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The Rise, Corruption and Coming Fall of the House of Saud

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This explosive examination of the Saud dynasty, whose greed and corruption have brought Saudi Arabia to the brink of bankruptcy - and the world to the edge of disaster - "raises important questions, not the least of which is whether Washington can afford to blithely close its eyes to developments within Saudi Arabia" (Newsday). of photos. This explosive examination of the Saud dynasty, whose greed and corruption have brought Saudi Arabia to the brink of bankruptcy - and the world to the edge of disaster - "raises important questions, not the least of which is whether Washington can afford to blithely close its eyes to developments within Saudi Arabia" (Newsday). of photos.


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This explosive examination of the Saud dynasty, whose greed and corruption have brought Saudi Arabia to the brink of bankruptcy - and the world to the edge of disaster - "raises important questions, not the least of which is whether Washington can afford to blithely close its eyes to developments within Saudi Arabia" (Newsday). of photos. This explosive examination of the Saud dynasty, whose greed and corruption have brought Saudi Arabia to the brink of bankruptcy - and the world to the edge of disaster - "raises important questions, not the least of which is whether Washington can afford to blithely close its eyes to developments within Saudi Arabia" (Newsday). of photos.

30 review for The Rise, Corruption and Coming Fall of the House of Saud

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kalle Wescott

    I read /The Rise, Corruption and Coming Fall of the House of Saud/, by Said K. Aburish: https://www.nytimes.com/1994/03/29/st... Wow, what an eye-opener. The first editions of this book came out in 1994, so the information is twenty-seven+ years old. And yes, we all know that Saudi Arabia has been somewhat despotic and repressive through the very recent past (c.f., Jamal Khashoggi)... though MBS is now transforming the Kingdom in to a much more tolerant nation, that will have more vacation spots a I read /The Rise, Corruption and Coming Fall of the House of Saud/, by Said K. Aburish: https://www.nytimes.com/1994/03/29/st... Wow, what an eye-opener. The first editions of this book came out in 1994, so the information is twenty-seven+ years old. And yes, we all know that Saudi Arabia has been somewhat despotic and repressive through the very recent past (c.f., Jamal Khashoggi)... though MBS is now transforming the Kingdom in to a much more tolerant nation, that will have more vacation spots attracting tourists within five years than the rest of the GCC/Middle East combined. I had no idea regarding some of the actual facts (I'm assuming that what Aburish writes is true, and will have to investigate whether he's been beheaded yet - he does write that he was banned from the Kingdom). Here are just a few tidbits. For example, the house of Saud, unlike the royal family of Jordan, does not have royal lineage nor are the various kings and princes descended from the Prophet. King Ibn Saud paid an Egyptian sheik (Muhammad Tammini) handsomely to fake the lineage from the Prophet (just like the King of Egypt, King Farouk, who hired the same sheik to fake his family's lineage). In the 1940s ARAMCO (back then using 700 camels for labor, now a US $7 trillion company no longer dependent on camels) paid for a similar study. Comparing the original King (Ibn) Saud with Qaddafi and Saddam Hussein, Qaddafi and Hussein come out quite a ways ahead in their benevolence... they just had less money and oil (there's a detailed chart in the book). The original Kings of this family (who took over Riyadh by ambushing and beheading their enemies), beginning with Ibn Saud, and continuing with Faisal in 1964, and later, Fahd, drink heavily, fuck thousands if not tens of thousands of women, and waste enormous sums of money of course... but while Saud was still King (1953 through 1964), the CIA used to procure boys for him as well. I hear the British edition of this book is called /The House of Sod/, with the paperback trade eidtion called /Sodding This and Sodding That/. Ibn Saud fathered approximately 170 children, with his 42 favored sons marrying 1400 women (this is in addition to the harems, sex slaves, the little boys, and yes, the animals). I'm going to have to find in the book which King or member of the royal family regularly travelled with 200 sheep and bags of aphrodisiacs in his plane. "Sheep" isn't in the index at the back (though it should be) so I'm still looking for that reference. You can't make this stuff up... I believe truth is stranger than fiction.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ietrio

    > What Saudi Arabia represents, and the disproportionate power it wields, cannot be considered acceptable in the modern world. If only Allah would grant Aburish to be the king and despot of all Arabs! Of course his enemies will die slowly, but the survivors will earn eternal bliss and $500 each, right?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mark Nenadov

    I found that Said did a wonderful job here in making a compelling presentation of his view of the "House of Saud". Yes, this book is heavily critical of the current Saudi kingdom, but I think he is a very careful author and explains things very well. I find what he is saying to be believable and he definately is very knowledgable on the subject. It definately was worth the read, especially since I am interested in the happenings in the Middle East. It really makes you wonder why the U.S.A. supports I found that Said did a wonderful job here in making a compelling presentation of his view of the "House of Saud". Yes, this book is heavily critical of the current Saudi kingdom, but I think he is a very careful author and explains things very well. I find what he is saying to be believable and he definately is very knowledgable on the subject. It definately was worth the read, especially since I am interested in the happenings in the Middle East. It really makes you wonder why the U.S.A. supports Saudi Arabia.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tom LaVenture

    Read this in preparation for the Gulf War deployment in 1991. Enlightening look at a charismatic warrior patriarch and how King Ibn Saud Abdul Aziz forged his destiny by manipulating the western powers into winning his own private war against his rivals and establishing the 20th century boundaries of Saudi Arabia and Iraq following WWI.

  5. 4 out of 5

    مساعد

    كتاب مفصل من داخل العائلة والعلاقات مع العائلات الثرية ايضا لا اعتبره كتاب في السياسية ،،بل تفاصيل كثيرة عن علاقات عائلة بن محفوظ و غيرها بالبيت السعودي تحياتي

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nur

    the rise, the richest and corrupt...

  7. 4 out of 5

    Linda Powless

    The start...of the Kingdom & Knowledge of Middle East

  8. 4 out of 5

    Irfan

    Lacks references to many of its more contentious claims. Otherwise a good read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ener Eknar

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joey Perpeña

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pyang

  12. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mario Brooks

  14. 4 out of 5

    Leo Africanus

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jakke

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Ziadeh

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yasir Luni

  19. 4 out of 5

    Edje Jeter

  20. 4 out of 5

    Darla Ebert

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anan

  22. 5 out of 5

    Guillaume

  23. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maria Marsh

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mckenzie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sheldon

  27. 5 out of 5

    Catherine Buck

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ivo

  29. 5 out of 5

    David Payne

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ione Ishii

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