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Sex and the Single Woman: 24 Writers Reimagine Helen Gurley Brown's Cult Classic

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This fresh, voice-driven feminist anthology reimagines Helen Gurley Brown's seminal work Sex and the Single Girl in time for its 60th anniversary, featuring twenty-four essays from acclaimed and bestselling authors, including Kristen Arnett, Morgan Parker, Evette Dionne, and Melissa Febos. In May 1962, Helen Gurley Brown's Sex and the Single Girl sent shockwaves through the This fresh, voice-driven feminist anthology reimagines Helen Gurley Brown's seminal work Sex and the Single Girl in time for its 60th anniversary, featuring twenty-four essays from acclaimed and bestselling authors, including Kristen Arnett, Morgan Parker, Evette Dionne, and Melissa Febos. In May 1962, Helen Gurley Brown's Sex and the Single Girl sent shockwaves through the United States, selling more than two million copies in three weeks. The future Cosmopolitan Editor-in-Chief's book promoted the message that a woman's needs, ambition, and success during her single years could actually take precedence over the search for a husband. While much of Brown's advice is outdated and even offensive by today's standards, her central message remains relevant. In this exceptional anthology, Eliza Smith and Haley Swanson bring together insights from many of today's leading feminist thinkers and writers to pay homage to Brown's original work and reinterpret it for a new generation. These contributors provide a much-needed reckoning while addressing today's central issues, from contraception and abortion (topics the publisher banned from the original) to queer and trans womanhood, racial double standards, dating with disabilities, sexual consent, singlehood by choice, single parenting, and more. Written for today's women, this revisionist anthology honors Brown's irreverent spirit just as it celebrates and validates women's sexual lives and individual eras of singlehood, encouraging us all to reclaim joy where it's so often been denied.


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This fresh, voice-driven feminist anthology reimagines Helen Gurley Brown's seminal work Sex and the Single Girl in time for its 60th anniversary, featuring twenty-four essays from acclaimed and bestselling authors, including Kristen Arnett, Morgan Parker, Evette Dionne, and Melissa Febos. In May 1962, Helen Gurley Brown's Sex and the Single Girl sent shockwaves through the This fresh, voice-driven feminist anthology reimagines Helen Gurley Brown's seminal work Sex and the Single Girl in time for its 60th anniversary, featuring twenty-four essays from acclaimed and bestselling authors, including Kristen Arnett, Morgan Parker, Evette Dionne, and Melissa Febos. In May 1962, Helen Gurley Brown's Sex and the Single Girl sent shockwaves through the United States, selling more than two million copies in three weeks. The future Cosmopolitan Editor-in-Chief's book promoted the message that a woman's needs, ambition, and success during her single years could actually take precedence over the search for a husband. While much of Brown's advice is outdated and even offensive by today's standards, her central message remains relevant. In this exceptional anthology, Eliza Smith and Haley Swanson bring together insights from many of today's leading feminist thinkers and writers to pay homage to Brown's original work and reinterpret it for a new generation. These contributors provide a much-needed reckoning while addressing today's central issues, from contraception and abortion (topics the publisher banned from the original) to queer and trans womanhood, racial double standards, dating with disabilities, sexual consent, singlehood by choice, single parenting, and more. Written for today's women, this revisionist anthology honors Brown's irreverent spirit just as it celebrates and validates women's sexual lives and individual eras of singlehood, encouraging us all to reclaim joy where it's so often been denied.

30 review for Sex and the Single Woman: 24 Writers Reimagine Helen Gurley Brown's Cult Classic

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Helen Gurley Brown’s proto-feminist, how-to classic, ‘Sex and the Single Girl,’ came screaming into existence in 1962. So did I. That means that both of us, that book/this body, will turn 60 this year. Trust me when I say this, neither of us has aged well. I won’t go into the details of how homophobic, fat phobic and horrifically racist Brown’s book actually is (there’s a link to THAT review at the end of THIS review). But I will say that those who rated it five stars either A) never read it, or Helen Gurley Brown’s proto-feminist, how-to classic, ‘Sex and the Single Girl,’ came screaming into existence in 1962. So did I. That means that both of us, that book/this body, will turn 60 this year. Trust me when I say this, neither of us has aged well. I won’t go into the details of how homophobic, fat phobic and horrifically racist Brown’s book actually is (there’s a link to THAT review at the end of THIS review). But I will say that those who rated it five stars either A) never read it, or B) don’t remember the details of it, or C) are horrible, horrible people. That said, this 2022 reimagining of Brown’s shallow homage to skinny, privileged, heterosexual, white women is a breath of rarified air. Herein are twenty-four essays from all those demographics that Brown either minimized, dismissed, insulted or completely ignored. If your life doesn’t revolve around the plasticine imagery of ‘Housewife Gazette,’ or you weigh more than 8 stones (112 lbs), or your skin tone is something other than alabaster, or you happen to prefer the company of same sex housemates—read this [Sex and the Single Woman] and skip that [Sex and the Single Girl]. _________________________________ A few of my favorite quotes “”You need to look glamorous every minute,” writes Helen Gurley Brown, in a siren song from beyond the grave. I’m sure wherever she is now, she’s perfectly turned out: face spackled with Max Factor Pan-Cake makeup, wig sleek and glossy, Chanel suit tailored close to the bone, hunger pangs ignored, even in the afterlife.” ~Briallen Hopper (pg 116) “Once, I dated a Pentecostal white guy. He said it was crucial that I was baptized again with only the name of Jesus. Not the trinity, or I wouldn’t get into heaven. He performed my second baptism, pushing me under the water, and then a few days later we f**ked in a sh*tty motel room near the interstate.” ~Tiana Clark (pg 170) “Sex workers aren’t killed because sex work is inherently dangerous. A culture of shame and violent policing is what makes sex work dangerous. If a client had decided to rape me or force me to do things I didn’t permit, he would likely face no consequences. Because reporting it to the police would mean I would be arrested, or worse, assaulted again—by the police.” ~Xoài Pham (pg 206) “I don’t know if I sleep better when I’m alone, but when I’m alone, I’m free to sleep poorly.” ~Seema Reza (pg 217) __________________________________ https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  2. 4 out of 5

    m.

    eARC provided by Netgalley in exhange for an honest review. Before requesting this book, I'd never heard of Helen Gurley Brown or her book, which, considering the first essay included in this one, is probably a good thing. It was very easy to read Sex and the Single Woman without having the knowledge of the work this book tries to reinvent, which I am also very grateful for, considering that Brown's sounds like a bore and this one was too, at times. A lot of essays I liked — When a Man Isn't eARC provided by Netgalley in exhange for an honest review. Before requesting this book, I'd never heard of Helen Gurley Brown or her book, which, considering the first essay included in this one, is probably a good thing. It was very easy to read Sex and the Single Woman without having the knowledge of the work this book tries to reinvent, which I am also very grateful for, considering that Brown's sounds like a bore and this one was too, at times. A lot of essays I liked — When a Man Isn't a Man, by Samantha Allen and Are You Having Sex by Natalie Lima being my two favorites — but I have to admit some of the time I found myself asking what was the point of a lot of the work included in this collection. I won't lie and say I know everything there is to know about feminism, but some of the essays felt really basic, your middle school friend trying to teach you how to tongue kiss without having to actually kiss you, type of feminism. And to pile on top of that, a lot of the essays felt scattered and misplaced in the general context. Some of them would go on for several pages longer than they should, adding pratically nothing, while others with very interesting ideas were so short to the point of it not having time to say anything. While some essays where charming — In Pursuit of Brown-on-Brown love by Jennifer Chowdhury, for example — I am a firm believer that expressions like "ho phase" and especially "vibe check" should never, under any circumstance appear in a book. And this can be kind of a mindless criticism but it must be made: the writing style of most writers really gave away that they are millennials, which isn't a bad thing on its own, but really gets tiring to read after a while.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Reagan

    Firstly, thank you @harperperennial for sending me this ARC. This book shares some powerful essays from 24 writers. It shares topics that Helen Gurley Brown wouldn't/couldn't talk about. This book was an informative and shared story that these authors went through and it was truly special to hear their stories. Overall, this book did a great job of talking about the outdated ways that Helen tried to advertise. Although this book had great chapters, some did get lost with following/tieing together Firstly, thank you @harperperennial for sending me this ARC. This book shares some powerful essays from 24 writers. It shares topics that Helen Gurley Brown wouldn't/couldn't talk about. This book was an informative and shared story that these authors went through and it was truly special to hear their stories. Overall, this book did a great job of talking about the outdated ways that Helen tried to advertise. Although this book had great chapters, some did get lost with following/tieing together with the topic. This book can definitely be worth a read!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn | letmetakea_shelfie_

    “60 years ago, Helen Gurley Brown wrote Sex and the Single Girl, setting off shock waves, selling more than 2 million copies in 3 weeks. Her message was radical for its time: marriage was not essential for women to lead rich, meaningful lives.” Fast forward to today, and things have changed drastically. This book features 24, incredibly written pieces, from a diverse group of individuals on what it really means to live a rich and meaningful life today. Everything from IVF, celibacy, menstruation, “60 years ago, Helen Gurley Brown wrote Sex and the Single Girl, setting off shock waves, selling more than 2 million copies in 3 weeks. Her message was radical for its time: marriage was not essential for women to lead rich, meaningful lives.” Fast forward to today, and things have changed drastically. This book features 24, incredibly written pieces, from a diverse group of individuals on what it really means to live a rich and meaningful life today. Everything from IVF, celibacy, menstruation, consent, sex work, and queer and trans womanhood; every piece has something you can take from it. You don’t have to have read the original book to read this one; this book is independent and highlights SO MUCH GOOD STUFF. An essential read for everyone - no matter how you identify, what your relationship status is, what your career is. Just read it. Thank you @bibliolifestyle and @harperperennial for this book. I will cherish it for a long time.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sashika Fernando

    Thank you to harperperennial for sending me this book. #gifted This book contains so much depth within its pages. To go into a little background; in 1962, Helen Gurley Brown’s Sex and the single girl was published. Even though I have not read it, it is said that it contains some outdated advice which would be considered offensive by today’s standards. In contrast, Sex and the Single Woman brings insights into the lives of different individuals. Women and Non-gender conforming individuals from hi Thank you to harperperennial for sending me this book. #gifted This book contains so much depth within its pages. To go into a little background; in 1962, Helen Gurley Brown’s Sex and the single girl was published. Even though I have not read it, it is said that it contains some outdated advice which would be considered offensive by today’s standards. In contrast, Sex and the Single Woman brings insights into the lives of different individuals. Women and Non-gender conforming individuals from highly diverse backgrounds, from all walks of life reimagines Brown’s classic. At the same time, this feminist anthropology brings the stories of those many women, 24 to be exact, into light. This has an amazing collection of stories about a vast range of topics that revolve around womanhood, such as contraception, abortion, queer and trans womanhood, polyamory, celibacy, interracial dating, bodies of all kinds, consent, sex work, IVF and the pop culture that both saves and fails us. I learned so much while reading this. I FELT SEEN. My favorite chapter was ‘In pursuit of brown-on-brown love’ by Jennifer Chowdhury. This is a paragraph from the said chapter, “Despite sharing a language and cultural background, we’ve had completely different life experiences. We didn’t need to go through the same trauma to learn from each other, to respect each other’s thoughts and desires. He helped me find what I truly craved and identify what had been there all along: an unwavering sense of self.” 🤍 I think this is a book that should be read by everyone. I sense that different individuals will live through this book differently. Many will feel seen. So, if you do decide to pick this up, do let me know what your thoughts are! PS: You don’t have to have read Brown’s Sex and the single girl before reading this. The passages tell us all that we need to know. ☺️

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emine Beasley

    Ease of Reading: 5✨ Substantiality: 5✨ Impactfulness: 5✨ Writing: 5✨ Overall: 5✨ Format: Audiovisual Month Read: June 22 Recommend: Yess This is a collection of beautifully written essays that are definitely not just for the single woman. They are explorative and enlightening and please just read them! There are so many perspectives from different ages, races, queerness that no matter your background you will hopefully learn like I did. And also hopefully be inspired like I was too. The book is based on Ease of Reading: 5✨ Substantiality: 5✨ Impactfulness: 5✨ Writing: 5✨ Overall: 5✨ Format: Audiovisual Month Read: June 22 Recommend: Yess This is a collection of beautifully written essays that are definitely not just for the single woman. They are explorative and enlightening and please just read them! There are so many perspectives from different ages, races, queerness that no matter your background you will hopefully learn like I did. And also hopefully be inspired like I was too. The book is based on a book written in the 60s, with a very modern take and discussion. It introduced me to 24 new writers that I’m sure I’ll read more of. What a book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Walters

    Some of the essays in this anthology will echo in my mind forever. A great collection of essays exploring the modern day “woman”.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    This felt very disjointed, and not at all what I expected. I definitely had some essays that I loved, but they didn’t make up for the ones that didn’t add anything.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Thank you #Netgalley for the advanced copy! I was unfamiliar with the original book referenced, and appreciated many of the authors talking about their experiences when they first heard of it. Some of the essays were very scattered and was hard to make the connection to the topic. It took me awhile to read through this book. I expected a more lighthearted read, where this became heavy at times.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Finished this gorgeous collection feeling celebrated and seen in my singlehood. Together, this impressive roster of essayists paint an unabashedly complex picture of what it means to be a single woman in today’s world. It’ll punch you in the gut, squeeze you tight, and lift you up — a true labor of love from all who’ve shared themselves in these pages.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tina Rae

    Hmmm. So I’m really conflicted about this collection. As with all essays collections, I definitely liked some entries more than others. And since this was written by multiple authors, even more so. My main problem with this was that the majority of it didn’t necessarily feel ~on topic? In some ways I would’ve almost rather read the original?? I know it’s incredibly outdated (and problematic) but from its description in this book, I feel like it is much more the celebration of singleton I was expe Hmmm. So I’m really conflicted about this collection. As with all essays collections, I definitely liked some entries more than others. And since this was written by multiple authors, even more so. My main problem with this was that the majority of it didn’t necessarily feel ~on topic? In some ways I would’ve almost rather read the original?? I know it’s incredibly outdated (and problematic) but from its description in this book, I feel like it is much more the celebration of singleton I was expecting. At times this also felt like it's mainly meant to be a criticism of the original work. The first few essays, in particular, seemed to focus mainly on what was wrong with the original book (instead of providing ~updated information). Which. It was written in the 60s. Obviously things have changed??? I would've rather had more updated information than just harping on everything that the original book didn't cover... “And married people always think love is the answer.” That’s mostly what it felt like this collection was expressing?? The vast majority of these essays were personal stories about how the writer met their spouse. So I really felt like Miss Trunchbull while reading this and wondering why all of these women are married. Because that’s not what this collection said it would be? I was looking for stories about how you felt fulfilled while single, not how miserable you were until you were married. (I’m not saying that there’s anything wrong with marriage; but don’t have the word single in the title and then only talk about being married?) So. Don’t get me wrong. There were still a few absolutely *EXCELLENT* essays in this collection (which is why I settled on three stars for this book even though I didn't like the vast majority of it). But unfortunately they were mostly overshadowed by the ones that didn’t really fit the topic. I did particularly enjoy one essay on consent that I feel deserves its own shoutout. It's the stories that were truly about life being single that really drew me in and those are the ones I enjoyed the most. (So the ones that actually fit the topic.) But overall, I just didn’t enjoy this. It didn’t really feel like the groundbreaking, revolutionary work that the original evidently was. This just felt like the same regurgitated information that you can already find all over the internet. There wasn't really anything new offered here and this isn't a book I'll ever be returning to. So. A miss for me, unfortunately. Thanks to Harper Perennial for sending this my way in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sam Hughes

    First of all, I just have to say that I am thankful for both Harper Perennial and Bibliolifestyle for sending me this finished copy of Sex and the Single Woman before its publishing day of May 17, 2022. Helen Gurley Brown's original book titled "Sex and the Single Girl" detailed the importance of women/girls exploring their sexual identities before they chose to marry, or without the marriage happening at all. The books was ridiculed by many and thought to be "Taboo" for women weren't to act so i First of all, I just have to say that I am thankful for both Harper Perennial and Bibliolifestyle for sending me this finished copy of Sex and the Single Woman before its publishing day of May 17, 2022. Helen Gurley Brown's original book titled "Sex and the Single Girl" detailed the importance of women/girls exploring their sexual identities before they chose to marry, or without the marriage happening at all. The books was ridiculed by many and thought to be "Taboo" for women weren't to act so independently, especially not in a sexual manner for those activities were to be practiced with their spouse and intimately. Flash forward 60 years, and 24 different female authors/writers have come together under Harper Perennial to reimagine this overarching message and tell the non-fiction/essay formatted tales of women who've come to relish, hate, and live their single lifetimes. Everyone should pick up a copy of this book and appreciate it for the themes it conveys -- the aptitude that all women should be allotted their sexual freedoms and abilities to discover who we are, throughout every age in our existences. 5/5

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    I did not love this! This book had a lot of potential, and I love the concept, but ultimately I didn't feel like the book was living up to it. Although I love many of the contributing authors, I didn't find most of these particular essays to be especially smart or critically engaging. (There are exceptions!) Here were a lot of the same thoughts on sex, race, gender, etc. that I feel like I usually see on the Internet, without any additional interrogation. This book also falls into the trap that I did not love this! This book had a lot of potential, and I love the concept, but ultimately I didn't feel like the book was living up to it. Although I love many of the contributing authors, I didn't find most of these particular essays to be especially smart or critically engaging. (There are exceptions!) Here were a lot of the same thoughts on sex, race, gender, etc. that I feel like I usually see on the Internet, without any additional interrogation. This book also falls into the trap that many books about women and singlehood fall into: It feels like just about everyone either ends up in a relationship (usually with a man) or passionately wants one, whereas what I'm expecting are thoughts on being deliberately single. In this way I think a number of the essays here – queerness, of which there is plenty, aside – fall into the trap of Brown's original book: they purport to be about singlehood, but really they're about trying to break out of singlehood as quickly as possible. I received an eARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Serena

    This book is a very unique take on Helen Gurley Browns legacy Sex and the Single Girl- affected for the modern age. This book starts out with a treatise on Helen Gurley Brown from her modern day biographer- then descents into stories of sexuality, as told through mothers, lesbians, women of color, fat women, queer folks- all in the purposes of telling stories of love and individuality, of making do with what you have and trying to find your own way. This is in line with Helen Gurley Brown and he This book is a very unique take on Helen Gurley Browns legacy Sex and the Single Girl- affected for the modern age. This book starts out with a treatise on Helen Gurley Brown from her modern day biographer- then descents into stories of sexuality, as told through mothers, lesbians, women of color, fat women, queer folks- all in the purposes of telling stories of love and individuality, of making do with what you have and trying to find your own way. This is in line with Helen Gurley Brown and her work, which is debated heavily in this age as to whether or not she should viewed as a feminist icon or an enemy. I think that the first essay sets the readers up well- she is a woman who tried to help other women win the proverbial "game" in the 1960s, when women didnt have any upper hands. Overall the book is an interesting treatise on simply being a woman- or more female-identified- in 2022, in the myriad of ways that means. Not to mention, the cover is exquisite. Thanks to Netgalley and Harper Perennial for my ARC!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    A timely and interesting rework of the Helen Gurley Brown classic which has been lost to the sands of time. HGB was an important pathfinder for women, even though her Sex and the Single Girl seems very outdated and astoundingly non-feminist. She was, however, ahead of her time in so many ways in addressing issues that others would not. Now a selection of writers have taken on the charge to write about things she did not. This isn't light reading (although some of the essays might make you smile) A timely and interesting rework of the Helen Gurley Brown classic which has been lost to the sands of time. HGB was an important pathfinder for women, even though her Sex and the Single Girl seems very outdated and astoundingly non-feminist. She was, however, ahead of her time in so many ways in addressing issues that others would not. Now a selection of writers have taken on the charge to write about things she did not. This isn't light reading (although some of the essays might make you smile) but the essays span everything from dating with disabilities to consent to abortion to coming out to queer love. Not all of them sparkle and you might find yourself less thrilled with others but treat this as a collection-read them one at a time. I wasn't familiar with many of the authors so this introduction to them was an added benefit. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Adams

    Definitely one of my most unique recent reads. I had heard of the classic Sex and the Single Girl - written back in the 60s, it was essentially an advice book on how a single young woman could go about having a bit of a dalliance. It was divisive in its time but definitely made a cultural impact in many ways. This 21st century take brings together essays from a range of different women and touches on everything from singlehood as a choice to consent to issues in the queer community. While the ori Definitely one of my most unique recent reads. I had heard of the classic Sex and the Single Girl - written back in the 60s, it was essentially an advice book on how a single young woman could go about having a bit of a dalliance. It was divisive in its time but definitely made a cultural impact in many ways. This 21st century take brings together essays from a range of different women and touches on everything from singlehood as a choice to consent to issues in the queer community. While the original spark of inspiration came from the Helen Gurley Brown book, this one is really quite different. As an anthology, I think it comes together well and would be best suited as the type of book you dip in and out of reading one or two essays and taking time to reflect on the different perspectives on womanhood. 4.5

  17. 4 out of 5

    stephanie

    For starters, thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an advance copy of "Sex and the Single Woman" in return for an honest review! Sex and the Single Woman makes a promise—and then it delivers. This collection of essays has been carefully chosen as an update of, and in response to, Helen Gurley Brown's 1962 "Sex and the Single Girl," a handbook designed to be a girl's guide to utilizing feminity as a tool for success, maximizing herself and her ability to perform within a patriarchal Americ For starters, thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an advance copy of "Sex and the Single Woman" in return for an honest review! Sex and the Single Woman makes a promise—and then it delivers. This collection of essays has been carefully chosen as an update of, and in response to, Helen Gurley Brown's 1962 "Sex and the Single Girl," a handbook designed to be a girl's guide to utilizing feminity as a tool for success, maximizing herself and her ability to perform within a patriarchal America. Editors Eliza Smith and Haley Swanson take no such avenue in their modernized rendition of the HGB. As a reader who hadn't been familiar with the original source content, I found none of the discussion off-putting; the first few essays speak to HGB's work and lifetime in a way that I can get the gist without being a researched scholar. Her original work was progressive in its own right, but still fit within the norms of the time that assumed her reader to be a socially permissible prim, proper, straight/cis/white/abled woman like herself. Sixty years later, she's just outdated and patronizing. This essay collection features the stories of women across ages, ethnicities, gender and sexual identities, and ability. The women write about being single, finding relationships, and everything in between, with a written emphasis on doing so for themselves rather than what is considered socially acceptable. Women write about love and divorce, coming out, working in the sex industry, finding and not finding pleasure, and so much more. Some essays are fun and light, whereas others can be strenuous reads; I wouldn't file this as a beach read, if that's what you're looking for. We see women pursuing satisfaction for themselves, not in the eyes of others. This collection is a much-needed update.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    I'm a 62 year old woman who has been married 32 years. I was interested in reading Sex and the Single Woman because I was an avid reader of Cosmopolitan in my teens and twenties. I'm quite sure I read Sex and the Single Girl back then but I didn't remember much of it. I enjoyed reading the different perspectives and being enlightened about how far we've progressed since then. I'm a 62 year old woman who has been married 32 years. I was interested in reading Sex and the Single Woman because I was an avid reader of Cosmopolitan in my teens and twenties. I'm quite sure I read Sex and the Single Girl back then but I didn't remember much of it. I enjoyed reading the different perspectives and being enlightened about how far we've progressed since then.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Alex Borden

    An amazing anthology covering so many aspects of singlehood- loneliness, dating, sexuality, having kids, abortion, the choice to get married, masturbation, etc. I found myself especially moved by Natalie Lima, Laura Bogart, Seema Reza, and Melissa Faliveno’s essays.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tawny Lara

    *disclaimer: My essay, Sober With a Big O, is part of this anthology* Sex and the Single Woman offers nuanced, modern, and diverse perspectives on what it means to be a single, sexual human living in a cishet world. Each of these essays taught me something about society and myself.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Masterson

    I’m going to carry this book deep in my heart for the rest of my life. I had no idea how badly I needed this. Hilarious, sad, but mostly uplifting THIS is the book to read if you ever need a little help finding yourself.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sara Ann

    essays varied pretty widely in quality. easily best one was self help which was about someone coping with being single at thirty. all very interesting perspectives on what it means to be a modern single woman!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emma Kupor

    Such a rich, lovely commentary on singlehood in all its various forms—so refreshing to read love stories where love & marriage is not the be-all and end-all

  24. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    A solid and thoughtful collection! The last two essays in particular felt like big, juicy jolts of lightning.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tammy Buchli

    Felt it was a bait and switch. I expected an update to Helen Gurley Brown’s light and cheerful how-to, which I’ve read and reread many times. This was just a series of personal essays, most of them pretty angsty. Not the type of thing I enjoy at all. Thanks to NetGalley for providing an ARC copy for my review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I had the honor of hearing a few of the contributing authors read in person at an event. I loved each one of their stories plus all the others that I read on my own. Each story was honest, vulnerable, and though some are harder to read, each was entertaining.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lulu David

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emilie

  29. 5 out of 5

    Erin

  30. 4 out of 5

    Isabel Lake

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