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The Simulated Multiverse: An MIT Computer Scientist Explores Parallel Universes, the Simulation Hypothesis, Quantum Computing and the Mandela Effect

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Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their lives in different timelines? In this follow up to his bestseller, The Simulation Hypothesis, MIT Computer Scientist and Silicon Valley Game Pioneer Rizwan Virk explores these topics from a new lens: that of simulation theory. If we are living in a simulated universe, composed of information that Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their lives in different timelines? In this follow up to his bestseller, The Simulation Hypothesis, MIT Computer Scientist and Silicon Valley Game Pioneer Rizwan Virk explores these topics from a new lens: that of simulation theory. If we are living in a simulated universe, composed of information that is rendered around us, then many of the complexities and baffling characteristics of our reality start to make more sense. In particular the two most popular interpretations of quantum mechanics, the Copenhagen Interpretation and the Many Worlds interpretation, which are thought to be mutually exclusive, can be unified in an information based framework. Quantum computing lets us simulate complex phenomena in parallel, allowing the simulation to explore many realities at once to find the most "optimum" path forward. Could this explain not only the enigmatic Mandela Effect but provide us with a new understanding of time and space? Bringing his unique trademark style of combining video games, computer science, quantum physics and computing with lots of philosophy and science fiction, Virk gives us a new way to think about not just our universe, but all possible timelines in the multiverse!


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Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their lives in different timelines? In this follow up to his bestseller, The Simulation Hypothesis, MIT Computer Scientist and Silicon Valley Game Pioneer Rizwan Virk explores these topics from a new lens: that of simulation theory. If we are living in a simulated universe, composed of information that Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their lives in different timelines? In this follow up to his bestseller, The Simulation Hypothesis, MIT Computer Scientist and Silicon Valley Game Pioneer Rizwan Virk explores these topics from a new lens: that of simulation theory. If we are living in a simulated universe, composed of information that is rendered around us, then many of the complexities and baffling characteristics of our reality start to make more sense. In particular the two most popular interpretations of quantum mechanics, the Copenhagen Interpretation and the Many Worlds interpretation, which are thought to be mutually exclusive, can be unified in an information based framework. Quantum computing lets us simulate complex phenomena in parallel, allowing the simulation to explore many realities at once to find the most "optimum" path forward. Could this explain not only the enigmatic Mandela Effect but provide us with a new understanding of time and space? Bringing his unique trademark style of combining video games, computer science, quantum physics and computing with lots of philosophy and science fiction, Virk gives us a new way to think about not just our universe, but all possible timelines in the multiverse!

30 review for The Simulated Multiverse: An MIT Computer Scientist Explores Parallel Universes, the Simulation Hypothesis, Quantum Computing and the Mandela Effect

  1. 5 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    Are we living within a huge computer simulation? Does it work like a video game that can be replayed, over and over again, to attain a better conclusion? Is that replay effect giving many of us deja vu? In The Simulated Multiverse, a MIT computer scientist tries to untangle the truth from the fiction. Okay, first of all, this is not just pop science. It helps to be well-educated or just plain smart to follow along on the wild ride down the possibility slide contained within this book. Does the au Are we living within a huge computer simulation? Does it work like a video game that can be replayed, over and over again, to attain a better conclusion? Is that replay effect giving many of us deja vu? In The Simulated Multiverse, a MIT computer scientist tries to untangle the truth from the fiction. Okay, first of all, this is not just pop science. It helps to be well-educated or just plain smart to follow along on the wild ride down the possibility slide contained within this book. Does the author scientifically prove anything? No. But he does present some very intriguing possibilities that aren’t disproven by known facts. I find science, especially new theories, fascinating. The Simulated Multiverse is an eye-opener on multiple levels. If you liked A Glitch in the Matrix, or The Matrix itself, this book goes even deeper into those same rabbit holes. This book would also be great for science fiction writers who want to add some unusual plot points or settings to their novels. For me, The Simulated Multiverse is easily worth 5 stars and is a favorite! Thanks to Bayview Books and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Cindee Ketches

    Rizwan Virk tackles some complex, multifaceted ideas and explains them very well; (no simple task). This book is by no means an easy read; but it is a rewarding one. I feel that my mind has been opened up to things that I had only skimmed before. The writing has very good flow. A good 4.5/5 stars for the technical readers among us. My one complaint: there were more references to the author’s previous book (the Simulation Hypothesis) than were necessary. It came across as giving it too much of a Rizwan Virk tackles some complex, multifaceted ideas and explains them very well; (no simple task). This book is by no means an easy read; but it is a rewarding one. I feel that my mind has been opened up to things that I had only skimmed before. The writing has very good flow. A good 4.5/5 stars for the technical readers among us. My one complaint: there were more references to the author’s previous book (the Simulation Hypothesis) than were necessary. It came across as giving it too much of a plug. The book explores scientific areas such as physics, computer science, quantum physics, and quantum computing; with science fiction as inspiration to investigate the idea of the simulated multiverse. There is the “idea that we live in a virtual garden of forking paths”; (a quote from Jorge Luis Borges). Starting with the works of Philip K Dick, there are many movie, story, and TV series references used to help explain different people’s thoughts and approaches on the subject; and just how much these ideas have permeated present day culture. Explanations are very well done. A favourite quote of mine explaining quantum computing: “a qubit is a classical bit that has, for lack of a better analogy, gotten drunk and can’t decide whether its value should be 0 or 1”. Scientific reading rarely makes one laugh out loud, but the author managed this in a few places while still taking the topic very seriously.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Brock Mclaughlin

    Interested in learning more about the Multiverse? Rizwan Virk has created a very accessibly and captivating book all about it. It's geeky, full of sci-fi references and interesting theories and is worth your time if you've ever wondered, are there other versions of you out there in the universe. Interested in learning more about the Multiverse? Rizwan Virk has created a very accessibly and captivating book all about it. It's geeky, full of sci-fi references and interesting theories and is worth your time if you've ever wondered, are there other versions of you out there in the universe.

  4. 5 out of 5

    M. K. French

    Rizvwan Virk is a successful entrepreneur, investor, bestselling author, video game industry pioneer, and indie film producer. Virk currently runs Play Labs @ MIT, leading to a unique experience able to explore the idea of parallel worlds and multiple simulated realities. With the media dealing with multiverses, it's definitely a hot topic right now. Riz had previously spoken on the topic and wrote the book "The Simulation Hypothesis," outlining the hypothesis that our reality is a simulation, r Rizvwan Virk is a successful entrepreneur, investor, bestselling author, video game industry pioneer, and indie film producer. Virk currently runs Play Labs @ MIT, leading to a unique experience able to explore the idea of parallel worlds and multiple simulated realities. With the media dealing with multiverses, it's definitely a hot topic right now. Riz had previously spoken on the topic and wrote the book "The Simulation Hypothesis," outlining the hypothesis that our reality is a simulation, rather like the Matrix. This book goes further than that, outlining at first how he came to research this book, then the theory of the Mandela effect and what the simulation hypothesis is. From there, Virk moves on to the concept of multiverses, quantum worlds as a way to create multiverses, how to build digital worlds, and the algorithms necessary to run the simulations for each digital world. This background draws from philosophy, the famous Platonic shadows in the cave, as well as how philosophers thought about consciousness, to more modern attempts at explaining digital worlds and the possibility that our world is a simulation. It's a theme brought up by multiple people over time and isn't quite the crackpot theory that it first sounds like. At first, I highlighted my copy of the book, and it felt like when I used to read books on string theory for fun. (Yes, I'm a nerd and used to read more scientifically than just sci-fi and fantasy.) This does involve mention of string theory in the section of quantum mechanics, as string theory posits multiple dimensions beyond the four we're used to. (length, width, height, and space-time) These other dimensions exist mathematically and involve geometry and physics beyond easy understanding. This kind of reality is currently involved in cutting-edge computing, and our technology is making great strides in virtual and augmented reality. Many movies for various reasons use virtual backgrounds and sometimes even characters in shots, which can be nearly indistinguishable from reality for the average viewer. What if our reality is the same way? What if we're all in a really complex simulation? Trying to define reality and consciousness is a difficult question and one that occupied many great minds for centuries. New discoveries in math and science force new interpretations to concepts once held to be inviolate, and Virk is doing the same with our sense of reality. This is a fascinating book to read, and it's laid out in easy-to-understand language, even if you didn't read string theory for fun! The concepts build on each other, laying out the framework of the theory and what evidence there is behind it. Even if you don't believe that we're living in a computer simulation, this is a start to understanding the theory and the concepts that are being played around with in the media today.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mateo Jaramillo

    This is a very modern (published 4 months ago) aggregate of existing theories and research on simulation theory and multiverse theory. It's a good book for anyone wanting a pop-culture filled introduction to high concept things like quantum computing and parallel realities. I was especially fascinated by the chapters on the nature of time, retrocausality, and information theory as a fundamental science of the universe. Chapters like quantum physics and computing went way over my head. I felt that This is a very modern (published 4 months ago) aggregate of existing theories and research on simulation theory and multiverse theory. It's a good book for anyone wanting a pop-culture filled introduction to high concept things like quantum computing and parallel realities. I was especially fascinated by the chapters on the nature of time, retrocausality, and information theory as a fundamental science of the universe. Chapters like quantum physics and computing went way over my head. I felt that there could have been way more said in terms of "proof" for the central claim of the book. There could have been more said about how computational complexity might factor into the argument of the book. And any college student can tell you that a paper only becomes stronger when you DEFEND against counterclaims, not ignore them, so I was disappointed by the book in that sense. Not to mention it wastes 3 whole chapters arguing for the existence of The Mandela Effect which is so irrelevant and bizarre when compared to the hard scientific evidence of the later chapters; it's difficult to take seriously. The final chapter leans too heavily on metaphysics and religious aspects to tie in "what it all means". There could have been very good points made about the nature of free will and implications of a Programmer figure, but it instead wastes a lot of time detailing anecdotal near-death-experiences as evidence that there is some control over the simulation.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Unleash The Knowledge

    This book uncovers the future for us all to learn! What in the world is the Multiverse/Metaverse? These words has been passed around like none other in the past 6-9 months. Well, look no further. Rizwan Virk, graduate of MIT and Stanford, successful entrepreneur, bestselling author, and venture capitalist, has put all of his research and learning into this book to get you the knowledge you need! Riz answers the question, “Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their This book uncovers the future for us all to learn! What in the world is the Multiverse/Metaverse? These words has been passed around like none other in the past 6-9 months. Well, look no further. Rizwan Virk, graduate of MIT and Stanford, successful entrepreneur, bestselling author, and venture capitalist, has put all of his research and learning into this book to get you the knowledge you need! Riz answers the question, “Do multiple versions of ourselves exist in parallel universes living out their lives in different timelines?” in his new bestseller. The Simulation Multiverse serves as a major follow up to his bestseller, The Simulation Hypothesis and explores similar topics with a new lens: that of simulation theory. If you are anything like me, language like what I shared above can sound like Chinese. Thankfully, Riz does a great job sharing these innovative changes our world is experiencing in simpler terms and allows anyone to gain a grasp on where our world could potentially be heading. Now is your time to grab this revolutionary book covering an impactful topic that will soon be the world we all live in. Better learn about it now, before it is too late! Here’s to the future!

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Calia

    This book is not for everyone. It is an extensive exploration of the concept of parallel universes and the concepts around multiple worlds. That said, it is not fantasy or science fiction. It is written by an MIT physicist who knows his stuff. I decided to read it as research for my next novel and was not disappointed. As a layman, I was concerned I would not be able to understand the science behind these concepts. I needn’t have worried. Dr. Virk does a terrific job of translating scientific kn This book is not for everyone. It is an extensive exploration of the concept of parallel universes and the concepts around multiple worlds. That said, it is not fantasy or science fiction. It is written by an MIT physicist who knows his stuff. I decided to read it as research for my next novel and was not disappointed. As a layman, I was concerned I would not be able to understand the science behind these concepts. I needn’t have worried. Dr. Virk does a terrific job of translating scientific knowledge into understandable language. And, I came away feeling as though I had learned a lot and enjoyed the process. In the end, whether you believe there are parallel universes is up to you. The book is not conclusive. It merely explores the possible reasons it might be so. And, so, I came away more open to the possibility, if not a true believer.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Juan Trujillo

    If the fundamental constituent of the universe is information, simulations will probably abound. These multiple lines, or non-Marvel-copyrighted multiverse, could explain the collapse of the wave function in quantum mechanics and provide a plausible explanation of an inflationary theory of everything where you and I are currently being drawn to a different lines of our stories based on writing or possibly even reading these lines (sic)! Rizwan Virk does a very good job at making a complex and co If the fundamental constituent of the universe is information, simulations will probably abound. These multiple lines, or non-Marvel-copyrighted multiverse, could explain the collapse of the wave function in quantum mechanics and provide a plausible explanation of an inflationary theory of everything where you and I are currently being drawn to a different lines of our stories based on writing or possibly even reading these lines (sic)! Rizwan Virk does a very good job at making a complex and conjectural hypothesis (almost) plausible. Quote to ponder: "The only simulations that are allowed to run beyond a certain point are the ones where life arises."

  9. 5 out of 5

    linda pilcher

    The Simulated Multiverse studies the idea of parallel universes. It took a while to read this book. I had to look up the meaning of words and concepts to understand the ideas that Rizwan Virk presented. It is an interesting book covering the multiverse concept from different angles. Parts of the book are over the average person’s head as it does go into quantum computing. Yet, it was an informative book. It gives a person food for thought. I have always believed that keeping an open mind is inte The Simulated Multiverse studies the idea of parallel universes. It took a while to read this book. I had to look up the meaning of words and concepts to understand the ideas that Rizwan Virk presented. It is an interesting book covering the multiverse concept from different angles. Parts of the book are over the average person’s head as it does go into quantum computing. Yet, it was an informative book. It gives a person food for thought. I have always believed that keeping an open mind is integral to learning. The book is a challenge to read but worth the time.

  10. 4 out of 5

    S C

    Starts out with a lot of references to TV and movies as the basis. Accessible, sure, but I was thinking, is this MIT guy really going to use pop culture to prove his point? Then it moves into what I consider hard science. I think I got the gist of it, but I still thought it was a little much for the layman. The author, though, kept implying that he was keeping it simple. And then he quickly wraps it all up. Didn't do much of a job of tying it all together, in my opinion. Just not very convincing Starts out with a lot of references to TV and movies as the basis. Accessible, sure, but I was thinking, is this MIT guy really going to use pop culture to prove his point? Then it moves into what I consider hard science. I think I got the gist of it, but I still thought it was a little much for the layman. The author, though, kept implying that he was keeping it simple. And then he quickly wraps it all up. Didn't do much of a job of tying it all together, in my opinion. Just not very convincing overall. Cause if we're living in a simulated multiverse, then my life sucks.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    By definition these types of books are extremely hard to write. Mr. Virk mostly pulls off something interesting with a good mix of synthesized theories, other written works and new ideas. Is this a must read? No. I actually found his first book on this topic more interesting, the simulation hypothesis. One of the highlights here however here was his approachable description of quantum computing 101, one of the best I've read. By definition these types of books are extremely hard to write. Mr. Virk mostly pulls off something interesting with a good mix of synthesized theories, other written works and new ideas. Is this a must read? No. I actually found his first book on this topic more interesting, the simulation hypothesis. One of the highlights here however here was his approachable description of quantum computing 101, one of the best I've read.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Esben Kranc

    The first impression as I was reading the book was relatively wack but as I went along, it was clear that it was well researched and carried the technical knowledge to support its story. I would not take it as a science textbook but it does give a comprehensive overview of multiverse theories, sci-fi depictions of parallel universes, why we might be in a simulated multiverse, and much more. 3.5 / 5.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nick Burchett

    So, interesting read. A LOT of redundant material. A LOT of movie synopsis (not even reviews, basically explaining the movie plots). So good "make you think" items, but for the most part, just a rehash of some theories that have been around for a while and nothing that really just makes it hard to refute the idea of a simulated multiverse. I actually got quite bored about halfway though and struggled to finish. Interesting to read on Kindle Unlimited, but glad I didn't purchase it. So, interesting read. A LOT of redundant material. A LOT of movie synopsis (not even reviews, basically explaining the movie plots). So good "make you think" items, but for the most part, just a rehash of some theories that have been around for a while and nothing that really just makes it hard to refute the idea of a simulated multiverse. I actually got quite bored about halfway though and struggled to finish. Interesting to read on Kindle Unlimited, but glad I didn't purchase it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jayson

    Interesting take on the Mandela Effect and our simulated multiverse. Great follow up to the Simulation Hypothesis and I am looking forward to the other books Riz is currently writing and working on!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Aurora

    Very thorough explanation of computations and theories. Expands upon first book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Gilmour

    Excellent book to stretch the imagination about physics multi-person/multi-verse theory. It helped me to solidify some of my own theories about how God intends to save all created beings (both humans and angels) in simulated universes and versions of ourselves, both while flesh and blood, and even in the afterlife!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adnan Januzaj

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jareth Navratil

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Luebbering

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael Fortner

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ngoc

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  23. 5 out of 5

    coffee

  24. 4 out of 5

    Stanley

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jaime

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michael Stokes

  27. 5 out of 5

    VIPERSNIPE

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Price

  29. 5 out of 5

    jeff king

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mike Riordan

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