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The Forty Year War in Afghanistan and Its Predictable Outcome

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The story of NATO’s disastrous occupation of Afghanistan, and how it repeated the mistakes of the Soviet occupation which preceded it The NATO occupation of Afghanistan is over, and a balance-sheet can be drawn. These essays on war and peace in the region reveal Tariq Ali at his sharpest and most prescient. Rarely has there been such an enthusiastic display of international The story of NATO’s disastrous occupation of Afghanistan, and how it repeated the mistakes of the Soviet occupation which preceded it The NATO occupation of Afghanistan is over, and a balance-sheet can be drawn. These essays on war and peace in the region reveal Tariq Ali at his sharpest and most prescient. Rarely has there been such an enthusiastic display of international unity as that which greeted the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001. Compared to Iraq, Afghanistan became the “good war.” But a stalemate ensued, and the Taliban waited out the NATO contingents. Today, with the collapse of the puppet regime in Kabul, what does the future hold for a traumatised Afghan people? Will China become the dominant influence in the country? Tariq Ali has been following the wars in Afghanistan for forty years. He opposed Soviet military intervention in 1979, predicting disaster. He was also a fierce critic of its NATO sequel, “Operation Enduring Freedom.” In a series of trenchant commentaries, he described the tragedies inflicted on Afghanistan, as well as the semi-Talibanization and militarization of neighbouring Pakistan. Most of his predictions proved accurate. The Forty Year War in Afghanistan brings together the best of his writings and includes a new introduction.


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The story of NATO’s disastrous occupation of Afghanistan, and how it repeated the mistakes of the Soviet occupation which preceded it The NATO occupation of Afghanistan is over, and a balance-sheet can be drawn. These essays on war and peace in the region reveal Tariq Ali at his sharpest and most prescient. Rarely has there been such an enthusiastic display of international The story of NATO’s disastrous occupation of Afghanistan, and how it repeated the mistakes of the Soviet occupation which preceded it The NATO occupation of Afghanistan is over, and a balance-sheet can be drawn. These essays on war and peace in the region reveal Tariq Ali at his sharpest and most prescient. Rarely has there been such an enthusiastic display of international unity as that which greeted the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001. Compared to Iraq, Afghanistan became the “good war.” But a stalemate ensued, and the Taliban waited out the NATO contingents. Today, with the collapse of the puppet regime in Kabul, what does the future hold for a traumatised Afghan people? Will China become the dominant influence in the country? Tariq Ali has been following the wars in Afghanistan for forty years. He opposed Soviet military intervention in 1979, predicting disaster. He was also a fierce critic of its NATO sequel, “Operation Enduring Freedom.” In a series of trenchant commentaries, he described the tragedies inflicted on Afghanistan, as well as the semi-Talibanization and militarization of neighbouring Pakistan. Most of his predictions proved accurate. The Forty Year War in Afghanistan brings together the best of his writings and includes a new introduction.

51 review for The Forty Year War in Afghanistan and Its Predictable Outcome

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Valuable as far as it goes, but this is a collection of Ali's articles about Afghanistan and related matters going back to the 1980s. It's helpful to have snapshots from the last few decades, but inevitably the book feels less useful than a completely new work might have been. The introduction and the final piece do bring his account up to date. But in the end, I found an interview he gave on an episode of the Jacobin-related podcast, The Dig with Daniel Denvir, on October 12, 2021 to be much mo Valuable as far as it goes, but this is a collection of Ali's articles about Afghanistan and related matters going back to the 1980s. It's helpful to have snapshots from the last few decades, but inevitably the book feels less useful than a completely new work might have been. The introduction and the final piece do bring his account up to date. But in the end, I found an interview he gave on an episode of the Jacobin-related podcast, The Dig with Daniel Denvir, on October 12, 2021 to be much more insightful and revealing than this book ultimately turned out to be.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  3. 5 out of 5

    DJ Cheek

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    Reeve

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    K

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    Edward

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    Eddie Burton

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    Wuttipol✨

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    Kate Twitchell

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    Alia

  11. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Doeksen

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ben Crouse

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    Gabe

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    Ashik

  15. 5 out of 5

    Siân Smith

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    Lindsay

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    Jevan

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    TheBookEnjoyer

  19. 5 out of 5

    Riel B.

  20. 4 out of 5

    John Jarowski

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    Ben Spill

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tom Blackburn

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    Daniel Van Der Woude

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gretel

  25. 4 out of 5

    Severi Saaristo

  26. 5 out of 5

    Cool_guy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carlos Martinez

  28. 5 out of 5

    T

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rafay Ali

  30. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

  31. 5 out of 5

    Mich

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    Bryan

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    emmy

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    Cecilia Domoto

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    Wade Bower

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    Osama Sayed

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    Tom Proctor

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    GrantyO

  41. 4 out of 5

    Brian Haynes

  42. 5 out of 5

    Jason

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    Tam Sothonprapakonn

  44. 5 out of 5

    Maiwand Sarbaz

  45. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  46. 4 out of 5

    Sian

  47. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  48. 4 out of 5

    Rebeka

  49. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  50. 4 out of 5

    Sasha

  51. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Chok

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