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The Manhattan Girls: A Novel of Dorothy Parker and Her Friends

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It's a 1920s version of Sex and the City, as Dorothy Parker--one of the wittiest women who ever wielded a pen--and her three friends navigate life, love, and careers in New York City. Perfect for fans of Fiona Davis, Beatriz Williams, and Renée Rosen. NEW YORK CITY 1921: The war is over, fashions are daring, and bootleg liquor is abundant. Here four extraordinary women form It's a 1920s version of Sex and the City, as Dorothy Parker--one of the wittiest women who ever wielded a pen--and her three friends navigate life, love, and careers in New York City. Perfect for fans of Fiona Davis, Beatriz Williams, and Renée Rosen. NEW YORK CITY 1921: The war is over, fashions are daring, and bootleg liquor is abundant. Here four extraordinary women form a bridge group that grows into a firm friendship. Dorothy Parker: renowned wit, member of the Algonquin Round Table, and more fragile than she seems. Jane Grant: first female reporter for the New York Times, and determined to launch a new magazine she calls The New Yorker. Winifred Lenihan: beautiful and talented Broadway actress, a casting-couch target. And Peggy Leech: magazine assistant by day, brilliant novelist by night. Their romances flourish and falter while their goals sometimes seem impossible to reach and their friendship deepens against the backdrop of turbulent New York City, where new speakeasies open and close, jazz music flows through the air, and bathtub gin fills their glasses. They gossip, they comfort each other, and they offer support through the setbacks. But their biggest challenge is keeping their dear friend Dottie safe from herself. In this brilliant new novel from the bestselling and acclaimed author of Jackie and Maria and The Secret Wife, readers will fall right into Jazz Age New York and into the inner lives of these groundbreaking, influential women.


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It's a 1920s version of Sex and the City, as Dorothy Parker--one of the wittiest women who ever wielded a pen--and her three friends navigate life, love, and careers in New York City. Perfect for fans of Fiona Davis, Beatriz Williams, and Renée Rosen. NEW YORK CITY 1921: The war is over, fashions are daring, and bootleg liquor is abundant. Here four extraordinary women form It's a 1920s version of Sex and the City, as Dorothy Parker--one of the wittiest women who ever wielded a pen--and her three friends navigate life, love, and careers in New York City. Perfect for fans of Fiona Davis, Beatriz Williams, and Renée Rosen. NEW YORK CITY 1921: The war is over, fashions are daring, and bootleg liquor is abundant. Here four extraordinary women form a bridge group that grows into a firm friendship. Dorothy Parker: renowned wit, member of the Algonquin Round Table, and more fragile than she seems. Jane Grant: first female reporter for the New York Times, and determined to launch a new magazine she calls The New Yorker. Winifred Lenihan: beautiful and talented Broadway actress, a casting-couch target. And Peggy Leech: magazine assistant by day, brilliant novelist by night. Their romances flourish and falter while their goals sometimes seem impossible to reach and their friendship deepens against the backdrop of turbulent New York City, where new speakeasies open and close, jazz music flows through the air, and bathtub gin fills their glasses. They gossip, they comfort each other, and they offer support through the setbacks. But their biggest challenge is keeping their dear friend Dottie safe from herself. In this brilliant new novel from the bestselling and acclaimed author of Jackie and Maria and The Secret Wife, readers will fall right into Jazz Age New York and into the inner lives of these groundbreaking, influential women.

30 review for The Manhattan Girls: A Novel of Dorothy Parker and Her Friends

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nina

    Sometimes we all need to escape into a book. It’s a plus when you also have the possibility to go back in time and get acquainted with people you hadn’t heard about before. Gill Pauls latest novel made that happen! I was transported to the 1920’s in New York, and met four interesting woman who belonged to the Algonquin Round table. We get acquainted with Jane Grant, first female reporter for The New York Times, who is determined to launch a new magazine. The Broadway actress Winifred Lenihan, be Sometimes we all need to escape into a book. It’s a plus when you also have the possibility to go back in time and get acquainted with people you hadn’t heard about before. Gill Pauls latest novel made that happen! I was transported to the 1920’s in New York, and met four interesting woman who belonged to the Algonquin Round table. We get acquainted with Jane Grant, first female reporter for The New York Times, who is determined to launch a new magazine. The Broadway actress Winifred Lenihan, beautiful, talented, and a casting-couch target. And Peggy Leech, magazine assistant by day, brilliant novelist by night. Dorothy Parker, poet and famous for her wit. They gossip, they comfort each other, they offer support through the setbacks. But their biggest challenge is keeping their dear friend Dottie safe from herself. I thoroughly enjoyed myself when reading this novel, and even stopped to look at pictures from the characters so that I really felt connected to them. The four woman came alive and felt real to me. Paul’s writing style is as always easy to follow. I never felt bored or disappointed by the book. The extra drama with Dottie made the book even more interesting, and I’m impressed by Paul’s ability to create a life based on the few facts she found when researching the book. I think he must have captured how it was to live in the 1920’s, the sexism seemed very real and I can imagine that it must have been hard to navigate in a culture where you had to just take men treating women badly (off course there are also descriptions of different men too). I’m glad I got my escape and will continue to look for it in her next books! Thanks to Avon books and netgally for this arc!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karren Sandercock

    New York City in 1921, America women are wearing flapper dresses, having their hair cut into shingle bobs, dancing to jazz music, and drinking hooch in speakeasies and during probation. Four friends decide to start a bridge club and have regular catch ups, Dorothy, Jane, Winifred, Peggy, and they will be nicknamed The Manhattan Girls. Dorothy Parker is a poet, a member of the Algonquin Round Table, when her marriage to Eddie ends, and she struggles with her mental health. Jane Grant is the first New York City in 1921, America women are wearing flapper dresses, having their hair cut into shingle bobs, dancing to jazz music, and drinking hooch in speakeasies and during probation. Four friends decide to start a bridge club and have regular catch ups, Dorothy, Jane, Winifred, Peggy, and they will be nicknamed The Manhattan Girls. Dorothy Parker is a poet, a member of the Algonquin Round Table, when her marriage to Eddie ends, and she struggles with her mental health. Jane Grant is the first female reporter for the New York Times, she’s determined to launch her own magazine, and her husband Howard has been keeping secrets from her. Winifred Lenihan is a beautiful actress, after growing up in a large Irish Catholic family, she likes her privacy, and has to constantly fight off seedy men trying to hit on her. Peggy Leech is a magazine assistant, she’s busy writing a novel, and her mother wonders if she will ever get married? An unlikely group of friends, who are there for each other through thick and thin. They help each other and give advice, from what to wear to an important business meeting or on a hot date, when a relationship breaks down, on opening nights and book releases, making sure Dottie eats, and stopping her from hurting herself. I received a copy of The Manhattan Girls by Gill Paul from NetGalley and Avon Books UK in exchange for an honest review. A well written and interesting novel about the challenges women faced during the 1920’s in New York City and in a male dominated world. The women had to juggle their careers and life at home, and fight to be respected at work. The story follows the ups and downs of their romantic relationships, friendships with each other, and their vulnerabilities. Five stars from me, a brilliant narrative about four unique and real women, I enjoyed every single page, and it’s my favorite book by Gill Paul.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mona

    Dorothy Parker and Manhattan: A Must Read for Me When I saw this book on NetGalley, I knew I had to read it. As a teenager, I discovered the humorous writings of Dorothy Parker, and became her admirer (and perhaps sensed a kindred spirit in her). I'm a lifelong New Yorker. I'm familiar with many of the venues in the book (the Algonquin Hotel, etc.), and many of the writers, artists, and actors featured in the book. Also, I'm fascinated by New York City History. So there was no doubt that an historic Dorothy Parker and Manhattan: A Must Read for Me When I saw this book on NetGalley, I knew I had to read it. As a teenager, I discovered the humorous writings of Dorothy Parker, and became her admirer (and perhaps sensed a kindred spirit in her). I'm a lifelong New Yorker. I'm familiar with many of the venues in the book (the Algonquin Hotel, etc.), and many of the writers, artists, and actors featured in the book. Also, I'm fascinated by New York City History. So there was no doubt that an historical novel about Dorothy Parker and her circle was one I had to read. A Different Kind of Book that Took a While to Get Into I've been reading so much science fiction, fantasy, and even historical adventure stories like The Lymond Chronicles that I've gotten used to a fast paced story with lots of action, battles, chase scenes, plot twists, violence, cliff hangers, etc. Also, there are often advanced AIs, computer games, space ships, magic, strange creatures, etc. This book had none of those things. The story went at a much slower pace than what I've normally been reading. So that took a bit of getting used to. But once I got into it, I got really wrapped up in the story. This is primarily a character study and the characters are really engaging. The Algonquin Round Table in the Roaring Twenties The book features the writers, artists, journalists, critics, actors, and theater people involved in the Algonquin Round Table (and their friends, associates, and hangers on). Wikipedia Entry about the Algonquin Round Table These folks met for lunch at the famed Algonquin Hotel which still exists on Manhattan's Upper West Side. Dorothy Parker was a prominent member of the group, which also included such luminaries as Robert Benchley, Tallulah Bankhead, Noel Coward, Harold Ross, Harpo Marx, Eva Le Gallienne, Neysa McMein, etc. The "Manhattan Girls" and Their Bridge Club The book mainly focuses on a small subset of this group, four women who formed a bridge club that met in their various apartments: Dorothy Parker, humorist and author; Jane Grant (journalist and cofounder of the New Yorker magazine), Margaret "Peggy" Leech (sales person at Conde Nast and author); and Winifred Lenihan (actress). These women, none of whom played bridge very well, became good friends over the years. Dorothy Parker I must admit that I cringed reading about Dorothy Parker, who reminded me in some ways of a younger version of myself. I've changed and become, as an older woman, self sufficient, diplomatic, and reserved. But when I was younger I was like her in many respects. Unlike her, I wasn't an alcoholic nor did I attempt suicide. But like her, I was vulnerable, often depressed, and invariably chose terrible men and then drove them away because of my codependence and anxiety. I also hadn't learned to control my mouth, so I often said cringeworthy and impulsive things. She was luckier than I was though, in some respects. She certainly had really good friends. The Fascinating and Fun Roaring Twenties It was great fun to read about the Roaring Twenties, with its fun loving New Yorkers who loved to dance, frequent speakeasies, and drank like fish in spite of Prohibition. I enjoyed the fashions of the times too. Parker and her buddies had great taste in clothing. Personal Problems We also find out about the difficulties all these women deal with: Winifred having to fend off the unwanted advances of directors, agents, and gangsters; Parker's inner pain and alcoholism, perhaps caused by an unhappy childhood and losing her mother at age five; Peggy's lack of confidence and difficulty finding men; and Jane's marital difficulties in spite of what seemed to others an ideal marriage. I was at times astonished what some of these people tolerated in their friends and associates. I never quite understood why Jane Grant and her husband Harold Ross put up with Alexander Woollcott, the theater critic, who moved in to the building they'd purchased in Hell's Kitchen, and was a generally nasty and malicious piece of work whose only pleasures in life seemed to be humiliating his associates and driving wedges between them. Jane perhaps tolerated Woollcott because he was suppposed to be a good friend of her husband Harold, although he didn't seem to be anyone's friend. Minor Quibble There were times when I wasn't entirely certain whether the language of the present day was also used in the 20's. For example, actress Eva LeGallienne exclaims "Spot-on" when Winifred says her accent seems a combination of American, French, and English. Would that phrase have actually been used then? Summary: Recommended Book I recommend this book. It highlights the struggles of creative New York women in the 1920s, but a lot of what they go through seems timeless and can apply to our times. I think women will particularly relate to this novel. I also enjoyed the history at lot. Thanks for the ARC Thanks to NetGalley and Avon Books UK for this ARC (Advanced Review Copy) in exchange for an honest review. I will note that although I am American and live in New York, I inadvertently requested the British edition of this ebook instead of the American version. It will be published on August 18, 2022. The American version comes out August 16, 2022. #NetGallley

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mandy White (mandylovestoread)

    Thanks to the publisher for an advanced copy of this book to read, A look at 1920s New York, through the eyes of 4 very different women who form life long friendships after the war. The world is changing and they are starting to have more rights than ever. Things are not easy though, being a woman they still need to try to juggle a marriage, a career and babies These women bond through their experiences, and are there for each other no matter what. Dorothy, Peggy, Winnie and Jane make their way t Thanks to the publisher for an advanced copy of this book to read, A look at 1920s New York, through the eyes of 4 very different women who form life long friendships after the war. The world is changing and they are starting to have more rights than ever. Things are not easy though, being a woman they still need to try to juggle a marriage, a career and babies These women bond through their experiences, and are there for each other no matter what. Dorothy, Peggy, Winnie and Jane make their way through a new world, they are strong and powerful. It was a fascinating look at a different kind of life to the one that we live these days. If it hadn’t been for women like these then we may not have some of the freedoms that we are lucky to have now. Thankfully, things have changed a lot.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Natalie all_books_great_and_small

    I received an advance reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review as part of the book tour hosted by Random Things Tours. The Manhatten Girls is an amazing novel set in the 1920s and follows Dorothy "Dotty" Parker and three of her closest friends. Set in New York, this book had the perfect backdrop for such a well written story. The book starts at the round table at the Gonk. We meet Dotty and her friends and each chapter that follows is about one of the four women and their I received an advance reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review as part of the book tour hosted by Random Things Tours. The Manhatten Girls is an amazing novel set in the 1920s and follows Dorothy "Dotty" Parker and three of her closest friends. Set in New York, this book had the perfect backdrop for such a well written story. The book starts at the round table at the Gonk. We meet Dotty and her friends and each chapter that follows is about one of the four women and their life, problems, ups and downs. Dotty is known for her sharp whit and longs to be loved. Peggy is a magazine assistant who can't find a man due to being intimidating with her intelligence. Jane is the first ever female reporter for The New York Times and married to Harrold - they dream of launching their own newspaper one day. And Winnifred is a talented and beautiful Broadway actress who despises men especially men in the showbiz industry. There is so much I could say about this book but I don't want to spoil it any way for future readers. The story flowed really smoothly and I felt like I knew each woman really well personally and that I was right there with them! The four women go through so much together, some more than others, and I loved how they supported and helped each other, comforted each other and looked out for each other. I really didn't want the book to end but I enjoyed reading the "what happened next" paragraphs for each character. I was confused with Alec as a character as to what his game was with Jane and Harold as this wasn't exposed by the end of the book. This is my first Gill Paul book and I've been desperate to read one of her books for absolutely ages and I'm so glad I got to read this. I will now be looking for all her other books to devour!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I did not expect to love this book as much as I did!! Set in 1920s Manhattan, we get to know four friends as they navigate life and love in the city during the time of prohibition and increasing levels of women's freedoms. Very much a Sex in the city vibe, I loved each of the characters and really enjoyed reading about the origins of the New Yorker magazine. The author doesn't shy away from tough topics either, covering suicide attempts, depression, alcoholism, abortion, rape and more! Highly re I did not expect to love this book as much as I did!! Set in 1920s Manhattan, we get to know four friends as they navigate life and love in the city during the time of prohibition and increasing levels of women's freedoms. Very much a Sex in the city vibe, I loved each of the characters and really enjoyed reading about the origins of the New Yorker magazine. The author doesn't shy away from tough topics either, covering suicide attempts, depression, alcoholism, abortion, rape and more! Highly recommended for fans of Fiona Barton and great on audio.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Diana N.

    The roaring 20s, but the issues in this book really could have been set in any time. This book is definitely a girls club (bridge style) that is full of drama. It follows 4 different women that all fit into classic personalities. Dottie the drama queen, Winifred the gorgeous actress, Jane the feminist, and Peggy the smart one brought a TV drama like quality to this book. Overall this book was just a drama, but so tough women's issues like abortion, rape, and suicide were touched on. Even though I e The roaring 20s, but the issues in this book really could have been set in any time. This book is definitely a girls club (bridge style) that is full of drama. It follows 4 different women that all fit into classic personalities. Dottie the drama queen, Winifred the gorgeous actress, Jane the feminist, and Peggy the smart one brought a TV drama like quality to this book. Overall this book was just a drama, but so tough women's issues like abortion, rape, and suicide were touched on. Even though I enjoyed the drama, I just wanted more substance from the plot. If you like TV dramas or sitcoms this book is for you. Thank you to the publisher and Netgalley for providing me a copy of this ARC for my honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shelleyrae at Book'd Out

    “Four things I am wiser to know: idleness, sorrow, a friend and a foe.” -Dorothy Parker The Manhattan Girls by Gill Paul is based on four well known women of 1920’s New York City; Dorothy Parker, a member of the Algonquin Round Table, a poet and writer known for her sharp wit; Jane Grant, reporter and cofounder of the The New Yorker magazine; broadway actress Winifred Lenihan; and novelist Peggy Leech; and tells the story of the friendship that sustained them during a particular period of their l “Four things I am wiser to know: idleness, sorrow, a friend and a foe.” -Dorothy Parker The Manhattan Girls by Gill Paul is based on four well known women of 1920’s New York City; Dorothy Parker, a member of the Algonquin Round Table, a poet and writer known for her sharp wit; Jane Grant, reporter and cofounder of the The New Yorker magazine; broadway actress Winifred Lenihan; and novelist Peggy Leech; and tells the story of the friendship that sustained them during a particular period of their lives. When the men of the Algonquin Round Table decide to form a Saturday night poker club, Jane Grant suggests some of the women instead meet for Bridge, inviting Dottie, Peggy and Winnie to join her. The game, hosted round robin style, quickly becomes a lifeline for the four women as they exchange confidences, hopes, failures and hardships, and provide each other with encouragement and support when it’s needed. From what I’m able to tell, Paul draws heavily on public records and other factual sources that inform the characters personality’s and events in the novel. While the line between fact and fiction is blurred, Gill’s portrayal of these women, and their relationships, feels genuine. Though this is very much a character driven novel as the friends face challenges in their personal and professional lives, Gill touches on several serious issues that affect the women, including sexism, self-harm, domestic violence, sexual assault, abortion, gambling, and alcoholism. Gill ably conveys the spirit of the Roaring Twenties in New York City, capturing the hedonism among the ‘arts’ crowd, epitomised by the notorious members of the Algonquin Round Table, and the changes in society brought about by the end of WWI, the introduction of Prohibition, and the increasing opportunities for women. Well-written, I enjoyed The Manhattan Girls as a story that explores friendship, loyalty and ambition, and as a glimpse into the private lives of four women whose influence on the arts lingers a century later.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tami (Books Bengals and Coffee)

    Gill Paul takes us back to 1920s Manhattan where we meet 4 distinctly different women trying to make it in a male dominated world. The Manhattan Girls is a character study. Its a book that takes it's time and envelopes us in the atmosphere of New York City - back to the time when jazz was hip, bootleg booze was free flowing and womens fashion was a must. This book has been compared with Sex and the City and I would agree with that statement. Dorothy, Jane, Winifred and Peggy are the Manhattan Gi Gill Paul takes us back to 1920s Manhattan where we meet 4 distinctly different women trying to make it in a male dominated world. The Manhattan Girls is a character study. Its a book that takes it's time and envelopes us in the atmosphere of New York City - back to the time when jazz was hip, bootleg booze was free flowing and womens fashion was a must. This book has been compared with Sex and the City and I would agree with that statement. Dorothy, Jane, Winifred and Peggy are the Manhattan Girls. Dorothy is a writer, Jane is the first female reporter for the New York Times, Winifred is an actress and Peggy is an assistant at a magazine. The ladies have different backgrounds and opinions, but they are steadfast in their friendship for each other. The issues they faced are not unlike the ones for women today. We watch them as they develop their careers, navigate society's expectations and sexism. And they support each other as they search for love. Paul takes 4 woman, puts their very different lifestyles together, and comes out with a pleasant story of friendship and loyalty. The story left me noting that even 100 years later we have not changed so very much. Many thanks to NetGalley, William Morrow and Gill Paul introducing me to all aspects of twenties Manhattan - from the flapper culture to Prohibition to speakeasies to gangsters and bootlegging. From Fifth Avenue to the Algonquin hotel to Central Park and Broadway, this one is surely for NYC fans. And I have to admit after reading, I did a little googling to take another look at these fascinating women (a true sign of an engaging historical fiction book).

  10. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Hedges

    There were many positives to this book. I loved the setting, the vibrant city, the quirky characters, and learning about how The New Yorker came to be. How much of the story was real and how much was fictionalized for the sake of the plot line is never clear. I would have loved an afterword explaining what happened to them all after that one small pocket of their lives. What became of Dorothy, did Harold and Jane stay together, did Winifred find her happy ever after. I have read other Gill Paul There were many positives to this book. I loved the setting, the vibrant city, the quirky characters, and learning about how The New Yorker came to be. How much of the story was real and how much was fictionalized for the sake of the plot line is never clear. I would have loved an afterword explaining what happened to them all after that one small pocket of their lives. What became of Dorothy, did Harold and Jane stay together, did Winifred find her happy ever after. I have read other Gill Paul novels and very much enjoy the use of real historical events to weave a story around. Looking forward to reading more, Thank you Netgalley for the ARC.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    I've been a fan of Gill Paul's books for a few years now, and I honestly think that her books get better and better. I love the fact that she takes well-known women from history and creates fictional stories around them. It is clever and entertaining and in The Manhattan Girls we are introduced to four amazing, colourful and fascinating women, headed up by the witty and acid-tongued Dorothy Parker. I adore the 1920s setting, it's my favourite era in historical fiction, along with the 1960s, prob I've been a fan of Gill Paul's books for a few years now, and I honestly think that her books get better and better. I love the fact that she takes well-known women from history and creates fictional stories around them. It is clever and entertaining and in The Manhattan Girls we are introduced to four amazing, colourful and fascinating women, headed up by the witty and acid-tongued Dorothy Parker. I adore the 1920s setting, it's my favourite era in historical fiction, along with the 1960s, probably because although they are forty years apart, they were so similar. Women were beginning to think for themselves, to go out and enjoy themselves, to drink and to have affairs, they certainly were swinging times. Gill Paul excels in her descriptive writing, with the fashions of the time so brilliantly explored, along with the glamour of the hotel settings, the speakeasys and the general air of hard work and very hard play. The story centres around a Bridge club started by the four lead characters; Jane Grant, a New York Times reporter who has dreams of starting her own magazine, Winifred Lenihan, Irish immigrant and now an upcoming Broadway star, Peggy Leech; novelist in waiting and of course, Dorothy Parker, best known for her witty poetry and short stories. Four very different women, all at varying times in their lives, careers and relationships but all brought together by their love of gossip, illicit gin and a game of cards. The Manhattan Girls is glorious, I lapped it up in almost one sitting. Totally losing myself in the Jazz Age and the unfolding dramas of each of the women. It's wonderfully researched, making reference to names that remain well known, and not always for the best reasons. Gill Paul excels in bringing her characters to life, as we follow them through joyous times and also their most desperate moments. A wonderful read, it is fascinating, glitzy, heartbreaking and utterly entertaining. Highly recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    theliterateleprechaun

    Gill Paul does, in this book, what she does best - immerse readers in the setting. She takes readers back to 1920s New York city and introduces us to 4 women, Dorothy Parker, Peggy Leech, Jane Grant and Winifred Lenihan, who become fast friends - The Manhattan Girls. These career women have little in common, yet become a great support system for each other in a male dominated world. Stepping back in time, Paul meticulously recreates the backdrop of the ‘Lost Generation’ - a generation who’d lost Gill Paul does, in this book, what she does best - immerse readers in the setting. She takes readers back to 1920s New York city and introduces us to 4 women, Dorothy Parker, Peggy Leech, Jane Grant and Winifred Lenihan, who become fast friends - The Manhattan Girls. These career women have little in common, yet become a great support system for each other in a male dominated world. Stepping back in time, Paul meticulously recreates the backdrop of the ‘Lost Generation’ - a generation who’d lost the values of their past and were at a pivotal time and place, questioning mortality, defying social norms, and learning to live in the moment. Paul masterfully offers 4 different points of view. It was a big step, and was, for the most part, successful. I did struggle with connecting to these women and wondered if it was because I didn’t ‘walk’ far enough in their shoes as I was taking them off to exchange them for another ‘pair’ just as I was getting comfortable with them. Regardless, I enjoyed learning about the Algonquin Round Table and came to the conclusion that a century later, we’re still the same; climbing the corporate ladder, struggling to be noticed and appreciated, sacrificing way too much to get ahead, and throwing our arms up at the never ending battle. I’ll be honest and admit that I had no idea about who these women were or their significance prior to reading this book. What I do love about Gil Paul’s approach to writing is that she gives readers enough to whet their appetite, but still leads us to the computer to research some more. What happened to these women? What legacy did they leave? A sign of a good historical fiction book is one that leaves me fulfilled but still drives me to find out more. Paul delivered. As I knew she would. I was gifted this advance copy by Gill Paul, Avon Books UK, and NetGalley and was under no obligation to provide a review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thebooktrail

    Discover the locations in The Manhattan Girls A novel to transport you deep in the heart of Dorothy Parker’s circle What a wonderfully fresh and fascinating novel! Oh this isn’t your usual novel, it’s a visit with four new friends, drinkingcocktails, plyaing cards, eating good food, hooking up with dubious men and just loving life! I was immediately thrust into bustling and glamourous New York. With a cocktail in my hand and my flapper dress blowing in the wind, I ran from one speakeasy to the nex Discover the locations in The Manhattan Girls A novel to transport you deep in the heart of Dorothy Parker’s circle What a wonderfully fresh and fascinating novel! Oh this isn’t your usual novel, it’s a visit with four new friends, drinkingcocktails, plyaing cards, eating good food, hooking up with dubious men and just loving life! I was immediately thrust into bustling and glamourous New York. With a cocktail in my hand and my flapper dress blowing in the wind, I ran from one speakeasy to the next before finding my way back to the Alconquin Club to play cards with four new friends. One of these friends is Dorothy Parker – a poet and wit. I knew nothing about this woman to be honest but I feel I really got to know her during this novel. I was there sitting beside her playing cards, laughing at her jokes, hugging her friends and I had a great time! The Manhattan Girls of the title are Dorothy, Jane, Winifred and Peggy. Jane is the first female reporter for the New York Times, Winifred is an actress and Peggy is an assistant at a magazine. Quite an unikely bunch you might think, but what fun getting to know them! This is the kind of group you really want as friends. Different, but always there for you. They always have your back even if you share different opinions or even morals. What happens in these meetings, stays in these meetings – it’s a bit like Fight Club but with glitz and glamour of the 1920s. As well as a really good time with some very iconic women, this was a spotlight on the life and times of women in 1920s New York. Whatever your status or wealth, women at this time had struggles. They fought for equality at work and, indeed at home. What I love about Gill Paul, is the way she takes a real event or person from history and then gives them a voice. Some of this might be imagined but it’s as if she went back in time and sat with Dorothy Parker and had her whisper in her ear. It’s evocative, fresh and fun. A rolicking good read and I need to see this on the big screen!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tanja ~ KT Book Reviews

    Ah, the roaring twenties (she says with a transcontinental accent). Art deco fabulousness. Beauty and opulence shimmer in my mind from the very beginning. Truly a decadent read, book friends. From the cadence - to the decision to add watermark art at the beginning of each chapter, The Manhattan Girls gives us everything a book romantic needs and wants in a tome centered around the 1920's. My mind's eye shimmers in black and white becoming technicolor with the words created by Gill Paul. Simply w Ah, the roaring twenties (she says with a transcontinental accent). Art deco fabulousness. Beauty and opulence shimmer in my mind from the very beginning. Truly a decadent read, book friends. From the cadence - to the decision to add watermark art at the beginning of each chapter, The Manhattan Girls gives us everything a book romantic needs and wants in a tome centered around the 1920's. My mind's eye shimmers in black and white becoming technicolor with the words created by Gill Paul. Simply wonderful! ~Tanja *Thank you to William Morrow and Harper Collins for sharing this title with me. Follow me on Instagram✿Twitter✿Facebook✿Pinterest✿TikTok

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cherlynn Womack

    Thank you goodreads & the publishing company for my advanced reader's copy in exchange for an honest review. It's 1921 & four friends in New York bond through bridge and frequenting the Algonquin Round Table. Jane & her husband have dreams of having their own magazine. Margaret "Peggy" Leech wants to be an author & wants to find love & marriage. Winifred Lenihan is a Broadway actress who is modest & doesn't really talk much about herself or her past. Dorothy "Dottie" Parker is a writer who is kno Thank you goodreads & the publishing company for my advanced reader's copy in exchange for an honest review. It's 1921 & four friends in New York bond through bridge and frequenting the Algonquin Round Table. Jane & her husband have dreams of having their own magazine. Margaret "Peggy" Leech wants to be an author & wants to find love & marriage. Winifred Lenihan is a Broadway actress who is modest & doesn't really talk much about herself or her past. Dorothy "Dottie" Parker is a writer who is known for being witty & sometimes careless with her choice of words. All friends have goals & are supportive of each other; often out to rescue Dottie from crisis. The story is powerful, full of booze, fun times and bad, and has humor to it. Not to mention sensitive topics of the 1920's still sensitive to the present. The author Gill Paul is a historical fiction master. This is the 3rd book I have read of hers. I found this book entertaining & beautifully put together. It is not my favorite book she has written, (maybe I just wasn't familiar with any of the characters in real life. When I think of the 1920's I think of F. Scott Fitzgerald), but I did enjoy this one & can't wait to read all of her books. Once again, I'm so glad I won an advanced copy!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer N

    3.5 stars. I usually love Gill Paul's historical fiction but this one fell flat. I think it tried to do too much. All 4 of these women are icons in their own right so trying to fit all of their stories into one book just scratched the surface. I understand from the historical note that there was really only a lot of information on Dottie and she had to embellish the other stories. The book didn't read like that though and I found myself distracted at times and wanting more information about othe 3.5 stars. I usually love Gill Paul's historical fiction but this one fell flat. I think it tried to do too much. All 4 of these women are icons in their own right so trying to fit all of their stories into one book just scratched the surface. I understand from the historical note that there was really only a lot of information on Dottie and she had to embellish the other stories. The book didn't read like that though and I found myself distracted at times and wanting more information about other characters. It didn't hole my attention although this is a fascinating time period.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Holloway

    I'm thankful I do not live in the 1920's, being a woman back then and our rights and how we were treated was horrible. However, I found it fascinating how these group of women kept their friendship and spirits up and creativity despite all of this. I'm thankful I do not live in the 1920's, being a woman back then and our rights and how we were treated was horrible. However, I found it fascinating how these group of women kept their friendship and spirits up and creativity despite all of this.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Faichney

    This is the first book I've read by Gill Paul and I'm so excited to check out her other work! I absolutely loved 'The Manhattan Girls'. I've long been fascinated by the Algonquin set and Paul brings 1920s New York, and its many talented residents, to life vividly. I listened to the audiobook, which is brilliantly narrated by Lisa Flanagan. I thoroughly enjoyed the escapism, and learning more about the women who were trailblazers in a bygone era. I also particularly appreciated seeing the more vu This is the first book I've read by Gill Paul and I'm so excited to check out her other work! I absolutely loved 'The Manhattan Girls'. I've long been fascinated by the Algonquin set and Paul brings 1920s New York, and its many talented residents, to life vividly. I listened to the audiobook, which is brilliantly narrated by Lisa Flanagan. I thoroughly enjoyed the escapism, and learning more about the women who were trailblazers in a bygone era. I also particularly appreciated seeing the more vulnerable side to sassy wordsmith, Dorothy Parker. A superb read. Highly recommend! 

  19. 4 out of 5

    Laura Waters

    This book is touted as the 1920s Sex and the City and I would definitely agree! I loved everything about it, especially the friendship between Dottie, Jane, Winifred , and Peggy. If you like a bit of history with your glitz and glamour, you’ll love this one.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Another insightful and very enjoyable historical fiction novel by this very talented author. Having devoured Gill’s previous two books (and I very highly recommend them) I was looking forward to her take on the famous Dorothy Parker, Dottie to her friends. The novel is set in 1920’s Manhattan, post First World War, during prohibition and at the time female actors were expected to do anything for an acting role. We meet Dottie and her three friends Jane, Winifred and Peggy as they get together to Another insightful and very enjoyable historical fiction novel by this very talented author. Having devoured Gill’s previous two books (and I very highly recommend them) I was looking forward to her take on the famous Dorothy Parker, Dottie to her friends. The novel is set in 1920’s Manhattan, post First World War, during prohibition and at the time female actors were expected to do anything for an acting role. We meet Dottie and her three friends Jane, Winifred and Peggy as they get together to learn to play bridge, each taking turns to host their bridge nights. The women become close and supportive of each other, this being very obvious after one of Dottie’s suicide attempts as they joined together to visit her in the hospital. I thoroughly enjoyed getting to know each woman, with their life’s ups and downs, their different personalities and their determination to succeed in life albeit with different life goals. It would have been a pleasure to have joined in one of those bridge nights! Gill is one of my auto read authors and I look forward to her next book.

  21. 5 out of 5

    WM D.

    The Manhattan girls was a very good book. I really enjoyed the characters. The plot was very well done.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Hannah Monson

    While I throughly enjoyed this look into the lives of four famous women of the Algonquin Round Table, it wasn’t my favorite of Paul’s books. Perhaps it was the narration split into 4 perspectives, but I felt perpetually in suspense for the other shoe to drop. And while plenty of dramatic events happened, I never truly felt like a climax of the story was reached leaving the ending feeling somewhat unfulfilling. Nonetheless, I didn’t know much about the Gonk crowd and throughly enjoyed their wit a While I throughly enjoyed this look into the lives of four famous women of the Algonquin Round Table, it wasn’t my favorite of Paul’s books. Perhaps it was the narration split into 4 perspectives, but I felt perpetually in suspense for the other shoe to drop. And while plenty of dramatic events happened, I never truly felt like a climax of the story was reached leaving the ending feeling somewhat unfulfilling. Nonetheless, I didn’t know much about the Gonk crowd and throughly enjoyed their wit and wry humor— though I know that Dottie would have found me to be a tedious bore!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Vivienne

    ‘Four Women. One City. An Impossible Dream’ - cover tag line My thanks to Avon Books U.K. for an eARC and to HarperCollins U.K. Audio for a review copy of the unabridged audiobook edition, both via NetGalley, of ‘The Manhattan Girls: ’ by Gill Paul. The audiobook is narrated by Lisa Flanagan. This sparkling work of historical biographical fiction opens in 1921 New York City and follows the lives of four extraordinary women: basically Sex and the City, Roaring Twenties edition. Its chapters cycle b ‘Four Women. One City. An Impossible Dream’ - cover tag line My thanks to Avon Books U.K. for an eARC and to HarperCollins U.K. Audio for a review copy of the unabridged audiobook edition, both via NetGalley, of ‘The Manhattan Girls: ’ by Gill Paul. The audiobook is narrated by Lisa Flanagan. This sparkling work of historical biographical fiction opens in 1921 New York City and follows the lives of four extraordinary women: basically Sex and the City, Roaring Twenties edition. Its chapters cycle between the four women’s perspectives. They are: Jane Grant, a reporter for the New York Times whose dream is to create a magazine focused on the unique culture of New York City; Margaret (Peggy) Leech, a historian and writer; Winifred Lenihan, a Broadway actress; and of course, Dorothy (Dottie) Parker, a famous wit and writer of short stories and poetry. At the opening of the novel Dorothy Parker is penniless and unemployed with her marriage on the rocks. She and her three friends: Peggy, Winifred, and Jane have formed a bridge club linked to their social circle (The Algonquin Round Table). The decade witnesses changes in their fortunes and relationships. I found this a fascinating novel. While I knew of Dorothy Parker and been amused by her witticisms, I knew nothing about her life. I also was unaware of how The New Yorker magazine was established. The novel unfolds against the backdrop of the Jazz Age and Prohibition and includes cameos from a number of well known mobsters. The novel is not all Art Deco, bobbed hair, and speakeasies as there are darker elements and mature content. It does have a large cast of characters and I appreciated that Paul opened the novel with a ‘Cast List’ as it certainly helped to keep track of who’s who. In the Historical Afterword, Gill Paul makes it clear that this is a novel and not four interlinked biographies. I appreciated this in-depth Afterword that outlined why she had focused on these particular members of Parker’s circle. She also includes a series of Reading Group Questions along with suggestions for further reading and watching. With respect to the audiobook, Lisa Flanagan is an award winning voice actor who has narrated a wide range of audiobook titles. I have listened to a number of these and found her work consistently good. Her voice has warmth and depth and I felt that her reading was excellent, infusing the story, setting, and characters with life. ‘The Manhattan Girls’ is a novel that I expect will appeal to reading groups. It is well written and explores a wide range of themes and the questions provided can serve to facilitate group discussion. Plus, who can resist the lure of the dazzling 1920s? Overall, I enjoyed this highly engaging novel that completely immersed me in 1920s New York City. I found it a moving tale that celebrated the power of friendship between women. Highly recommended.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    We perhaps all feel we know a little about the life and times of Dorothy Parker – her legendary wit (and I certainly have my favourite quotes), the circles she moved in, perhaps a few details about the key moments in her sometimes troubled life. About New York in the prohibition era too – it’s been the background for plenty of stories I’ve enjoyed. But Gill Paul is a writer with a remarkable ability to breathe life into her characters and to transport her readers into that world – she uses her m We perhaps all feel we know a little about the life and times of Dorothy Parker – her legendary wit (and I certainly have my favourite quotes), the circles she moved in, perhaps a few details about the key moments in her sometimes troubled life. About New York in the prohibition era too – it’s been the background for plenty of stories I’ve enjoyed. But Gill Paul is a writer with a remarkable ability to breathe life into her characters and to transport her readers into that world – she uses her meticulous research to create a world I felt entirely part of, emotionally involved in the lives of her characters, through a compelling story of female friendship and support that blends historical fact and her extraordinary imagination. At the centre of the story is Dottie herself – a fascinating portrait of supreme poise and control, surrounded by other luminaries of the literary world, enthralling everyone as she holds court at the table in the Algonquin, always ready with the next clever riposte to wound or delight. But we also see her less than perfect life – her disintegrating marriage, her loneliness, her unwise relationships, her inability to manage her life, the fragility of her mental health and her cries for help – and her extraordinary vulnerability. The author frames her story with those of the other members of the occasional bridge club they hold in their apartments, and the other individuals’ lives are every bit as fascinating. Jane Grant is the first female reporter for The New York Times – moving into a dilapidated house on the wrong side of town, she and husband Harold are living off one salary while trying to launch their own magazine (and you might just have heard of it – The New Yorker). Winifred “Winnie” Lenahan is a Broadway actress, talented and beautiful, awaiting her big break: and Margaret Leech is an assistant at Condé Nast, working on their magazines but with aspirations to become a best selling author. Combining fact and fiction – and the author’s fascinating afterword sets out where one starts and the other comes in – we follow their lives too, their different struggles, their highs and lows, their setbacks and triumphs, their private moments and their lives as they unfold. I loved every moment of this wonderful read, entirely immersed in the world the author created. Its setting – the era, the lifestyle, the society, the speakeasies, the free-flowing bootleg alcohol, the presence of the criminal underworld, the changing place of women – becomes so much more than background, instead a world you completely experience. The relationships between the four women are superbly drawn, the support they provide to each other both moving and convincing – and each of their lives provides a compelling story of its own, whether focused on their personal lives or their public achievements. There’s a magnificent supporting cast too – every well-drawn individual playing their part in the wider story, although the focus is always firmly on the four women at its core. And the story-telling – because this is, after all, a work of fiction grounded in the fact – is sublime, the time and place perfectly captured, the pacing flawless as its threads tangle and unwind, the emotional depth and the extent to which you become involved in their lives simply stunning. Quite wonderful – perhaps the author’s best yet, and a book I’d highly recommend to others.

  25. 4 out of 5

    ⭐️ (inkwitchery)

    THE MANHATTAN GIRLS by Gill Paul This is described as a 1920s version of Sex and the City and I feel that’s a fairly accurate assessment. Dorothy “Dottie” Parker is a writer, poet and an incredibly flawed individual. She uses her cynicism, dark humor and wit to hide the fact that she can’t manage to get her shit together. Jane Grant is the first female reporter for The New York Times. She’s married to Harold and their dream is to publish a new magazine they’ve named, The New Yorker. (Yes, that one! THE MANHATTAN GIRLS by Gill Paul This is described as a 1920s version of Sex and the City and I feel that’s a fairly accurate assessment. Dorothy “Dottie” Parker is a writer, poet and an incredibly flawed individual. She uses her cynicism, dark humor and wit to hide the fact that she can’t manage to get her shit together. Jane Grant is the first female reporter for The New York Times. She’s married to Harold and their dream is to publish a new magazine they’ve named, The New Yorker. (Yes, that one!) Winifred Lenihan is a successful Broadway actress who is tired of the casting-couch. She wants to do something more meaningful with her life. She’s beautiful and talented, but very guarded. Margaret “Peggy” Leech is a magazine assistant at Condé Nast and has dreams of being a published author. She’s so busy writing her first book that she doesn’t have time for romance. These women establish a Bridge club where they come together to drink bootleg liquor, eat canapés, gossip, celebrate each other’s triumphs and offer support in their tragedies. There are a few sensitive subjects broached in this story (some of which are on the forefront of today’s news, unfortunately) which makes it even more relatable. I do wish there was a note regarding timelines because some chapters take place a few months or weeks after the previous one and it was a bit jarring. Overall, I enjoyed this book. It’s a well written and immersive character study of four very different, intelligent, independent and interesting women. Each character felt real and their storylines blend seamlessly. Recommend if you’re looking for an easy weekend read. **ARC courtesy of @NetGalley & @AvonBooksUK Rating: 4/5 ⭐️ Release Date: 08.16.22 #TheManhattanGirls #GillPaul

  26. 5 out of 5

    Demelda Penkitty

    NEW YORK CITY, 1921 An impossible dream. The war is over, the twenties are roaring, but in the depths of the city that never sleeps, Dorothy Parker is struggling to make her mark in a man’s world. A broken woman. She’s penniless, she’s unemployed and her marriage is on the rocks when she starts a bridge group with three extraordinary women – but will they be able to save her from herself? A fight for survival. When tragedy strikes, and everything Dorothy holds dear is threatened, it’s up to Peggy, Win NEW YORK CITY, 1921 An impossible dream. The war is over, the twenties are roaring, but in the depths of the city that never sleeps, Dorothy Parker is struggling to make her mark in a man’s world. A broken woman. She’s penniless, she’s unemployed and her marriage is on the rocks when she starts a bridge group with three extraordinary women – but will they be able to save her from herself? A fight for survival. When tragedy strikes, and everything Dorothy holds dear is threatened, it’s up to Peggy, Winifred and Jane to help her confront the truth before it’s too late. Because the stakes may be life or death… The 'girls' may seem on paper an unikely bunch but how I enjoyed getting to know them. This is the kind of group you really want as friends. Different in their ways and opinions but always there for you. They always have each others backs. These fabulous ladies come together as a bridge group and form a friendship that lasts through thick and thin. This is only my second Gill Paul book but I really love how she can take someone from history and give them a voice. Whilst some of their story is imagined you still feel as if Gill has travelled back in time and interviewed Dorothy Parker. It is plain to see Gill has done her research well and the setting, atmosphere and surroundings convey the period well. There are also mentions of some literary greats, too such as Hemmingway, Wilde and Shaw. While Dorothy Parker is at the centre of this story the other ladies all get their share of the limelight and their friendships are woven together succinctly. This is a very enjoyable read that would transfer well to film, I would definitely be first in line for my ticket.

  27. 4 out of 5

    JeanneK

    The Manhattan Girls by Gill Paul is a well written, fascinating, delightful story set in 1921 in New York City during the Jazz Age. The story centers around Dorothy (Dottie) Parker known for her famous satirical wit. Dottie works as a theater critic for Vanity Fair. She loved going to premieres and theatrical events in exchange for writing a review and loved the feeling of entitlement until one day she was fired because the “powers that be” found her sarcastic wit too much for some people to hand The Manhattan Girls by Gill Paul is a well written, fascinating, delightful story set in 1921 in New York City during the Jazz Age. The story centers around Dorothy (Dottie) Parker known for her famous satirical wit. Dottie works as a theater critic for Vanity Fair. She loved going to premieres and theatrical events in exchange for writing a review and loved the feeling of entitlement until one day she was fired because the “powers that be” found her sarcastic wit too much for some people to handle. Dorothy was emotionally fragile, though she appeared strong and hid behind her sharp wit and barbs. The author provided a good in depth insight into who the real Dorothy Parker was. Jane Grant, was the first female reporter for the New York Times whose dream is to launch a new magazine she calls The New Yorker. I really enjoyed reading the history surrounding the magazine’s publication. Winifred Lenihan who led a fascinating life as a beautiful, talented Broadway actress. Peggy Leech whose day job was a magazine assistant and at night she was a talented novelist. When these three amazing, talented women became friends with Dorothy, they worried about her and always had her back. The author’s excellent written characterization of these four women was outstanding as well as her research of the Jazz Age. I was immersed in this storyline from the very beginning and didn’t want to put it down. I recommend it as a “must read” and rated it a five.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lynda

    This was so good. Set in New York in the 1920’s during Prohibition , I enjoyed every page of it and really wanted it to go on longer. It’s quite slow paced, which suit this genre perfectly, and brilliantly written. I was completely fascinated with the lives of the Algonquin crowd and the dissolute lives they led. Although this is fiction the author has based it around fact but using poetic license. The four women, as with most characters, in the book were real, and although Dorothy ‘Dottie’ Park This was so good. Set in New York in the 1920’s during Prohibition , I enjoyed every page of it and really wanted it to go on longer. It’s quite slow paced, which suit this genre perfectly, and brilliantly written. I was completely fascinated with the lives of the Algonquin crowd and the dissolute lives they led. Although this is fiction the author has based it around fact but using poetic license. The four women, as with most characters, in the book were real, and although Dorothy ‘Dottie’ Parker is the most well known Peggy Leech, Jane Grant and Winifred Lenihan did exist and the broad outline of their lives, as told in the novel, was factual. The rest as they say is fiction, and what great fiction it is. Briefly, chatting in the Algonquin Hotel the four women decide to set up their own bridge club, the start of their friendship that saw some sad and traumatic times but tempered with happier days. Dottie was a renowned wit and poet but was in reality an unhappy woman who needed mental support as she navigated her way through trauma after trauma. Jane was much stronger and alongside her rather weak husband is fighting to set up a magazine called The New Yorker. Winifred is a respected Broadway actress who was ‘damaged’ by a casting couch rape. Peggy is looking for love whilst dreaming of becoming a published author. Together they support each other through some terrible times, broken romances, financial problems, suicide attempts and more… The characterisations of these four ladies is just wonderful. I feel like I know every one of them intimately, their worries, their lives, their hopes and their wishes. But alongside them there is a big cast of equally well written characters but I’m singling out just the one. The most odious and revolting man I’ve seen on the pages of a novel for a while, Alexander ‘Alec’ Woollcott, and one I would happily have thrown out of a top floor window. Seriously, I hated him! It’s a testament to the writing that I felt such strong emotions towards him and some other characters. Ostensibly this is a novel about friendship and that what stood out for me was just how supportive the women were of each other, although it’s Dottie who needed the most support. A fabulous read and one I would definitely recommend. Personally I would love to see a follow up about the rest of the Manhattan Girls lives. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

  29. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Well-written historical fiction about four young women in the 1920s Jazz Age New York who are trying to develop their careers in a male-dominated and misogynistic society. Themes of sexism, power dynamics, particularly in the theatre world with men abusing their authority over up and coming actresses, and depression and alcohol use are explored in the book. But this is first and foremost a book about the friendship between the four female friends as they try to support each other as they share m Well-written historical fiction about four young women in the 1920s Jazz Age New York who are trying to develop their careers in a male-dominated and misogynistic society. Themes of sexism, power dynamics, particularly in the theatre world with men abusing their authority over up and coming actresses, and depression and alcohol use are explored in the book. But this is first and foremost a book about the friendship between the four female friends as they try to support each other as they share mutual challenges of finding love, including self-love, and developing careers and navigating societal expectations and rampant sexism. These characters are based on real women - actresses and writers, most notably Dorothy Parker, the American poet and writer, and while I did not know anything about them, I enjoyed how diverse the characters were and how their personalities balanced each other very well. Good plot, descriptive writing that took me to the 1920s, generally well-paced, and effectively told from the four women’s points of view. A good entry to the historical fiction genre. Thanks to Avon Books UK and Netgalley for an advance copy. Opinions expressed are my own.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Preeti Mahatme

    Historical fiction based on the lives, loves and tragedies of 4 real-life women living in Manhattan in the 1920s. The author has done a fantastic job of bringing alive the heady atmosphere of New York City of those years. It was a time of great social and cultural change when women were coming into their own, stepping out of societal norms, experimenting with their sexuality and trying to forge their own careers and identity in a male dominated world. The story touches all aspects of Manhattan o Historical fiction based on the lives, loves and tragedies of 4 real-life women living in Manhattan in the 1920s. The author has done a fantastic job of bringing alive the heady atmosphere of New York City of those years. It was a time of great social and cultural change when women were coming into their own, stepping out of societal norms, experimenting with their sexuality and trying to forge their own careers and identity in a male dominated world. The story touches all aspects of Manhattan of the twenties - from the flapper culture to Prohibition to speakeasies to gangsters and bootlegging. From Fifth Avenue to the Algonquin hotel to Central Park and Broadway, this one is surely for NYC fans. I'm also looking forward to reading the biographies of the four Manhattan Girls - Dorothy Parker, Jane Grant, Peggy Leech and Winifred Lenihan now that Ive read the fictional version. Thank you Netgalley, Gill Paul and .Avon Books UK for the ARC.

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