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The Unbelievable Unteens

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From the world of the Eisner Award-winning Black Hammer series comes this meta team superhero saga taking place between two different worlds. After signing at a comic book convention, Unbelievable Unteens artist Jane Ito finds herself visited by one of the characters from her own creation—but was it her own creation? Were the Unteens an actual school of teenaged misfit supe From the world of the Eisner Award-winning Black Hammer series comes this meta team superhero saga taking place between two different worlds. After signing at a comic book convention, Unbelievable Unteens artist Jane Ito finds herself visited by one of the characters from her own creation—but was it her own creation? Were the Unteens an actual school of teenaged misfit superheroes who battled supervillains under the lead of the mysterious Dr. Miles Moniker? And if so who wiped their memories and why? As Jane’s world is turned upside down and she learns the true nature of her identity she discovers a sinister plot leading her to assemble a team she had suspected was purely fictional. Collects issues #1-4 of The Unbelievable Unteens and featuring a sketchbook section and pinups by Emi Lenox, John McCrea, Tonci Zonjic, and Ray Fawkes!


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From the world of the Eisner Award-winning Black Hammer series comes this meta team superhero saga taking place between two different worlds. After signing at a comic book convention, Unbelievable Unteens artist Jane Ito finds herself visited by one of the characters from her own creation—but was it her own creation? Were the Unteens an actual school of teenaged misfit supe From the world of the Eisner Award-winning Black Hammer series comes this meta team superhero saga taking place between two different worlds. After signing at a comic book convention, Unbelievable Unteens artist Jane Ito finds herself visited by one of the characters from her own creation—but was it her own creation? Were the Unteens an actual school of teenaged misfit superheroes who battled supervillains under the lead of the mysterious Dr. Miles Moniker? And if so who wiped their memories and why? As Jane’s world is turned upside down and she learns the true nature of her identity she discovers a sinister plot leading her to assemble a team she had suspected was purely fictional. Collects issues #1-4 of The Unbelievable Unteens and featuring a sketchbook section and pinups by Emi Lenox, John McCrea, Tonci Zonjic, and Ray Fawkes!

30 review for The Unbelievable Unteens

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    A clear lesser spin off in the ever expanding Black Hammer universe (BlaHamniverse..?), it's Lemire's take on the X-Men. Thing is, the whole thing feels like a repetition of the main Black Hammer storyline - superheroes who have forgotten they are superheroes, superheroes who have moved on into adulthood and have family lives.. even the big bad, the Wraith, reminds a lot of Anti-God. And the story doesn't offer any surprises. I kind of wished Lemire had taken a bit of a risk in the storytelling, t A clear lesser spin off in the ever expanding Black Hammer universe (BlaHamniverse..?), it's Lemire's take on the X-Men. Thing is, the whole thing feels like a repetition of the main Black Hammer storyline - superheroes who have forgotten they are superheroes, superheroes who have moved on into adulthood and have family lives.. even the big bad, the Wraith, reminds a lot of Anti-God. And the story doesn't offer any surprises. I kind of wished Lemire had taken a bit of a risk in the storytelling, taken the next step, so to speak. There constantly are glimpses of a more interesting story, but they are ignored. Tyler Crook's art is good, and he has become one of the best matches to Lemire's writing. That said, it's the inessential Unteens, I'm afraid. 2.5 stars (Thanks to Dark Horse Books for providing me with an ARC through Edelweiss)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    When does homage just become a string of generic cliches and tropes? In this tribute to 1980s teen superhero books, all the kids spend more time crushing on each other and training than they do having adventures. In a 1990s flash forward though everyone has forgotten their past, but when one of the heroes remembers he sets out to get the band back together to fix their last disastrous adventure. Even then, they spend more time fighting with each other than the greater evil. These Black Hammer spi When does homage just become a string of generic cliches and tropes? In this tribute to 1980s teen superhero books, all the kids spend more time crushing on each other and training than they do having adventures. In a 1990s flash forward though everyone has forgotten their past, but when one of the heroes remembers he sets out to get the band back together to fix their last disastrous adventure. Even then, they spend more time fighting with each other than the greater evil. These Black Hammer spin-offs are getting increasingly blah, bland, and bad. Maybe I'll just stick to the core title from here on out. I'm not a fan of Tyler Crook's art either.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brian Garthoff

    The Unbelievable Unteens is another solid addition to the growing Black Hammer universe, and one that pulls a lot inspiration from X-men but still feels totally unique.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    The latest (final?) Black Hammer-verse mini-series focuses on Jane Ito, the writer and artist of the Incredible Unteens. But when one of her characters turns up in her living room, she's faced with the strange idea that perhaps all the adventures she's been creating are actually her own repressed memories. On the surface, Unteens is a Teen Titans/Doom Patrol/X-Men pastiche that goes a little grimdark in order to get some extra mileage out of a Dark Phoenix/Trigon & Raven type story. But that's al The latest (final?) Black Hammer-verse mini-series focuses on Jane Ito, the writer and artist of the Incredible Unteens. But when one of her characters turns up in her living room, she's faced with the strange idea that perhaps all the adventures she's been creating are actually her own repressed memories. On the surface, Unteens is a Teen Titans/Doom Patrol/X-Men pastiche that goes a little grimdark in order to get some extra mileage out of a Dark Phoenix/Trigon & Raven type story. But that's all just the superficial surface stuff. This mini-series, perhaps moreso than any of the other Black Hammer books, is all about the nitty gritty underneath. Unteens is actually a story about grief. About revisiting the past and seeing it through new eyes and not just through the rose-tinted goggles of nostalgia. About growing as a person, and facing the mistakes you've made in order to become a better version of yourself. Is it all wrapped up in a superhero bow? Yeah, sure. But there's so much more beneath the surface if you scratch just a little bit deeper. I feel like the fact that this doesn't even feel like a Black Hammer book aside from the Free Comic Book Day preview is intentional, since it's exploring very different themes to the other mini-series that we've had so far. On art is Tyler Crook, who also drew the Colonel Weird mini-series a while back. Crook's work is solid, with a lot of versatility shown in his ability to completely change his style when depicting the comic-within-a-comic world of the Unteens compared to the more dour 'real' world of the rest of the story. Unteens looks like one thing but is something entirely different if you take even a second to consider it for more than what it presents itself to be. It looks good, it's a solid story, but it'll have you thinking far past the final pages.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Benji Glaab

    Easily one of my favourite 'Hammerverse' mini series so far. Lemire takes an 80's Teen Titans like team and spoofs the hell out of it. Throw in some nostalgia as the team has grown up 10 years later with memories erased and there is some better days and regrets abounding in this tale. I don't think this is even critical to pick up if you are into BlackHammer, this is critical to pick up if you like good stories period. Easily one of my favourite 'Hammerverse' mini series so far. Lemire takes an 80's Teen Titans like team and spoofs the hell out of it. Throw in some nostalgia as the team has grown up 10 years later with memories erased and there is some better days and regrets abounding in this tale. I don't think this is even critical to pick up if you are into BlackHammer, this is critical to pick up if you like good stories period.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jefferson

    A solid entry in the Black Hammer series that also works as a stand-alone story. Jeff Lemire really seems to understand what the appeal of superhero comics in the '80s was, and it shows. A solid entry in the Black Hammer series that also works as a stand-alone story. Jeff Lemire really seems to understand what the appeal of superhero comics in the '80s was, and it shows.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Connolly

    It’s not quite finished yet but it is already 5 stars. I’m just saving myself the trouble of doing this later.

  8. 5 out of 5

    April Gray

    I enjoyed this, but it felt a bit too compact, it needed more fleshing out. To be fair, I don't get to read nearly as many comics as I'd like, so I may have missed some of this story elsewhere. I did get (I believe) the full story of the Unteens, but I just would've liked to get to know them better. The story was good, with it's influences showing (X-Men, Fabulous Killjoys, Teen Titans, etc), which I'm cool with; I mean, I love the Black Hammer stuff, and it's pretty obvious about its influences I enjoyed this, but it felt a bit too compact, it needed more fleshing out. To be fair, I don't get to read nearly as many comics as I'd like, so I may have missed some of this story elsewhere. I did get (I believe) the full story of the Unteens, but I just would've liked to get to know them better. The story was good, with it's influences showing (X-Men, Fabulous Killjoys, Teen Titans, etc), which I'm cool with; I mean, I love the Black Hammer stuff, and it's pretty obvious about its influences. At the same time, it was pretty predictable, and the ending felt rushed to me, too easy. The art was great, though - it set the tone and suited the story well. I do and will recommend this, but go in knowing it might leave you wanting a bit.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Robinw76

    Another awesome addition to the Black Hammerverse. I loved Jack Sabbath in his brief appearance previously, so was eager for more. If you know this series, you know it pays homage to the comics universes and this backstory kind of felt Doom Patrol-ish, which is far from being a bad thing. As with the rest of Black Hammer, I'm always left wanting so much more. We got the tiniest flabour of the characters and are left with a bunch of open paths to explore in the future, I hope that happens. Tyler Cr Another awesome addition to the Black Hammerverse. I loved Jack Sabbath in his brief appearance previously, so was eager for more. If you know this series, you know it pays homage to the comics universes and this backstory kind of felt Doom Patrol-ish, which is far from being a bad thing. As with the rest of Black Hammer, I'm always left wanting so much more. We got the tiniest flabour of the characters and are left with a bunch of open paths to explore in the future, I hope that happens. Tyler Crook's artwork is staggeringly beautiful, an incredible talent.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Far from the best of the Black Hammer stories. It's Lemire trying to do a Black Hammer take on the X-Men, without including any of the elements that make the X-Men compelling. There's no world that hates and fears them, no struggle with their own abilities. I get that it's largely inspired by the original team, but those were all essential elements for the first X-Men, too. And the story felt too close to the main Black Hammer story for me, with extraordinary people stuck in ordinary lives. I wa Far from the best of the Black Hammer stories. It's Lemire trying to do a Black Hammer take on the X-Men, without including any of the elements that make the X-Men compelling. There's no world that hates and fears them, no struggle with their own abilities. I get that it's largely inspired by the original team, but those were all essential elements for the first X-Men, too. And the story felt too close to the main Black Hammer story for me, with extraordinary people stuck in ordinary lives. I was excited for this book, but it just didn't give me what I was looking for.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vincent

    This time around we get the Black Hammer-verse version of the Uncanny X-men. Grown up versions of a teen super group must re-band to vanquish a forgotten foe. As usual, I like Lemire's pace of giving out information about the mystery. I seldom found myself anticipating revelations and didn't think anything was sped over too quickly either. Also as usual, there is a melancholic or bittersweet element throughout. This time around we get the Black Hammer-verse version of the Uncanny X-men. Grown up versions of a teen super group must re-band to vanquish a forgotten foe. As usual, I like Lemire's pace of giving out information about the mystery. I seldom found myself anticipating revelations and didn't think anything was sped over too quickly either. Also as usual, there is a melancholic or bittersweet element throughout.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Wood

    Story wise this is a great little book. The first chapter comes across hokey, but it takes off on a much better ride through the remainder of the story. Couple of misprinted words, but nothing that killed the immersion. Great story!

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

    A little too heavy on the pastiche, but a great ending.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    Perfectly fine comic. Fun 80s x-men vibes were nice. B-

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mike Hughes

    Not Black Hammer's first foray into comics that are transparently about comics, but certainly a twist on the theme. The story is quick, illuminates one of my favorite side characters (Jack), and offers a cool play on 80s-era X-Men comics. Not the best story in the universe, but I appreciated the focus of the storytelling and thought the ending hit well. Not Black Hammer's first foray into comics that are transparently about comics, but certainly a twist on the theme. The story is quick, illuminates one of my favorite side characters (Jack), and offers a cool play on 80s-era X-Men comics. Not the best story in the universe, but I appreciated the focus of the storytelling and thought the ending hit well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tad

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ed Barredo

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lautaro Vincon

  19. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  20. 4 out of 5

    Scott Waldie

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bryan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ian Roditi

  24. 5 out of 5

    liambaje

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kenny Porter

  26. 5 out of 5

    Theodorus Danny

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pete

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erik

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sam

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