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Young Women

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Everyone's got that history, I guess. Everyone's got a story. When Emily meets the enigmatic and dazzling actress Tamsin, her life changes. Drawn into Tamsin's world of Soho living, boozy dinners, and cocktails at impossibly expensive bars, Emily's life shifts from black and white to technicolour and the two women become inseparable. Tamsin is the friend Emily has always l Everyone's got that history, I guess. Everyone's got a story. When Emily meets the enigmatic and dazzling actress Tamsin, her life changes. Drawn into Tamsin's world of Soho living, boozy dinners, and cocktails at impossibly expensive bars, Emily's life shifts from black and white to technicolour and the two women become inseparable. Tamsin is the friend Emily has always longed for; beautiful, fun, intelligent and mysterious and soon Emily is neglecting her previous life - her work assisting vulnerable women, her old friend Lucy - to bask in her glow. But when a bombshell news article about a decades-old sexual assault case breaks, Emily realises that Tamsin has been hiding a secret about her own past. Something that threatens to unravel everything . . . Young Women is a razor sharp novel that slices to the heart of our most important relationships, and asks how complicit we all are in this world built for men.


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Everyone's got that history, I guess. Everyone's got a story. When Emily meets the enigmatic and dazzling actress Tamsin, her life changes. Drawn into Tamsin's world of Soho living, boozy dinners, and cocktails at impossibly expensive bars, Emily's life shifts from black and white to technicolour and the two women become inseparable. Tamsin is the friend Emily has always l Everyone's got that history, I guess. Everyone's got a story. When Emily meets the enigmatic and dazzling actress Tamsin, her life changes. Drawn into Tamsin's world of Soho living, boozy dinners, and cocktails at impossibly expensive bars, Emily's life shifts from black and white to technicolour and the two women become inseparable. Tamsin is the friend Emily has always longed for; beautiful, fun, intelligent and mysterious and soon Emily is neglecting her previous life - her work assisting vulnerable women, her old friend Lucy - to bask in her glow. But when a bombshell news article about a decades-old sexual assault case breaks, Emily realises that Tamsin has been hiding a secret about her own past. Something that threatens to unravel everything . . . Young Women is a razor sharp novel that slices to the heart of our most important relationships, and asks how complicit we all are in this world built for men.

30 review for Young Women

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alwynne

    Acclaimed writer Jessica Moor’s second outing is an exceptionally gripping take on the #MeToo era. It’s set in a slightly clichéd version of middle-class London – filled with familiar landmarks from Soho’s cafés to Gordon’s Wine Bar, the Savoy Hotel and the Hampstead Ladies Pond. A young lawyer Emily, now working for a women’s advocacy charity, has a chance encounter with a charismatic, would-be actress Tamsin at a climate change protest. At first their budding friendship plays out like the begi Acclaimed writer Jessica Moor’s second outing is an exceptionally gripping take on the #MeToo era. It’s set in a slightly clichéd version of middle-class London – filled with familiar landmarks from Soho’s cafés to Gordon’s Wine Bar, the Savoy Hotel and the Hampstead Ladies Pond. A young lawyer Emily, now working for a women’s advocacy charity, has a chance encounter with a charismatic, would-be actress Tamsin at a climate change protest. At first their budding friendship plays out like the beginnings of a love story or maybe a potentially dangerous obsession, Emily’s attraction to Tamsin, and Tamsin’s upmarket lifestyle, fuelled by equal parts suppressed desire and envy. But when Tamsin’s past’s linked to a breaking scandal the story takes an unexpected turn. A scandal that revolves around the exposure of a middle-aged, mainstream but arty director. A man who specialises in films that centre women from Billie Holiday to Anaïs Nin, but is now implicated in the sexual coercion and assault of a number of the younger actresses who’ve worked with him. Viewed from some angles this is a blatantly-manipulative piece reminiscent of novels like Gone Girl. Moor’s central character, the gawky Emily, with her increasingly-disturbing fixation on the glamorous Tamsin, is a recognisable iteration of the unlikeable, vampiric woman who frequently surfaces in the pages of a certain subgenre of literary thriller. But at the same time, it’s an often fascinating, surprisingly fertile and accessible exploration of abusive male power, laced with references to acts of casual and not-so-casual sexual violence perpetrated by entitled, predatory men. Stories that might seem a little too much if they weren’t so horribly, achingly familiar - stories I’ve heard from other women, some I could have told myself. But Moor’s narrative’s less about the men but the women whose lives they’ve blighted, and the complex interactions between them: Emily’s best friend, the women Emily works with, and Emily herself. Women entangled in questions and issues of complicity, trauma, the nature of justice, and the damage they might also inflict on each other. I was completely caught up in this, at least up until the concluding sections when the pace suddenly faltered and the structure became increasingly uneven. I was less than happy with the rather tokenistic treatment of a "wiser", older, Black, lesbian character; and disappointed that Moor shied away from tackling the intricate, sexual implications of Emily’s fascination with Tamsin. I was also slightly frustrated by the way in which - after a cursory examination of the social and cultural systems that foster damaging manifestations of male power, economic and otherwise - Moor appeared to be backing away from fully confronting wider, underlying political concerns. Instead edging towards, what could be interpreted, as a heavily compromised, not-all-men-are-like-that position. A position that stirred unfavourable comparisons to Eliza Clark’s ferocious, boundary-pushing Boy Parts. Even so, this is a well-crafted, compulsively-readable piece, packed with explicit talking points. A novel I could easily see becoming a summer bestseller, if not a compelling, mini-series. Thanks to Netgalley and publisher Manilla Press for an ARC Rating: 3.5

  2. 5 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    A somewhat messy, shapeless narrative that nevertheless deals with pressing issues of women's suffering under patriarchy, along a spectrum of assault from 'casual' touching on the Underground to rape. The sheer number of stories of sexualised attack can be a bit overwhelming but is probably the most important takeaway here: we all have our stories to tell in this field, and still regress is slow and elusive. Indeed, as this book shows, there is an institutionalised weighing against women whether A somewhat messy, shapeless narrative that nevertheless deals with pressing issues of women's suffering under patriarchy, along a spectrum of assault from 'casual' touching on the Underground to rape. The sheer number of stories of sexualised attack can be a bit overwhelming but is probably the most important takeaway here: we all have our stories to tell in this field, and still regress is slow and elusive. Indeed, as this book shows, there is an institutionalised weighing against women whether that's through a reluctance of the police and legal sector to investigate, the tricky nature of he said/she said and lack of so-called hard evidence, or the pernicious use of legal silencing tactics like NDAs and out of court payoffs (and it's worth noting that the £2m payoff in the book has, allegedly, increased to around £12m in the current case of Prince Andrew and Virginia Giuffre). One of the hot issues raised in the story is to what extent women might be complicit in perpetuating rape culture by accepting this silence in return for money: a difficult topic that touches on choice, responsibility, agency, self-care and what individuals might need to do to survive and move forward. The book falls neatly into two halves: the first feels like it's going to be one of those toxic female friendship tales where one partner has all the glamour, money and excitement - but about halfway through this shifts into a different story altogether and Tamsin all but disappears from the narrative. The consequences of Emily's behaviour feel underdeveloped and the shift of focus a little unsatisfying. Nevertheless, this is valuable as a 'popular' piece of fiction which raises important questions about power, privilege and patriarchy in an easily readable, page-turning and accessible way. It feels a little thin at times as it doesn't delve into the issues it raises and has an overly neat ending - but the righteous anger that seems to fuel the book made me want to cheer it on anyway: 3.5 stars. Thanks to the publisher for an ARC via NetGalley

  3. 5 out of 5

    leah

    3.5 set against the backdrop of the #metoo movement, Young Women seeks to explore the complex experience of being a young woman living under the patriarchy. while at first this book seems like a typical slice of life, female friendship story revolving around two twenty-something women in london, the second half digs a little deeper into its #metoo commentary, posing a number of difficult questions centring around notions of female power and choice. can women be complicit in the perpetuation of ra 3.5 set against the backdrop of the #metoo movement, Young Women seeks to explore the complex experience of being a young woman living under the patriarchy. while at first this book seems like a typical slice of life, female friendship story revolving around two twenty-something women in london, the second half digs a little deeper into its #metoo commentary, posing a number of difficult questions centring around notions of female power and choice. can women be complicit in the perpetuation of rape culture by accepting money from men in exchange for their silence? to what extent do these women have a responsibility to other women? of course the book doesn’t provide any answers to these questions (and i don’t think a book ever could due to their complexity), but it still leaves the reader with a lot to reckon with. the book could’ve had a little more depth and the sudden shift in narrative felt slightly jarring, but overall it’s a fast-paced, relevant book which explores the politics of both female friendship and the intricacies of the #metoo movement. [thank you Bonnier Books / Manilla Press for the arc! this book comes out on 26th may 2022]

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jo_Scho_Reads

    When Emily meets Tamsin her life changes. Tamsin is effervescent, confident, captivating. Emily is drawn to her like a moth to a flame. The two of them become inseparable; expensive bars, cocktails, jazz, conversations deep and meaningful. They understand each other, they’re fighting for the same cause - being a woman in a man’s world. But when Emily learns of a secret Tamsin has been hiding it blows everything open and threatens to unravel their friendship. Can they recover from this? Jessica Mo When Emily meets Tamsin her life changes. Tamsin is effervescent, confident, captivating. Emily is drawn to her like a moth to a flame. The two of them become inseparable; expensive bars, cocktails, jazz, conversations deep and meaningful. They understand each other, they’re fighting for the same cause - being a woman in a man’s world. But when Emily learns of a secret Tamsin has been hiding it blows everything open and threatens to unravel their friendship. Can they recover from this? Jessica Moor is an original and forceful new author - her books cover incredibly pertinent issues very relevant to society today. In the current age of #metoo this book was such a thought provoking and compelling read. It made me reflect on instances in my own past and worry for the future of today’s young women. Although there are many like Emily and Alice who are a force to be reckoned with, there’s still work to be done in shifting the dynamics of male power. I liked the characters of Emily and Tamsin, I recognised characteristics of both of the girls and the style of this book meant I raced through it at pace. It’s a book that will really make you think and I would encourage men to read it too - consent and coercion are two huge topics of the day and the more people get thinking about exactly what they mean has got to be a good thing. And finally, I’m really glad I’m old and not young any more! Navigating the minefields of youth these days sounds far too complicated!

  5. 4 out of 5

    C

    Review on: https://clife.blog/2022/08/11/__trash... I enjoyed the plot, I really did but about half way through I started to get bored with the ranting type of article-search that was going on. The start of the novel was going somewhere but it is as if the author got stuck as to where to take it as it began to ramble on and not really go anywhere. Review on: https://clife.blog/2022/08/11/__trash... I enjoyed the plot, I really did but about half way through I started to get bored with the ranting type of article-search that was going on. The start of the novel was going somewhere but it is as if the author got stuck as to where to take it as it began to ramble on and not really go anywhere.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    I think this book is incredibly smart and sensitive about the way that sexual violence is woven into the fabric of our society, and the way that women have learnt a form of acceptance. It’s very apparent in how even a woman like the protagonist, who works for a law firm specialising in cases of violence against women, is able to facilitate this violence, for example when she tells her childhood friend who was groomed by their teacher that she was mature for her age. It’s especially self-aware wh I think this book is incredibly smart and sensitive about the way that sexual violence is woven into the fabric of our society, and the way that women have learnt a form of acceptance. It’s very apparent in how even a woman like the protagonist, who works for a law firm specialising in cases of violence against women, is able to facilitate this violence, for example when she tells her childhood friend who was groomed by their teacher that she was mature for her age. It’s especially self-aware when it comes to how the main character’s privilege interacts with these narratives, how she dreams of a world in which she is able to expose another friend’s encounter with a rapist film director to the world and receive fame from doing so, whilst actively neglecting the assault case of her desperate Senegalese client. That doesn’t mean the main character doesn’t deserve sympathy - she, after all, also has her own story of sexual violence to tell - but rather, that she is one of many messy young women (hey! that’s the name of the book!) who has a lot to learn (+ unlearn) about how misogyny operates in the world. I think the book is a refreshing take on feminism - one which makes explicit how sorely needed it is, but also rejects the individualistic notions of modern feminism in what it means to be a “strong independent woman,” or a “brave victim.” Loved it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cathy

    For the first portion of Young Women I thought I knew exactly where the book was going. Tamsin is the manipulative young woman who wheedles her way into Emily’s life, adjusting her behaviour to be exactly what she thinks Emily needs; a life that’s much more exciting and daring than the one Emily is currently living – a diet of meal deals and a flatmate she hardly ever speaks to. And Tamsin’s an actress so she’ll have no problem putting on a performance and pulling the wool over Emily’s eyes unti For the first portion of Young Women I thought I knew exactly where the book was going. Tamsin is the manipulative young woman who wheedles her way into Emily’s life, adjusting her behaviour to be exactly what she thinks Emily needs; a life that’s much more exciting and daring than the one Emily is currently living – a diet of meal deals and a flatmate she hardly ever speaks to. And Tamsin’s an actress so she’ll have no problem putting on a performance and pulling the wool over Emily’s eyes until her true motives are revealed. Except it’s not as simple as that. Everything changes in the second part of the book when the story becomes much more nuanced, as do the characters.  Gradually we learn that Tamsin and Emily, and Emily’s friend Lucy, have experiences in common none of which have resulted in action being taken against the perpetrators. (It may be a concidence but in each case where they’ve reported what they’ve suffered it was to a woman yet no action was taken.)  A neat counterpoint to this is Renee, Emily’s boss at the Women’s Advocacy Group, who is relentless in her support of women who have suffered sexual violence. In a turnaround, it’s Emily who sees herself taking the dominant role in her relationship with Tamsin. Here’s her chance to demonstrate her activism by supporting Tamsin in calling out the actions of a powerful and influential figure in the film industry. Emily pictures the two of them being seen as a ‘force to be reckoned with’ taking part in joint interviews as the story reaches the press. She even fantasises about quitting her job to make time for it all. (Ironically, Emily’s has been careless in her handling of an actual case she’s been assigned at work.)  Emily is sure she knows exactly how Tamsin will respond, congratulating herself on ‘getting good at writing her’ so she’s disappointed at Tamsin’s reaction. She’s even more shocked at Tamsin’s subsequent actions, although her own are not exactly laudable. What happens next explores issues of consent and the extent to which there is a responsibility to speak out. Does failing to do so somehow make you complicit? Although I had some reservations about Emily’s risk-taking behaviour towards the end of the book, Young Women raises some interesting moral questions, bringing to mind cases that have made the headlines in recent years.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ophelia

    How vulnerable are women to men in power and also how complicit are they in keeping them there? The book commences with the intense new friendship between Emily and Tamsin. They meet at a protest in London, where they both live, and very quickly become entwined with each other. This relationship is heady, intoxicating and there is an undercurrent of darkness lurking that means you will struggle to do much else than read this book. I had little knowledge of what this book was about but was gripped How vulnerable are women to men in power and also how complicit are they in keeping them there? The book commences with the intense new friendship between Emily and Tamsin. They meet at a protest in London, where they both live, and very quickly become entwined with each other. This relationship is heady, intoxicating and there is an undercurrent of darkness lurking that means you will struggle to do much else than read this book. I had little knowledge of what this book was about but was gripped, maybe because of this, so I won’t ruin it for anyone else with even a clue. This was absolutely brilliant and I am sure many will be talking about this book and the questions that it provokes.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Demelda Penkitty

    When Emily meets enigmatic and dazzling actress Tamsin, her life changes. Drawn into Tamsin's world of Soho living, boozy dinners, and cocktails at impossibly expensive bars, Emily's life shifts from black and white to technicolour and the two women become inseparable. Tamsin is the friend Emily has always longed for; beautiful, fun, intelligent and mysterious and soon Emily is neglecting her previous life - her work assisting vulnerable women, her old friend Lucy - to bask in her glow. But when When Emily meets enigmatic and dazzling actress Tamsin, her life changes. Drawn into Tamsin's world of Soho living, boozy dinners, and cocktails at impossibly expensive bars, Emily's life shifts from black and white to technicolour and the two women become inseparable. Tamsin is the friend Emily has always longed for; beautiful, fun, intelligent and mysterious and soon Emily is neglecting her previous life - her work assisting vulnerable women, her old friend Lucy - to bask in her glow. But when a bombshell news article about a decades-old sexual assault case breaks, Emily realises that Tamsin has been hiding a secret about her own past. A secret that threatens to unravel everything . . . 'Everone's got that history, I guess. Everyone's got a story.' This is not an easy read because of the issues it deals with but it is a thought provoking and powerful one. It takes a look at just how complicit we are as women in a patriarchal society and the complexities of intense female friendships. Predominantly taking place in London set against the 'me too' era it focuses on three young women and their stories. I found the characters mostly unlikeable and definitely unreliable but completely addictive and engaging. Young Women is not afraid to ask the tough questions. 'I have notified the police, and I found myself blaming myself even as I did it. But this can't go on. Women's lived experience is too often defined by their trauma and lack of safety in navigating public spaces.' For once I am quite glad to be older, navigating the minefields of youth these days sounds far too complicated!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emma Hardy

    This started so well and then tailed off for me. Could see what the author was trying to do but it failed to hold my attention to fully appreciate it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Debby

    Emily and Tamsin, both twenty-something women living in London, meet after being arrested at a protest and Emily is captivated by Tamsin’s vibrant personality and affluent lifestyle, quickly becoming enamoured with the young actress. A solicitor working for a women’s advocacy charity, Emily is idealistic and, at times, naïve, characteristics which lead to her making mistakes and undermining her friendships, both with Tamsin and her best friend, Lucy. There is a shift in the narrative about halfw Emily and Tamsin, both twenty-something women living in London, meet after being arrested at a protest and Emily is captivated by Tamsin’s vibrant personality and affluent lifestyle, quickly becoming enamoured with the young actress. A solicitor working for a women’s advocacy charity, Emily is idealistic and, at times, naïve, characteristics which lead to her making mistakes and undermining her friendships, both with Tamsin and her best friend, Lucy. There is a shift in the narrative about halfway through, as the plot moves from Emily’s slightly obsessive relationship with Tamsin to a #MeToo commentary, as sexual assault accusations begin to emerge about a famous art film director. Emily soon realises that Tamsin has been keeping a secret about her past that is linked to this current news and struggles to understand the decisions that she makes in the aftermath. There are so many incidents of assault or abuse of power perpetrated against women in this novel as well as the further humiliations and scepticism women are subject to when they report them. It’s utterly depressing how they are dismissed or their stories trivialised by the people who are supposed to help them and highlights systemic prejudices that need to be addressed. I found Emily to be quite unlikeable at times and struggled to understand some of the decisions she made, particularly towards the end, as people don’t live up to her idealistic view of the world. However, I think she does seem to have some self-awareness about her actions and comes to terms with the fact that people are complicated and can’t always be perfect. The writing is astute and precise and I enjoyed the first person narration from Emily’s perspective. Young Women is an absorbing novel about the intrinsic complexities of female friendships and an exploration of female autonomy and consent in a patriarchal society. I thoroughly enjoyed reading it as the issues it raises are timely and interesting and Jessica Moor relates the challenges and injustices women face every day within a compelling narrative.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emine Beasley

    Ease of Reading: 4✨ Characters: 5✨ Plot: 4✨ Writing: 4✨ Overall: 4✨ “YOUNG WOMEN is a searing new novel from a dazzling new voice where a fierce new female friendship will unearth a secret that could change everything . . .” YOUNG WOMEN is a tale as old as time concerning sexual assault and how we as women choose to react to those circumstances. Would you come forward? How would you support a friend going through this? How would you react to a nice guy who is trying to understand but isn’t in the femi Ease of Reading: 4✨ Characters: 5✨ Plot: 4✨ Writing: 4✨ Overall: 4✨ “YOUNG WOMEN is a searing new novel from a dazzling new voice where a fierce new female friendship will unearth a secret that could change everything . . .” YOUNG WOMEN is a tale as old as time concerning sexual assault and how we as women choose to react to those circumstances. Would you come forward? How would you support a friend going through this? How would you react to a nice guy who is trying to understand but isn’t in the feminist camp yet? This book explores all of these questions and many more. With intriguing female friendships and a main character you will both learn to love and hate, YOUNG WOMEN folds modern concepts and a fast paced story into a ride of a book. Set in a modern London world of bars and wine in the park, this book has a millennial feel that is perfect for any young woman. I was transported to sunny evenings perfect for this time of year, with deep important themes that made this story one to remember. A new take on recurring issues. I won’t go into details of my thoughts as I don’t want to give spoilers, but I’ll leave you with a quote I loved. “When we’re least like ourselves we reveal the most.” Will you be picking this one up?

  13. 5 out of 5

    Theresa Smith

    Beautifully written, compelling and thought provoking, Young Women is a novel that I hope becomes the next one that everyone is talking about. Emily and Tamsin are in their mid-twenties, navigating their way through a world that is pushing back against the patriarchy. This is a post-MeToo story, but it’s not ‘just another’ MeToo story, if that makes sense. It’s more of a story about having agency over your own experiences. Having the right to make a call about what to do with your own story, wit Beautifully written, compelling and thought provoking, Young Women is a novel that I hope becomes the next one that everyone is talking about. Emily and Tamsin are in their mid-twenties, navigating their way through a world that is pushing back against the patriarchy. This is a post-MeToo story, but it’s not ‘just another’ MeToo story, if that makes sense. It’s more of a story about having agency over your own experiences. Having the right to make a call about what to do with your own story, without feeling the imposed pressure to act within the defined parameters of how others think you should act. I really liked how the author examined the manner in which women can take ownership over other women’s experiences. A potentially contentious topic, but she handled it beautifully within this novel. It’s such a critical issue, the way in which we cleave to a hashtag, make it our own, judge, and join the cause, even if we have the best of intentions, are we doing more harm than good? Yes, the anger is real, but my anger doesn’t necessarily have to become your anger, and your trauma doesn’t necessarily have to be considered within the same framework as mine. Do our reactions have to be the same, and am I wrong if my reaction differs to yours, and vice versa. I’m not sure if I’m articulating this in the way that does the novel the justice it deserves, but suffice to say, this is a powerful and impactful read that I highly recommend. Incredibly thought provoking, an ideal pick for book clubs. Thanks to the publisher for the review copy.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    ‘Young Women’ instantly grabbed me from the first chapter; Emily meets Tamsin at a climate change protest in London and is like a moth drawn to a flame. Emily is a millennial young woman who is trying to hold onto her freedom as her best friend chooses the path of settling down. Tamsin is a free spirited actress who instantly holds her attention but as the two women spend more time together, Emily begins to understand that there is a darkness beneath Tamsin’s veneer. This book tackles the topic ‘Young Women’ instantly grabbed me from the first chapter; Emily meets Tamsin at a climate change protest in London and is like a moth drawn to a flame. Emily is a millennial young woman who is trying to hold onto her freedom as her best friend chooses the path of settling down. Tamsin is a free spirited actress who instantly holds her attention but as the two women spend more time together, Emily begins to understand that there is a darkness beneath Tamsin’s veneer. This book tackles the topic of assault in a fresh way, almost making the reader question things from all points of view and almost all of the female characters unfortunately have experiences of abuse to varying degrees. The young women that Moor has constructed all have different ways of coping with the events that have happened in their lives and it gives the plot a far more thought-provoking and more complex storyline. I devoured this novel and am really excited to read plenty more from this author.

  15. 5 out of 5

    andshe.reads

    Honestly I'm not sure how I feel about Young Women. It covers some pressing issues about women existing under the patriarchy. At first it revolved around two young women who became friends, both living in London, but then it soon delves into more serious topics. One of the main issues covered in the story is to what extent can women be complicit in perpetuating rape culture by accepting money in exchange for silence. This leads onto female power and choice and what they have to do move forward w Honestly I'm not sure how I feel about Young Women. It covers some pressing issues about women existing under the patriarchy. At first it revolved around two young women who became friends, both living in London, but then it soon delves into more serious topics. One of the main issues covered in the story is to what extent can women be complicit in perpetuating rape culture by accepting money in exchange for silence. This leads onto female power and choice and what they have to do move forward with their lives. I felt that the narrative had a sudden shift and I wasn't sure what to make Of that. Also felt like the book lacked a little depth however I don't think any book could truly cover the complexity of all there is in this modern world about female rights. However overall its quite a fast paced read that is completely relevant. Thank you to Netgalley and Manilla Press for the chance to review this book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lau

    Thank you to NetGalley, Jessica Moor and the publisher for sending me an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. After being arrested at a protest Emily meets Tamsin and her life changes immediately. She becomes more spontaneous, and enjoys her life more. However when Emily finds out one of Tamsin’s deepest secrets she reacts in an extremely unsupportive way and goes behind her back to reveal it. I would have given this book 5 stars if it wasn’t for the way the Emily acted, an Thank you to NetGalley, Jessica Moor and the publisher for sending me an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. After being arrested at a protest Emily meets Tamsin and her life changes immediately. She becomes more spontaneous, and enjoys her life more. However when Emily finds out one of Tamsin’s deepest secrets she reacts in an extremely unsupportive way and goes behind her back to reveal it. I would have given this book 5 stars if it wasn’t for the way the Emily acted, and I feel like there wasn’t enough closure at the end. It just all felt a bit unfinished.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    Young Women was a really interesting take on the complexities of female friendship, sexual assault and existing as a women in the modern era. It looks at various forms of assault and how it has affected the women from thereon out. I really enjoyed the depth of Emily’s character, in some respects she was quite dislikable but still easy to understand and sympathise with. Thank you to Netgalley for the arc!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tami

    I was very much looking forward to reading this book. I liked reading the book, however, I feel I struggled to connect with the characters in a way I have in other books I’ve read. That being said, I thought the concept of the book is one that needs to be out there. It’s a book that got me thinking. Whether it was me agreeing, disagreeing or thinking new thoughts from the opinions of the characters. I’d very much like to read more of what the author has written and look forward to seeing any fut I was very much looking forward to reading this book. I liked reading the book, however, I feel I struggled to connect with the characters in a way I have in other books I’ve read. That being said, I thought the concept of the book is one that needs to be out there. It’s a book that got me thinking. Whether it was me agreeing, disagreeing or thinking new thoughts from the opinions of the characters. I’d very much like to read more of what the author has written and look forward to seeing any future books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    T

    Female friendship and choosing not to date men. A haunting exploration of 20-somethings coming to realizations of their unchosen relationships with older, powerful men and the consequences. A Plath poem cross-stitch "I rise with my red hair And I eat men like air" On London: "This whole city's like an awful shrine to Empire. It's gross. It's gross, and it's gorgeous, and they can both be true at the same time." One young woman wonders why, like menstruation and STDs, she hadn't been taught in schoo Female friendship and choosing not to date men. A haunting exploration of 20-somethings coming to realizations of their unchosen relationships with older, powerful men and the consequences. A Plath poem cross-stitch "I rise with my red hair And I eat men like air" On London: "This whole city's like an awful shrine to Empire. It's gross. It's gross, and it's gorgeous, and they can both be true at the same time." One young woman wonders why, like menstruation and STDs, she hadn't been taught in school about these types of men/relationships, an excellent point.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Staceywh_17

    Set in the early 'Me Too' era Young Women is a superb piece of contemporary fiction. I literally read it in several sittings, it was compelling, exciting and real. Admittedly the last few chapters left me floundering and I felt the story completely had switched into something else. It has two strong female characters in both Emily and Tamsin. I found their characters to be credible, relatable and the story very thought provoking. The story focuses on what it is to be a woman in the modern age, sex Set in the early 'Me Too' era Young Women is a superb piece of contemporary fiction. I literally read it in several sittings, it was compelling, exciting and real. Admittedly the last few chapters left me floundering and I felt the story completely had switched into something else. It has two strong female characters in both Emily and Tamsin. I found their characters to be credible, relatable and the story very thought provoking. The story focuses on what it is to be a woman in the modern age, sexual assault and other tribulations. Many thanks to Random Things Tour Rating ⭐⭐⭐⭐

  21. 5 out of 5

    mais

    i really enjoyed this book and loved the ending although i found her really annoying and she didn't understand like obvious things, like when her friends clearly didn't wanna talk about something and she just kept pushing them to talk and when she was so oblivious about people being hurt about certain things that were so obvious!!! hated the main character but loved the book i really enjoyed this book and loved the ending although i found her really annoying and she didn't understand like obvious things, like when her friends clearly didn't wanna talk about something and she just kept pushing them to talk and when she was so oblivious about people being hurt about certain things that were so obvious!!! hated the main character but loved the book

  22. 5 out of 5

    Abbie

    **3.5 stars**

  23. 5 out of 5

    Danni Corben

    Young Women was an insightful and interesting novel about issues that still arise today. Most women can say they have been sexual assaulted at some point in their life and this doesn't mean most have been raped. Sexual assault can be anything that isn't consensual. This story was so important in educating all about consent and that is the key message I took away from this book. Tamsin was such an inspiring character and how she wasn't scared of Art really made me admire her. Her beliefs surround Young Women was an insightful and interesting novel about issues that still arise today. Most women can say they have been sexual assaulted at some point in their life and this doesn't mean most have been raped. Sexual assault can be anything that isn't consensual. This story was so important in educating all about consent and that is the key message I took away from this book. Tamsin was such an inspiring character and how she wasn't scared of Art really made me admire her. Her beliefs surrounding men proved she was a strong confident woman even with the trauma that she faced. Initially, I thought I was going to read a story about two women with an amazing connection and what I got was a story about two very different women with very different opinions in regards to having a voice and when/how to use it. This book gripped me right from the beginning, I really liked Tamsin and her whole badass personality. It was dark at times when the stories of sexual assault were coming out but it is so important to hear these different stories. I will be recommending this book to all!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ivy Elland

    Thank you to Tandem UK for my copy of this book in exchange for a review. I was very intrigued about this one from the cover and blurb alone. I felt it wouldn’t be a thriller but a more contemporary book with some mystery or thrilling aspects. It’s safe to say, I had an initial idea of how the book would go. I was wrong. So the blurb made this book out to be something exciting and makes the potential reader want to know WHAT IS THE STORY? HOW WILL THIS SHOCK ME? I was getting through the book sl Thank you to Tandem UK for my copy of this book in exchange for a review. I was very intrigued about this one from the cover and blurb alone. I felt it wouldn’t be a thriller but a more contemporary book with some mystery or thrilling aspects. It’s safe to say, I had an initial idea of how the book would go. I was wrong. So the blurb made this book out to be something exciting and makes the potential reader want to know WHAT IS THE STORY? HOW WILL THIS SHOCK ME? I was getting through the book slowly and waiting for something to happen…the whole time. Nothing much did happen. I just could not find an exciting plot in this book. Now I don’t really do contemporary books for that reason alone, I feel a lot of them are good at tackling issues of interest but I haven’t found one with a good story. I finished the book and felt it was a waste of time in most aspects. The book does deal with issues such as misogyny and sexism and has a good feminist element which is why I didn’t rate it one star as I feel these were important and well written. I think the book wants you to think deeper about these things and that can never not be a positive thing. Overall, it just wasn’t for me but I appreciate lots of people have enjoyed it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    I couldn't put this book down! The story starts with a protest against climate change, follows up with the protagonist meeting this larger than life young woman who is fearless, rich, rebellious and wholesome. The book examines the delicate subject of complicity in sexual assault, the wafer thin line between consent and rape and the question of how much one is contributing to rape culture, therefore allowing abusive men to get away with hurting women. Above all, it's a really great story about f I couldn't put this book down! The story starts with a protest against climate change, follows up with the protagonist meeting this larger than life young woman who is fearless, rich, rebellious and wholesome. The book examines the delicate subject of complicity in sexual assault, the wafer thin line between consent and rape and the question of how much one is contributing to rape culture, therefore allowing abusive men to get away with hurting women. Above all, it's a really great story about female friendship. How they will get each other through one another throughout the worst days, and just really enjoying the hell out of each others company.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Sam Still Reading

    Young Women is a powerful story of the experience of young women in the setting of #MeToo. It’s about friendship, bonding over shared (awful) experiences and the rights of each woman to her own story – and whether she chooses to tell it. The story opens as Emily is arrested at a protest – something quite out of character for the lawyer who is, well…fairly average on the surface. A lawyer who works for a charity for women’s rights, Emily feels strongly about the mistreatment of women in today’s so Young Women is a powerful story of the experience of young women in the setting of #MeToo. It’s about friendship, bonding over shared (awful) experiences and the rights of each woman to her own story – and whether she chooses to tell it. The story opens as Emily is arrested at a protest – something quite out of character for the lawyer who is, well…fairly average on the surface. A lawyer who works for a charity for women’s rights, Emily feels strongly about the mistreatment of women in today’s society. Elsewhere, she’s a mess. She has split from her partner after an incident, she gets drunk a lot and she’s in a flat share on the outskirts of London. This is in dramatic contrast to her best friend from school Lucy, who has a job she loves, a partner and is about to buy a flat. Lucy is so boring and stable to Emily. So when she meets Tasmin as she gets arrested, it’s a breath of fresh air. Tasmin is a Canadian actor who has plenty of money and time on her hands. Together, they have a lot of fun from swimming at Hampstead Heath to running away from bad Tinder dates. There is also no shortage to good food and alcohol, but Tasmin just ‘gets’ Emily. But then a scandal breaks regarding historical sexual assault by a famous name and it’s all Emily can talk about. Tasmin, meanwhile, is becoming less polished and Emily puts two and two together… The really interesting part of this story is the reactions of different characters to the sexual assaults in the media. Emily is like a bull at a gate, with only one ‘correct’ way forward in her head – tell all. She simply can’t see how anyone would do differently. Tasmin is against adding her voice to the women who have spoken out and it leads Emily to do the only thing she thinks she can. (I personally thought this was rather selfish, and in direct contradiction that Emily can’t tell the reader what caused the breakup between Harry and selfish). But it’s Lucy – so quiet and boring in Emily’s mind – that reacts completely differently and ultimately, was the most powerful revelation for me. The novel looks at sexual assault, consent (and lack of it) and the objectification of women in multiple ways. The way some characters shrug it off yet others are affected daily. It also looks at the changing attitudes towards coercion, particularly when there are power imbalances in relationships that make consent very difficult. It also explores whether women have an obligation to speak out publicly, and the effects on them if they do so. Emily dreams she’s some kind of saviour and pillar of support for Tasmin to share her story. But at the same time, the women who did are subject to abuse and questioning online and in the media. Emily’s ideas are rather naïve, despite her work. I must admit that Lucy ended up being my favourite character in the end for her quiet strength. Overall, the novel is a powerful exploration of consent and friendship. Thank you to Allen & Unwin for the copy of this book. My review is honest. http://samstillreading.wordpress.com

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dibz

    Emily meets the enigmatic, charming actress Tamsin at a climate change protest in London. The two immediately hit it off and end up spending the whole evening and night together, drinking wine at Victoria Embankment Park and going back to Tamsin’s glamorous Soho flat. Emily is smitten with her new friends’ beauty, confidence and mysterious life. Emily quickly entangles herself in Tamsin’s life at the expense of her prior responsibilities and relationships. The friendship between the two women be Emily meets the enigmatic, charming actress Tamsin at a climate change protest in London. The two immediately hit it off and end up spending the whole evening and night together, drinking wine at Victoria Embankment Park and going back to Tamsin’s glamorous Soho flat. Emily is smitten with her new friends’ beauty, confidence and mysterious life. Emily quickly entangles herself in Tamsin’s life at the expense of her prior responsibilities and relationships. The friendship between the two women become more complicated when an incident in Tamsin’s past brings up conflicting emotions and responses in both women. ‘ Young Women’ started out strong enough. The narrator Emily, had just come out of a long term relationship with a toxic City Boy (ugh) with her self esteem barely intact. I felt a tenderness towards her character, especially when she explained to her new friend Tamsin why she chose to work at a women’s advocacy centre ‘ …It’s good to go to work everyday and feel like there’s clearly a moral value to what you’re doing. So it’s worth carrying on, even if we don’t win them all. Even if it’s just to keep the idea of justice alive, until a better time comes’ I could see why she was enamoured with Tamsin who had successfully affected a manic pixie girl persona. I was keen to see how they’re relationship developed and how far Emily would neglect her own life to embed herself in Tamsin’s. However, the second half of the book was a bit of a train wreck. It went from a page turning exploration of female friendship and loneliness to an thinly veiled exploration of the Weinstein scandal and the subsequent MeToo movement. The change of pace between part one and part two might have given me whiplash. I think it’s possible to write a book exploring both intense female friendships and the MeToo movement in depth but I felt that Moor was struggling to juggle both. At times I felt like I was reading two different books smashed together. I also felt that there were times that the book was trying to be a thriller and I found that inappropriate and out of place for the subject matter and what the rest of the book was trying to say. By the end of ‘Young Women’ I was also super frustrated by Emily. I did feel that Emily’s characterisation was inconsistent, she seemed a lot more intelligent and self reflective at the start of the book and I couldn’t quite figure out what had happened to turn her into the irritating person she was midway through the book. It could be that I’m missing something and she’s ‘complex’, but I do fear that it was just poor writing. I do want to end the review on a positive note though, I think the way London was described was excellent. I think Moor really captured the vibe and excitement of the city well and I really enjoyed the moments Tamsin and Emily ran wild around London.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    (Trigger warning; mentions of SA in this review and heavily in the book.) ——— Is justice always the answer? Do survivors have a responsibility to prevent future victims by coming forward? Shouldn’t men who’ve done awful things face the consequences of their actions? Firstly, I need to congratulate Jessica Moor on the creation of such a poignant, important, and hard-hitting book. Thank you from the bottom of my heart, I think this book has forever changed my life. Young Women is set in London, and th (Trigger warning; mentions of SA in this review and heavily in the book.) ——— Is justice always the answer? Do survivors have a responsibility to prevent future victims by coming forward? Shouldn’t men who’ve done awful things face the consequences of their actions? Firstly, I need to congratulate Jessica Moor on the creation of such a poignant, important, and hard-hitting book. Thank you from the bottom of my heart, I think this book has forever changed my life. Young Women is set in London, and the protagonist, Emily, finds herself making unlikely friends with a charismatic, beautiful woman named Tamsin during a protest. The two of them could not lead more different lives - Tamsin has an apartment in trendy Soho with a balcony overlooking the city and a taste for luxurious food and drink, whereas Emily shares a not-worth-mentioning flat across the city and has a penchant for eating the same meal deal from Tesco twice in one day. The novel follows their unfolding friendship, all whilst Emily struggles to keep up with her job working for a charity that advocates for women in trouble, an old friend facing a silent trauma, and… the horrors of tinder. As if this wasn’t enough, Emily’s life is thrown into chaos when she learns a secret about Tamsin that rocks her to the core. I genuinely do not have enough words to describe how much this book made me question myself. The first thing I noticed myself doing was taking a dislike to Emily, but I believe that this was something Jessica Moor intended. I started out with neutral feelings towards the protagonist, but after some serious events happened, I took a severe dislike to her. That’s not to say that she was badly written, quite the opposite! It’s much easier to make a character that’s likeable, in my opinion, and Moor has done an incredible job of writing a protagonist that is not the hero of the story - because there are no heroes - and is quite simply a normal human being, flawed, but trying her best. Without giving away too much detail, the main and sub-plots are all involved in some way with the sexual abuse of women, by men. Through Emily’s eyes, the reader is invited to listen to the stories of various women, and what this book also does so well is make you reconsider your own opinions of these cases, and it helps you to see things from other perspectives. What may not seem like a big deal to one woman might be something that another woman can’t stop thinking about, something that destroys her life. Young Women made me question my own claim to being open minded and non-judgemental. Who was I to decide that Emily was in the wrong for the decisions she made? Thank you so much to NetGalley, Bonnier Books, Manilla Press, and Jessica Moor for giving me the chance to read this ARC!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Beverley

    https://beverleyhasread.wordpress.com/ Young Women, the second novel by Jessica Moor is an unflinching look at female friendship, relationships, violence against women and misogyny. Set in modern day London in centres around the friendship of two young women during a sultry summer against a backdrop of Me Too allegations, online dating and growing up. When Emily first meets Tamsin they’re at a protest and about to be arrested and thrown in the back of a police van. They form an instant connection https://beverleyhasread.wordpress.com/ Young Women, the second novel by Jessica Moor is an unflinching look at female friendship, relationships, violence against women and misogyny. Set in modern day London in centres around the friendship of two young women during a sultry summer against a backdrop of Me Too allegations, online dating and growing up. When Emily first meets Tamsin they’re at a protest and about to be arrested and thrown in the back of a police van. They form an instant connection and an immediate friendship is born. They are complete opposites of one another; Tamsin is a beautiful burgeoning actress who was born in Canada, can speak a number of languages and lives in a gorgeous flat in the heart of Soho. Emily is a lawyer who works for a Women’s Advocacy Charity, is in a flat share with a woman she has little in common with, eats pasta meal deals from supermarkets for most meals and is getting over the break down of a significant relationship. The friendship between Emily and Tamsin is authentic, particularly in its depiction of the early stages of female connection. It is a unique thing, those halcyon days of meeting somebody new and falling in platonic love and Moor sets both an intoxicating and engrossing scene. The passages describing their intimate conversations, their lengthy dinners at Tamsin’s flat drinking champagne and their wild nights out in expensive bars armed with posh cocktails in London are heady. Everything feels slanted in sunlight, it feels fresh, exciting and alluring. Nothing can go wrong when you’re with a friend who gets you the way Tamsin and Emily get each other. Or do they? Moor writes beautifully, showing us this burgeoning relationship, allowing us to almost fall in love with the two women ourselves. At times I felt like an interloper, nosing on a private conversation which I shouldn’t be privy to, but I just couldn’t look away. The thing is, wherever there is light and sunshine, there is also darkness and shade and Moor brings this in spades. I wondered at times if this was going to be a book with a Single White Female slant and there were occasions it certainly fees like it could tip into a sexual or romantic relationship, but Moor takes it in a completely different direction. The almost obsessive friendship between the two women is laid bare, and Moore casts their glittery, fun filled relationship deep into shadow. The darkness comes in the form of a looming secret, and a seemingly constant bombardment of utter despair at the way some men treat women. This is definitely a book of two halves, with the second being much darker in tone. There are some difficult passages and at times it is emotional. Moor doesn’t pull any punches, taking us down an avenue lined with misogyny, the question of consent and the fragility of being a woman in a man’s world. I found some of it, not difficult to read per se, but quite brutal and uncomfortable, and that is a testament to the writing which is really powerful. I read this in a day, picking it up when I was on my lunch break and spending all afternoon waiting to get back to it. It deals with heavy subject matter but I found it an absorbing and compelling read. Tamsin and Emily are both so well written that I was fully invested in them immediately and really couldn’t put it down. I have a copy of Moor’s first book, Keeper, on my bookshelves which I’m going to bump up my To Be Read pile because with writing this good, why wouldn’t I?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    Some books come along at exactly the right time, sometimes for personal reasons and sometimes because of events that are dominating the news. Young Women is one of those books, as we find ourselves constantly being told of how women continue to be treated, despite the excellence of the #MeToo movement, this story hits home. It's stark and often brutal and not everything gets resolved perfectly ... just like real life. However, this is not a new idea, sadly it is a take on events that are as old Some books come along at exactly the right time, sometimes for personal reasons and sometimes because of events that are dominating the news. Young Women is one of those books, as we find ourselves constantly being told of how women continue to be treated, despite the excellence of the #MeToo movement, this story hits home. It's stark and often brutal and not everything gets resolved perfectly ... just like real life. However, this is not a new idea, sadly it is a take on events that are as old as the planet. Concentrating as it does, on the power of the male, and how this power, combined with money can protect those who do the most wrongs, and injure the victims even more. The story begins as Emily and Tamsin meet for the first time. They obviously have at least one in thing in common as they are both arrested at an environmental protest march. However, it soon becomes clear that these are two very different women. Emily is English, living in a flat in London, working as a lawyer for a women's charity. Apart from her childhood friend Lucy, Emily is insular and isolated. Tamsin, on the other hand, is bright and exudes glamour and excitement. An actress, Canadian by birth, but living in London. Emily is dazzled and soon falls under Tasmin's spell. It's something of a one sided relationship at times, with Tasmin supplying the material things such as champagne and gourmet food, whilst Emily invest heavily emotionally. Moor excels in detailing the beginnings of a new friendship, and as Emily becomes more desperate to be part of this bright new world, she lets her old friendships and her work commitments slip. It's a joy to watch unfolding, and probably familiar to many women. What is also familiar is what happens as the story takes a sharp turn and the reader learns about the accusations made by woman against a well-known and well-respected man in the film trade. Readers will not be surprised to hear the accusations, they seem to have become part of everyday life. What is quite shocking is how this impacts Emily and Tasmin's relationship. When Emily learns of Tasmin's involvement, she is determined to make things right. However, Tasmin deals with issues in her own way. I applaud the author for the way that she deals with uncomfortable issues and how she doesn't take the reader exactly where they expect to go. The characterisation is precise and real, with all of the female characters often choosing what could be seen as the wrong path. This is a story that will raise many issues, I can imagine the debates within book groups as they discuss the rights and the wrongs, the whys and the what-ifs. Unsettling, sometimes challenging but always compelling. Highly recommended by me.

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