Hot Best Seller

Jacqueline in Paris

Availability: Ready to download

From the bestselling author of The Lost Vintage, a rare and dazzling portrait of Jacqueline Bouvier's college year abroad in postwar Paris, an intimate and electrifying story of love and betrayal, and the coming-of-age of an American icon - before the world knew her as Jackie. In August 1949 Jacqueline Bouvier arrives in postwar Paris to begin her junior year abroad. She’s From the bestselling author of The Lost Vintage, a rare and dazzling portrait of Jacqueline Bouvier's college year abroad in postwar Paris, an intimate and electrifying story of love and betrayal, and the coming-of-age of an American icon - before the world knew her as Jackie. In August 1949 Jacqueline Bouvier arrives in postwar Paris to begin her junior year abroad. She’s twenty years old, socially poised but financially precarious, and all too aware of her mother’s expectations that she make a brilliant match. Before relenting to family pressure, she has one year to herself far away from sleepy Vassar College and the rigid social circles of New York, a year to explore and absorb the luminous beauty of the City of Light. Jacqueline is immediately catapulted into an intoxicating new world of champagne and châteaux, art and avant-garde theater, cafés and jazz clubs. She strikes up a romance with a talented young writer who shares her love of literature and passion for culture – even though her mother would think him most unsuitable. But beneath the glitter and rush, France is a fragile place still haunted by the Occupation. Jacqueline lives in a rambling apartment with a widowed countess and her daughters, all of whom suffered as part of the French Resistance just a few years before. In the aftermath of World War II, Paris has become a nest of spies, and suspicion, deception, and betrayal lurk around every corner. Jacqueline is stunned to watch the rise of communism – anathema in America, but an active movement in France – never guessing she is witnessing the beginning of the political environment that will shape the rest of her life—and that of her future husband. Evocative, sensitive, and rich in historic detail, Jacqueline in Paris portrays the origin story of an American icon. Ann Mah brilliantly imagines the intellectual and aesthetic awakening of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis, and illuminates how France would prove to be her one true love, and one of the greatest influences on her life.


Compare

From the bestselling author of The Lost Vintage, a rare and dazzling portrait of Jacqueline Bouvier's college year abroad in postwar Paris, an intimate and electrifying story of love and betrayal, and the coming-of-age of an American icon - before the world knew her as Jackie. In August 1949 Jacqueline Bouvier arrives in postwar Paris to begin her junior year abroad. She’s From the bestselling author of The Lost Vintage, a rare and dazzling portrait of Jacqueline Bouvier's college year abroad in postwar Paris, an intimate and electrifying story of love and betrayal, and the coming-of-age of an American icon - before the world knew her as Jackie. In August 1949 Jacqueline Bouvier arrives in postwar Paris to begin her junior year abroad. She’s twenty years old, socially poised but financially precarious, and all too aware of her mother’s expectations that she make a brilliant match. Before relenting to family pressure, she has one year to herself far away from sleepy Vassar College and the rigid social circles of New York, a year to explore and absorb the luminous beauty of the City of Light. Jacqueline is immediately catapulted into an intoxicating new world of champagne and châteaux, art and avant-garde theater, cafés and jazz clubs. She strikes up a romance with a talented young writer who shares her love of literature and passion for culture – even though her mother would think him most unsuitable. But beneath the glitter and rush, France is a fragile place still haunted by the Occupation. Jacqueline lives in a rambling apartment with a widowed countess and her daughters, all of whom suffered as part of the French Resistance just a few years before. In the aftermath of World War II, Paris has become a nest of spies, and suspicion, deception, and betrayal lurk around every corner. Jacqueline is stunned to watch the rise of communism – anathema in America, but an active movement in France – never guessing she is witnessing the beginning of the political environment that will shape the rest of her life—and that of her future husband. Evocative, sensitive, and rich in historic detail, Jacqueline in Paris portrays the origin story of an American icon. Ann Mah brilliantly imagines the intellectual and aesthetic awakening of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis, and illuminates how France would prove to be her one true love, and one of the greatest influences on her life.

30 review for Jacqueline in Paris

  1. 5 out of 5

    Annette

    Jacqueline in Paris reimagines Jacqueline’s junior year abroad, which later turns out to be her favorite year in her life and one of her greatest influences. In August 1949, Jacqueline breaks away from the Vassar College in New York, which felt isolated and constrained. She is making her way to Paris as she craves to experience freedom and what Paris has to offer: experimental theater, modern dance, and love. She boards with de Renty family. Soon after her arrival, she finds out that Madame de R Jacqueline in Paris reimagines Jacqueline’s junior year abroad, which later turns out to be her favorite year in her life and one of her greatest influences. In August 1949, Jacqueline breaks away from the Vassar College in New York, which felt isolated and constrained. She is making her way to Paris as she craves to experience freedom and what Paris has to offer: experimental theater, modern dance, and love. She boards with de Renty family. Soon after her arrival, she finds out that Madame de Renty with her husband were part of a spy ring during the war. Her husband died in prison and she managed to survive. In north Germany, in the women’s concentration camp of Ravensbruck, where very few survived. Jacqueline has a hard time imagining it as she knows Madame with a gentle voice and dressed in bright colors, but now, she recalls some cries in the morning hours. After the war, the communists become the new enemy. Some start working as spies for the government again. Madame volunteers in assisting former deportees, who were deported from France to concentration camps. Her daughter is involved as well. Jacqueline’s experience in Paris is probably much more that she has expected. From observing the post-war Europe, visiting Dachau in Germany, to experiencing different culture and mind-set especially when it came to communism, and falling in love. Jacqueline meets John, who is an impoverished writer with poor prospects. He isn’t someone her parents would approve off. She feels pressure to make a brilliant match, which in her mother’s eyes is marrying a politician from D.C. John’s good friend is an active communist, which is shocking to Jacqueline that people openly know about it until a friend of hers explains that communism is like another political party in France. It’s not a taboo like in America. There is someone Jacqueline suspects might have used her to extract information about her friends, classmates, and professors, who might be a spy for the Communist party. Then, another’s erratic behavior makes her second guess. Was she being deceived by someone she trusted the most? Drawing from the real lives, the story explores the emotional and private side of Jacqueline Bouvier. Before she became an American icon, she was very private and guarded. It involves a time, when Europe is healing from the atrocities of WWII, raising itself from the rubble and bullet holes scarring the continent. A time, when people are grasping a new ideology, which feels threatening to some. With luminous prose, wit, and respect the story offers suspense and romance, which are woven into a fast-paced story. Source: ARC was provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Review originally posted at mysteryandsuspense.com

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ann Mah

    This is my newest novel and I'm giving it five shiny stars of love because writing this book allowed me to escape to Paris when I couldn't physically go there myself; it kept me dreaming when the world often felt very bleak. I hope you love it, too. Thank you for reading! This is my newest novel and I'm giving it five shiny stars of love because writing this book allowed me to escape to Paris when I couldn't physically go there myself; it kept me dreaming when the world often felt very bleak. I hope you love it, too. Thank you for reading!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    "How could any of us have known back then, as we shivered in the parlor at avenue Mozart, that we were witnessing the battle lines being drawn for a conflict that would define the politics of our adult lives?" Review to come "How could any of us have known back then, as we shivered in the parlor at avenue Mozart, that we were witnessing the battle lines being drawn for a conflict that would define the politics of our adult lives?" Review to come

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gill Paul

    In 1949, Jacqueline Bouvier managed to persuade her very strict mother and stepfather to let her spend a year studying in Paris. She was being groomed to make a great match, not a great career, and she was an obedient daughter, but the lure of the French capital, and the lure of freedom from her mother’s rules, made her determined to get her way. This is a fictional account that sticks close to the known facts of Jacqueline’s year abroad – a year that would be pivotal for her, which she later de In 1949, Jacqueline Bouvier managed to persuade her very strict mother and stepfather to let her spend a year studying in Paris. She was being groomed to make a great match, not a great career, and she was an obedient daughter, but the lure of the French capital, and the lure of freedom from her mother’s rules, made her determined to get her way. This is a fictional account that sticks close to the known facts of Jacqueline’s year abroad – a year that would be pivotal for her, which she later described as the time in her life when she was happiest. Right from the moment she arrives, the novel is a love letter to Paris: the grand Haussmann architecture, the cuisine, the smells of coffee and freshly baked croissants, the poetry of the language. Jacqueline throws herself into her studies, but can’t help but be aware of the shadows of war that still hover overhead. Her landlady, Madame de Renty, survived Ravensbrück concentration camp, and dresses in bright, cheerful colours by day but Jacqueline can hear her crying at night. At parties, she overhears whispers about those who were collaborators in the war, and realises there are some topics that must never be raised. Jacqueline is surprised to find that some of her circle are Communists, because in the US, Communism is considered almost as heinous as Nazism. Gradually, she learns that the motives of the Communists are not Soviet-style revolution, but a society governed by fairness. As readers, this has added resonance for us, because we know she will later marry the man who brought the world close to nuclear war with the Soviet Union during the Cuban missile crisis. It’s just one way in which her mind is expanded by her year in Paris. Ann Mah writes in first person, so we hear Jacqueline’s thoughts and feelings throughout. Her portrait feels very true and full of empathy for a young woman torn between duty to her parents, and her artistic instincts and desire for freedom. It has long been rumoured she took a lover while in Paris, and Ann Mah portrays this relationship with great sensitivity. I also like the instinctive reserve of her Jacqueline who, even before her famous marriage, treasured her privacy and kept her innermost thoughts to herself. She was a person who was difficult to know, but this novel provides insights which feel very true. Needless to say, I absolutely loved it! If you are interested in Jackie Kennedy, or a lover of Paris, or you just like beautifully written historical novels that provide fresh perspectives on a particular era, I strongly urge you to read this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allison Larkin

    Vibrant and sensitive. This is the Jackie Kennedy origin story we’ve been waiting for. If you come to Jacqueline in Paris as an expert of French history, the Kennedys, or post-World War II Europe, I believe you will marvel at how deftly Ann employs her extensive archival and experiential research to capture surprising nuances of time, place, and feeling. But if you come to this book with fresh eyes, Ann generously gives you everything you need to appreciate Jacqueline's journey. Jacqueline in Par Vibrant and sensitive. This is the Jackie Kennedy origin story we’ve been waiting for. If you come to Jacqueline in Paris as an expert of French history, the Kennedys, or post-World War II Europe, I believe you will marvel at how deftly Ann employs her extensive archival and experiential research to capture surprising nuances of time, place, and feeling. But if you come to this book with fresh eyes, Ann generously gives you everything you need to appreciate Jacqueline's journey. Jacqueline in Paris is a marvel of research and imagination and is also an entertaining and dear coming-of-age tale.

  6. 4 out of 5

    The Bookend Diner

    Thank you, Mariner Books, for the gifted copy of Jacqueline in Paris. {partner} Genre: Historical Fiction When: 1949 - 1950 Format: 🎧 Pub Date: 9.27.2022 Star Rating: ☆☆☆.5 This coming-of-age story allowed me to see a glimpse of Jacqueline, which not many of us have seen. While I know who Jaqueline Kennedy is, and I've always admired her style, I can't say that I know much about her or the person she was before she became First Lady and wife to John F. Kennedy. I listened to this book through Harper Au Thank you, Mariner Books, for the gifted copy of Jacqueline in Paris. {partner} Genre: Historical Fiction When: 1949 - 1950 Format: 🎧 Pub Date: 9.27.2022 Star Rating: ☆☆☆.5 This coming-of-age story allowed me to see a glimpse of Jacqueline, which not many of us have seen. While I know who Jaqueline Kennedy is, and I've always admired her style, I can't say that I know much about her or the person she was before she became First Lady and wife to John F. Kennedy. I listened to this book through Harper Audio and was transported back to post-war France. I am so glad I chose to listen to this book instead of reading it because I would have mispronounced numerous names and places - the audio truly helped bring the story to life. My only criticism about the book is that I felt the first half was sluggish. I didn't feel like anything happened until around the 60% mark. But, after that point, many events ensued, and that's when I saw Jacqueline's character growth. The entirety of Jacqueline in Paris is full of stunning descriptions of Paris and the places that Jacqueline visits. It felt like I was walking along with Jacqueline as she experienced life free from her parent's control. 💯 Audiobook 😍 Captivating descriptions that bring the book to life 👩🏽Coming-of-age story 😔 Vivid details of their trip to Dachau 🐌 Slow start but takes off after the 60% mark I recommend reading Jacqueline in Paris if you enjoy reading historical fiction books set in post-war Europe! ______ Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thebookend.... Follow my blog: https://thebookenddiner.com/ Follow me on Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/thebookendd... Follow me on StoryGraph: https://app.thestorygraph.com/profile...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wendy G

    https://wendyreadit.wordpress.com/202... This is the story of what life could have been like for Jacqueline Bouvier the summer of 1949, when she spent a summer abroad in Paris with a few other college students. There's a lot of history here, a few years after WW2 ended and the worry and concern of communism affecting not only France, but Europe and the United States. Fans of Jackie Kennedy will definitely enjoy this story of what life must have been like for Jacqueline during this time. The war i https://wendyreadit.wordpress.com/202... This is the story of what life could have been like for Jacqueline Bouvier the summer of 1949, when she spent a summer abroad in Paris with a few other college students. There's a lot of history here, a few years after WW2 ended and the worry and concern of communism affecting not only France, but Europe and the United States. Fans of Jackie Kennedy will definitely enjoy this story of what life must have been like for Jacqueline during this time. The war is over but hardly forgotten. Sep 2022 Pub Date #harpercollins @harpercollins

  8. 5 out of 5

    Catherine McKenzie

    What's not to love about a year in Paris? Mah dives right into Jackie's world before she was the woman everyone thought they knew! Highly recommend. What's not to love about a year in Paris? Mah dives right into Jackie's world before she was the woman everyone thought they knew! Highly recommend.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Holsinger

    I absolutely loved this book--lush, rigorously researched, wonderfully written, and with twists that will leave readers thirsting for more. Like the city that serves as its setting, the novel immerses the reader in an environment both intimately familiar and utterly new. A brilliant novel more than worthy of its intriguing subject. [ARC provided by the publisher]

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

    An outstanding book. Enjoy!!!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brittany | Brittany_the_Bookworm

    3.5 stars— Full review to come.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sydney Long

    4.5 out of 5 Stars Jacqueline Bouvier loved France. It was a place where she felt she could truly be herself, away from her controlling mother, alcoholic but adored father and the life society dictated she should live. So when she was able to study abroad in Paris in 1949c she was in seventh heaven. But the Paris she dreamed of was a different place. Still not yet recovered from Nazi occupation, like Jackie herself, Paris was trying to discover itself again. It was important to remember that desp 4.5 out of 5 Stars Jacqueline Bouvier loved France. It was a place where she felt she could truly be herself, away from her controlling mother, alcoholic but adored father and the life society dictated she should live. So when she was able to study abroad in Paris in 1949c she was in seventh heaven. But the Paris she dreamed of was a different place. Still not yet recovered from Nazi occupation, like Jackie herself, Paris was trying to discover itself again. It was important to remember that despite the horrors of WWII still fresh in their minds, France was a land of culture, art, love and life. During her time abroad, Jackie’s eyes were opened to what and who she could become. Throw in a ring of spies and a bit of communism for thrill and mystery and you have a lovely portrayal of one of the most famous First Ladies in American History. Loosely based on Jackie’s year abroad, Ann Mah paints a stunning portrait of Paris as it recovers from war and tries to redefine and rediscover itself in its wake. It’s a coming of age time for the ever so private Jackie and makes her easy to connect with! Thanks so much to NetGalley, Mariner Books and Ann Mah for early access to this gem of a story! Taking a trip to Paris in the pages of a book I’d always exciting and to tag along with Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis was inspiring!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley and am voluntarily posting a review. All opinions are my own. I really liked the idea behind Jacqueline in Paris. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis is such a legendary figure, it’s fascinating to think about the fact that she was once a bright-eyed young woman who fell in love without pretensions or expectations for more. And I get what it was trying to do in exploring her foundation, and how postwar Paris and her youthful love affair influenced the wo I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley and am voluntarily posting a review. All opinions are my own. I really liked the idea behind Jacqueline in Paris. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis is such a legendary figure, it’s fascinating to think about the fact that she was once a bright-eyed young woman who fell in love without pretensions or expectations for more. And I get what it was trying to do in exploring her foundation, and how postwar Paris and her youthful love affair influenced the woman she became. But, the book still falls a bit short, and I feel in some ways, the issue is entirely due to my own subjective perception. I’m by no means a Kennedy or Jackie enthusiast, and while I know the basics (and some of the tawdry details of her subsequent relationships), I feel this is a book that required a more extensive connection to her full story for me to really understand. If I don’t know much beyond the superficial, can I really grasp the roots of her story? As such, I don’t feel this is a book that many can go into unless they have a strong grasp for Jackie’s full life story, as otherwise, it mainly feels like a story of a young woman in postwar Paris engaged in an ill-fated romance. That’s not to say the research wasn’t well-done, as I did find myself captured by the landscape of Paris as Mah depicts it. But I saw no reason why this had to be Jackie’s story, specifically…there wasn’t enough for me as someone with only a passing connection to her life story to contextualize this narrative within what I knew about her already. As such, while this isn’t a bad book, it just didn’t work for me. I would hesitate to recommend it, unless you’re well acquainted with Jackie Kennedy’s story.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Davida Chazan

    4.5/5 stars. This biographical, historical, women's fiction novel explores who was Jacqueline Bouvier during the time before Kennedy or Onassis. Read my full review here https://tcl-bookreviews.com/2022/09/2... 4.5/5 stars. This biographical, historical, women's fiction novel explores who was Jacqueline Bouvier during the time before Kennedy or Onassis. Read my full review here https://tcl-bookreviews.com/2022/09/2...

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tami

    Ann Mah brings readers a time period in Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy’s life that most have read very little about. The novel, set in Paris during the years following WWII portray a city that is struggling to return to normal. It’s a wonderful read for anyone needing a novel with a strong sense of time and place. Jacqueline has persuaded her parents to allow her to spend the year studying abroad in Paris, where she will be immersed in learning the language. Mah imagines how Jackie’s experience might Ann Mah brings readers a time period in Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy’s life that most have read very little about. The novel, set in Paris during the years following WWII portray a city that is struggling to return to normal. It’s a wonderful read for anyone needing a novel with a strong sense of time and place. Jacqueline has persuaded her parents to allow her to spend the year studying abroad in Paris, where she will be immersed in learning the language. Mah imagines how Jackie’s experience might have been and how it molded her into the woman she became. I loved the story and seeing a side of Jackie that I had no knowledge of. Most of us relate to her as a grieving wife and mother, but in this book, we see the young Jackie who is trying to find her way in the world and does not want to be molded into the person her controlling mother wants her to be. Many thanks to NetGalley and Mariner Books for allowing me to read an advance copy. I am happy to give my honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly Cranford

    ARC Review: I absolutely adored this book. I know next to nothing about the real Jackie Kennedy or who she really was, but I can only hope that she was anything like the version of her portrayed in this novel. It was so fun revisiting Paris and other places in Europe through her eyes. The intrigue in this book was delightful. I could hardly put it down, with all of Jackie's various adventures including her unintentional, indirect involvement in Communist spy circles... ARC Review: I absolutely adored this book. I know next to nothing about the real Jackie Kennedy or who she really was, but I can only hope that she was anything like the version of her portrayed in this novel. It was so fun revisiting Paris and other places in Europe through her eyes. The intrigue in this book was delightful. I could hardly put it down, with all of Jackie's various adventures including her unintentional, indirect involvement in Communist spy circles...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robin Beard

    *Publish date 9/27/22 - Thank you to Net Galley and Harper Collins for the advanced copy!* Ann Mah does a wonderful job of weaving the tale of a young Jacquline Bouvier (Kennedy Onasis) and her adventures in France during a year long study abroad program during the early 50s. It is always interesting to "peek behind the curtain" of famous/infamous families, and this is no different. Although fictionalized due to gaps in written and oral histories (as explained in the notes), the story was well to *Publish date 9/27/22 - Thank you to Net Galley and Harper Collins for the advanced copy!* Ann Mah does a wonderful job of weaving the tale of a young Jacquline Bouvier (Kennedy Onasis) and her adventures in France during a year long study abroad program during the early 50s. It is always interesting to "peek behind the curtain" of famous/infamous families, and this is no different. Although fictionalized due to gaps in written and oral histories (as explained in the notes), the story was well told, well researched, and thoroughly enjoyable. I highly recommend this book!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne McDonnell

    This is miracle of a novel, with rare beauty and depth. When Ann Mah first wrote about young Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy’s year as an exchange student in Paris, it was that day’s most avidly read story in THE NEW YORK TIMES. The biographical novel that arose from that article instantly sold to a publisher. Who better than Ann Mah, a travel and food writer, a long-time resident of Paris, to guide us through Jackie’s discoveries and the drama of her experiences in France? As a journalist, Ann Mah has This is miracle of a novel, with rare beauty and depth. When Ann Mah first wrote about young Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy’s year as an exchange student in Paris, it was that day’s most avidly read story in THE NEW YORK TIMES. The biographical novel that arose from that article instantly sold to a publisher. Who better than Ann Mah, a travel and food writer, a long-time resident of Paris, to guide us through Jackie’s discoveries and the drama of her experiences in France? As a journalist, Ann Mah has followed Jacqueline’s path through Paris, and was invited to have coffee at the apartment of the daughter of a countess whose family had hosted Jacqueline during that year she later called “the happiest” time of her life. Ann Mah unearthed things few people knew…. If you are tempted to partake of the sensory and cultural pleasures experienced by young Jacqueline Bouvier, they are here in abundance – the countess tutoring the young American woman about French furniture design (knowledge that later affected her decoration of the White House); or offering lessons about how to squeeze lemon juice onto raw oysters, before swallowing and washing them down with sips of a flinty Muscadet wine. When I opened the pages, I was also startled and absorbed by the novel’s seriousness and intimacy. Jackie’s mother arranged for her to live with a widowed countess that year. No one, not even the elite, could escape the deprivations of post World War II Paris – the absence of heat in the apartment, or hot water to bathe in…. The reader comes to inhabit the chill of the sheets Jackie sleeps in, and hears the strange sobs in the apartment at night. (The countess and her husband were members of the French resistance, arrested by Nazis and taken to concentration camps; he never returned.)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Jacqueline in Paris by Ann Mah is an excellent historical fiction that highlights Jacqueline Bouvier and her year abroad in Paris during college. Just beautiful. I have read several biographies of Jackie, and most included her year abroad in Paris while attending undergrad. I have never read any fictional accounts of this pivotal time in her life. This takes place in 1949, and here we see not only some of the foundational stones being set in regards to Jackie’s passions, loves, hopes, and dreams Jacqueline in Paris by Ann Mah is an excellent historical fiction that highlights Jacqueline Bouvier and her year abroad in Paris during college. Just beautiful. I have read several biographies of Jackie, and most included her year abroad in Paris while attending undergrad. I have never read any fictional accounts of this pivotal time in her life. This takes place in 1949, and here we see not only some of the foundational stones being set in regards to Jackie’s passions, loves, hopes, and dreams, but also the state of Paris itself post-WWII. So many changes: personal, societal, political…and the author does an amazing job weaving fact and fiction to create a narrative that is just wonderful and truly memorable. I truly adore this book and recommend it for any historical fiction fan and anyone that loves Jackie Kennedy. 5/5 stars Thank you NG and Mariner Books for this wonderful arc and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon, Instagram, and B&N accounts upon publication on 9/27/22.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    Jacqueline Bouvier convinces her mother to let her spend a year abroad studying in Paris. It is 1949 and Paris is still recovering. The family she is staying with was in the Resistance and the mother was captured and taken to Ravensbruck. Sometimes in the night Jacqueline hears screams from a nightmare but during the day Madame is calm, takes everything in stride and always wears bright colors. The apartment is cold in winter, hot in summer and this is the happiest year of Jackie's life. I haven Jacqueline Bouvier convinces her mother to let her spend a year abroad studying in Paris. It is 1949 and Paris is still recovering. The family she is staying with was in the Resistance and the mother was captured and taken to Ravensbruck. Sometimes in the night Jacqueline hears screams from a nightmare but during the day Madame is calm, takes everything in stride and always wears bright colors. The apartment is cold in winter, hot in summer and this is the happiest year of Jackie's life. I haven't read anything about Jackie before but this small glimpse into her life makes me want to know more. Thank you to Netgalley and Mariner Books for providing me with a digital copy.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Piper Huguley

    This was an amazing novel that shows a young woman becoming aware of life beyond her sheltered walls. All of the descriptions of post WW2 Europe are tenderly depicted and inflict Jacqueline's very soul so that the reader can envision how she will become a global figure. Mah tells this story to show the young Jacqueline and how she changes over time. Mah's depiction of this Jacqueline, not the world figure we've come to know, but the developing Jacqueline is expertly done and results in a deeply This was an amazing novel that shows a young woman becoming aware of life beyond her sheltered walls. All of the descriptions of post WW2 Europe are tenderly depicted and inflict Jacqueline's very soul so that the reader can envision how she will become a global figure. Mah tells this story to show the young Jacqueline and how she changes over time. Mah's depiction of this Jacqueline, not the world figure we've come to know, but the developing Jacqueline is expertly done and results in a deeply impactful and enjoyable read. Read it!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Jacqueline in Paris is a fictional account of Jacqueline Bouvier’s (née Kennedy Onassis) junior year abroad in Paris, told from her perspective. The year is 1949 and while America has moved on from WWII, Jacqueline is greeted by a city and a people that are still reeling from the effects of Hitler and his war. She is housed, along with two other girls from her program, with a family from the aristocracy that tries to keep its secrets from the past hidden from these American girls. Along the way Jacqueline in Paris is a fictional account of Jacqueline Bouvier’s (née Kennedy Onassis) junior year abroad in Paris, told from her perspective. The year is 1949 and while America has moved on from WWII, Jacqueline is greeted by a city and a people that are still reeling from the effects of Hitler and his war. She is housed, along with two other girls from her program, with a family from the aristocracy that tries to keep its secrets from the past hidden from these American girls. Along the way she finds romance, and learns what Europe actually suffered during the war. I wanted to love this book, but it was just ok for me. It is well researched, and the characters are based on real people, and some of the story lines are based on fact. But I felt that the characters were shallow. Even Jacqueline. Not knowing the details until reading the epilogue, this story could have starred anyone. Also, there were storylines that started then nothing. Like when she goes to her families ancestral village to find out about her family. That would have been an interesting plot to follow. One short conversation with a shop keeper and nil heard. It felt like parts were either edited out or not fully flushed out. Having been an exchange student, I was very interested in this plot, but alas, it couldn’t hold my attention and I kept reaching for another book. The writing was very good though, and I will read the author again. Thank you to NetGalley, the publishers and the author for the ARC in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mary Meade Evans

    Really enjoyed this book and learning more about Jacqueline and her college years. Paris right after the war would have been an interesting place to be and she made the most of it. I thought it fun to see how her time there served her well after becoming First Lady.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Ski

    My favorite book of all time is The Lost Vintage, so I was so excited to get an advanced copy of Ann Mah’s new book Jacqueline in Paris. It was a wonderful read and beautifully written. I enjoyed all the details about post War Paris and getting a glimpse at “Jackie’s life” before she became a Kennedy. The Lost Vintage remains my favorite but this is a fabulous read also.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Pam Papworth

    Thank you HarperCollins for the ARC of this book which is due out in September. The first half of the book was really good, but then I became bored and was anxious to just finish it. I would give it 3.5 if I could, but I had to choose 3 or 4, so I chose 3.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    3.5⭐️ Charming & evocative … channels the period, place & people.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Larson

    I will sadly admit that I thought despite my lack of French, I still thought I'd get wrapped up in a scandal during my week in Paris.... At least I got to live vicariously thru Jacqueline... I will sadly admit that I thought despite my lack of French, I still thought I'd get wrapped up in a scandal during my week in Paris.... At least I got to live vicariously thru Jacqueline...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Meredith

    Loved this book. What a great writer Ms. Mah is. It was so refreshing to read a historical book that isn’t tainted or twisted by the current “modern” viewpoint. Excellent writer and book. I can’t wait to read more from her.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marcie Bushnell

    Pre-ordered. Can hardly wait until September 27, 2022!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Juliette

    A beautiful and evocative dive into the one year of freedom of an American icon. It gives us the "true" Jackie, before her life is molded by the expectations of her family and their circumstances, before she becomes the lovely first lady, the tragic widow, the reemerging woman trying to grab the reins of her life. It gives us a broken but still beautiful and ever-fascinating Paris. I enjoyed this from start to finish! A beautiful and evocative dive into the one year of freedom of an American icon. It gives us the "true" Jackie, before her life is molded by the expectations of her family and their circumstances, before she becomes the lovely first lady, the tragic widow, the reemerging woman trying to grab the reins of her life. It gives us a broken but still beautiful and ever-fascinating Paris. I enjoyed this from start to finish!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...