Hot Best Seller

Thunderous

Availability: Ready to download

If Aiyana hears one more traditional Lakota story, she’ll scream! More interested in her social media presence than her Native American heritage, Aiyana is shocked when she suddenly finds herself in a magical world-with no cell coverage! Pursued by the trickster Raven, Aiyana struggles to get back home, but is helped by friends and allies she meets along the way. Her danger If Aiyana hears one more traditional Lakota story, she’ll scream! More interested in her social media presence than her Native American heritage, Aiyana is shocked when she suddenly finds herself in a magical world-with no cell coverage! Pursued by the trickster Raven, Aiyana struggles to get back home, but is helped by friends and allies she meets along the way. Her dangerous journey through the Spirit World tests her fortitude and challenges her to embrace her Lakota heritage. But will it be enough to defeat the cruel and powerful Raven?


Compare

If Aiyana hears one more traditional Lakota story, she’ll scream! More interested in her social media presence than her Native American heritage, Aiyana is shocked when she suddenly finds herself in a magical world-with no cell coverage! Pursued by the trickster Raven, Aiyana struggles to get back home, but is helped by friends and allies she meets along the way. Her danger If Aiyana hears one more traditional Lakota story, she’ll scream! More interested in her social media presence than her Native American heritage, Aiyana is shocked when she suddenly finds herself in a magical world-with no cell coverage! Pursued by the trickster Raven, Aiyana struggles to get back home, but is helped by friends and allies she meets along the way. Her dangerous journey through the Spirit World tests her fortitude and challenges her to embrace her Lakota heritage. But will it be enough to defeat the cruel and powerful Raven?

30 review for Thunderous

  1. 5 out of 5

    mel

    Aiyana is a native American teen girl who wants to hang out with popular girls. She spends all her time on the phone, and she’s not nice to her relatives because they’re not cool. When popular girls challenge her to climb on the top of the tower to take a selfie, she falls and wakes in another world. She is about to go on an extraordinary journey in a magical world. At the back, there is a glossary of some of the words. I would appreciate it if I knew that during my reading. Illustrations are mos Aiyana is a native American teen girl who wants to hang out with popular girls. She spends all her time on the phone, and she’s not nice to her relatives because they’re not cool. When popular girls challenge her to climb on the top of the tower to take a selfie, she falls and wakes in another world. She is about to go on an extraordinary journey in a magical world. At the back, there is a glossary of some of the words. I would appreciate it if I knew that during my reading. Illustrations are mostly very good and colorful. Sometimes I didn’t like the style so much. Thunderous is a nice middle-grade graphic novel about family ties and the importance of our heritage. Thanks to Dynamite Entertainment for the ARC and this opportunity! This is a voluntary review, and all opinions are my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    REMEMBER UKRAINE NOW ReadingReindeer

    A very thought-provoking children's story for upper Elementary and Middle Grade readers which packs a plethora of lessons and is a great read to celebrate National Indigenous Month in June! Two aspects of Indigenous history are represented, as two cousins who move from the reservation to a city learn to adapt. One cleaves to tradition and the elders' storytelling, while the other turns her back on the "past." The outworking of the plot I found tremendously gratifying. The illustrations are simpl A very thought-provoking children's story for upper Elementary and Middle Grade readers which packs a plethora of lessons and is a great read to celebrate National Indigenous Month in June! Two aspects of Indigenous history are represented, as two cousins who move from the reservation to a city learn to adapt. One cleaves to tradition and the elders' storytelling, while the other turns her back on the "past." The outworking of the plot I found tremendously gratifying. The illustrations are simple and easily understood. Highly recommended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Maxine

    Aiyana, a young Lakota girl, has recently moved off her Reserve with her cousin and in with her grandmother. Her grandmother wants to teach them the stories of the Lakota people but Aiyana just wants to fit in with the popular girls at her new school. While on a school trip, three of the girls she has been trying to impress dare her to climb a high bluff and take a selfie just as a storm begins. Just as she reaches the top, she is swept off and when she awakes, she is in a different land where n Aiyana, a young Lakota girl, has recently moved off her Reserve with her cousin and in with her grandmother. Her grandmother wants to teach them the stories of the Lakota people but Aiyana just wants to fit in with the popular girls at her new school. While on a school trip, three of the girls she has been trying to impress dare her to climb a high bluff and take a selfie just as a storm begins. Just as she reaches the top, she is swept off and when she awakes, she is in a different land where nothing is familiar and she doesn't know how to get home. Fortunately, or perhaps not, trickster Raven tells her it is possible for her to go back but only if she can complete four tasks. It will take all her memories of her grandmother's stories as well as a lot of help from some friends she meets on her way to complete Raven's challenges to find her way home. Thunderous is a graphic novel written by M.L. Smoker and Natalie Peeterse. The story is well-written and with plenty of adventure to keep a young reader, or an old one, entertained. But it also provides some important lessons about family and heritage as well as the difficulties facing young Indigenous children who leave the Reserve for school - does fitting in to this new culture mean leaving behind your past and all the cultural riches it provides. The art is by Dale Ray Deforest and it is gorgeous. Done in full vibrant colours, it is a perfect complement to the story. Thunderous is aimed at a young audience between 8 and 12 but I would suggest younger children and even those way past the target audience would enjoy it. I not only recommend it highly but would suggest it should be available in all school libraries and not just in the US. Thanks to Edelweiss+ and Dynamite Entertainment for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review

  4. 4 out of 5

    David

    This is a graphic novel for a junior high school audience. The art is okay, but nothing special for a children's comic. It was created by Native American artists and writers, and I backed it on Indiegogo because I was interested in the Native American mythology. The story is very typical "Tween girl trying to fit in rediscovers her roots" + a standard portal fantasy. Aiyana is a Lakota girl whose family just moved off the rez to the local big city. She wants to be popular and fit in with the cool This is a graphic novel for a junior high school audience. The art is okay, but nothing special for a children's comic. It was created by Native American artists and writers, and I backed it on Indiegogo because I was interested in the Native American mythology. The story is very typical "Tween girl trying to fit in rediscovers her roots" + a standard portal fantasy. Aiyana is a Lakota girl whose family just moved off the rez to the local big city. She wants to be popular and fit in with the cool (non-Indian) kids. Her grandmother keeps telling her Lakota stories, which she's sick of because grandma is old and doesn't know anything. On a field trip, Aiyana winds up being thrown into the Lakota spirit world, where she meets the trickster Raven, who tells her four offerings she must bring to Inktomi, the Spider, if she wants to go home. Aiyana foolishly makes a deal with Raven before she knows the terms (maybe if she'd listened to grandma she'd have known not to do that) which puts her quest on a timer. She travels around meeting other talking animals, eventually reaches Inktomi, has a confrontation with Raven, and goes home, where of course she has a new appreciation for her heritage and all those old stories, goes home to hug grandma, the end. For what it was, it was all right, but definitely suitable for younger readers.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carol Flores

    This is the story of a teenager who is new in town and wants to fit in with the kids at school. She’s being a bit selfish and mean towards people who are just trying to show respect for the place they all came from. But she doesn’t realize this until she’s transported to the world which was built around the tales she heard from since she was a little girl. In these few pages we see those tales featuring mystical animals come to life and teach her that our ancestor’s stories are important not onl This is the story of a teenager who is new in town and wants to fit in with the kids at school. She’s being a bit selfish and mean towards people who are just trying to show respect for the place they all came from. But she doesn’t realize this until she’s transported to the world which was built around the tales she heard from since she was a little girl. In these few pages we see those tales featuring mystical animals come to life and teach her that our ancestor’s stories are important not only because they teach us how to be better but because their stories keep them alive in our hearts. For me it was a light-hearted reading and I would totally recommend it to kids and younger teenagers since it’s a quick read. I received an e-book ARC in exchange for an honest review via Diamond Comic Distributors.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kit

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I’m going to lead with the caveat that the Kindle ARC download had some formatting issues that made it difficult to track some of the images to the correct text. That said- this is a beautiful book that dives into stories that I think we need more of. On a field trip to Black Elk Peak Aiyana is swept into the Spirit World where she gets to experience first hand the stories that have been handed down from her grandmother. Aiyana has struggled to find a balance between life in Colorado and the trad I’m going to lead with the caveat that the Kindle ARC download had some formatting issues that made it difficult to track some of the images to the correct text. That said- this is a beautiful book that dives into stories that I think we need more of. On a field trip to Black Elk Peak Aiyana is swept into the Spirit World where she gets to experience first hand the stories that have been handed down from her grandmother. Aiyana has struggled to find a balance between life in Colorado and the traditional teachings of the Lakota. Her experience in the Spirit World gives Aiyana touchstone she needs to feel connected. This story hits for me on two major fronts. One is specific to the story. It’s one that not many people have access to. For a middle school librarian, a book like this creates an opportunity for students to learn about a culture that isn’t their own, but that is integral to the history of the United States. Many only learn about Native American Nations in the context of history, and forget that these stories belong to Nations that exist today. Secondly, and this is more broad, there are a ton of students who can relate to not feeling connected to the culture their parents or families grew up with. So many have to find that balance between tradition and their current day to day lives and this story does a great job exploring that in a quick and accessible way. On top of all that the art is beautiful and helps to tie the story together visually. I will definitely be adding this one to our library collection next year.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Madison

    I am always on the lookout for new graphic novels for my school library and Thunderous is going to be a must-buy.  A beautiful story of adventure and identity, Thunderous is the story of Aiyana. She just wants to fit in at school, get followers online and be liked. She'd rather not listen to yet another Lakota story from her grandmother or her dorky cousin. When on a school field trip, three girls who Aiyana wants desperately to impress, deal Aiyana to climb on top of a building in a storm, Aiyan I am always on the lookout for new graphic novels for my school library and Thunderous is going to be a must-buy.  A beautiful story of adventure and identity, Thunderous is the story of Aiyana. She just wants to fit in at school, get followers online and be liked. She'd rather not listen to yet another Lakota story from her grandmother or her dorky cousin. When on a school field trip, three girls who Aiyana wants desperately to impress, deal Aiyana to climb on top of a building in a storm, Aiyana finds herself accidentally plunged into a strange world where animals talk and she must complete four challenges if she is to be allowed to return home.  The artwork is gorgeous. Some pages have sequences of panels done in a tight monochromatic palette of incredibly bright colours, from vibrant blues to neon pinks. These colours are used to highlight different passages of Aiyana's journey and are an excellent way to bring night scenes to life. Other panels use a full range of colours.  Thunderous is both a story of Lakota stories and Native American heritage and a story of family and accepting your identity. On her journey, Aiyana learns compassion, to stand up against those who are cunning and wish her harm, and the importance of family. It is a story of growth and I loved watching Aiyana step into and start to appreciate her heritage. Thunderous is also a story of adventure, epic landscapes and beautiful animals who offer Aiyana guidance, strength and support.  I adored this beautiful graphic novel and it belongs on all school library shelves - and not just those in the USA. The publishers provided an advanced readers copy of this book for reviewing purposes. All opinions are my own.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Olivia Moe

    M.L. Smoker and Natalie Peeterese, better known for their award winning poetry, have collaborated on the next graphic novel to take both library and personal bookshelves by storm: "Thunderous". Lakota lore, with a dash of "The Wizard of Oz", Aiyana's experience with code-switching and assimilation with her peers at a new school off the reservation is one that so billions have had to endure, and to various degrees continue to endure. It is an internal pain that many can only begin to imagine, give M.L. Smoker and Natalie Peeterese, better known for their award winning poetry, have collaborated on the next graphic novel to take both library and personal bookshelves by storm: "Thunderous". Lakota lore, with a dash of "The Wizard of Oz", Aiyana's experience with code-switching and assimilation with her peers at a new school off the reservation is one that so billions have had to endure, and to various degrees continue to endure. It is an internal pain that many can only begin to imagine, given their privilege. But not all is lost for Aiyana, nor her loved ones both in this world and the one she enters when a field trip goes wrong. There will be those who, like myself, were not engrossed due to the illustrations. It was the story, and the storytelling, that won my heart and immediately caused me to add this GN to the list of contenders for the Graphic Novel Book Club I am leading this summer. The range of topics one could discuss are endless. One minute you could discuss 'identity' and 'mythology', and the next 'pros and cons of technology'. Regardless of the size of your group, or the time frame to read a selection, this is the perfect GN to work with. Along with the names of Smoker and Peeterse's other works, I shared this GN with the head of the children's department at my library, and she was instantly on board with ordering copies for our collection. I hope this is not the last time we see Smoker and Peeterse in the GN section, and that Aiyana's advice comes true: more graphic novels and comics about the Indigenous communities and cultures of our world.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Far too unsubtle for its own good, this young comic looks at a Lakota girl, belligerently going about her day and school life not caring about her ancestry – and insisting that the old stories of her grandparents and suchlike have no worth in the current day. Wanting to fit in, she goes off-limits on a school trip to a heritage site – and gets zapped into the world of Lakota lore, full of all the vibrant characters – and sick-making vibrant colour schemes – of the heritage she denies. In a world Far too unsubtle for its own good, this young comic looks at a Lakota girl, belligerently going about her day and school life not caring about her ancestry – and insisting that the old stories of her grandparents and suchlike have no worth in the current day. Wanting to fit in, she goes off-limits on a school trip to a heritage site – and gets zapped into the world of Lakota lore, full of all the vibrant characters – and sick-making vibrant colour schemes – of the heritage she denies. In a world where this should have been a really successful flashback to legendary animal characters, it's a nuance-free cartoonish approach, with a heroine that's not really easy to like, and something that really deserved to be less broad and more finely crafted.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I wish the book would have had information about the author. I enjoyed it, but it wasn't my favorite. I am, however, looking forward to recommending it to some of our Lakota library customers! I think they'll love it. I wish the book would have had information about the author. I enjoyed it, but it wasn't my favorite. I am, however, looking forward to recommending it to some of our Lakota library customers! I think they'll love it.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Aurora

    The art was lackluster, with some of the coloring choices being extremely odd. The story had too much of a feeling of “cranky old person writing about kids these days” for me to ever enjoy it. Aiyana never felt like a real person, just a vehicle for the creators to get out their proselytizing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Meliss

    Well executed, simple, heartwarming graphic novel!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Claire

  14. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

  15. 4 out of 5

    Michael Logan

  16. 4 out of 5

    Molly

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

  18. 4 out of 5

    susen s

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nicolette

  20. 5 out of 5

    jo

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Chris Mills

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sally

  24. 4 out of 5

    Deanna

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah T.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kyle!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Hillis

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rainier

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...