realized that I wasn't in the frame of mind to appreciate it fully. I liked this book well enough, but I stopped reading when I realized that I wasn't in the frame of mind to appreciate it fully.

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