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The School that Escaped the Nazis: The True Story of the Schoolteacher Who Defied Hitler

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The extraordinary true story of a courageous school principal who saw the dangers of Nazi Germany and took drastic steps to save those in harm’s way   In 1933, the same year Hitler came to power, schoolteacher Anna Essinger saved her small, progressive school from Nazi Germany. Anna had read Mein Kampf and knew the terrible danger that Hitler’s hate-fueled ideologies posed The extraordinary true story of a courageous school principal who saw the dangers of Nazi Germany and took drastic steps to save those in harm’s way   In 1933, the same year Hitler came to power, schoolteacher Anna Essinger saved her small, progressive school from Nazi Germany. Anna had read Mein Kampf and knew the terrible danger that Hitler’s hate-fueled ideologies posed to her pupils, so she hatched a courageous and daring plan: to smuggle her school to the safety of England.   As the school she established in Kent, England, flourished despite the many challenges it faced, the news from her home country continued to darken. Anna watched as Europe slid toward war, with devastating consequences for the Jewish children left behind. In time, Anna would take in orphans who had given up all hope: the survivors of unimaginable horrors. Anna’s school offered these scarred children the love and security they needed to rebuild their lives.   Featuring moving firsthand testimony from surviving pupils, and drawing from letters, diaries, and present-day interviews, The School that Escaped the Nazis is a dramatic human tale that offers a unique perspective on Nazi persecution and the Holocaust. It is also the story of one woman’s refusal to allow her belief in a better world to be overtaken by hatred and violence.


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The extraordinary true story of a courageous school principal who saw the dangers of Nazi Germany and took drastic steps to save those in harm’s way   In 1933, the same year Hitler came to power, schoolteacher Anna Essinger saved her small, progressive school from Nazi Germany. Anna had read Mein Kampf and knew the terrible danger that Hitler’s hate-fueled ideologies posed The extraordinary true story of a courageous school principal who saw the dangers of Nazi Germany and took drastic steps to save those in harm’s way   In 1933, the same year Hitler came to power, schoolteacher Anna Essinger saved her small, progressive school from Nazi Germany. Anna had read Mein Kampf and knew the terrible danger that Hitler’s hate-fueled ideologies posed to her pupils, so she hatched a courageous and daring plan: to smuggle her school to the safety of England.   As the school she established in Kent, England, flourished despite the many challenges it faced, the news from her home country continued to darken. Anna watched as Europe slid toward war, with devastating consequences for the Jewish children left behind. In time, Anna would take in orphans who had given up all hope: the survivors of unimaginable horrors. Anna’s school offered these scarred children the love and security they needed to rebuild their lives.   Featuring moving firsthand testimony from surviving pupils, and drawing from letters, diaries, and present-day interviews, The School that Escaped the Nazis is a dramatic human tale that offers a unique perspective on Nazi persecution and the Holocaust. It is also the story of one woman’s refusal to allow her belief in a better world to be overtaken by hatred and violence.

30 review for The School that Escaped the Nazis: The True Story of the Schoolteacher Who Defied Hitler

  1. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This is the inspirational story of how Anna Essinger, known as Tante Anna, moved her progressive school from Nazi Germany to Bunce Court in Kent. Anna had trained in America and was herself Jewish. When she was asked to fly a swastika over her school, and realised that her views were too well known, she recognised the danger and hatched a daring plan. She began with seventy children, moving secretly to the safety of the Kent countryside. However, the danger in Europe was increasing and, even in This is the inspirational story of how Anna Essinger, known as Tante Anna, moved her progressive school from Nazi Germany to Bunce Court in Kent. Anna had trained in America and was herself Jewish. When she was asked to fly a swastika over her school, and realised that her views were too well known, she recognised the danger and hatched a daring plan. She began with seventy children, moving secretly to the safety of the Kent countryside. However, the danger in Europe was increasing and, even in Kent, there were issues with illness, school inspectors and later internment. By 1938 the Kindertransports arrived, bringing children torn from their families and way of life to uncertainty. Anna, and her staff, provided safety and security and later had to provide overspill accommodation to take the children fleeing Germany while the borders remained open. This book then follows events through, and after the war, when Anna made room for those children left displaced by war, who had spent their time on the run in Nazi occupied territory or who had survived concentration camps. The story of Anna Essinger is an amazing example of how one person can make such a difference. Although she did not work alone, obviously, she was quick to recognise the danger posed by the rise of Hitler and she responded with practical solutions and strong resolve, that saved the lives of many children and gave them a safe haven, when their lives had fallen apart. This is particularly encouraging and heartening, when Europe again finds itself in a time of conflict and reminds us that individuals can inspire change and save lives. I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via NetGalley, for review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Maine Colonial

    I received a free digital review copy from the publisher, via Netgalley. In 1926, Anna Essinger opened a boarding school in Ulm that was different from the usual German school. It was progressive, not rigidly authoritarian, and its students were mainly Jews. Essinger recognized as soon as the Nazis gained power in 1933 that her school and many of its students and teachers didn’t have a chance under the new regime. She came up with a daring plan. She and a dozen students and teachers made an advan I received a free digital review copy from the publisher, via Netgalley. In 1926, Anna Essinger opened a boarding school in Ulm that was different from the usual German school. It was progressive, not rigidly authoritarian, and its students were mainly Jews. Essinger recognized as soon as the Nazis gained power in 1933 that her school and many of its students and teachers didn’t have a chance under the new regime. She came up with a daring plan. She and a dozen students and teachers made an advance party, traveling to England to make preparations. Just two weeks later, 65 others from the school split into three separate groups, pretended to be going on a school field trip, and all made it to England. Essinger found a manor house in disrepair in Kent, rented it, and she and her teachers and students worked night and day to transform it into what they called the Bunce Court School. It was a tremendous challenge to get enough food and supplies, and just to get enough heat and light to survive. But such was the spirit of Essinger, her teachers and students, that their ambitions extended much further, adding more buildings to the grounds and even building an outdoor amphitheater, planting large vegetable gardens and raising livestock for food and profit. Essinger worked tirelessly to bring attention to the needs of refugee children, working with the Kindertransport sponsors as conditions for Jews in Germany deteriorated and more parents chose to send their children out of Germany. And within the school, she inspired everyone with her high standards, blended with kindness and understanding. The school was challenged by its shoestring budget, the need to assimilate children traumatized by their experiences, local prejudices, the rigid attitudes of British school credentialing authorities, and the upheaval caused by the declaration of war in 1939. The Kent school was requisitioned by the military and with just a few days’ notice, the staff and students had to find a new property and move to what became the Trench Hall school in Shropshire. Cadbury’s description of the school is inspiring, as is her portrayal of the charismatic, empathetic and determined Essinger. Cadbury also depicts the horrors that several students went through before making it to the school. Though these experiences won’t be new to those readers familiar with the Nazi era, it is especially painful to read about how the Nazi persecution affected these children. The Bunce Court School closed in 1948, after Essinger retired from active service with the school, but its alumni visited often before the closure and got together for many years thereafter. Many of these refugee children went on to distinguished careers in all sorts of fields. One of its last students, who survived harrowing wartime conditions in Poland, became a tenured professor with a special study subject of altruism. The mixture of accounts of the children’s persecution by the Nazis with the story of the school makes for a sometimes clunky narrative. Especially in the second half of the book, it feels like Essinger and the school take a back seat. I was left wishing for more detail about her and the school. Still, this is a well-researched and illuminating history of a lesser-known aspect of the Nazi era.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Anna Essinger was an assimilated Jewish, American-educated, German teacher with a heart of gold. She founded a progressive liberal arts school in the aftermath of WWI, but as the Nazi party came to power, she quickly realized Germany was no longer safe. Through various contacts, she was able to relocate her school to an old manor in Kent, England. Bunce Court School would become a haven for refugee children in the years to come as war broke out on the continent. Also known as Tante Anna to her st Anna Essinger was an assimilated Jewish, American-educated, German teacher with a heart of gold. She founded a progressive liberal arts school in the aftermath of WWI, but as the Nazi party came to power, she quickly realized Germany was no longer safe. Through various contacts, she was able to relocate her school to an old manor in Kent, England. Bunce Court School would become a haven for refugee children in the years to come as war broke out on the continent. Also known as Tante Anna to her staff and students, it was her foresight, logistical and organizational acumen, and resourcefulness that would save the lives of hundreds of children in Nazi occupied territories. Her primarily Jewish students left their parents in uncertain circumstances, and many of them would become orphans without knowing that until the war ended. Tante Anna was able to create a safe environment for these children despite a shoestring budget and being enemy aliens in a foreign country. At one point, they were kicked out of Bunce Court because it was on the southeast coast, so they had to start a new school from scratch in the middle of the war. An interesting aspect to the narrative was how Cadbury paralleled the lives of the Bunce Court Students with children who actually survived the Nazi occupation. Kids who lived through ghettos and concentration camps or hid in plain sight were severely traumatized, but through some divine providence ended up at Bunce Court after VE Day. Through Tante Anna’s patience and tender ministering, they were able to overcome debilitating emotional damage and thrived at the school. So many people owe their lives to Tante Anna and hers is an inspirational story. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Deborah Cadbury’s The School That Escaped the Nazis relates the story of Anna Essinger, called Tante Anna, a German Jewish woman who moved her progressive school from Ulm, Germany, to England before the start of the Second World War. For years she spoke out against the rise of Hitler, but the last straw for Anna was the requirement that she fly the Nazi swastika from her school. She planned out her escape, taking many students with her to England to restart her school in a more accepting atmosph Deborah Cadbury’s The School That Escaped the Nazis relates the story of Anna Essinger, called Tante Anna, a German Jewish woman who moved her progressive school from Ulm, Germany, to England before the start of the Second World War. For years she spoke out against the rise of Hitler, but the last straw for Anna was the requirement that she fly the Nazi swastika from her school. She planned out her escape, taking many students with her to England to restart her school in a more accepting atmosphere. From the first seventy students who joined her new venture, to the students who arrived during the Kindertransports in the nine months prior to the war, to the students who joined the school after the war ended, Cadbury presents the picture of a woman who does everything in her power to show these children what life can be outside of Germany and away from Nazism. Cadbury sums up her book well in her conclusion, stating, “[Tante Anna’s] story could easily be lost to us, existing as it does principally in the minds of her elderly former students. She has been overlooked by a history frequently beguiled by male-dominated narratives of power and decision-makes. But Anna’s story arguably stands for the efforts of generations of women in history. She is a symbol of caring and loving; qualities that are just as important in shaping human history though much more easily overlooked.” The School That Escaped the Nazis is exhaustive in its research and puts the story of Anna’s school in the context of the history of the Second World War. One of the sections I found most compelling was the British reaction to having this group of German people in their midst when war began. At times, this book read like fiction in that I found myself not wanting to put it down, but to find out what happened to certain characters. That being said, I did have a few quibbles with this work. First, I think there was too much detail. That seems a strange thing to say, but there were times while reading this when I asked myself what the point was of a certain account. Eventually, I would find out, but sometimes not until one hundred pages later. I also don’t think it was necessary to know the nicknames of every single staff member. I found this to be a bit distracting, although I understand the author was sharing details like this to humanize the characters. Second, the book could have benefited from a better edit. I try not to review a book based on its grammatical errors—every author has missed typos—but there were just too many for me to ignore here. I often found sentences with words mixed up, along with some misspellings throughout (for example was the teacher’s name “Gwynne” or “Gywnne”? I’m not certain, because it was spelled both ways quite often). In the end, these critiques are minor, and I would highly recommend this book to anyone looking to learn about this pioneering woman who saved a group of German Jewish children from the atrocities of Nazi Germany. I received a copy of this book from the publisher via NetGalley for review.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Caren

    The educational philosophy and practices of Anna Essinger, affectionately called “Tante Anna”, were far ahead of her time. In opposition to the Nazi policies of 1933 that had begun to infiltrate her home in Germany, Anna closed her school there and launched a plan to move the institution entirely to England. Her “home-school” in Kent, Bunce Court, would eventually accept “waves of traumatised children from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia…and Poland”, brought over through the Kindertransport pro The educational philosophy and practices of Anna Essinger, affectionately called “Tante Anna”, were far ahead of her time. In opposition to the Nazi policies of 1933 that had begun to infiltrate her home in Germany, Anna closed her school there and launched a plan to move the institution entirely to England. Her “home-school” in Kent, Bunce Court, would eventually accept “waves of traumatised children from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia…and Poland”, brought over through the Kindertransport program, and offer them a safe place where they “could not only recover, but be inspired.” The account of the love, care and hope she provided within the stability of the school, despite the struggles of the years of war and horror that most of her Jewish students had suffered, was presented with meticulous detail and from the perspective of the children who were protected by this incredible woman. Cadbury featured contributions by many of those whose lives had been saved by Essinger, traumatised children who had grown to believe once again that there was a place for them in the world that had robbed them of their families. Cadbury set the success and struggle of Essinger’s school against the timeline of the war years, providing its historical context, and placing within it the horror of what some of the children and their families had experienced – in the ghettos, in the camps, in the killing fields. This allowed the reader to view the intensity of trauma within the refugees and appreciate the dedication of Essinger and her staff in helping them to heal and to restore their faith in humanity. Her educational practices were progressive and humanistic, allowing the students to develop their identities within a safe environment that encouraged individuality and a partnership in the running of the school. Because the perspective given was that of the students, Cadbury’s use of direct quotations and source material from them as they remembered their time before the war and during their stay at Bunce Court, gave the account its intensity as we lived through their trauma with them, as they reflected on the impact of their years under Essinger’s astute guidance and boundless love. Her “school in exile…provided a unique experience in progressive education, where with minimal resources, children who had experienced the very worse of humanity were given a profound appreciation of the beauty and magnitude of human achievements.”

  6. 5 out of 5

    Steven Baumann

    Simply put, I enjoyed this book and think it will be interesting for people with a great deal of knowledge on the Holocaust and people who need more context. Cadbury does a good job of appealing to wide audiences by offering plenty of context and background on World War II, while also artfully delivering several lesser-known Holocaust biographies. The writing is clear and precise and the people and stories are compelling and well-researched. By focusing on a school and an imperfect woman who sav Simply put, I enjoyed this book and think it will be interesting for people with a great deal of knowledge on the Holocaust and people who need more context. Cadbury does a good job of appealing to wide audiences by offering plenty of context and background on World War II, while also artfully delivering several lesser-known Holocaust biographies. The writing is clear and precise and the people and stories are compelling and well-researched. By focusing on a school and an imperfect woman who saved and shaped many lives, Cadbury successfully changes the focus of a tragic event from high politics to every day living. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Rae Nason

    The School that Escaped the Nazis is the truly remarkable story of Anna Essinger, the founder and headmistress of a unique boarding school in southern Germany. When she read Mein Kampf during Hitler's rise to power and the rise of Naziism, she immediately knew that his world view was dangerous and hateful and that many of her pupils would be in grave danger. She decided to move her school and her pupils out of harm's way and establish a safe haven from the erupting violence and hate and finds a The School that Escaped the Nazis is the truly remarkable story of Anna Essinger, the founder and headmistress of a unique boarding school in southern Germany. When she read Mein Kampf during Hitler's rise to power and the rise of Naziism, she immediately knew that his world view was dangerous and hateful and that many of her pupils would be in grave danger. She decided to move her school and her pupils out of harm's way and establish a safe haven from the erupting violence and hate and finds a a location in Kent, England, As the years up to World War 2 pass, more and more children come from all over Europe to find a safe haven with Anna - many of them Jewish. The tale of this remarkable woman is told from first person accounts of the experiences of children that escaped to her unique school and the experiences and reflections they shared in the wake of such a traumatic time. It took me a lot longer than usual to read this book. The content was so heavy and emotional that I couldn't read it for long periods of time, But it really was a wonderful story that I feel that many more people need to know. Anna's story is one of hard work, ingenuity, and most importantly, of hope. I knew little of the Kindertransports before reading this book and nothing of the woman who nearly single-handedly organized them. Miss Anna really is a one-of-a-kind human and the world was really a much better place with her in it and humanity suffered a huge loss with her passing. Mankind needs more people like Anna. Learning of her extraordinary life through the stories of her pupils and the people she helped save was another high point in reading this book. Learning of their individual stories just enriched the reading experience. Even though there was much loss and heartache and pain, the perseverance and love and kindness leave the heart aching, but full. Thank you to NetGalley and Public Affairs Publishing for providing me with a digital copy for review. The opinions expressed here are my own and do not reflect those of the author or publisher.

  8. 4 out of 5

    montogma25

    I would first like to thank Netgalley for granting me permission to read an early access copy of the book The School that Escaped the Nazi's by Deborah Cadbury. The School that Escaped the Nazis is a Historical Non-Fiction book about a Jewish Teacher in Germany named Anna Essinger (Tanta Anna) who decides to defy Hitler and his Nazi Ideology by moving her school and her students to another country where the students could be free from oppression and allowed to focus on their education. I was sur I would first like to thank Netgalley for granting me permission to read an early access copy of the book The School that Escaped the Nazi's by Deborah Cadbury. The School that Escaped the Nazis is a Historical Non-Fiction book about a Jewish Teacher in Germany named Anna Essinger (Tanta Anna) who decides to defy Hitler and his Nazi Ideology by moving her school and her students to another country where the students could be free from oppression and allowed to focus on their education. I was surprised by how early her escape was in the book. When I first read the description of the book I thought that the escape would be taking place later on., However, Anna was was every smart and could see what the was happening to her country and realized that from there it could only get worse and now was the time to leave. The way that she ran her school was so interesting. It makes me wonder why there are not more schools like Bunce Court in existence. Especially considering the success rate that her students had after they left the school. The Kinder-transports really did save many children's lives. I'm surprised that there have not been a lot movies or television series about them. It's a miracle how many children were saved on those transports. Overall, the book did an excellent job detailing the students and the teachers life at the school and as refugees. This book sis a must read for History lovers and for people who are going into education to become teachers. A lot can be learned from how Tanta Ann taught in her school. I would give this book a five out of five stars.

  9. 4 out of 5

    BOOKarina (Karina)

    Disclaimer: I received an ARC of this book, my thoughts are my own. It is always hard to review a book about a true story. One because the touching moments in the novel are real, two because it is someone's life, real accounts and it is impossible to feel nothing but love and impossible to be left un-impressed by a life such as the one Anna Essinger or Tante Anna lived. This book was moving, it was lovely to learn about the life of a women who fought for what is right in the mist of everything happ Disclaimer: I received an ARC of this book, my thoughts are my own. It is always hard to review a book about a true story. One because the touching moments in the novel are real, two because it is someone's life, real accounts and it is impossible to feel nothing but love and impossible to be left un-impressed by a life such as the one Anna Essinger or Tante Anna lived. This book was moving, it was lovely to learn about the life of a women who fought for what is right in the mist of everything happening around her. She's a teacher at heart, with the will to save all those who learned from her. We learn how she opened a school in England in the middle of the war and the atrocities that were happening saving the life of hundred of children, many who were Jewish. Those children who left their parents behind during the escape she planned, the sacrifices all these people made to save their child or the children and how humanity can come together when someone is brave enough to do something. When someone one has so much compassion as Anna did, she couldn't help but want to save them all, speak on their behalf, she was never hiding how she was against the rise of Hitler, publicly speaking about it and when she saw they would have to have the Nazi's flag in school she knew this was too big for her to change and planned to save all the children she could. I really enjoyed this book, while not an easy read it is an important one in my opinion. A story that will stay in my heart. Bookarina.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    I stayed up half the night since this book compelled me to finish it, and it WAS worth my bleary eyes this morning. What one woman dreamed of affected hundreds of others in one of the worst time's in this world's history, prior to and after WWII. She had a dream and moved heaven and earth---literally--to start a school in England in the 30's, filling it with Jewish students from the school she had operated in Germany, and seeing the horrors emerging in her country after Hitler came to power and I stayed up half the night since this book compelled me to finish it, and it WAS worth my bleary eyes this morning. What one woman dreamed of affected hundreds of others in one of the worst time's in this world's history, prior to and after WWII. She had a dream and moved heaven and earth---literally--to start a school in England in the 30's, filling it with Jewish students from the school she had operated in Germany, and seeing the horrors emerging in her country after Hitler came to power and started his insane vision of persecuting Jews and any others who didn't conform to his vision of Germany. This teacher, who started a school in a foreign country with very little money or resources, but infinite wisdom, empathy, and sheer guts, saved the children she brought with her, escaping from Germany with them at great personal risk, and built a place that would not only shelter them, but teach, inspire, and offer them hope that the whole world was not like Germany in the 30's and 40's. This teacher was short-sighted to the point of blindness after the war, worked her wonders, and though she never married and had children of her own, the boys and girls in her school WERE hers. What she accomplished was not accomplished completely on her own, as she had a "family" of dedicated teachers and staff who shared her dream, but she was the glue that held them together, and altogether, an inspiring woman who proved that one person CAN make a difference. An ARC of this book was provided to me by NetGalley, but the opinions expressed are my own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Karen Ross

    Several years ago i read a book about the British Fascists during WW11 in ths book it referenced several times a school 'for Germans' rather disparagingly. I realise now this was Bunce Court. IT shows clearly how the perspective of the writer shapes what you are 'told'. This book was very different to what I expected. Whilst it tells the story of extraodinary Anna Essinger whose whole life was dedicated to young people. It is the story of all of Europe and plight of the Jewish community and most Several years ago i read a book about the British Fascists during WW11 in ths book it referenced several times a school 'for Germans' rather disparagingly. I realise now this was Bunce Court. IT shows clearly how the perspective of the writer shapes what you are 'told'. This book was very different to what I expected. Whilst it tells the story of extraodinary Anna Essinger whose whole life was dedicated to young people. It is the story of all of Europe and plight of the Jewish community and most of all the children. The story of Essinger is nit just the children she rescued, it is one of a way of living and educating that provides hope, love, support, and and shelter. The Epliloge concluding the book could be written for 2022, "Anna had a far sighted vision, and nothng , not even Hitler, ws=as going to get in her way. As she grappled with the destructive forces of a caraclysmic epoch and her school becam a mirror of the Eurpoean catastrophes, she herself had to find reserves of strengthbeyond the ordinary. Not seeking anyhing for herself, she tried to show her pupils a path that would lead them away from pain and hatred towards healing love. Without subscribing to the Jewish faith, she fulfilled in her own unique way the old Hebrew saying, 'Trikkun Haolam' - mend the world" A book that gives you hope and belief, makes us ask the question why is mankind so inhuman and why do we never learn the lessons history provides us with?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    Very good non-fiction book that is aptly named, The School that Escaped the Nazis. This book really gives you a different perspective from most books about WWII. The students and staff really did what they needed to do to make their world a better place. It must have been terribly confusing to be a student and to be receiving cryptic messages from your family and then to never hear from them. Definitely worth reading and I'm glad that NetGalley approved my request for the advance read copy in exc Very good non-fiction book that is aptly named, The School that Escaped the Nazis. This book really gives you a different perspective from most books about WWII. The students and staff really did what they needed to do to make their world a better place. It must have been terribly confusing to be a student and to be receiving cryptic messages from your family and then to never hear from them. Definitely worth reading and I'm glad that NetGalley approved my request for the advance read copy in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to the author Deborah Cadbury and to the publisher PublicAffairs. Publication date is July 12, 2022.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chris Wares

    Fascinating story about a school that relocated to England to escape the Nazis and then became home to hundreds of refugee children. The headmistress, Tante Anna, provided not only education but a roof over their heads and psychological and emotional welfare for her charges. I believe Anni Bergman, a cousin of my grandpa, and her young daughter Hanna, stayed at the school during the winter of 1939-1940. Anni had studied at the University of Vienna and probably joined the teaching staff for a few Fascinating story about a school that relocated to England to escape the Nazis and then became home to hundreds of refugee children. The headmistress, Tante Anna, provided not only education but a roof over their heads and psychological and emotional welfare for her charges. I believe Anni Bergman, a cousin of my grandpa, and her young daughter Hanna, stayed at the school during the winter of 1939-1940. Anni had studied at the University of Vienna and probably joined the teaching staff for a few months.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Farrells Bookshop

    This is a book that highlights the worst in humanity. Anna Essinger predicted disaster in 1933 when Hitler came to power and did everything she could to get her school and it's students out of Germany. The result, a book that is horrifying and unbelievable. It shows what humans are capable of, good and bad. Read by Emily This is a book that highlights the worst in humanity. Anna Essinger predicted disaster in 1933 when Hitler came to power and did everything she could to get her school and it's students out of Germany. The result, a book that is horrifying and unbelievable. It shows what humans are capable of, good and bad. Read by Emily

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brendan Dowd

    Full review coming soon

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    A very moving account of the Holocaust and how it affected those people featured in the book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  19. 5 out of 5

    Fontaine Woods

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

  21. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Barker

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  23. 5 out of 5

    Pat

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lira

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lloma Greuter

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nardine Johnson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marilynrobbins

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Speight

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mrs T Dalton

  30. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Steinmetz

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