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Whitemud Walking

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An Indigenous resistance historiography, poetry that interrogates the colonial violence of the archive Whitemud Walking is about the land Matthew Weigel was born on and the institutions that occupy that land. It is about the interrelatedness of his own story with that of the colonial history of Canada, which considers the numbered treaties of the North-West to be historical An Indigenous resistance historiography, poetry that interrogates the colonial violence of the archive Whitemud Walking is about the land Matthew Weigel was born on and the institutions that occupy that land. It is about the interrelatedness of his own story with that of the colonial history of Canada, which considers the numbered treaties of the North-West to be historical and completed events. But they are eternal agreements that entail complex reciprocity and obligations. The state and archival institutions work together to sequester documents and knowledge in ways that resonate violently in people’s lives, including the dispossession and extinguishment of Indigenous title to land. Using photos, documents, and recordings that are about or involve his ancestors, but are kept in archives, Weigel examines the consequences of this erasure and sequestration. Memories cling to documents and sometimes this palimpsest can be read, other times the margins must be centered to gain a fuller picture. Whitemud Walking is a genre-bending work of visual and lyric poetry, non-fiction prose, photography, and digital art and design.


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An Indigenous resistance historiography, poetry that interrogates the colonial violence of the archive Whitemud Walking is about the land Matthew Weigel was born on and the institutions that occupy that land. It is about the interrelatedness of his own story with that of the colonial history of Canada, which considers the numbered treaties of the North-West to be historical An Indigenous resistance historiography, poetry that interrogates the colonial violence of the archive Whitemud Walking is about the land Matthew Weigel was born on and the institutions that occupy that land. It is about the interrelatedness of his own story with that of the colonial history of Canada, which considers the numbered treaties of the North-West to be historical and completed events. But they are eternal agreements that entail complex reciprocity and obligations. The state and archival institutions work together to sequester documents and knowledge in ways that resonate violently in people’s lives, including the dispossession and extinguishment of Indigenous title to land. Using photos, documents, and recordings that are about or involve his ancestors, but are kept in archives, Weigel examines the consequences of this erasure and sequestration. Memories cling to documents and sometimes this palimpsest can be read, other times the margins must be centered to gain a fuller picture. Whitemud Walking is a genre-bending work of visual and lyric poetry, non-fiction prose, photography, and digital art and design.

30 review for Whitemud Walking

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tina

    So so good! Loved these poems! Thank you to Coach House Books for my gifted review copy!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robbie

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    Keighlagh

  5. 5 out of 5

    River

  6. 5 out of 5

    Leah Horton

  7. 4 out of 5

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    Holden Wall

  9. 5 out of 5

    Danuta

  10. 5 out of 5

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    Jeanne Yurris

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jazz

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea Novak

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rowan Levi

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bookworm Adventure Girl

  16. 4 out of 5

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  17. 4 out of 5

    Margot

  18. 4 out of 5

    lacy

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lanika

  20. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jbondandrews

  22. 4 out of 5

    Tyler

  23. 5 out of 5

    Adam Lachacz

  24. 4 out of 5

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  25. 4 out of 5

    Madison Longbottom

  26. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Morse

  28. 5 out of 5

    Miranda M

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heather Pearson

  30. 4 out of 5

    Derya

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